You are on page 1of 113

A STUDY ON EMPLOYEES PERCEPTION TOWRADS HR POLICIES

AT GIL SHARED SERVICE CENTRE

PROJECT REPORT

Submitted by

Ms. S. EVANJELIN

(Register No: MHRM/16/14)

In partial fulfilment of the requirement for the award of the degree

MASTER OF ARTS IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Under the guidance of

Ms. P. Mohana M.A. HRM., MBA., M.Phil.,

P.G. DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

MADRAS SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

(AUTONOMOUS)

No. 32, CASA MAJOR ROAD, EGMORE

CHENNAI-600008

OCTOBER 2017
BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the project titled “A STUDY ON EMPLOYEES PERCEPTION


TOWRADS HR POLICIES AT GIL SHARED SERVICE CENTRE” is a bonafide
project work done by Ms. S. EVANJELIN (Reg No: MHRM/16/14), a second year student
of M.A. HRM, Madras School of Social Work (Autonomous), Egmore, Chennai in partial
fulfillment of the requirement for the award of the degree of Master of Arts in Human Resource
Management and that the project has not been used previously for the award of any Degree,
Diploma, Scholarship, Fellowship or any other project title .

Signature of the HOD Signature of the Guide

Signature of thePrincipal
DECLARATION

I, Ms. EVANJELIN, final year student of M.A. HRM hereby declare that the thesis entitled
“A STUDY ON EMPLOYEES PERCEPTION TOWRADS HR POLICIES AT GIL
SHARED SERVICE CENTRE” is the original work done by me under the guidance and
supervision of Ms. P. Mohana, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the
degree of Master of Arts in Human Resource Management, Madras School of Social work. I
further declare that the research work has not been submitted at any other University or
Institution, for the award of any degree or diploma or fellowship.

Signature of the Student

PLACE: CHENNAI

DATE: 13.10.2017
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

First and Foremost, I thank God for his immense blessings and making this study happen as
planned.

I would like to thank, Dr.S.Raja Samuel, Principal, MSSW for being a pillar of support
throughout my duration as a student at Madras School of Social Work.

I would like to extend my heart-felt gratitude to Dr. Jayanthi Peter, Head of the Department,
M.A.HRM for her constant guidance and support.

I would like to thank my guide, Ms.P.Mohana, for helping me constantly with all her
inputs/feedback and finish the project on time.

Thanks to my internship guide, Mr. Anslem Vivek - SENIOR MANAGER HR GIL Shared
Service Centre, Chennai, without whose support and encouragement, this study wouldn’t have
been possible.

Last but not the least, I would like to record my profound gratitude to all the respondents who co-
operated and answered the questionnaire.
LIST OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER PARTICULARS PAGE


NO.
INTRODUCTION AND RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Need and scope of the study 5
1.3 Statement Of Problem 6
1.4 Industry Profile and Company profile 7
1.5 Chapterization 14
2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE
2.1 Theoretical & Conceptual Review 15
2.2 Research review 24
2.3 Case study 35
3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
3.1 Importance of the Study 44
3.2 Objective of the study 44
3.3 Hypothesis of the study 45
3.4 Definition of Variables 45
3.5 Research Design 47
3.6 Sampling Methods 47
3.7 Methods of Data Collection 47
3.8 Tools for Data Collection 48
3.9 Pilot Study 49
3.10 Reliability and Validity 49
3.11 Limitation of the Study 50
4 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 51-88

5 FINDING,SUGGESTION AND CONCLUSION


5.1 Summary of Findings 89
5.2 Suggestion of Findings 93
5.3 Conclusion 94
BIBLIOGRAPHY
ANNEXURE – QUESTIONNAIRE
LIST OF TABLES

TABLE PAGE
TITLE NO.
NO.

4.1 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON AGE 51

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENDER


4.2 52

4.3 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON DESIGNATION 53

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON EXPERIENCE 54


4.4

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON SCREENING AND


4.5 SELECTION PROCESS 55

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE EXTERNAL


56
4.6 SOURCE THROUGH WHICH THEY HAVE BEEN RECRUITED

4.7 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON CLEAR 57


COMMUNICTAION OF OBJECTIVES. JOBREQUIREMENTS AND JOB
SPECIFICATION

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE


4.8 INTERVIEWING PROCCESS AND SELECTION INSTRUMENT 58

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.9 TOWARDS INDUCTION PROGRAM FOR NEW JOINERS 59

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.10 TOWARDS THE MISSION AND VISSION OF THE COMPANY 60
EXPLAINED DURING INDUCTION

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.11 TOWRADS ORGANIZATIONAL STRUTURE AND POLICIES 61
COVERED DURING INDUCTION
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION
TOWARDS COMPANY BACKGROUND AND HIERCAHY COVERED
4.12 DURING THE INDUCTION 62

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION


4.13 TOWARDS TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 63

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.14 TOWARDS THE WORK EFFIECNCY AFTER BEING TRAINED 64

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.15 TOWARDS THE CAREER PATH BUILD BY TRAINING AND 65
DEVELOPMENT

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.16 TOWARDS THE PEFORMANCE MANAGEMENT THAT MOTIVATES 66
THEM TO WORK BETTER

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.17 TOWARDS WELL DEFINED, FAIR AND TRANSPARENT APPRAISAL 67
PROCEDURE

4.18 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION 68


TOWARDS THE RATING SCALE USED FOR THE APPRAISAL
PROCESS

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.19 TOWARDS THE MEDICALIM BENEFITS AND OTHER SERVICES 69
PROVIDED BY THE ORGANIZATION

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.20 TOWARDS THE CLARITY ON THE LEAVE MANAGEMENT 70

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.21 TOWARDS THE SUFFICIENT LEAVE OFFERED BY THE COMPANY 71

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.22 TOWARDS HAVING A WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY IN PLACE 72

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THIER OPINION


4.23 TOWARDS THE PROHIBITION OF MAKING FALSE ALLEGATION 73

4.24 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION 74


TOWARDS APPLICABILITY OF THE POLICY
4.25 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION
TOWARDS HAVING AN INTERNAL HOTLINE 75

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.26 TOWARDS IMPLEMENTING EAP 76

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION


4.27 TOWARDS THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR TO BE INCLUDED 77
UNDER EAP

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


THAT EAP WILL BE A VALUABLE BENEFIT 78
4.28

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


THAT EAP WILL IMPROVE JOB PERFORMANCE 79
4.29

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION


TOWARDS THEIR WORK BEING APPRECIATED BY THE COMPANY 80
4.30
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION OF
4.31 ON THE SPOT REWARD 81

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION ON


4.32 LONG TERM RETENTION POLICY
82
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION
4.33 THE POLICY STATEMENT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY 83

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.34 TOWARDS THE LEGAL HELP PROCEDURE 84

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.35 TOWARDS THE INITIATIVES TAKEN BY THE ORGANIZATION 85

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.36 TOWARDS IMPLEMENTING SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY 86

CHI SQUARE SHOWING ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GENDER AND


4.37 THE OPINION ON IMPLEMENTING SEXUAL HARASSMENT 87
POLICY

ANOVA ASSOCIATION BETWEEN DESIGNATION AND THE OPINION


4.38 ON IMPLEMENTING WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY 88
LIST OF CHARTS

CHART PAGE
TITLE
NO. NO.

4.1 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON AGE 51

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENDER


4.2 52

4.3 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON DESIGNATION 53

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON EXPERIENCE


4.4 54

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON SCREENING AND


4.5 SELECTION PROCESS 55

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE EXTERNAL


4.6 SOURCE THROUGH WHICH THEY HAVE BEEN RECRUITED 56

4.7 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON CLEAR 57


COMMUNICTAION OF OBJECTIVES. JOBREQUIREMENTS AND JOB
SPECIFICATION

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE


4.8 INTERVIEWING PROCCESS AND SELECTION INSTRUMENT 58

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.9 TOWARDS INDUCTION PROGRAM FOR NEW JOINERS 59

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.10 TOWARDS THE MISSION AND VISSION OF THE COMPANY 60
EXPLAINED DURING INDUCTION

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.11 TOWRADS ORGANIZATIONAL STRUTURE AND POLICIES 60
COVERED DURING INDUCTION

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


TOWARDS COMPANY BACKGROUND AND HIERCAHY COVERED
4.12 DURING THE INDUCTION 62
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION
4.13 TOWARDS TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 63

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.14 TOWARDS THE WORK EFFIECNCY AFTER BEING TRAINED 64

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.15 TOWARDS THE CAREER PATH BUILD BY TRAINING AND 65
DEVELOPMENT

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.16 TOWARDS THE PEFORMANCE MANAGEMENT THAT MOTIVATES 66
THEM TO WORK BETTER

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.17 TOWARDS WELL DEFINED, FAIR AND TRANSPARENT APPRAISAL 67
PROCEDURE

4.18 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION 68


TOWARDS THE RATING SCALE USED FOR THE APPRAISAL
PROCESS

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.19 TOWARDS THE MEDICALIM BENEFITS AND OTHER SERVICES 69
PROVIDED BY THE ORGANIZATION

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.20 TOWARDS THE CLARITY ON THE LEAVE MANAGEMENT 70

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.21 TOWARDS THE SUFFICIENT LEAVE OFFERED BY THE COMPANY 71

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.22 TOWARDS HAVING A WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY IN PLACE 72

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THIER OPINION


4.23 TOWARDS THE PROHIBITION OF MAKING FALSE ALLEGATION 73

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.24 TOWARDS APPLICABILITY OF THE POLICY 74

4.25 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


TOWARDS HAVING AN INTERNAL HOTLINE 75
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION
4.26 TOWARDS IMPLEMENTING EAP 76

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION


4.27 TOWARDS THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR TO BE INCLUDED 77
UNDER EAP

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


THAT EAP WILL BE A VALUABLE BENEFIT 78
4.28

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


THAT EAP WILL IMPROVE JOB PERFORMANCE 79
4.29

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION


TOWARDS THEIR WORK BEING APPRECIATED BY THE COMPANY 80
4.30
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION OF
ON THE SPOT REWARD 81
4.31

4.32 CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION ON


LONG TERM RETENTION POLICY
82
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION
4.33 THE POLICY STATEMENT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY 83

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.34 TOWARDS THE LEGAL HELP PROCEDURE 84

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.35 TOWARDS THE INITIATIVES TAKEN BY THE ORGANIZATION 85

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION


4.36 TOWARDS IMPLEMENTING SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY 86
CHI SQUARE SHOWING ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GENDER AND
4.37 THE OPINION ON IMPLEMENTING SEXUAL HARASSMENT 87
POLICY

ANOVA ASSOCIATION BETWEEN DESIGNATION AND THE


4.38 OPINION ON IMPLEMENTING WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY 88
CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

1.1 INTRODUCTION OF THE STUDY

Human Resource policies are continuing guidelines on the approach an organization intends to
adopt in managing its people. They represent specific guidelines to HR managers on various
matters concerning employment and state the intent of the organization on different aspects of
Human Resource management policies such as recruitment, training, selections etc. They
therefore serve as a reference point when human resources management practices are being
developed or when decisions are being made about an organization's workforce.

A good HR policy provides generalized guidance on the approach adopted by the organization,
and therefore its employees, concerning various aspects of employment. A procedure spells out
precisely what action should be taken in line with the policies.

Ideally, everyone comes to work on time, treats their co-workers kindly, does their work well, and
is rewarded fairly and equitably by their employer. Unfortunately, however, we do not live or
work in the ideal scenario, and there are often other circumstances that affect how employees
interact with other employees and how employees interact with their employers.

It is for these reasons that human resources (HR) policies and procedures were developed. They
encapsulate a broad field of information, requirements, and restrictions that assist employees in
doing their jobs well; assist management in training, managing, and disciplining employees;
ensure consistency in how companies interact with employees; and ensure that companies are
following the law when it comes to the treatment of their employees.

Policies and procedures are written by human resources departments for various reasons. Some of
them are written to comply with government mandates. A government mandate is a law that an
employer must follow in order to ensure fair treatment and safety of employees. This might include
policies that restrict the number of working hours an employee is allowed to work with no break.

Some are written for practical reasons, such as cutting insurance costs. For example, a company
might institute a no smoking policy on campus. Others might be written to show solidarity with
health, social, or political movements. For example, long before gay marriage was legally
1
recognized across the United States, many organizations had already written policies that included
same sex partners as recipients of health benefits and retirement plans.

Usually, human resource departments also issue a generalized policy with wording such as: 'We
do not discriminate against employees or applicants on the basis of age, colour, disability, gender,
national origin, race, religion, genetic information, veteran status, pregnancy, or any other basis
protected by law.' This kind of policy covers a wide range of employment laws which help ensure
that all employees will be treated equally in the workforce.

Many human resources policies include an active approach towards protecting employees and
ensuring fair treatment. These might include mandating diversity and discrimination training
and harassment training. Receiving this kind of training helps an employee identify
mistreatment in the workplace and take the proper steps to ensure that it stops.

Some of the Human resource policy followed in Industries:

1. Conditions of service

2. Recruitment and selection policy

3. Training and development policy

4. Performance management policy

5. Leave policy

6. Disciplinary code

7. Grievance handling policy

8. Insurance policy

9. Sexual harassment policy

10. Termination policy, etc.

TYPES OF HR POLICIES:

There are two different parts of human resource (hr) policies, first half of the human resource
policies and procedures are formulated on the basis of their source and second half of the human
resource policies are provided on the basis of their description.

2
On the basis of source:

In this source based human resource policies the actual activities in which all the employment
policies are generated mainly rely upon their managers and employees working needs and wants.
Moreover, this reliance can be classified in different terms of words and they are as follows.

1. Originated policy:

The actual nature of working in relation with the originated policy is handled and established by
the senior manager so that the senior manager can understand all the necessary requirements of
the employees. Moreover, these senior managers provide these guidelines to their subordinates to
improve and develop their professional career. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the
originated policies for the empowerment of the employees of the company.

2. Implicit policy:

With the help of these policies the managers can express their intention in favor of the company.
First of all the actual importance of these implicit policies are implied because of the nature and
behaviour of the managers. And that is why these implicit policies are also called and recognized
by the name of implied policies of the company. It is quite clear that these implicit policies are
recognized by the managers of the company. Therefore, it is necessary to understand that these

policies are made in favour of the managers’ requirement.

3. Imposed policies:

The nature of working in the company doesn’t include only the management of the company.
Moreover, as the matter of fact, the organizational structure of the company even depends upon
the governmental agencies of the company. The human resource policies and procedures of the
company will also provide with the provision that, part of the policy of the company can be
governed and favoured by the governmental agencies or trade unions. It is one of the policies
which is made for the development of the staff and workers value in the company.

