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CHAPTER 5 CONSEQUENCES OF STATE SUCCESSION

THE CONCEPT OF THE STATE


CREATION OF STATES - Allegiance of the inhabitants of the predecessor state in the territory
affected is transferred to the successor state. They are also naturalized en
- By revolution masse
- By unification - Political law of the former are automatically abrogated and may be
- By secession
restored only by a positive act on the part of the new sovereign. But non-
- By assertion of independence
political laws, such as those dealing with familiar relations, are deemed
- By agreement and attainment of civilization
continued unless they are changed by the new sovereign or are contrary to
EXTINCTION OF STATES the institution of the successor state.
- Treaties of a political and even commercial nature, as well as treaties of
- By extinction or emigration en masse of its population extradition, are also discontinued, except those dealing with local rights
- By loss of territory and duties, such as those establishing easement and servitudes.
- By overthrow of government resulting in anarchy - All the rights of the predecessor state are inherited by the successor state
but this is not so where liabilities are concerned.
PRINCIPLES OF STATE CONTINUITY
SUCCESSION OF GOVERNMENT
- The state continues as juristic being notwithstanding changes in its
circumstances, provided only that they do not result in loss of any of its - Where the government replaces another either peacefully or by violent
essential elements. methods. In both instances, the integrity of the state is not affected; the
- This principle applied in the sapphire case where, after Emperor Louis state continues as the same international person except only that its lawful
napoleon filed a damage suit on behalf of France in an American court, he representative is changed.
was deposed. Nonetheless, the action was not abated and could continue - The rights of the predecessor government are concerned; they are
upon recognition of the duly authorized representative of the new inherited in too by the successor government.
government of France. - Where the new government was organized by virtue of a constitutional
reform duly ratified in plebiscite, the obligations of the replaced
SUCCESSION OF STATES
government are completely by the former.
- Where the new government was established through violence as by a
- Takes place when one state assumes the rights and some of the obligations
revolution, it may lawfully reject the purely personal or political obligations
of another because of certain changes in the condition of the latter.
- May be either: of the predecessor government but not contracted by it in the ordinary
o Universal succession -when a state is annexed to another state or course of official business.
is totally dismembered or merges with another state to form a
CHAPTER 6
new state RECOGNITION
o Partial succession- take place when a portion of the territory of BASIC RULES IN RECOGNITION OS STATES
the states or is ceded to another or when an independent state
becomes a protectorate or a suzerainty or when a dependent - It is political act and mainly a matter of policy on the part of each state.
state acquires full sovereignty. - it is discretionary on the part of the recognizing authority.
- it is exercised by the political (executive) department of the state.
- The legality and wisdom of recognition is not subject to judicial review.
THEORIES ON RECOGNITION - held irrevocable and imports the recognition of the government

1. Declaratory (majority view) EFFECTS OF THE RECOGNITION OF THE STATE AND GOVERNMENT
- merely affirms the pre-existing fact that the entity being recognized already
possess the status of an international persons. 1. full diplomatic relations are established except where the government
- Political and discretionary 2. the recognized state or government acquire the right to sue in courts of
2. Constitutive (minority view) recognizing state
- It is last indispensable element that converts or constitutes the entity being 3. the recognized state or government has a right to possession of properties
recognized into an international person. of predecessor in the territory of the recognizing state
- Mandatory and legal 4. all acts of the recognized state or government are validated retroactively,
preventing the recognizing state from passing upon their legality in its own
OBJECTS OF RECOGNITION courts

1. Recognition of a state- held irrevocable and imports the recognition of the RECOGNITION OF A STATE V. RECOGNITION OF GOVERNMENT
government
2. Recognition of a government- may be withdrawn and does not necessary - recognition of the state carries with it recognition of the government
signify the existence of a state as the government may be that of a mere - recognition states is irrevocable
colony.
3. Recognition of belligerency- does not produce the same effect as the RECOGNITION OF GOVERNMENT
recognition of states and government because the rebels are accorded
- may be withdrawn and does not necessary signify the existence of a state
international personality only in connection with the hostilities they are
as the government may be that of a mere colony.
waging.
REQUISITES:
KIND OF RECOGNITION
1. government is stable and effective (objective test)
1. Express- may be verbal or in writing. It may be extended through a formal
2. no substantial resistance to its authority
proclamation or announcement, a stipulation in a treaty, a letter or 3. the government must show willingness and ability to discharge its
telegram, or on the occasion of an official call or conference. international obligations (subjective test)
2. Implied- when the recognizing state enters into officials intercourse with 4. government must enjoy popular consent or approval of the people.
the new member by exchanging diplomatic representatives with it.
KINDS OF THE DE FACTO GOVERNMENT
The act constituting recognition shall give a clear indication of an intention:
1. That which is established by the inhabitants who rise in revolt against and
1. To treat with the new state as such depose the legitimate regime.
2. To accept the new government as having authority to represent the state it 2. That which is established in the course of war by the invading forces of one
purports to govern and to maintain diplomatic relations with it belligerent in the territory of the other belligerent, the government of
3. To recognize in the case of insurgent that they are entitled to exercise
which is also displaced.
belligerent rights 3. That which is established by the inhabitants of a state who secede
therefrom without overthrowing its government.

