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Infrared

&
Radio
Transmission
Infrared Transmission
• Infrared (IR) light is electromagnetic radiation
with a wavelength longer than that of visible
light, measured from the nominal edge of
visible red light

• Employed in short-range communication


among computer peripherals and personal
digital assistants and electronic devices
Propagation

• Uses infrared light-emitting diodes

• Receiver uses a silicon photodiode to convert the


infrared radiation to an electric current

• Responds only to the rapidly pulsing signal created


by the transmitter, and filters out slowly changing
infrared radiation from ambient light
Uses
• Short Range Communication

• Indoor use
Advantages
• Simple Circuit
• Cheap
• Low Power Consumption
• No Licenses Needed
• Higher Security
• Simple Shielding
• Portable
Disadvantages
• Works ONLY on Line-of-Sight (LOS) Mode

• Short Range

• Blocked by common materials: people, walls, etc

• Low bandwidth

• Speed is comparatively slow


Examples
• Remote Control

• Mobile Phones
Radio Transmission
• Radio is the transmission of signals through
free space by modulation of electromagnetic
waves with frequencies below those of visible
light
Propagation
• Radio waves travels by means of oscillating
electromagnetic fields that pass through the
air and the vacuum of space

• Information is carried by systematically


changing (modulating) some property of the
radiated waves, such as amplitude, frequency,
phase, or pulse width
Uses
• Audio
• Telephony
• Video
• Navigation
• Radar
• Data (Digital Radio)
• Radio control
Advantages
• Simple Circuit

• Cheap

• No Licenses Needed

• High Speed/Bandwidth

• Covers Large Areas (Penetrates through walls)


Disadvantages
• Limited number of free frequency bands

• Shielding is difficult

• Interference with other electrical devices

• Greater Power Consumption

• Limited Spectrum of Frequency


Examples
• FM Channels

• Walkie Talkies