3
4. Appealed policy:

It is not an actual policy, as its name suggests it is such kind of policies which are requested by
the managers of the company, so the management of the human resource policy will consider
looking into certain situation which is not included in all the above-mentioned policies. The
appealed policies can be generated by the managers and employees of the company, but the final
decision of that appeal, whether it is accepted or rejected can be decided by the human resource
management of the company.

On the basis of description:

The human resource policies and procedures of the company are made for the advantage and
benefit of the company employees and their employment. And the nature of working of the human
resource policy which is made on the basis of its description, can be derived on behalf of the
company development.

1. General policy:

It is one of the policy which is based on the description of its working. The human resource policy
based on their description established some of the general policies. These general policies are
completely different from the rest of the policies generated from the human resource management
of the company. As these general policies don’t belong to any particular issues of the company,
and that is why it is named as the general policy of the company.

2. Specific policy:

As its name suggests, the specific policies are those types of policies in an organisation which is
related to specific issues of the company such as staffing, recruitment and salary related issues.
Therefore, these specific policies are designed to undertake those specific issues of the company.
Moreover, all the working order of these specific policies of the company favours all the staffing
related issues of the company.

4
1.2 NEED AND SCOPE OF THE STUDY

Need of the study:

Human resource policies are always a must in all types of organizations as they need to cater and
meet the needs of all types of people. There are different natured people, not surprisingly all go
well with each other. Few people might have a habit of accepting what is the norms, few might
want to relax the rules but still written policies have the power to make people stick to the
regulations of the organisation.

The establishment of policies can help an organization demonstrate, both internally and externally,
that it meets requirements for diversity, ethics and training as well as its commitments in relation
to regulation and corporate governance of its employees. The establishment of an HR Policy which
sets out obligations, standards of behaviour, and documents disciplinary procedures, is now the
standard approach to meeting these obligations. HR policies provide frameworks within which
consistent decisions are made and promote equity in the way in which people are treated.

HR policies can also be very effective at supporting and building the desired organizational
culture. For example, recruitment and retention policies might outline the way the organization
values a flexible workforce, compensation policies might support this by offering a 48/52 pay
option where employees can take an extra four weeks holidays per year and receive less pay across
the year.

In actuality, policies serve a number of purposes

1. They provide clear communication between the organization and their employees
regarding their condition of employment.
2. They form a basis for treating all employees fairly and equally.
3. They are a set of guidelines for supervisors and managers.
4. They create a basis for developing the employee handbook.
5. They establish a basis for regularly reviewing possible changes affecting employees.
6. They form a context for supervisor training programs and employee orientation programs.
Thus under normal circumstances every organization should have an effective hr policies –
guidelines in place for operational practices. The study will interrogate if these do exist in GIL

5
Shared service centre. This study can be helpful to the management to improve its core weaknesses
by the suggestions and recommendations prescribed in the project.

Scope of the Study:

1. The project has wide scope to help the company to know the employees perception towards
the existing HR policies in the organization
2. The study will help the management to take measures to revise the HR policies
3. The core project lies in analyzing and assessing the organizations HR policies and to the
know the satisfaction level of employees in implementing the suggested policies

1.3 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:

Since HR policies are guiding principles, there should be clear and consistent statement of the
organization's policies regarding all conditions of employment and procedures for their equal and
fair implementation. In order to fulfil this objective, policies should be.

 Clear and specific, but provide enough flexibility to meet changing conditions.
 Comply with all appropriate law and regulation.
 Consistent amongst one another and reflect an overall true and fair view approach to all
employees.

HR policies are required for decision making and taking actions on the day-to-day problems of
the organization. The process of developing HR policies involves the assessment of the following
factors:

1. Identify the purpose and objectives which the organization wishes to attain regarding
its Human Resources department.
2. Analysis of all the factors under which the organization's HR policy will be operating.
3. Examining the possible alternatives in each area which the HR policy statement is
necessary.
4. Implementation of the policy through the development of a procedure to support the
policy.

6
5. Communication of the policy and procedures adapted to the entire organization.
6. Auditing the policy so as to reveal the necessary areas requiring change.
7. Continuous revaluation and revision of policy to meet the current needs of the
organization.

Thus it is necessary for an organization to have a clearly set HR policies to address the the factors
mentioned above.

The aim of the research study is to know if the developed policy in GIL Shared Service Centre is
effective and to suggest new HR policy for implementation.

1.4 INDUSTRY PROFILE AND COMPANY PROFILE

INDUSRY PROFILE (ITES/BPO)

Information Technology Enabled Services is believed to be revolutionary IT offshoot which looks


after all outsourcing needs including, Customer Relationship Management (CRM), Back Office
Operations/Revenue Accounting/ Data Entry, Data Conversion including Finance &
Accounting/HR Services, Transcription/Translation Services, Content Development/ Animation,
Other Services including Remote Education, Data Search Market Research, Network
Management & Consultancy Services etc.

The ITES/BPO industry has performed splendidly well over the past decade with a compound
annual growth rate exceeding 50 percentage. The triggers for this are availability of high quality
skilled/semi-skilled labour, low cost base and incremental advantages accruing from the learning
curve happen to be the critical success factors. In addition, the conducive tax environment in the
form of tax holiday benefits given to the industry under the Software Technology Park of India
(STPI) and the Export Oriented Unit (EOU) schemes have also acted as a catalyst to the growth.

Outsourcing has been taking place for many years, but has gained momentum since 1990′s due to
the rise of Internet and communication technologies. BPO saves precious management time and
resources and allows focus building upon core competencies. ITES stands for IT- enabled
services. IT-enabled outsourcing can be defined as,

7
a. Those outsourcing services that use information technology in the processing and delivery of
the service.

b. Services are typically delivered through a telecommunications or data network, or other


electronic media Types of process

1. Core processes (which give strategic advantage)

2. Critical, non-core processes (which are important but are not competitive differentiators)

3. Non- core, non-critical processes (which are needed to make the environment work).

ITES, which started with basic data entry tasks over a decade ago, is witnessing an expansion in
its scope of services to include increasingly complex processes involving rule-based decision
making and even research services requiring informed individual judgment. It now offers services
such as knowledge process outsourcing (KPO), legal process outsourcing (LPO), and games
process outsourcing (GPO) and design outsourcing among others. The wide range of services
provided by the BPO can be categorized into two groups:

Horizontal BPO: Horizontal BPO involves function centric outsourcing. Examples of horizontal
BPO are outsourcing in procurement, payroll processing, HR, facilities management and similar
functions. Automatic Data Processing (ADP) is an example of a horizontal BPO vendor. ADP
focuses on providing services in horizontal functions such as payroll, HR, benefit administration,
tax solutions, etc.

Vertical BPO: A vertical BPO focuses on proving various functional services in a limited number
of industry domains. It covers various horizontals to cater a particular industry as a whole.
Healthcare, financial services, manufacturing and retail are examples of vertical BPO domains.

Components and Types

Outsourcing essentially implies the transfer of non-core services to third parties who specialize in
providing such services. It can cover a wide range of components depending upon the core
competency as well as the requirements of the outsourcer.

Outsourcing may be broadly classified into the following types:

1. Information Technology (IT)

8
2. Human Resource

3. Customer Service Engineering

4. Knowledge Services, 5. R&D; etc.

Business Processing Outsourcing (BPO) and Knowledge Processing Outsourcing (KPO) are the
two major components of the outsourcing industry in India.

Business process outsourcing may be defined as the delegation of one or more IT intensive
business processes to an external agency, which in turn owns, administers and manages the
selected process based on definite and measurable performance.

Knowledge process outsourcing may be defined as a high added value process chain where the
achievement of objectives is dependent on the skills, domain knowledge and experience of the
people carrying out the activity. It is being claimed that KPO is one step extension of BPO.

KPO involves business processing outsourcing, research process outsourcing and analysis process
outsourcing. KPO business entities provide typical domain based processes, advanced analytical
skills and business expertise, rather than just process expertise. KPO Industry handles more
amount of high skilled work other than the BPO Industry.

In other words, while KPO derives its strength from the depth of knowledge, experience and
judgment factor; BPO is more about size, volume and efficiency.

The future potential of KPO is quite high because it is not restricted to Information Technology
(IT) or Information Technology Enabled Services (ITES) sectors and includes other sectors like
Legal Processes, Intellectual Property and Patent related services, Engineering Services, Web
Development application, Business Research and Analytics, Clinical Research, Market Research,
etc.

COMPANY PROFILE

Agility is one of the largest freight forwarders and logistics providers in India. Our significant
investments in multiple locations across India facilitate trade across India, even in the most
challenging environments. Our presence in Indian includes 18 locations covering all major ports,

9
airports and inland locations. Our solutions are tailored to our customers’ needs, timetables and
capacity requirements, including 122,955 sq. of warehouse space covering 35 cities in India.

Agility’s experienced logistics experts keep goods moving across the country, thanks to close
interaction with regulatory authorities and an in-depth knowledge of local laws to ensure all
customs requirements are met. The application of stringent performance standards to our internal
operations ensures customers receive high-quality, customized services. For example, Agility
operates a certified life science warehouse to cater to the strict requirements of pharmaceutical
companies. In addition to air and ocean freight services, Agility offers a range of solutions to help
companies operate in the highly attractive Indian market and also for Indian companies that are
looking to explore opportunities outside of India.

CORPORATE STRUCTURE:

1. Commercial logistics:

Agility’s primary business is commercial logistics. Its commercial arm, Agility Global Integrated
Logistics (GIL), is headquartered in Baar, Switzerland. Agility GIL manages the shipment and
delivery of finished goods, parts, raw materials and other cargo by sea, air, road or a combination.
GIL provides warehousing and distribution services, along with services and technology that track
and manage shipments and inventory.

GIL’s logistics specialty businesses provide logistics for the chemicals industry (Agility
Chemicals), trade shows and events (Agility Fairs & Events), and customers with large, complex
projects in the energy, mining and marine industries (Agility Project Logistics).

2. Logistics related business:

Agility’s other businesses include:

 Agility Real Estate - commercial and industrial real estate management.


 National Aviation Services (NAS) - ground handling and airport services.
 Metal and Recycling Company (MRC) – waste management.
 Global Clearinghouse Systems (GCS) - joint venture with Kuwait General Administration for
Customs to support customs operations

10
 GCC Services – construction and management of remote living facilities for the mining,
energy and engineering industries.
 Inspection & Control Services (ICS) – technology and services used in customs clearance and
processing.
 Agility Defence & Government Services (DGS) – public sector logistics and contracting.
 United Projects for Aviation Services Company (UPAC) – commercial real estate
development and facilities management company

INDUSTRY SOLUTIONS:

Automotive
Agility’s customized supply chains improve visibility, shorten delivery times and cut costs for
leading original equipment manufacturers, their suppliers and after-market suppliers. Agility helps
automotive customers manage global supplier networks and deliveries for top efficiency.

Chemicals
Agility Chemical Logistics – safe, reliable and cost effective: freight forwarding, operations
management, transport, storage, handling and safety management solutions for the chemical and
bulk commodity sectors. We are the chemical sector's customer intimate specialist, with global
coverage, emerging market expertise, local knowledge and chemical industry credentials.

Consumer goods
Governments, international organizations, relief groups and defense forces need partners who can
move quickly to solve logistics challenges, especially in demanding environments.
Agility Defence & Government Services (DGS) brings unmatched expertise and innovation to
supply chain management, logistics and procurement in support of defense and peacekeeping
missions, government programs, and humanitarian and relief efforts.

Defence and environment


Governments, international organizations, relief groups and defense forces need partners who can
move quickly to solve logistics challenges, especially in demanding environments. Agility
Defense & Government Services (DGS) brings unmatched expertise and innovation to

11
supply chain management, logistics and procurement in support of defense and peacekeeping
missions, government programs, and humanitarian and relief efforts.

Industrial
Industrial companies that supply raw materials or make parts and finished products require special
supply chain expertise and providers with global networks. Agility works with producers of
industrial automation, energy and power equipment, medical products, construction machinery
parts and other high-value manufactured goods to secure raw materials and parts – and to move
goods to market.

Oil and gas


Agility offers the oil and gas industry a suite of solutions across the supply chain, and has a strong
track record of serving the world’s largest oil and gas companies in some of the globe’s most
challenging environments. This includes specialized logistics expertise: be it managing the supply
base for the world’s largest natural gas project off the coast of Australia, building supply lines
through remote Papua New Guinea, or moving an entire gas compression station to Uzbekistan.
Agility’s real estate division has developed dedicated facilities for the oil and gas sector, including
a 1 million sqm energy park in Iraq. Agility also offers customers remote site services, like
construction, facilities management, and catering.

Pharma and life science


The world’s leading pharmaceutical companies are looking beyond traditional markets for growth.
They need globalized, scalable, secure and compliant supply chains. Agility
is a global leader in pharmaceutical and life sciences logistics, designing integrated supply chains
for every step of the product life cycle. That means working with customers from the earliest stages
of R&D through clinical trials, product launch, marketing and sales of patented drugs, and
development and launch of generics.

Retail
Agility re-engineers retail supply chains to help customers manage complexity and risk, improve

12
visibility, tap into growing consumer markets and adjust to the mobile and digital technology that
is changing the shopping experience and blurring lines between in-store and online retail.

Technology
Agility brings efficiency, security and loss-prevention expertise to supply chains for brand name
and contract manufacturers of consumer electronics, semiconductors, computers, mobile devices,
components and telecommunications equipment.

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Agility’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) efforts focus on providing logistics support
during and after natural disasters and humanitarian emergencies. Agility has provided pro bono
support to its humanitarian partners in Haiti, Chile, Myanmar, China, Indonesia, the
Philippines, Bangladesh, Lebanon, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. Additionally, under the auspices of
the World Economic Forum, Agility partners with other companies to assist humanitarian
agencies through deployment of rapid response teams (Logistics Emergency Teams). LETs have
been deployed in Indonesia, Philippines, Haiti, Pakistan, Japan, Myanmar, among other countries.

In addition to company-wide and employee-led projects to improve sustainability and support


local neighbourhoods and communities, Agility participated in development of the World
Economic Forum report “Supply Chain Decarbonisation: The role of Logistics and Transport in
Reducing Supply Chain Carbon Emissions”. The report highlights and prioritizes the leading
opportunities for the logistics and transport sector to lower CO2 emissions

13
1.5 CHAPTERIZATION

Chapter 1

The first chapter deals with Introduction, need and Scope of the study, Statement of the problem,
Industry and company profile.