LANDMARK CASE DOCTRINE


RECOGNITION OF STATES
1. WILSON/ TOBAR DOCTRINE properties abroad properties abroad
- This precludes recognition of the government established by revolution,
civil war, coup d’etat or other form of internal violence until the freely Brings about full Limited to certain
elected representatives of the people have recognized a constitutional diplomatic relations juridical relations
government

2. KELSEN DOCTRINE
EFFECTS OF THE RECOGNITION OF THE STATE AND GOVERNMENT
- A states violates international law and thus infringes upon the rights of
other states if it recognizes as a state a community which does not fulfil the 1. full diplomatic relations are established except where the government
requirements of international law 2. the recognized state or government acquire the right to sue in courts of
recognizing state
3. BETANCOURT DOCTRINE 3. the recognized state or government has a right to possession of properties
- This came as a reflection of Venezuelan president Romulo Betancourt’s of predecessor in the territory of the recognizing state
antipathy for non-democratic rule, which denied diplomatic recognition to 4. all acts of the recognized state or government are validated retroactively,
any regime, right or left, which came to power by military force. preventing the recognizing state from passing upon their legality in its own
courts
4. LAUTERPACHT DOCTRINE
- It is the recognition of an entity which is not legally a state is wrong RCOGNITION OF BELLIGERENCY
because it constitutes as abuse of the power of recognition. It
acknowledges a community which is not in law, independent and which - Does not produce the same effect as the recognition of states and
does not therefore fulfil the essential conditions of statehood as an government because the rebels are accorded international personality only
independent state. It is, accordingly, a recognition which an international in connection with the hostilities they are waging.
tribunal declare not only to constitute a wrong but probably also to be
itself invalid. CONDITION FOR RECOGNITION OF BELLIGERENCY

5. STIMSON DOCTRINE 1. there must be an organized civil government directing the rebel forces
- This precludes recognition of any government established as a result of 2. the rebels must occupy a substantial portion of the territory of the state
3. the conflict between the legitimate government and the rebels must be
external aggression
serious, making the outcome uncertain.
6. ESTRADA DOCTRINE 4. The rebels must be willing and able to observe the laws of war.
- This refers to dealing or not dealing with the government established
through a political upheaval is not a judgement on the legitimacy of the
said government.
-
EFFECTS OF RECOGNITION OF BELLIGERENCY
RECOGNITION DE JURE RECOGNITION DE FACTO
1. Responsibility for acts of rebels resulting to injury to nationals of
Relatively permanent Provisional
recognizing state shall be shifted to rebel government
Vests title in the Does NOT vests title in 2. The legitimate government recognizing the rebels as belligerents shall
government to its the government to its observe laws or customs of war in conducting hostilities
3. Third states recognizing belligerency should maintain neutrality;
4. Recognition is only provisional and only for purposes of hostilities.  Example of Regional Agency: Organization of American States – Whose
organ of consultation authorized or ratified the action taken by the US.
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THE RIGHT OF EXISTENCE AND SELF-DEFENSE THE BALANCE OF POWER
 Once a state comes into being. It is invested with certain rights described as
fundamental.  One reason for the organization of regional arrangements is to provide for
 Most important of these rights: the balance of power
o Right of existence  An arrangement of affair so that no state shall be in a position to have
o Self-defence absolute mastery and dominion over others. – Vattel

*It is important because all its other rights are supposed to flow or be derived from AGGRESSION – Use of armed force by a state against:
it.
 Sovereignty
 The presence of an “Armed Attack” to justify the exercise of the right of  Territorial Integrity
self-defence may be taken by a state only in the face of a necessity of self-  Political independence of other state
defense that is instant, overwhelming and leaving no choice of means and
 First use of armed forces shall constitute prima facie evidence of aggression
no moment for deliberation
 Right may be resorted only upon clean showing of a grave and actual
QUALIFY AS AN ACT OF AGGRESSION
danger to the security of the state
 “The best defense is offense” – Grotius 1. Invasion/attack by armed forces of a state of the territory of another state
 One might well argue now that the very state of armed preparedness of a 2. Bombardment of armed forces
nuclear power is per se a potent, if latent. 3. The blockade of parts/coasts of a state by the armed forces of another
state
4. Attack of sea, air forces, land etc.
5. Use of armed forces within the territory of another State with the
THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS
agreement of the receiving State, in contravention of the conditions
 “The peace of the world and the security of the US (had been) endangered provided for in the agreement or any extension of their presence in such
by reason of the establishment by the Sino-Soviet powers of an OFFENSIVE territory beyond the termination of the agreement
MILITARY CAPABILITY in Cuba, including bases for ballistic missiles with a 6. The action of a State in allowing its territory, which it has placed at the
potential range covering most of North and South America. disposal of another State, to be used by that other State for perpetrating
an act of aggression against a 3rd state
7. The sending by or on behalf of a State of armed force against another State
of such gravity as to amount to the acts listed above, or its substantial
REGIONAL ARRANGEMENTS involvement therein.