Chapter 2

The second chapter gives a theoretical and research review of the research and contains an
elaborate literature survey of the subject under study.

Chapter 3

The third chapter deals with significance of the study, objectives of the study, hypothesis of the
study, definition of variables, research design, sampling methods, methods of data collection, tools
of data collection, pilot study, reliability and validity and limitations of the study.

Chapter 4

The fourth chapter contains a data analysis of the research findings and their corresponding
interpretations.

Chapter 5

The fifth chapter summarizes the findings, draws conclusion and also indicates the scope for
further research in the area of study.

14
CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

2.1 THEORETICAL AND CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Human resource policies are the formal rules and guidelines that businesses put in place to hire,
train, assess, and reward the members of their workforce. These policies, when organized and
disseminated in an easily used form, can serve to pre-empt many misunderstandings between
employees and employers about their rights and obligations in the business place. It is tempting,
as a new small business owner, to focus on the concerns of the business at hand, and put off the
task of writing up a human resource policy. All business analysts and employment lawyers will
advise a new business owner to get a policy down on paper, even if it is a simple one drafted from
a boilerplate model. Having policies written is important so that it is clear to all what the policies
are and that they are applied consistently and fairly across the organization. Moreover, when issues
concerning employee rights and company policies come before federal and state courts, it is
standard practice to assume that the company's human resource policies, whether written or verbal,
are a part of an employment contract between the employee and the company. Without clear ly
written policies, the company is at a disadvantage.
Small businesses and especially business start-up cannot afford to fritter away valuable time and
resources on drawn-out policy disputes or potentially expensive lawsuits. Having a human
resource policy in place from the start can help to avoid this situation. The business owner who
takes the time to establish sound, comprehensive human resource policies will be far better
equipped to succeed over the long run than the business owner who deals with each policy decision
as it erupts. The latter ad hoc style is much more likely to produce inconsistent, uninformed, and
legally questionable decisions that may cripple an otherwise prosperous business. For as many
small business consultants state, human resource policies that are inconsistently applied or based
on faulty or incomplete data will almost inevitably result in declines in worker morale,
deterioration in employee loyalty, and increased vulnerability to legal penalties. To help ensure
that personnel management policies are applied fairly, business owners and consultants alike
recommend that small business enterprises produce and maintain a written record of its HR
policies and of instances in which those policies came into play.

15
SUBJECTS COVERED UNDER HR POLICIES

 Equal Employment Opportunity policies: Equal Employment Opportunity means that all
peoples regardless of gender, race, colour, age, marital or parental status, sexual preference,
disability or religious belief have the right to be given fair consideration for a job or other job
related benefits such as staff training and development.

 Employee classifications: The Fair Labour Standards Act (FLSA) requires that employers
classify employees as either exempt or non-exempt. Exempt or non-exempt status determines
whether an employee is entitled to overtime pay under the FLSA.

 Overtime compensation: According to the Fair Labour Standards Act, a non-exempt weekly- or
hourly-paid staff member who works more than 40 hours in a workweek must be paid an overtime
rate of one and one-half times his/her regular rate of pay for all time actually worked in excess of
40 hours in the workweek.

 Meal periods and break periods: This policy ensures that the workers get sufficient breaks for
meals and other necessary periods

 Payroll deductions: Amount withheld by an employer from employee's earnings. It typically


includes income tax, national insurance or social security contributions, and may also include
group insurance or pension fund contributions, union or association dues, authorized wage
assignments, etc.

 Vacation policies: Vacation policies are a delicate balancing act that look different from one
organization to the next. No matter a company's size or industry, though, its time-off policy must
be fair to both employees and the employer.

 Sick days and personal leave (for bereavement, jury duty, voting, etc.): The supervisor is
responsible for the equitable administration of the Institute's sick leave policy, and may require
medical certification from an employee's (or family member's) physician indicating that the
employee is unable to work because of the employee's or family member's illness, before the sick
leave is paid.

 Performance evaluations and salary increases: The primary goals of a performance


evaluation system are to provide an equitable measurement of an employee's contribution to the
16
workforce, produce accurate appraisal documentation to protect both the employee and employer,
and obtain a high level of quality and quantity in the work produced.

 Performance improvement: The purpose of the Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) is to


help supervisors and direct reports address and resolve performance issues. This guidance should
be used in concert with the advice received from the department's Human Resources
Representative, Employee Relations Services and/or HR Consultancy Services.

 Termination policies: Employers should develop standard procedures governing both voluntary
termination of employment by employees and involuntary termination of employment by the
employer.

 Recruitment policy: The policy defines the objectives to be met in the implementation of
Recruitment and Selection which are aimed at attracting competent individuals to fill a position
with the most suitable applicant.

 Whistle blowing policy: A whistle-blower is a person who raises a concern about a wrongdoing
in their workplace or within the NHS or social care setting. If a person wishes to raise their
concerns they should obtain a copy of their organisations whistleblowing policy and seek advice.

 Employee assistance programme: An employee assistance program (EAP) is an employee


benefit program that assists employees with personal problems and/or work-related problems that
may impact their job performance, health, mental and emotional well-being.

 Sexual harassment policy: The Department of State is committed to providing a workplace that
is free from sexual harassment. When the Department determines that an allegation of sexual
harassment is credible, it will take prompt and appropriate corrective action.

 Rewards and recognition: Vital to pursuing this aim is the acknowledgement of employees for
their contributions to the University and the recognition of outstanding performance. This policy
encourages such recognition of individuals and teams through a range of formal and informal
mechanisms,

ADVANTAGES FOR FORMAL HUMAN RESOURCE POLICIES

17
Small business owners who have prepared and updated good personnel management policies have
cited several important ways in which they contribute to the success of business enterprises. Many
observers have pointed out that even the best policies will falter if the business owners or managers
who are charged with administering those policies are careless or incompetent in doing so. But for
those businesses that are able to administer their HR policies in an intelligent and consistent
manner, benefits can accrue in several areas:

Communication with employees:


A well written and thoughtfully presented human resource policy manual can establish the tone
that a new business person wishes to maintain within his or her business. Such a policy also serves
to disseminating information about what employees may expect from the company as well as what
the employer expects from the employees regarding work performance and behavior while on the
job.

Communication with managers and supervisors:


Formal policies can be helpful to managers and other supervisory personnel faced with hiring,
promotion, and reward decisions concerning people who work under them.
Time Savings. Prudent and comprehensive human resource management policies can save
companies significant amounts of management time that can then be spent on other business
activities, such as new product development, competitive analysis, marketing campaigns, etc.
Curbing litigation. Members of the legal and business communities agree that organizations can
do a lot to cut off legal threats from disgruntled current or ex-employees simply by creating—and
applying—a fair and comprehensive set of personnel policies.

STEPS IN DEVEOPLING POLICIES:

 Step 1: Establish need for a policy


 Step 2: Develop policy content
 Step 3: Draft the policy
 Step 4: Write the procedure
 Step 5: Review of the policy by key parties
 Step 6: Approve the policy

18
 Step 7: Implement the policy
 Step 8: Policy review and update
 Step 9: Communication of changes to the policy
STEP 1: ESTABLISH NEED FOR A POLICY

In its simplest form, a policy is a written record of a workplace rule.


It is time to develop a policy when:

 There is legislation that expressly requires an organization has a policy in place.


 There is legislation that does not expressly require an organization have a policy, but the
regulations and steps to be followed are tightly defined and a policy will help to ensure the
organization is in compliance.
 There is inconsistency in how employees behave or managers make decisions that is negatively
impacting the work environment or accomplishment of business.
 There is significant confusion about certain areas of the business or how things are done and
the organization would benefit from a policy.

STEP 2: DEVELOP POLICY CONTENT


Legal Legislations

For policies required by legislation, much of the policy content may be driven by the requirements
of the legislation. It is not feasible to review all the possible legislation. Therefore, you need to be
aware of the legislation that applies in your jurisdiction and area of work. At minimum, consider
the following:

 Employment/Labour Standards
 Privacy legislation
 Occupational Health and Safety
 Human Rights
 Workers Compensation
Organizations also need to be aware of how legislation may periodically be applicable to their
workplace, such as provisions for releasing staff to vote on Election Day or legislation relevant to
organizing a union

19
STEP 3: DRAFT THE POLICY

Purpose: The purpose sets out what the policy intends to accomplish, or the goal of the policy.
For example, a health and safety policy may have a purpose of ensuring a safe and healthy
workplace for all workers in compliance with the relevant health and safety legislation.

Scope: The scope outlines to whom the policy applies. It may apply to all staff and workers, or
differentiate based on level, location, employment status, or department. If the policy also applies
to volunteers, contract workers and consultants doing work on behalf of the company be sure to
identify this. The scope should also identify exceptions to the policy.

Statement: The statement is the actual rule or standard the policy needs to communicate.

Responsibilities: Outline the responsibilities of the board, management and staff in regards to the
policy as well as who is responsible for developing, maintaining, monitoring and implementing
the policy. If there are consequences for not complying with the policy (e.g., disciplinary), be sure
to mention this. For example, “Failure to comply with this policy could result in disciplinary
measure up to and including just cause for termination of your employment.”

Definitions: Clearly define any terms used within the policy. If the terms are included in
legislation that underpin the policy be sure to use the definitions from the legislation (e.g.,
disability, prohibited grounds, discrimination, harassment, workplace violence).

Questions: Identify the person or position employees can approach if they have questions.

References: Reference any other policies, documents or legislation that support the interpretation
of this policy.

Effective: Indicate the date the policy came into effect and the date of any revisions.
Review: Indicate the date the policy is to be reviewed.

Approval: Indicate who approved the policy and the date of approval (e.g., the board, the human
resources policy committee, the executive director).

STEP 4: WRITE THE PROCEDURE

Policies often have a related procedure, which may be a section of the policy or a separate
document that the policy refers to. The procedure gives step-by-step instructions for carrying out
the policy. If you determine that a procedure will be developed be sure to include a statement that

20
it is intended as a guide only. Some legislation specifically requires procedures be developed so
be aware of the legislative requirements that govern your organization.

STEP 5: REVIEW OF THE POLICY BY KEY PARTIES


It is good practice to ask a representative group of managers and employees to review the policy.
For some policies you may also want to involve stakeholders.

Manger review

Ask managers:

 Do you have the skills and resources to be able to implement and monitor the policy?
 What is your understanding of different parties’ responsibilities is as outlined in the policy?
 Is the content and wording unbiased?
 What training or information would you require to be able to carry out your responsibilities as
outlined in the policy? What about your staff?
 What issues or concerns could implementation of this policy potentially raise among employees
and stakeholders?

Employee review

 What is you understanding of your responsibilities and the organization’s expectations as


outlined in the policy?
 Is the content and wording unbiased?
 What training or information would you require to be able to carry out your responsibilities as
outlined in the policy?
 What issues or concerns could implementation of this policy potentially raise among employees
and stakeholders?
Legal review

This step may not apply to all policies. Complex policies, such as discipline and grievance
policies, and policies required by legislation should be reviewed by a lawyer that specializes in
employment law. Ask them to check that the policy:

21
 Complies with employment standards and other federal and provincial legislation
 Is consistent with the terms of any collective agreements

STEP6: APPROVE THE POLICY


If your board is responsible for giving the final approval on policies, it is often done with a formal,
recorded motion. Provide the board with information on why the policy is needed and the steps
you took in developing the content for the policy. Consult with the board on the scheduled review
date. After you have the board approval, add the date of approval to the policy.

STEP 7: IMPLEMENT THE POLICY


Ways to implement and communicate about policy:
Employees, managers and key stakeholder must have access to up-to-date copies of the policies
and procedures that are relevant to their role in the organization and be advised of and understand
any new policies or changes to policies coming into effect.
When selecting methods to communicate policies consider:

 Will employees be able to easily access electronic copies or will they need hard copies?
 What concerns and issues are likely to be raised about the policy and how will they be dealt
with? If concerns are likely to be significant an initial face to face communication through an
information session or manager communication will be a more effective approach than an
email.
 Does the policy provide enough information for managers and staff to be able to effectively
implement and comply with the policy or will they need training or additional information?
The methods below are often used in combination to develop a strategy to ensure employees are
aware of, understand and have the skills to implement and comply with the policies that
underpin how they work.

STEP 8: POLICY REVIEW AND UPDATE


When reviewing policies consider the following:

 Has the legal environment or regulations changed in a way that impacts the policy? At minimum
you will want to review employment/labour standards, privacy legislation, occupational health

22
 Has the policy been effectively implemented?
 How effective has it been in dealing with relevant situations?
 What feedback have you received from managers and employees on the policy?
 Is the policy accomplishing the objective for which it was intended?

STEP 9: COMMUNICATION OF CHANGES TO THE POLICY

Some changes to policy may be so fundamental that they could attract claims of constructive
dismissal. It is critical to provide employees with sufficient notice of any fundamental change in
a term or condition of their employment. If you are uncertain it is prudent to seek legal advice.
Make sure that significant updates to policies are communicated and that if employees are required
to a statement of understanding, this forms part of the communication of the updated policy.

BENEFITS OF HR POLICIES

Recruitment and Employment: Human resources are responsible for all the functions of
advertisement, recruitment, selection, training and development of an organisation. Recruitment,
selection and training of new employees are done based on the HR policies developed for the
company.

Compensation and Evaluation: Human resources team members are responsible for conducting
proper market survey and job analysis to determine adequate compensation of employees.
Performance review and job evaluation are also conducted by the human resources team in lines
of the HR policies so as to provide standardisation and unbiased reviews. The HR policies do not
state the quantitative measurement of compensation, employees must receive; but they state that
each employee must be adequately compensated for his\her input.

Training and Development: HR policies include the tools and resources available to the
employers to provide proper training to employees. They also help new employees as well as old
employees get enough assistance in case of added responsibilities.

23
Ground for termination: HR policies contain guides and information on grounds for termination
of employees. These policies help protect the organization from harmful employees. They also
provide clear cut ground rules for the violation of any company policies or rules, which call for
corrective measures, or in the worst case scenario, termination of the contract of an employee.

While HR policies and procedures may be developed in every organization, it is eventually up to


the staff members and employees to put them into action, and provide a safe working environment
for all.

2.2 RESEARCH REVIEW

INFLUENTIAL FACTORS

The following factors will influence the HR policies of an organization:

Laws of the country: The various labour laws and legislation pertaining to labour have to be taken
into consideration. Policies should conform to the laws of the country, state, and/or province
otherwise they are bound to cause problems for the organization.

Social values and custom: Social values and customs have to be respected in order to maintain
consistency of behaviour throughout the organization. The values and customs of all communities
should be taken into account when framing policies.

Management philosophy and values: Management philosophy and values influence its action
on matters concerning employees. Therefore, without a clear, broad philosophy and set values, it
would be difficult for employees to understand management.

Financial impact: HR policies may have an impact on productivity and an organization's overall
finances if they create unnecessary burdens or red tape for the organization's workforce.
Organizations may also want to consider how realistic it is to enforce a policy fairly or keep it up-
to-date as these have the potential to create issues amongst employees.

Many authors understand HRM’s current role in the organizations as being strategic. One of the
distinctive features of HRM is that better performance is achieved through the people in the
organization (AlDamoe, Yazam, & Ahmid, 2012). Ulrich, Halbrook, Meder, Stuchlik, and
Thorpe (1991) stated that the competitive panorama is constantly being changed and has been
24
demanding new models of competitiveness which in turn require organizational capacities that
will enable the companies to better serve their customers and distinguish them from their
competitors. These organizational capacities come from the redefinition and redistribution of
HRM practices, functions and professionals.

By summarizing what authors such as Guest (1987), Storey (1995), Legge (2006) and Bohlander
and Snell (2009) say, it is possible to observe that people have been assuming a strategic and
relevant role in organizations, and therefore cohesive and coherent theories - aligned to both
planning and organizational strategy - must properly sustain HRM.

In this meaning, HRM policies and practices may vary among organizations and should be aligned
with business strategy (Chênevert & Tremblay, 2009). Boxall and Purcell (2000) add that the
effects of individual HRM practices depend on both the nature of the effects of other HRM
practices and the business strategy. Also, Lim (2012) argues that external business environment
has a strong influence on HRM activities.

From the perspective of Strategic HRM, policies can be mutually reinforced and create a strong
impact on organizational goals (Morris & Snell, 2010). Moreover, HRM policies are guided by
the logic of skills developed in accordance to the requirements of business processes (Serpell &
Ferrada, 2007). Thus, they provide tools to capture and communicate the strategic vision and
objectives of the organization in clear terms that can be more easily understood and requested
(Vakola, Soderquist, & Pratascos, 2007).

HRM must also not be relegated to a traditional supporting role anymore, but instead must
constitute an essential competence in reaching the organizational and individual objectives and
results, since human resources are valuable and constitute a source of competitive advantage.
Uysal (2012) indeed found strong, positive and significant correlations among the main HRM
policies cited in the literature, such as staffing, training, performance evaluation and
compensation. These results are important for understanding the inter-relationships between HRM
practices in order to enhance the effect HR systems have on employee-based organizational
outcomes.

25
In this context, organizations have turned to the perspective of creating competitive advantage.
Consequently, themes related to the areas of organizational strategy and theory converge,
spawning comprehensive implications for HRM and putting its primary function under discussion.
According to the Resourced Based View by Barney (1991), the creation of competitive advantage
depends on prerequisites that may be closely related to the HRM area, since resources must be
valuable and rare to the organization, may never be imitated or replaced, and the organization must
be able to exploit them. Beauvallet and Houy (2010) support that the key mechanism and decisive
variable that would justify the competitive advantages of companies alleged as being lean
enterprises, or the ones practicing a lean management, are directly related to HRM.

The term organizational policy can be defined as: principles established for leading a company, a
general course of action in which some practices are developed collectively, in a constructive way,
aiming to reach certain objectives (Singar & Ramsden, 1972). HRM policies define the attitude,
expectations and values of the organization concerning how individuals are treated, and still serve
as point of reference for the development of organizational practices and for decisions made by
people, besides resulting in equal treatment among individuals (Armstrong, 2009).

In this study the term HRM policy means an organizationally articulated proposal, with theoretical
and practical constructions within human relations aiming to reach the desired results. Thereby,
HRM policies define theoretical and practical referential built to make possible the reaching of an
organization’s objectives and purposes, operating as thinking and acting guides for the HRM area.

Some research results have pointed out positives relationships between HRM policies and
variables like commitment, productivity, profitability and quality, among others (Guest, 1987;
Schneider & Bowen, 1985; Ulrich, Halbrook, Meder, Stuchlik, & Thorpe, 1991). In the meta-
analysis performed, Combs, Liu, Hall, and Ketchen (2006), found that relationships between
Human Resources practices and organizational outcomes are stronger in manufacturing companies
than in service companies.

Studies have also been conducted in cultures other than the American and European ones.
Majumder (2012) verified strong relationships between HRM policies and employee satisfaction
in Bangladeshi private banks, and Kim and Lee (2012) found evidence that HRM policies and
practices improve strategic capabilities and firm performance in management consultant firms in

26
South Korea. The study by Demo (2010) showed positive and strong relationship between HRM
policies and organizational justice in both private and public Brazilian organizations.

Similarly, other researches have shown that HRM policies favorably affect organizational
performance (Boselie, Dietz, & Boon, 2005; Menezes, Wood, & Geladi, 2010; Subramony,
2009).

Employee perceptions of HRM policies also influence discretionary work effort and co-worker
assistance (Frenkel, Restubog, & Bednall, 2012). On the other hand, the effectiveness and
acceptance of HRM policies are related to organizational values and culture (Stone, Stone-
Romero, & Lukaszewski, 2007).

There is indeed a consensus that HRM policies produce higher organizational performance when
integrated into business strategy (Ezzamel, Lilley, & Willmott, 1996; Guest & Hoque, 1994).
This is also true for small firms. The study conducted by Katou (2012) showed that HRM policies
have a positive effect on organizational performance through employee attitudes (satisfaction,
commitment, motivation) and employee behaviours (absences, turnover, disputes).

In summary, HRM policies assume special connotation in development, appreciation and retention
of talents. They also promote employee commitment and, as a result, goodwill on their part to act
in a flexible and adaptive manner towards excellence in organizations (Legge, 2006). An
entrepreneurial strategy aiming at production and supply of added-value products and services must
concern the development and the implementation of HRM policies resulting in well- qualified
employees (Legge, 2006).

Table 1 summarizes the selected policies as well as constitutive definitions elaborated from the
literature review. The main authors who were reviewed in the development of the theoretical
background for each HRM policy are pointed out.

Table 1

Constitutive Definition of HRM Policies and Their Theoretical Background

27
HRM Policy Constitutive Definition and Authors Reviewed
Recruitment and Organizationally articulated proposal, with theoretical and practical
Selection (RS) constructions, to look for employees, encourage them to apply, and
select them, aiming to harmonize people’s values, interests,
expectations and competences with the characteristics and demands
of the position and the organization.

Authors reviewed: Armstrong (2009); Bohlander and Snell (2009);


Dessler (2002); Lievens and Chapman (2010); Mathis and Jackson
(2003).
Involvement (I) Organizationally articulated proposal, with theoretical and practical
constructions, to create an affective bond with its employees,
contributing to their well-being at work, in terms of
acknowledgement, relationship, participation and communication.

Authors reviewed: Bohlander and Snell (2009); Dessler (2002);


Dietz, Wilkinson and Redman (2010); Mathis and Jackson (2003);
Muckinsky (2004); Sisson (1994); Ulrich et al. (1991); Siqueira
(2008).
Training, Organizationally articulated proposal, with theoretical and practical
Development & constructions, to provide for employees' systematic competence
Education acquisition and to stimulate continuous learning and knowledge
(TD&E) production.

Authors reviewed: Bohlander and Snell (2009); Borges-Andrade,


Abbad and Mourão (2006); Dessler (2002); Dutra (2001);
Goldstein (1996); Sisson (1994); Winterton (2007).
Work Conditions Organizationally articulated proposal, with theoretical and practical
(WC) constructions, to provide employees with good work conditions in
terms of benefits, health, safety and technology.

28
Authors reviewed: Bohlander and Snell (2009); Dessler (2002);
Loudoun and Johnstone (2010); Mathis and Jackson (2003);
Osborn, Hunt and Schermerhorn (1998); Sisson (1994); Ulrich
(2001).
CompetencyBased Organizationally articulated proposal, with theoretical and practical
Performance constructions, to evaluate employee’s performance and competence,
Appraisal (CBPA) supporting decisions about promotions, career planning and
development.
Organizationally
Authors reviewed: Bohlander and Snell (2009); Dessler (2002);
Devanna, Fombrun and Tichy (1984); Dutra (2001); Latham, Sulsky
and Macdonald (2007); Mathis and Jackson (2003
Compensation Organizationally articulated proposal, with theoretical and practical
and Rewards (CR) constructions, to reward employees’ performance and competence
via remuneration and incentives.

Authors reviewed: Bohlander and Snell (2009); Dessler (2002);


Devanna et al. (1984); Dutra (2001); Gerhart (2010); Hipólito
(2001); Sisson (1994).

Other reviews:
Pawan S. Budhwar, Harsh K. Luthar, Jyotsna Bhatnagar, highlights the context within which
business process outsourcing (BPO) has rapidly grown in India and the critical need to investigate
the dynamics of human resource management (HRM) practices and systems in this sector. Using
a mixed-method approach involving both in-depth interviews and self-completing questionnaires,
they analyzed the nature of HRM systems in BPO organizations operating in India. The analysis
is based on a sample of 51 BPO companies, a majority of which are located near the capital of
New Delhi. The result focusses on the nature and structure of work and organization of Indian
BPOs, as well as the strategic role played by HRM in such organizations. Furthermore, the
findings highlight the way specific HRM practices such as recruitment, performance appraisal,
training and development, and compensations are implemented. Their study suggests the existence
of formal, structured, and rationalized HRM systems in Indian BPOs. A number of insights related
29
to HRM policies and practices are shared by the HR managers interviewed shedding more light
on the inner workings of the Indian BPO companies and their challenges.

Catherine Truss, paper contributes by analyzing in detail the human resource policies and
practices of one case-study organization over a two-year time period, using a variety of
methodologies and drawing on a broad range of informants across the organization. Instead of
devising a list of 'best practice' HRM from the literature and testing its impact on performance,
she instead invert the question and take a firm that is financially successful and ask what HR
policies and practices it uses. We also examine the way in which these policies are enacted. This
methodology enables us to show that even successful organizations do not always implement 'best
practice' HRM, and that there is frequently a discrepancy between intention and practice.
Outcomes at the individual and organizational levels are complex and often contradictory.

Mir Mohammed Nurul Absar, Balasundaram Nimalathasan, Munshi Muhammad Abdul


Kader Jilani, studied the Impact of human resource management policies and practises on
organizational performance in Bangladesh and other developing countries. Data collected from
fifty manufacturing firms in Bangladesh shows that HR policies and practises have significant
association with organizational performance. Out of HR policies, only performance appraisal is
found to have significant impact on organizational performance.

Saini R.R. (2010) in his article ―Human resource development in UCO Bank-A case study of
Chandigarh Region.‖ evaluates the Human Resources Development policies and practices. This
study identified the process and problems in designing and implementing Human Resources
Development Systems. This study was analytical in nature and consist a sample of 100 respondents
to analyze their opinion about HRD Policies and Practices. The Important findings of this study
were, qualification was the most important factor of recruitment at all level of managers and
employees. It also concluded that problem solving 59 strategy of the organization was very
effective because all appropriate method have been used to solve problems. Negotiation and Union
involvement was the most prevalent used method to solve the problem. This study also observed
that the managers were not aware sufficiently about the functioning of HRD Systems. Therefore
a proper action plan to improve awareness, Motivation, & serious concern among managers about
HRD should be implemented.

30
Kundu. Subhash C., Divya Malhan (2009) in their article on "HRM Policies and Practices in
Insurance Companies: A Study of Indian and Multinational Companies" opined that Competitive
advantage of a company can be generated from human resources (HR) and company performance
is influenced by a set of effective HRM practices. The results of this study indicated that both
multinational companies and Indian companies have to significantly improve their practices
regarding performance appraisal, training and financial benefits, and hr planning and recruitment.
Service sector is human resource intensive business. To gain competitive advantage, service
organizations should emphasize on human resource management practices, as has been indicated
in the results. A well-defined framework of human resource management practices benefits not
only the organization but also the employee. HR policies of an organization benefit the employee
by providing better opportunities for growth in terms of better compensation, benefits, training
and development opportunities, and career management, in turn leading to job satisfaction and
self-fulfilment.

Abdul Basit Al-Hamadi, Pawan S. Budhwar and Helen Shipton (2007): provided a summary
of management of human resources and the factors influencing the same in the sovereign of Oman.
The initial section of the paper built the study of HRM policies in the Omani context. This is
carryout with analysis of the background information and specific features of social environment
of the sovereign of Oman along with key national initiatives that are likely to influence the take-
up and endorsement of HRM in Oman. The research observation in support of key issues related
to management of human resources was presented, and conclusions were drawn by evaluating the
significances of the described findings. This is done by considering the current situation in Oman
and through analyzing key challenges will be faced in the future. Ashok Som (2008): Indian
organizations adopted innovatory changes in their HRM practices. Current research showed that
HRM policies are important for enhanced organization performance but little had been reported
on the effect of HRM policies and organization performance in the context of economic
liberalization of India. The study tried to understand the role of innovative HRM policies such as
the role of HR department, recruitment, retraining and redeployment, performance appraisal and
compensation, enhance organization achievement during the change process. A multiple-
respondent survey of 69 Indian organizations was undertaken to study the influence of innovative
HRM policies on firm performance. The research found that the innovative recruitment and
compensation policies have important positive relationship with firm performance. It was

31
observed that recruitment, the role of the HR department and compensation policies to beseem
significantly changing within the Indian enterprises in the context of India’s economic
liberalization. The behavior of system between innovative HRM policies was not significant in
enhancing organization performance during the liberalization process. Hui-O Yang and Nita
Cherry (2008) Contemporary international literature founds three major human resource
management (HRM) issues as being critical in the hospitality industry across the world, both
present and in the future. They were service quality, training and development, staff recruitment
and staff selection. This study involved interviews with the senior most executives in a sample of
chain hotels in Taiwan nominated by the hotels as being responsible for HRM. This study explored
that the three major HRM issues identified in the study are perceived as important by Taiwanese
hoteliers. The conclusion suggest that although most participants perceive these issues a
significant and challenging, they are concentrated mainly on operational and not in strategic
solutions for dealing with these issues. It is argued that the current and arising challenges facing
the industry demand an approach to HRM that is longer in strategic than the traditional focus of
personnel administration. The implication is that HRM has a key role to play in generating and
sustaining competitive advantage in hotels. A particular strength of this study, the data collected
through face-to-face interviews, which enabled a more intensive exploration of the thinking of
respondents than is often the case with quantitative surveys. Ilias Vlachos (2008): This study
addressed a central research question: how do human resource management practices assist to
organizational performance? They examined the following HR practices: (1) job security (2)
Selective hiring (3) self-managed teams and decentralization of decision making (4) compensation
policy (5) widespread training and (6) Information sharing. They collected data from food
managers in Greece and recorded their perceptions on HR practices and their relation to
organization’s performance. The conclusion provides overall support for all HR practices except
the job security. Selective hiring was found to be a key practice that enhanced organizational
performance. Compensation policies, information sharing, decentralization and wide training
were significant anticipates for all performance variables. Directions for further research are
provided. Irene Hon-fun Poon and Chris Rowley (2010) many competing hypotheses have been
advanced to relation for human resource management (HRM) change. The present review
evaluates the theoretical development and empirical revise in HRM change in Asia in the early
twenty-first century (from 2000 to 2006). Three research themes common to HRM change are
discussed. (1) Change context is about the issues of forces to make easier or to make difficult
32
HRM change; (2) Change process includes pace, sequence and magnitude of HRM change
movement and (3) Change direction is about resultant change outcome. Comparisons of HRM
change were made on Asian economies as well as between Asia and other ranges. It is resulted
that the interplay between different perspectives can produce a wide variety of more complex
understanding of change circumstance while cross-sectional approach can add value to explain
dynamic process and resultant direction. Peter K. Ross and Lutz Michael Buchner (2010) This
article analyze the competition demands faced by Deutsche Telekom for global consistency and
local responsiveness as it tried to coordinate its human resource management strategies across its
Eastern European supplemental. It considers the degree to which the former economics and
political histories of Eastern Europe continue to influence and/or pressurizing MNC strategies and
policies in the post-2000 era. Institutional path dependency, strategic international human resource
management, and international industrial relations theories are used to stand in ascertain the date.
The study countries are rapidly declining, thereby permitting MNC’s to implement “Western-
style” human resource management strategies. It further propose that industrial relations
institutions at the European Union Level, rather than individual country level, have the greatest
ability to impact on international human resource management strategies in the region.
Multinational corporations should therefore engage in more-integrated strategies international
human resource management and approximate international industrial relations.

According to most of the HRM specialists the effective human resource management system is
very much important to achieve high levels of organizational performance (Delery, 2009;
MacDuffie, 1999). According to them the effective Human resource management system is
mostly designed to ensure high organizational performance by getting optimum overall output of
the company rather than having more focus on individual performance. As Reeves and Dare
(2007) describes that we can get high performance from an employee by increasing his motivation
and abilities by using any method. In the field of HRM and organizational performance a
significant contribution is from Huczynski and Buchanan, 2009. According to them when HRM
activities are designed in an organization according to its strategy it increases the productivity
level of the organization, reduces its turnover and also enables it to perform well in financial sector
(Huczynski & Buchanan, 2009). Their findings proved that when organization succeeded to satisfy
its workforce and make them committed it can make its performance in corporate sector

33
much better. The productivity is also very much dependant on the job design (Huczynski &
Buchanan, 2009).

According to Huselid and Becker (1995) have critically examined the human resource
management system and find out the three major dimensions of it

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION POLICY:

Many studies have proved that an effective recruitment and selection process in organization is
very much crucial for its success and to achieve high performance goal of the company. The
system should be rigorous and should be designed to meet the overall organizational goals
according to Reeves ad Dare (2007). The researchers have found that there is a positive
relationship between effective recruitment and selection process of the company and overall
organizational performance. When organization selects employees who best match its
requirements and have enough abilities to contribute to the overall success of the company they
can reduce their cost of employee development, they don't need to invest in employee training
programs that costs a lot to the organizations.

REWARD POLICY:

According to many researchers the compensation based on performance is a very successful tool
to get high performance level (e.g. Arthur, 1998; Delery and Doty, 2009; Huselid, 1995;
MacDuffie, 1999). Doty and Delery (2009) even declare the reward system based on performance
as only method of achieving high performance level. Along these many other studies have
discussed the positive relationship of performance based reward system with the overall
performance of the organization Like in control theory by Snell, 1999, cost theory by Wright and
Jones, 1992, and agency theory by Eisenhardt, 1988 and all these studies have found a positive
relationship between the overall performance of the organization and the reward system based on
performance. According to expectancy theory by Vroom 1964 the high performance level of an
individual can be expected if organization meet his expected needs. But most important thing is
that the reward system based on performance is dependent on other functions of human resource
management. The individual output should not be the only basis of rewards provided by the
company; organization should also consider the contributions of that person in the overall
organizational performance.

34
EMPLOYEES DEVELOPMENT POLICY:

The performance of an organization is very much dependant on the employee's development


policy of the organization. Organizations use a number of practices in order to develop their human
capital. First of all the investments made by the organization, to provide non-technical and technical
trainings to its workforce, determines the success of organization to increase the knowledge level
of its employees. According to many researchers like Huselid and Delaney (1995), McGrath and
Koch (1996), Huselid (1995) the organizational performance can be increased greatly by
providing proper training to the workforce. They all have developed a positive relationship
between overall organizational performance and the employee development policies of the
organization. Organizational are now more concerned to develop their employees in order to
achieve high performance they invest in their trainings and also try to make it possible to have
long-term mutually beneficial relationship with them (Doty and Delery 2009). In order to enable
their employees to plan their careers properly they design proper career development programs
for them. The companies that have promotion system from within the organization they have
usually more committed and motivated employees as they want to work hard in order to get
promotion (Snell and Lepak, 1999) and when company adopts internal promotion system it
shows the commitment of the organization towards its workforce.

2.3 CASE STUDY

Introduction

This is the story of a young MBA, Ms. Neha Rai, with strong academic background and
realistic ambitions. In the backdrop we have recession hard hitting the placement season and
final year students, eager to start their career in the professional world, hanging on to the first
job that they could lay their hands on. The worst hit specialization during this period is HR
(Human Resource) Management.
The organization:
Let us call it, Crocodile India Pvt Ltd. It was established in the 1960’s in western India to look
over its operations of manufacturing consumer products across India. With operations covering
more than 140 countries, it is one of the top 3 manufacturers of such products in the world. In a
nut shell, Crocodile India Pvt. Ltd. was well established in terms of its business, employee
35
strength, market share and profits. An organization of such a stature came for campus
placement to a management institute looking for students from all functional areas –
Marketing, Finance, Systems and HR. Obviously, as a student pursuing MBA - HR, Neha was
elated.
The Initial Shock:

A day after the students were informed about the campus placement, a pre-placement talk
(PPT) was arranged in the campus at 2:30 pm to be delivered by the higher officials of the
company. After a long wait, at 4:45 pm, the International Head (HR) and the VP (Marketing)
met the students. The International Head (HR) was 51 years of age and the VP (Marketing)
was 29. They gave a presentation which included only their company and product profile
ignoring the role of Management Trainees (MTs), their pay package, location and growth
prospects in the organization.
During the interaction and question-answer session, any question by the students on job profile
and location of work were brusquely ignored by the International Head (HR) and VP
(Marketing) respectively. The students were spell-bound to hear that the International Head
(HR) had promoted an MBA (Finance) person to the post of Head (HR) and an MBA
(Operations) person to the post of Personal Assistant to the CFO (Chief Financial Officer) of
the company within a span of one year. They were confused between whether the organization
lacked proper structure, performance appraisal and promotion policy or it was that it had a
culture where growth was not an issue as long as one showed potential and interest and that it
had a strong cross functional policy?
The Selection Process: The selection process was a 2-tier one: group discussion (GD) and
interview. Students were not shortlisted on any criteria. As long as they were interested they
were welcome to appear for the GD, which was the screening process.
Neha’s GD was scheduled the next day after the PPT. Again it was behind schedule – it started
at 8 pm instead of 6 pm. After the GD, the International Head (HR) asked questions
individually to each of the candidates. He was caustic with the answers given by the students.
Neha was confused as she didn’t understand what would she answer when her turn comes?
There was a lot of expectation gap between the answers given by the 23 or 24 year old students
and the 51 year old International Head HR. Thankfully Neha moved up successfully to the next
tier.

36
Personal interview was scheduled for the following day. Again it was to start at 10 am but it
started at 11.30 am. It was a one man show. Neha was the 4th candidate to be interviewed. The
International Head (HR) did not exhibit excellence in either interviewing skill or soft skills.
When the candidate was asked to give location preference, she was given Hyderabad despite
her choice of Mumbai, citing no vacancy as the reason. Surprisingly, all other candidates after
Neha were placed in Mumbai. The take home salary offered was Rs. 3 lakhs/annum for
fresher’s and Rs 3.5 lakhs/annum for engineers or experienced candidates. The sky high
ambition and self-estimation nose-dived but the recession made Neha swallow her pride and
accept the offer. It was true for all the 19 MTs picked up by the organization from the Institute,
out of its total 20 new MTs.

The Offer Letter

Finally, a month after the interview and the offer, the offer letters came. It had no reference
no., the designation of the individual who signed the offer letter, the address of the factory
where each individual was to report and even the CTC (Cost to the Company) was not
mentioned. It took the Institute a long time and a number of reminders to confirm the CTC
from the organization. Through a brief e-mail it was communicated that the CTC offered was 3
lakhs to the freshers and 3.5 lakhs to engineers or people with prior work experience. This
disappointed all 19 MTs as the amount was supposed to be their take home and not CTC. The
joining date mentioned was 1st of June in respective locations. Suddenly the company changed
all the plans. The selected candidates were to report to Mumbai and stay there for a week
before joining their respective locations. Rumours spread thick and fast across the Institute
with this period of stay in Mumbai varying from 3 months to 1 year. Fed up, Neha contacted
the International Head (HR) who confirmed that all MTs were to be in Mumbai for 1 year.
The organization promised to provide accommodation for a few days till the MTs arranged
their own accommodation. But at the last moment, when they called up an HR Executive to get
the address of the place where they were to put up, she mentioned that the Company was not
providing any accommodation, not even for one day, citing the finance department was not
sanctioning the same. Even talking to the HR Head did not solve the problem as according to
him “finding an accommodation in Mumbai is not at all tough” and that he found his in three
days when he had come to Mumbai for the first time. Neha took the help of the alumni network

37
and was welcomed by one to share with her till she found her own.
All these disturbed the selected students. They lost trust in the organization even before they
actually joined it.
The Joining

The MTs assembled at the HR Centre on the assigned date of joining. HR Centre was a small air
conditioned class room, equipped with age old furniture, a white board, an LCD and white sheet
for projection. The two ACs were in dire need of maintenance, as, when switched on they
produced such a noise that audibility became a problem.
The MTs were immediately handed over a form and a green colored paper on which it was
written “AGREEMENT”. Some of the clauses of the agreement were as follows:-
1. There was a bond of 3 years post 1 year training period in the organization.

2. If the company felt that the MT was promising (post-training), he/she will be absorbed
as Assistant Manager, with or without increments, and must continue with the
organization for a minimum period of 3 years. On the contrary, if the company felt that
the trainee is unsuitable, then he/she would be asked to leave without an experience
certificate.
3. If the trainee decides to leave during the training period then he/she would have to pay
back the company the entire stipend received till then and at the same time also pay
back the training cost as ascertained by the organization at the time of leaving. No
experience certificate will be granted even in this case.
After the agreement was signed and submitted by all the MTs, the appointment letter was issued
the very next day. But the photocopies of the agreement were given after 7 days and that too after
constant reminders. Neha’s appointment letter had a number of errors in her address.

The Induction Programme

A 3-day induction programme was organised which covered introduction about the organization
and its products, details about their manufacturing process, their competitor,
Certain unethical practices they follow to continue their business, bribes they give to the trade
union to solve labor issues and so on. The speakers – in-company personnel – generally arrived
late and overshot the time allotted to them. They also boasted about the company and their
contribution to the organization.
38
The MTs were asked to come to the organization on a Sunday at 3 pm to meet the Global CEO.
After waiting till 7pm, they were met by the Personal Secretary to the Global CEO. He met each
of the MTs individually and asked them if they wanted to be a part of his team that involved
work related to Finance, Accounts, Auditing and so on. Most of them declined as they were HR
and Marketing MBAs and wanted to work in their respective fields except for one HR specialist
who grabbed the offer. Unfortunately, she was put on the job without any guidance and every
time she approached anybody for help she was snubbed. Clearly, she was unwelcome to the
department.
The MTs were taken for a factory visit to see the manufacturing process. The shop floor was neat
and clean. Workers had proper uniform. The food at the Canteen was being offered at a
subsidised rate - Rs 3 per plate and unlimited quantity. However, the canteen needed renovation,
number of utensils increased, and the quality of food and hygiene had to be improved. There was
a bus facility for workers that were being availed mainly by women workers. Also there was a
crèche for children below the age of 6 years. Women were not put to operate machines. They
were put into the packaging department. Hence, their safety was taken care of. There was a
medical room to provide first aid. Provisions for clean drinking water and clean toilets had been
made within the factory premises. All legal compliances under the Factories Act 1947 had been
taken care of.
All the workers - men and women - were equally happy to receive the MTs and explained the
processes with a lot of enthusiasm. But as soon as they came to know that they were coming
from the management and were there to work as managers, their facial expression turned to
suspicion.
The workers mentioned that they were receiving pending wages after a period of 3 months each
for a period of 2 years in continuation as the company had been making severe losses since the
past two years. This was contrary to what the company projected itself as – a profit making
organization. On enquiry, the MTs were told that they would receive their salary on the 10th or
on the 15th of the next month. This came in as a shock as it is difficult to survive in Mumbai with
salaries being paid 10 or 15 days late when all expenses towards rent and fooding needs to be
met on the 1st day of each month.
The only good thing was the lunch offered on the first day of the induction in a good hotel. On
the second day they were taken to the factory canteen for lunch, which was not up to the mark.
The Resignation
39
After analyzing all these points Neha decided to resign. The fact that another colleague had
already put in her paper influenced her decision too. After a lot of persuasion she was released
without any release letter.
Neha felt that the organization was like a crocodile ready to swallow everything in sight. It had
already swallowed her image of an ideal corporate life, her zeal to work and all her HR- related
knowledge about policies and procedures that have been taught class after class. This continuous
clash between theory and practice and the unprofessionalism of the organization made her resign.
Today, Neha is jobless but a happy person.

THE SURVEY:

A survey was conducted amongst the non-HR employees about their satisfaction towards the
implementation of HR policies in their respective organization. Close ended questions related to
various aspects of HR policies and practices were asked in the same.
70.8% of the respondents were predominantly from the service sector, while the remaining
belonged to the manufacturing sector. 75% of the employees who have responded to this survey
were working in organizations that have large scale business operations, whereas emplo yees
working in organizations with medium and small scale business operations formed 13% and
8% of the population respectively. Most of the respondents belonged to the Marketing
Department and had a minimum of two years’ experience. Hence, they had a fair idea on the
implementation of HR and other organizational policies.
Contrary to the experience of our protagonist, the survey showed that of the 75% of the
respondents who got selected through campus placement, 62.5% of the employees got a
detailed power point presentation in the PPT while only 12.50% claimed that they did not
receive the same. For 25% population this is not applicable as they got placed through other
means like Placement Agencies, direct company recruitment through Advertisements,
Referral Policy, etc. Even 87.50% employees felt that they were encouraged to ask questions
after the PPT where as 4.17% employees felt the opposite.
In reply to a question “Were the various policies to be followed clearly explained to you prior to
joining?” 62.50% of the employees answered in the affirmative and 37.50% of the employees
disagreed. With respect to the category of policies about which the respondents were aware pre-
joining, the responses are presented below with the help of a bar diagram.

40
58.33 % employees surveyed underwent structured formal induction training after joining their
organization whereas 41.67% did not have induction training.
Most of the respondents (75%) were aware that their organization had documented HR policies.
Of them, 58.33% employees were informed about their HR policies during their induction and
training, 16.67% employees were informed about the same much later but during probation and
the remaining 16.67% employees were informed about the same only on enquiry. Again, while
58.33% of the employees were aware that a handbook/employee manual on HR policies existed
in the organization, 41.67% said that such a thing did not exist in the organization. Those
employees who were aware were either given an individual copy at the time of induction or the
HR policies were available on intranet.
In reply to a question “Do you think your organization is transparent with reference to policies?”
54.17% employees thought that their organization was transparent with policies where as
12.50% employees felt that their organization was not at all transparent with policies. 25%
employee’s felt that they were transparent with select few policies and 4.17% felt that they were
transparent with all the policies.
Regarding the areas in which the organizations had well defined policies that were implemented,
Recruitment and Selection (58.33%), Compensation (58.33%), Performance Evaluation
(50.33%) and Reward and Recognition (50.00%) were the ones that had a predominant choice.
Responses on the areas in which the organizations had well defined policies are shown
graphically below.

41
Despite, having very positive feedback regarding HR and implementation of its policies through
separate questions, it has been found that only 45.83% of the employees are satisfied with their
organization and its policies. While 4% employees refrained from answering the question
directly, 37.5% were hovering between satisfied and unsatisfied and 12.5% were absolutely
unsatisfied.

ANALYSIS:

The central theme of the case study is focused on the policies and practices related to the
campus placement, induction and compensation of Management Trainees. There is no doubt
that the organization is at fault. The questions that intrigue us the most are related to the
implementation of HR policies and the actual practices. The entire case highlights on the
unprofessionalism of the organization – right from its recruitment policies, its communication,
its induction, unethical practices, high handedness, whimsical nature of its top brass, etc. The
problem areas are certain areas of weaknesses of the individuals who represented the
organization as well as that of the organization as a whole. They lacked:

1. Marketing skill as well as presentation skill

2. Punctuality

3. Transparency

4. Soft skills (hence, unapproachable)


42
5. Communication skill including written one

6. Uniform and fair policy including salary

7. Coordination among its various departments

8. Planned induction programme

9. Employment engagement policies

10. Trust among workers

True, the Management Trainee should have given a bit more time to get acclimatized to the
organizational culture but as it has been pointed out in the case there was a threat of financial
loss, her personal traits coupled with strong academic background and realistic ambitions
revolted against the unprofessionalism as she had “lost trust in the organization even before ...
(she) actually joined it.” Never-the-less, it is never a wise decision to leave a job and then look
for an alternative one. Moreover, when placement is through the campus, then students should
think of the reputation of the Institute and how such quick resignations may affect its future
relationship with the Institute.

CONCLUSION

Based on the above case it can be concluded that an employee’s ultimate intention to depart or
continue his job is the consequence of HR policies and practices [Ehrenberg, R. and Smith, R.
(1994)]. Interpretation of the survey results have shown that majority of the respondents have
positive feedback. Statistically, low percentage with negative feedback may be overlooked. But,
when we deal with human resources, we cannot ignore even such low negative feedback as then
we have cases like Neha Rai’s whose first interaction with the corporate life ended in such a bitter
note.

43
CHAPTER III

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY

The following points show us why are policies important for human resource management

HR policies ensure every employee of the organisation is looked after; his needs
respected and proper benefits are given to them for their work.
They help address complaints, problems and grievances of employees and solve
them appropriately. 
They protect employees from wrong behaviour from other employees or even from
the organisation itself.
Helps train and develop employees who are consistent with the needs of the
organisation. 
Helps employees receive adequate compensation. 
Helps maintain discipline in the workplace.
Provide paid vacations and holidays to eligible employees.
It creates a sense of accountability in each employee and allows the employer to
more easily take disciplinary action, up to and including termination, in the event
that the employee knowingly and wilfully violates the company policies. 

3.2 OBJECTIVES

1. Primary objective

1. To study employees perception towards HR policies in GIL Shared Service Centre

2. Secondary objective

1. To recognize the employees perception towards HR policies


2. To identify the efficiency of existing HR policies
3. To identify if any improvement are required to be made regarding HR policies
4. To suggest new policies for implementation and to study the satisfaction level of
employees towards the suggested HR policies

44
3.3 HYPOTHESIS OF THE STUDY
TEST 1:
Null hypothesis: There is no significant association between gender and the opinion
on implementing sexual harassment policy
Alternative hypothesis: There is significant association between gender and the
opinion on implementing sexual harassment policy

TEST 2:

Null hypothesis: There is no significant association between designation and the


opinion on implementing whistle blowing policy
Alternative hypothesis: There is significant association between designation and
the opinion on implementing whistle blowing policy

3.4 DEFINITION OF VARIABLES:

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION

This Recruitment and Selection Policy sets out how to ensure, as far as possible, that the best
people are recruited on merit and that the recruitment process is free from bias and
discrimination.

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

The Employee Training and Development company policy refers to the company's learning
and development programs and activities. In the modern competitive environment, employees
need to replenish their knowledge and acquire new skills to do their jobs better.

INDUCTION

This training is regarded as a vital part of staff recruitment and integration into the working
environment. This policy, associated procedures and guidelines define the Company's
commitment to ensure that all staff are supported during the period of induction, to the benefit
of the employee and Company alike

45
.

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL

The performance appraisal policy supports the performance appraisal scheme. The scheme
is a formal process centred on an annual meeting of each employee and their line manager to
discuss his/her work.

MEDICALIM POLICY

Mediclaim policy is a hospitalization benefit that is offered by both public and private sector
general insurance companies in India. The mediclaim insurance policy takes care of expenses
following hospitalization/domiciliary hospitalization

LEAVE POLICY

To define the policy and procedures employees leave entitlements. Scope: Employees at all
locations. Guidelines: One day privilege leave will be credited to employees leave account for
every twenty working days which, the employee can avail on confirmation of services.

WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY

A whistle-blower is a person who raises a concern about a wrongdoing in their workplace or


within the NHS or social care setting. If a person wishes to raise their concerns they should
obtain a copy of their organisations whistleblowing policy and seek advice.

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMME

An employer-sponsored employee assistance program (EAP) is a work-based intervention


program designed to identify and assist employees in resolving personal problems that may be
adversely affecting their performance at work, such as marital, financial or emotional problems;
family issues; or substance or alcohol abuse.

REWARDS AND RECOGNITION

Vital to pursuing this aim is the acknowledgement of employees for their contributions to the
University and the recognition of outstanding performance. This policy encourages such
recognition of individuals and teams through a range of formal and informal mechanisms.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

46
The Department of State is committed to providing a workplace that is free from sexual
harassment. ... When the Department determines that an allegation of sexual harassment is
credible, it will take prompt and appropriate corrective action.

3.5 RESEARCH DESIGN

The researcher adopted descriptive research design for the present study. Descriptive research
is a study designed to depict the participants in an accurate way. More simply put, descriptive
research is all about describing people who take part in the study. Descriptive research gathers
quantifiable information that can be used for statistical inference on your target audience
through data analysis. As a consequence this type of research takes the form of closed-ended
questions, which limits its ability to provide unique insights. However, used properly it can
help an organization better define and measure the significance of something about a group of
respondents and the population they represent.

3.6 SAMPLING METHOD

The sampling design adopted in the research is convenient sampling. A convenience sample is
one of the main types of non-probability sampling methods. A convenience sample is made up
of people who are easy to reach. In this type of sampling, items for the sample are selected on
the basis of easy accessibility by the researcher; and are representatives of the universe.

UNIVERSE:

The universe is the totality of items/events from which you can select or sample for statistical
analysis and description.

The universe is the 320 employees of GIL SHARED SERVICE CENTRE

SAMPLE SIZE:

The sample size of the research is 100 employees.

3.7 METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION

The source of data collection is both primary and secondary nature.

47
1. Primary data:

Primary data are those, which are collected afresh and for the first time and thus happen to be
original in character. Survey is the method adopted to collect data. Data was collected from the
respondents through questionnaire.

2. Secondary data:

Secondary data are those which has already been collected by someone else and which has
already been passed through the statistical process. Secondary data may either be published
(books, magazines, newspapers, reports, etc) or unpublished (diaries, letters, biographies, auto-
biographies, etc). For the purpose of the study, secondary data on Hr policies and other facts
related to the study has been collected from various websites and books.

3.8 TOOLS OF DATA COLLECTION

Questionnaire is the tool adopted by the researcher for the purpose of collecting data. It refers
to a devise securing answers to questions by using a form, which the respondent fills by
herself/herself. It is framed based on the nature and objectives of the study. This method is
followed because it is:-

Cost effective
Free from bias of the interviewer
Rating is done based on the respondents own thinking

A 5-point scale is provided for different levels of agreement. This gives more meaningful
results. Also included a space where respondents can highlight certain issues that was not
touched upon by the researcher and a ranking type question is also used in the questionnaire.

STATISTICAL TOOLS USED:

PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS:

One of the simplest methods of analysis of data is the percentage method. It is the traditional
statistical tools. Through the use of percentage the data are reduced in the standard form with

48
the base equal to 100 which facilitates relative comparison. In the study, the percentage analysis
is been used for interpretation.

CHI SQUARE: This test is used to find the association between two variables.

ANNOVA TEST: This test is used to find the association between two variables.

3.9 PILOT STUDY

A pilot study or feasibility study is a small experiment designed test logistics and collect
information prior to the larger study, in order to improve latter’s quality and efficiency.

A pilot study can reveal the deficiencies in the design of the proposed experiment or procedure
then these can be addressed before time and resources expanded on large scale studies.

The pilot study was done with the selected number of 20 respondents drawn from the universe.

The pilot study revealed that the study was reliable and therefore no changes had to be made
with regards to the questionnaire. So the actual experiment was circulated with no changes

3.10 RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY

VALIDITY

The instrument was constructed by the researcher. To validate the constructed instrument the
researcher administered content validation by experts. The instrument was validated by three
experts from different fields- one faculty member from the department of HRM MSSW and
the other experts being HR and business head of GIL SHARED SERVICE CENTRE. After the
content analysis by experts the researcher made subsequent changes in the instrument as
suggested by the experts.

RELIABILITY

The researcher has applied the reliability test to determine the internal consistency and
reliability of the questionnaire. The results obtained by the researcher were:

49
Reliability Statistics
Cronbach's Cronbach's N of Items
Alpha Alpha Based
on
Standardized
Items
.931 .935 30

3.11 LIMITATIONS

Since the tool used in this study is a questionnaire there is a chance for the sample to avoid some
questions and also to be bias for some questions. The research was carried on for a short span
of time and so couldn't widen up the study for more samples. The sample size is limited to 100
which may not reveal the complete expectation or perception of employees on organization
climate and retention, and so may not help with an effective result in its implementation. The
study is limited to only the GIL SHARED SERVICE CENTRE, Chennai.

1. The research was carried out in a short span of time, where the researcher could not
widen the study.
2. The study is limited to 100 samples due to the constrain of busy working schedule of
the employees.
3. The study is limited to analyse the perception about few basic factors.
4. The researcher was unable to get genuine response from few respondents.
5. There is every possibility of bias in the respondents reply.

50
CHAPTER 4
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
TABLE 4.1:

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON AGE

AGE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


20-25 34 34.0
26-30 48 48.0
31-35 9 9.0
36-40 7 7.0
Above 40 2 2.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.1:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON AGE

2.0
PERCENT
7.0

9.0
34.0 20-25
26-30
31-35
36-40
Above 40

48.0

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that out of 100 percent, only 2% belong to the age group
of category above 40 and 48% belong to the age group of 26-30. Thus we can understand that
majority of the respondents are young and at the start of their career whereas very few are adults
and are at the prime of their career
51
TABLE 4.2:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON SEX

SEX FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Male 76 76.0
Female 24 24.0

Total 100 100.0

CHART4.2:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON SEX

PERCENT

24.0
FEMALE

76.0
MALE

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that out of 100 percent, majority of respondents are
male (76%) and the remaining respondents are female (24%)

52
TABLE 4.3:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON DESIGNATION

DESIGNATION FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Process leader 7 7.0


Senior Process associate 44 44.0
Junior process associate 49 49.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.3:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON DESIGNATION

FREQUENCY

49

44

Process leader Senior Process associate Junior process associate

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred from the table that 44% of respondents are Junior
Process associates, 49% are Senior Process associates and7%majority are process associates.

53
TABLE 4.4:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON EXPERIENCE

EXPERIENCE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Less than 1 year 45 45.0


1-3 years 33 33.0
3-5 years 3 3.0
5 years and above 19 19.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.4:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON EXPERIENCE

PERCENT

19

3 45
Less than 1 year
1-3 years
3-5 years
5 years and above

33

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that 19% of respondents have worked for more than 5
years and 45% of respondents have worked for less than 1 year. Thus the respondents who have
served the company more than 5 years is lesser and respondents who served the company is
comparatively more.

54
RECRUITMENT AND SELCETION

TABLE 4.5:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON SCREENING AND SELECTION
PROCESS

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 0 0
Disagree 2 2.0
Neutral 20 20.0
Agree 66 66.0
Strongly agree 12 12.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.5:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON SCREENING AND SELECTION
PROCESS

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

66.0

20.0
12.0
2.0
Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that more than half of the respondents(66%) have agreed
and none of the respondents have strongly disagreed. Thus more than half the respondents are
satisfied with the screening and selection process and less than half have been neutral and only
2% are not satisfied.

55
TABLE 4.6:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE EXTERNAL SOURCE
THROUGH WHICH THEY HAVE BEEN RECRUITED

EXTERNAL SOURCE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Direct applicants 28 28.0
Placement consultants 4 4.0
Campus 15 15.0
Job Portals 26 26.0
Employee referral 27 27.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.6:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE EXTERNAL SOURCE
THROUGH WHICH THEY HAVE BEEN RECRUITED

27% 28%

4%

26% 15%

Direct applicants Placement consultanats Campus Job Portals Employee referral

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that (48%) of the respondents are direct applicants, the
next majority to be Employee referral (27%) and only 4% of the respondents have been
recruited through Placement consultants.

56
TABLE 4.7:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON CLEAR COMMUNICTAION
OF OBJECTIVES. JOBREQUIREMENTS AND JOB SPECIFICATION

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 0 0
Disagree 1 1.0
Neutral 10 10.0
Agree 71 71.0
Strongly agree 18 12.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.7:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON CLEAR COMMUNICTAION
OF OBJECTIVES. JOBREQUIREMENTS AND JOB SPECIFICATION

PERCENT

Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total


100.0

71.0

10.0 12.0
1.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred majority(71%) have stated that they are clear with the
position objectives, requirements and job specification communicated during the recruitment
process and only very few state that they are not clear with the objectives and specifications.

57
TABLE 4.8:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE INTERVIEWING
PROCCESS AND SELECTION INSTRUMENT

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 0 0
Disagree 4 4
Neutral 24 24
Agree 62 62
Strongly agree 10 10
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.8:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THE INTERVIEWING
PROCCESS AND SELECTION INSTRUMENT

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

62

24
10

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that more than half the respondents (62%) have agreed
and only a very few have disagreed. Thus the interviewing and selection instrument used by
the organization is effective.

58
INDUCTION
TABLE 4.9:

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS


INDUCTION PROGRAM FOR NEW JOINERS

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT


Strongly disagree 1 1
Disagree 4 4.0
Neutral 4 4.0
Agree 63 63.0
Strongly agree 28 28.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.9:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
INDUCTION PROGRAM FOR NEW JOINERS

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

63.0

28.0

4.0 4.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
It can be inferred that majority (63%) of respondents have agreed that the organization conducts
induction program for the new joinees regularly and only a very few have disagreed.

59
TABLE 4.10:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE MISSION AND VISSION OF THE COMPANY EXPLAINED DURING
INDUCTION

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 1 1
Disagree 0 0.0
Neutral 5 5.0
Agree 59 59.0
Strongly agree 35 35.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.10:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE MISSION AND VISSION OF THE COMPANY EXPLAINED DURING
INDUCTION

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

59.0

35.0

0.0 5.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that majority (59%) of the respondents have agreed that the
mission and values of the company are explained during the induction program and only a few
have disagreed.

60
TABLE 4.11:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWRADS
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUTURE AND POLICIES COVERED DURING
INDUCTION

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 1 1
Disagree 2 2.0
Neutral 7 7.0
Agree 63 63.0
Strongly agree 27 27.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.11:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWRADS
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUTURE AND POLICIES COVERED DURING
INDUCTION

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

63.0

27.0

7.0
2.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that majority (63%) of the respondents have stated that the
induction of the organization covers organizational structure and policies and only a few have
disagreed.

61
TABLE 4.12:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
COMPANY BACKGROUND AND HIERCAHY COVERED DURING THE
INDUCTION

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 1 1
Disagree 2 2.0
Neutral 14 14.0
Agree 54 54.0
Strongly agree 29 29.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.12:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
COMPANY BACKGROUND AND HIERCAHY COVERED DURING THE
INDUCTION

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

54.0

29.0
14.0
2.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that more than half of the respondents (54%) agree that the
induction program covers company background and hierarchy and only a very few disagree.

62
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

TABLE 4.13:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION TOWARDS
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 0 0
Disagree 3 3.0
Neutral 19 19.9
Agree 59 59.0
Strongly agree 19 19.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.13:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION TOWARDS
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

59.0

19.9 19.0
3.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that almost half of the respondents (59%) state that the
organization has a well-planned training and development program and only a very few have
disagreed.

63
TABLE 4.14:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE WORK EFFIECNCY AFTER BEING TRAINED

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 1 1
Disagree 6 6.0
Neutral 21 21.0
Agree 55 55.0
Strongly agree 17 17.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.14:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE WORK EFFIECNCY AFTER BEING TRAINED

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

55.0

21.0
17.0
6.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
The inference would be such that majority (55%) of the respondents feel that there is working
efficiency has been increased after the training program and only a very few have disagreed.

64
TABLE 4.15:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE CAREER PATH BUILD BY TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 1 1.0


Disagree 7 7.0
Neutral 19 19.0
Agree 49 49.0
Strongly agree 24 24.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.15:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE CAREER PATH BUILD BY TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

49.0

24.0
19.0
7.0
1.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that 49% of the respondents have agreed that the training and
development program will help them to build their career path and only a few have disagreed.

65
PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL

TABLE 4.16:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE PEFORMANCE MANAGEMENT THAT MOTIVATES THEM TO WORK
BETTER

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT


Strongly disagree 3 3.0
Disagree 6 6.0
Neutral 37 37.0
Agree 44 44.0
Strongly agree 10 10.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.16:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE PEFORMANCE MANAGEMENT THAT MOTIVATES THEM TO WORK
BETTER

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

44.0
37.0

6.0 10.0
3.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that 44% of the respondents agree that the performance
management system designed by the organization motivates them to work better and only a
very few have disagreed.

66
TABLE 4.17:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
WELL DEFINED, FAIR AND TRANSPARENT APPRAISAL PROCEDURE

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 1 1.0
Disagree 11 11.0
Neutral 42 42.0
Agree 40 40.0
Strongly agree 6 6.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.17:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
WELL DEFINED, FAIR AND TRANSPARENT APPRAISAL PROCEDURE

PERCENT

Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total


100.0

42.0 40.0

11.0
6.0
1.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that 42% of the respondents have been neutral to the fact that
the organization has a well-defined, fair and transparent appraisal procedure and 40% have
agreed to the same and only a few have disagreed.

67
TABLE 4.18:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE RATING SCALE USED FOR THE APPRAISAL PROCESS

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 0 0.0
Disagree 14 14.0
Neutral 40 40.0
Agree 36 36.0
Strongly agree 10 10.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.18:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE RATING SCALE USED FOR THE APPRAISAL PROCESS

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

40.0 36.0

14.0 10.0
0.0

LEVEL OF AGREEMENT

INFERENCE:
It can be inferred that 40% of the respondents have given neutral and 36% have agreed that
they have clarity with the rating scale used for appraising the performance and very few have
disagree.

68
MEDICLAIM POLICY
TABLE 4.19:

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS


THE MEDICALIM BENEFITS AND OTHER SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE
ORGANIZATION

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 1 1.0


Disagree 5 5.0
Neutral 23 23.0
Agree 57 57.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.19:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE MEDICALIM BENEFITS AND OTHER SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE
ORGANIZATION

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

57.0

23.0
14.0
1.0 5.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that majority (57%) of the respondents agree that the
mediclaim benefits and services offered by the organization provided by the organization are
sufficient and only a very few have disagreed.

69
LEAVE POLICY
TABLE 4.20:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE CLARITY ON THE LEAVE MANAGEMENT

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 1 1.0


Disagree 0 0.0
Neutral 5 5.0
Agree 74 74.0
Strongly agree 20 20.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.20:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE CLARITY ON THE LEAVE MANAGEMENT

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100

74.0

20.0
1.0 5.0
0.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that almost more than half of the respondents (74%) have
agreed that they have clarity on the leave management of the organization and only a few have
disagreed.

70
TABLE 4.21:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE SUFFICIENT LEAVE OFFERED BY THE COMPANY

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 0 0.0


Disagree 0 0.0
Neutral 10 10.0
Agree 64 64.0
Strongly agree 26 26.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.21:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE SUFFICIENT LEAVE OFFERED BY THE COMPANY

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

64.0

26.0
10.0
0.0 0.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that majority (64%) of the respondents have agreed that the
company provides sufficient leave for the calendar year and none of them disagreed. Thus the
company provides sufficient leave to the employees.

71
WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY

TABLE 4.22:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
HAVING A WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY IN PLACE

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 2 2.0
Disagree 3 3.0
Neutral 26 26.0
Agree 57 57.0
Strongly agree 12 12.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.22:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
HAVING A WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY IN PLACE

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

57.0

26.0
12.0
2.0 3.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
It can be inferred that more than half the respondents (57%) have agreed that they want their
organization to have a whistle blowing policy in place to support the staff to report wrongdoing,
misconduct, poor practice and only a few have disagreed. Thus the organization should
implement whistle blowing policy to support the employees.
72
TABLE 4.23:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THIER OPINION TOWARDS
THE PROHIBITION OF MAKING FALSE ALLEGATION

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 0 0.0


Disagree 5 5.0
Neutral 23 23.0
Agree 56 56.0
Strongly agree 16 16.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.23:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THIER OPINION TOWARDS
THE PROHIBITION OF MAKING FALSE ALLEGATION

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

56.0

23.0
16.0
0.0 5.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that 56% of the respondents agree that organization
while implementing this policy should make sure that the policy prohibits the making of
making false allegation maliciously.

73
TABLE 4.24:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
APPLICABILITY OF THE POLICY

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 0 0.0
Disagree 2 2.0
Neutral 12 12.0
Agree 64 64.0
Strongly agree 22 22.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.24:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
APPLICABILITY OF THE POLICY

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

64.0

22.0
12.0
0.0 2.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that since majority of the respondents (64%) have agreed
and only a few have disagreed, the organization must state that the policy applies to all the
employees working in the organization regardless of their position.

74
TABLE 4.25:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
HAVING AN INTERNAL HOTLINE

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 0 0.0


Disagree 4 4.0
Neutral 29 29.0
Agree 53 53.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.25:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
HAVING AN INTERNAL HOTLINE

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

53.0

29.0
14.0
0.0 4.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that considering the majority of the response which is
agreeableness, the organization should provide an internal hotline on which concerns can be
raised.

75
EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
TABLE 4.26:

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS


IMPLEMENTING EAP

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 4 4.0
Disagree 3 3.0
Neutral 24 24.0
Agree 60 60.0
Strongly agree 9 9.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.26:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
IMPLEMENTING EAP

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

60.0

24.0
9.0
4.0 3.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that majority (60%) of the respondents have agreed that they
want their organization to have an EAP setup. Thus the company must consider implementing
the Employees assistance program for their employees.

76
TABLE 4.27:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION TOWARDS THE
MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR TO BE INCLUDED UNDER EAP

Descriptive Statistics
N Mean Std. Deviation Minimum Maximum
Face to face counselling
100 4.50 2.003 0 6
for employees
Internet based online
100 2.28 1.928 0 6
counselling
Financial, legal ,health
and other information 100 2.60 2.132 0 6
services
Work place mediation 100 2.01 1.667 0 6
Work life balance
100 4.02 2.040 0 6
services
Management training 100 2.37 1.910 0 6

FRIEDMAN TEST

Ranks
Mean Rank
Face to face counselling for employees 4.66
Internet based online counselling 2.90

Financial, legal, health and other information services 3.28


Work place mediation 2.72
Work life balance services 4.35
Management training 3.11

INFERENCE:
1. The respondents feel that face to face counselling for employees is the first important
factor to be covered under the EAP service
2. The second important factor to be covered is Work life balance services
3. The third important factor to be covered is Financial, legal, health and other
information services
4. The fourth important factor to be covered Management training
5. The fifth important factor to be covered is Internet based online counselling
6. The last important factor to be covered is Work place mediation
77
TABLE 4.28:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION THAT EAP
WILL BE A VALUABLE BENEFIT

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 2 2.0


Disagree 5 5.0
Neutral 16 16.0
Agree 60 60.0
Strongly agree 17 17.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.28:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION THAT EAP
WILL BE A VALUABLE BENEFIT

Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

60.0

16.0 17.0
2.0 5.0

PERCENT

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that majority (60%) of the respondents have agreed that EAP
will be a valuable benefit if it is offered by the organization and only a few have disagreed to
this fact.

78
TABLE 4.29:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION THAT EAP
WILL IMPROVE JOB PERFORMANCE

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 2 2.0


Disagree 5 5.0
Neutral 21 21.0
Agree 59 59.0
Strongly agree 13 13.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.29:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION THAT EAP
WILL IMPROVE JOB PERFORMANCE

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

59.0

21.0
13.0
2.0 5.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that more than half of the respondents (59%) have agreed and
only a very few have disagreed that their job performance will be improved after EAP service.

79
REWARDS AND RECOGNITION
TABLE 4.30:

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION TOWARDS THEIR


WORK BEING APPRECIATED BY THE COMPANY

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 2 2.0


Disagree 7 7.0
Neutral 22 22.0
Agree 59 59.0
Strongly agree 10 10.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.30:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON OPINION TOWARDS THEIR
WORK BEING APPRECIATED BY THE COMPANY

Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

59.0

22.0
7.0 10.0
2.0

PERCENT

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that almost half of the respondents (59%) have agreed that
their work is being valued and appreciated in the organization and only few of them disagreed.

80
TABLE 4.31:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION OF ON THE
SPOT REWARD

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT

Strongly disagree 2 2.0


Disagree 5 5.0
Neutral 17 17.0
Agree 51 51.0
Strongly agree 25 25.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.31:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION OF ON THE
SPOT REWARD

Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

51.0

25.0
17.0
2.0 5.0

PERCENT

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that since majority of respondents (51%) have agreed,
the organization should provide on the spot reward for employees achievement.

81
LONG TERM RETENTION POLICY
TABLE 4.32:

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION ON LONG


TERM RETENTION POLICY

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 0 0.0
Disagree 1 1.0
Neutral 27 27.0
Agree 58 58.0
Strongly agree 14 14.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.32:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION ON LONG
TERM RETENTION POLICY

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

58.0

27.0
14.0
0.0 1.0

LEVEL OF AGREEMENT

INFERENCE:
Thus it can be inferred that majority of the respondents have agreed that long term retention
policy will help in building a good career path and only few of them have disagreed.

82
SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY
TABLE 4.33:

CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION THE POLICY


STATEMENT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 1 1.0
Disagree 0 0.0
Neutral 12 12.0
Agree 65 65.0
Strongly agree 22 22.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.33:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION THE POLICY
STATEMENT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

65.0

22.0
12.0
1.0 0.0

LEVEL OF AGREEMENT

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that almost half of the respondents (65%) have agreed
that the organization should provide a policy statement on sexual harassment.

83
TABLE 4.34:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE LEGAL HELP PROCEDURE

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%


Strongly disagree 0 0.0
Disagree 0 0.0
Neutral 13 13.0
Agree 67 67.0
Strongly agree 20 20.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.34:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE LEGAL HELP PROCEDURE

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

67.0

20.0
13.0
0.0 0.0

LEVEL OF AGREEMENT

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that almost half the respondents (67%) have agreed that there
should be a legal procedure available in the organization for sexual harassment.

84
TABLE 4.35:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE INITIATIVES TAKEN BY THE ORGANIZATION

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 0 0.0


Disagree 1 1.0
Neutral 17 17.0
Agree 60 60.0
Strongly agree 22 22.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.35:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
THE INITIATIVES TAKEN BY THE ORGANIZATION

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total
100.0

60.0

22.0
17.0

0.0 1.0

LEVEL OF AGREEMENT

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that most of the respondents (60%) have agreed that the
organization should provide initiatives to make the employees more comfortable regarding
taking legal help on sexual harassment.

85
TABLE 4.36:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
IMPLEMENTING SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

RESPONSE FREQUENCY PERCENT%

Strongly disagree 2 2.0


Disagree 1 1.0
Neutral 8 8.0
Agree 64 64.0
Strongly agree 25 25.0
Total 100 100.0

CHART 4.36:
CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS BASED ON THEIR OPINION TOWARDS
IMPLEMENTING SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

PERCENT
Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total

100.0

64.0

25.0
8.0
2.0 1.0

Level of Agreement

INFERENCE:
From the table it can be inferred that majority (64%) of the employees feel that sexual
harassment policy will ensure safety in the workplace. Thus organization should implement
sexual harassment policy.

86
CHI SQUARE ANALYSIS
TEST1:

H0- There is no significant association between sex and the opinion on implementing sexual
harassment policy

H1- There is significant association between sex and the opinion on implementing sexual
harassment policy

TABLE 4.37

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 3.805a 3 .283

Likelihood Ratio 4.264 3 .234


Linear-by-Linear Association 3.614 1 .057

N of Valid Cases 100

a. 3 cells (37.5%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is .24.

INFERENCE:
 p value = .283

 level of significance=0.05

The Chi square test performed shows that p value > 0.05. Thus the null hypothesis “(Ho) is
not rejected. This shows that “there is no association between sex and the opinion on
implementing sexual harassment policy”

87
ANOVA TEST
ONE-WAY ANOVA

TEST2

H0- There is no significant association between designation and the opinion on implementing
whistle blowing policy

H1- There is significant association between designation and the opinion on implementing
whistle blowing policy

TABLE 4.38

ANOVA
DESIGNATION

Mean
Sum of Squares Df Square F Sig.
Between Groups .969 4 .242 .615 .653
Within Groups 37.391 95 .394

Total 38.360 99

INFERENCE:
 p value = .653

 level of significance=0.05

The One-Way Anova test performed shows that the p value> 0.05, thus the null hypothesis
(Ho) is not rejected. This shows that “there is no association between designation and the
opinion on implementing whistle blowing policy”

88
CHAPTER 5
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

5.1 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS


1. 48% belong to the age group of 26-30 only 2% belong to the age group of category above
40. Thus we can understand that majority of the respondents are young and at the start of
their career whereas very few are adults and are at the prime of their career

2. Majority of respondents are male which constitutes to 76% and the remaining 24% of
respondents are female

3. It was found that 7% of respondents fall under the designation of process Leader and 49
% of respondents under the designation Junior Process associates and the remaining
under Senior Process associates.

4. Nearly 19% of respondents have worked for more than 5 years and 45% of respondents
have worked for less than 1 year. Thus the respondents who have served the company
more than 5 years is lesser and respondents who served the company is comparatively
more.

5. More than half of the respondents are satisfied with the screening and selection process
and less than half have been neutral and only 2% are not satisfied.

6. 48% are direct applicants, the next majority to be Employee referral (27%) and only 4%
of the respondents have been recruited through Placement consultants.

7. Majority have stated that they are clear with the position objectives, requirements and
job specification communicated during the recruitment process and only very few state
that they are not clear with the objectives and specifications.

8. More than half (62%) of the respondents have agreed that the interviewing and selection
instrument used by the organization is effective.

9. More than half (63%) of the respondent have agreed to the fact that the organization
conducts induction program to the new joinees regularly.

10. Majority of the respondents have agreed (59%) that the mission and values are explained
well during then induction program.
89
11. More than half of (63%) the respondents have agreed that the induction of the
organization covers organizational structure and policies.

12. 54% of the respondents state that the induction program covers company background
and hierarchy.

13. More than half of the respondents that the organization has a well-planned training and
development program.

14. Majority of the respondents feel fruitful changes in their working efficiency after being
trained.

15. Majority of the respondents state that the training and development program help them
to build their career path.

16. It was found that (44%) of the respondents have stated that their performance
management system motivates them to work better.

17. 42% of the respondents have given neutral and 40% of the respondents have agreed that
the organization has a well-defined, fair and transparent appraisal procedure.

18. 36% of the respondents have clarity with the rating scale used for appraising the
performance.

19. Majority (57%) of the respondents feel that the mediclaim benefits and services offered
by the organization provided by the organization are sufficient.

20. Nearly (74%) of the respondents have clarity on the leave management of the
organization.

21. 64% of the respondents agree that the company provides sufficient leave for the calendar
year.

22. Majority (57%) of the respondents want their organization to have a whistle blowing
policy in place to support the staff to report wrongdoing, misconduct, poor practice.

90
23. It was found that 56% of the respondents have agreed, 16% of the respondents the
strongly agreed, 23% of them have given neutral, 5% of them have disagreed that policy
should prohibit the making of making false allegation maliciously.

24. 64% of the respondents have stated that they want the policy to state that it applies to all
employees in the organization.

25. Majority (53%) of the respondents want the organization to give access to an internal
hotline on which concerns can be raised.

26. Majority of the respondents (60%) of the respondents want their organization to have an
EAP setup.

27. It was found that face to face counselling and work life balance services are the most
preferable factor to be covered under EAP services.

28. 60% of the respondents have agreed that the EAP will be a valuable benefit if it is offered
by the organization.

29. More than half (59%) of the respondents have agreed that their job performance will be
improved after EAP service.

30. 59% of the respondents have agreed that their work is being valued and appreciated in
the organization.

31. 51% of the respondents state that “on the spot” recognition must be given for significant
achievement.

32. More than half (58%) of the respondents have agreed that long term retention policy will
help in building a good career path.

33. 65% of the respondents have state the organization should provide a policy statement on
sexual harassment.

34. 67% of the respondents agree that there should be a legal procedure available in the
91
organization for sexual harassment.

35. 60% of the respondents want their organization to provide initiatives to make the
employees more comfortable regarding taking legal help on sexual harassment.

36. Majority (64%) of the respondents agree that implementing sexual harassment policy
will ensure safety to all employees in the organization.

CHI-SQUARE TEST
1. The Chi square test performed shows that it is significant at 0.05 level. Thus the null
hypothesis “There is no significant association between sex and the opinion on
implementing sexual harassment policy” (Ho) is not rejected.

ANOVA TEST
2. The One-Way Anova test performed shows that it is significant at 0.05 level. Thus the
null hypothesis “There is no significant association between designation and the opinion
on implementing whistle blowing policy” (Ho) is not rejected.

92
5.2 SUGGESTIONS
A good HR policy provides generalized guidance on the approach adopted by the organization,
and therefore its employees, concerning various aspects of employment. A procedure spells
out precisely what action should be taken in line with the policies.
 The rating scale used for appraising process can be communicated to the employees for
better understanding of the procedure.

 The appraisal procedure adopted can be even more well-defined, transparent and fair.

 The organization should focus on implementing whistle blowing policy.

 The Organization should focus on mentor system intend to help employees in their
career progression.

 The Organization should adopt sexual harassment policy for the well-being of the
employees.

 The organization should consider new selection and screening method for recruiting the
candidates.

 The Departments should develop constructive attitude towards each other.

 The company should give the appropriate recognition for the contributions and
accomplishments made by employees. A flexible reward system should be adopted by
organization to improve employee motivation.

 A more transparent and full proof communication system should be developed in the
organization.

 The organization should also have in place Employee assistance program.

93
5.3 CONCLUSION

Policies important for human resource management because HR policies ensure every
employee of the organisation is looked after; his needs respected and proper benefits are given
to them for their work. They help address complaints, problems and grievances of employees
and solve them appropriately. They protect employees from wrong behaviour from other
employees or even from the organisation itself. Helps train and develop employees who are
consistent with the needs of the organisation. Helps employees receive adequate compensation.
Helps maintain discipline in the workplace. Provide paid vacations and holidays to eligible
employees and it creates a sense of accountability in each employee and allows the employer
to more easily take disciplinary action, up to and including termination, in the event that the
employee knowingly and wilfully violates the company policies.

Study shows that:

The Policies of the company provides facilities for all round growth of individuals by training
in-house. The Policies grooms every individual to realize his potential in all facets while
contributing to attain higher organizational and personal goals. The Policy builds teams and
foster team-work as the primary instrument in all activities. The Policy implements equitable,
scientific and objective system of rewards, incentives and control. The Policy recognizes worth
contributions in time and appropriately, so as to maintain a high level of employee motivation
and morale. The employees agree on the part that the interviewing process and selection
instrument is effective. The employees understand how their work goals relate to company’s
goals. Company inspires the employees to do their best work every day. The employees are not
communicated the rating scales used for apprising the performance. The employees want the
organization to have a whistle blowing policy in place to support the staff. The employees want
the company to adopt sexual harassment policy and Employees assistance program for their
well-being. And it was also found that the demographics details (age, sex) has no association
with the policies

94
Bibliography
&
Webliography
BOOKS:

K.Aswathappa, ―Human Resource and Personnel Management, Third


Edition, 2002, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, Ltd.

C.R.Kothari, ―Research Methodology, Revised Second Edition, 2007,


New Age International (P) Ltd, Publishers.

L.M.Prasad, ―Human Resource Management, Second Edition, 2005, Sultan


Chand & Sons.

WEBLIOGRAPHY:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_resource_policies

https://content.wisestep.com › Management › Human Resources

http://www.scielo.br/pdf/bar/v9n4/aop0512.pdf-

www.icmrr.org/global/pdffiles/IJHRRR/H201604003.pdf

https://www.academia.edu/5450371/HR_POLICIES_AND_PRACTICES_THE_REALITY_
A_CASE_STUDY_INTRODUCTION

http://www.ijirst.org/articles/IJIRSTV2I11034.pdf-employees
http://www.essay.uk.com/essays/business/essay-global-talent-management-human-
resources/-GTM

http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/10603/76568/9/09_chapter%202.pdf
https://www.scribd.com/doc/144116454/Project-Report-on-HR-Policies-and-Its-
Implementation-at-Deepak-Nitrite-Limited
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-hr-policies-procedures-important-caroline-robertson-
mcipd-cahri
http://yourbusiness.azcentral.com/importance-hr-policies-1589.html
hrcouncil.ca/hr-toolkit/policies-guideline.cfm
ANNEXURE
OUESTIONNAIRE

I am Evanjelin S, pursuing my Masters in Human Resource Management at Madras School of


Social Work. As a part of the curriculum I am currently working on research project, the
topic being “A Study on the effectiveness of HR policies in GIL Shared Service Centre”. I
would need only a few minutes of your time to fill out a questionnaire which forms a
comprehensive part of my research. Your response hold a great significance in my quest of
data collection. I ensure that all the results of this research will be kept confidential and will
be used only for research purpose. Thank you very much for your support and co-operation.

PERSONAL PROFILE

Name (optional): Age:


Gender: Male / Female:
Designation:

How long you have been working with GIL shared service centre?

a) Less than 1 year


b) 1-3 years
c) 3-5years
d) 5 years & above

PART I
Tick the appropriate option based on your choice

RECRUITMENT

1. I am satisfied with the screening and selection process used by the organization
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

2. Choose the external source from which you were been recruited in your company
i) Direct applicants
ii) Placement Consultants
iii) Campus
iv) Job portals
v) Employee referral
3. I am clear with the position objectives, requirements and Job specifications
communicated during the recruitment process
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

4. The interviewing process and selection instrument used by the organization is effective
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

INDUCTION
5. The organization conducts induction programme for new joiners regularly
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

6. The mission and values of the company are well explained during the induction
programme
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

7. The induction of the organization covers organizational structure and policies


a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

8. The induction program covers the company background and hierarchy


a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT


9. The organization conducts well planned training and development programme
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

10. I feel fruitful changes in working efficiency after being trained


a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

11. Training and development programme helps to build my career path


a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL

12. The Performance Management system designed by the organization motivates me to


work better
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

13. The organization has a well-defined, fair and transparent appraisal procedure
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree
14. I have clarity with the rating scale used for appraising the performance
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

MEDICLAIM POLICY
15. The medical benefits and other services provided by the organization are sufficient
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

LEAVE POLICY
16. I have clarity on the leave management of the organization
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

17. My company provides sufficient leave for the calendar year


a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

PART II

Tick the appropriate option based on your choice

WHISTLE BLOWING POLICY


18. I want my organization to have a whistleblowing policy in place to support staff to
report wrongdoing, misconduct, poor practice etc
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

19. The policy should prohibit the making of a false allegation maliciously
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

20. The policy should state that it applies to all employees in the organization
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

21. I want my organization to give access to an internal hotline on which concerns can be
raised
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMME


(An employee assistance program (EAP) is a work-based intervention program designed to
identify and assist employees in resolving personal problems (e.g., marital, financial or
emotional problems; family issues; substance/alcohol abuse) that may be adversely affecting
the employee's performance.)
22. I want my organization to have an EAP setup
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

23. Rank the following services as to which you think is very important to be covered
under EAP in your organization. Use 1 to indicate the most important factor, 2 the next
most important factor, etc.

 Face-face counselling for employees


 Internet based online counselling
 Financial, legal, health and other information services
 Work place mediation
 Work life balance services
 Management training

24. The EAP will be a valuable benefit if is offered by the organization


a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

25. My job performance will be improved after EAP service


a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

REWARDS AND RECOGNITION


26. My work is being valued and appreciated in the organization
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

27. Recognition should be given for significant achievement “on the spot”
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

LONG TERM RETENTION POLICY


28. Long term retention policy will help in building a good career path
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY


29. The organization should provide a policy statement on sexual harassment
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

30. There should be a legal help procedure available in the organization for sexual
harassment
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree
31. The organization should provide initiatives to make the employees more comfortable
regarding taking legal help on sexual harassment
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree

32. Implementing sexual harassment policy will ensure safety to all employees in the
organization
a) Strongly disagree b) Disagree c) Neutral d) Agree e) Strongly agree