 Nothing in the present charter precludes the existence of regional CHAPTER 8


arrangements. THE RIGHT OF INDEPENDENCE SOVEREIGNTY
Supreme, uncontrollable power inherent in a state, the supreme power of the state
REGIONAL ARRANGEMENTS – Agencies for dealing with such matters relating to the to command and enforce obedience
maintenance of international peace and security as are appropriate for regional
action.
 Enables the state to make its own decision vis-à-vis other states and vests it CHAPTER 9: THE RIGHT OF EQUALITY
with competence to enter into relation and agreements with them.
 Art. 2 of Charter of the UN: “The organization is based on the principle of
2 ASPECTS the sovereign equality of all its members.
 States are juridically equal, enjoy the same rights, and have equal capacity
1. INTERNAL SOVEREIGNTY – Power of the state to direct its domestic affairs in their exercise. The rights of each one do not depend upon the power
2. EXTERNAL SOVEREIGNTY – The freedom of the state to control its own which it possesses to assure its exercise, but upon the simple fact of its
foreign affairs. existence as a person under international law.
o External sovereignty is more often referred to as independence.
ESSENCE OF EQUALITY
NATURE OF INDEPENDENCE
 Does not signify parity in physical power, political influence or economic
 Freedom from control by any other state or group of states and not
status or prestige
freedom from the restrictions that are binding on all states forming the  Equality does not even require equality in the number of rights
family of nations.  All the rights of a State, regardless of their number, must be observed and
 Must submit to limitations, independence of a state is of necessity respected
restricted.  All States, big or small have an equal right to the enjoyment of all their
respective attributes as members of the family of nations
INTERVENTION  All members of UN have each one vote in the General Assembly, all votes
having equal weight and are generally eligible for positions in the various
 State must abstain from intervention. It expects its independence to be
organs of the UN
respected by other states, so too must it be prepared to respect their own
 “Par in parem non habet imperium” – Even the strongest state cannot
independence.
assume jurisdiction over another state, no matter how weak etc..
 Rights of independence carries with it duty of non-intervention.
LEGAL EQUALITY VS. FACTUAL INEQUALITY
2 INSTANCES WHEN THE USE OF FORCE IS ALLOWED UNDER THE CHARTER OF THE
UN:  Not all states have equal eligibility with regard to elective membership of
the Security Council
1. When such action is agreed upon in a treaty
 5 of them must be elected from the African and Asian states and only 1 can
2. When requested from sister states or from the UN
come from the Eastern European State.
 Recent events have called for a re-examination of the law on intervention,  In General Assembly, all members have on vote regardless of the number
especially where intervention is based on humanitarian grounds of people they separately represent.
 Revolted by the inhumane plight of the innocent victims, the UN sent a
CHAPTER 9
contingent of military troops from several countries, primarily the US.
THE RIGHT OF EQUALITY
 Art. 2 of Charter of the UN “The organization is based on the principle of
THE DRAGO DOCTRINE
the sovereign equality of all its members
 The contracting powers agree not to have recourse to armed force for the  States are juridically equal, enjoy the same rights, and have equal capacity
recovery of contract debts claimed from the government of one country by in their exercise. The rights of each one do not depend upon the power
the government of another country as being due to its nationals. which it possesses to assure its exercise, but upon the simple fact of its
existence as a person under international law.
ESSENCE OF EQUALITY Territory may be acquired by:

 Does not signify parity in physical power, political influence or economics  Discovery
status or prestige  Occupation
 Equality does not even require equality in the number of rights.  Subjugation
 PRINCIPLE: All the rights of a state, regardless of their number, must be  Prescription
observed and respected  Cession
 All states, big or small have an equal right to the enjoyment of all their  Accretion
respective attributes as members of the family of nations.
Territory may be lost by:
 All members of UN have each one vote in the General Assembly, all votes
having equal weight, and are generally eligible for positions in the various  Abandonment
organs of the UN  Dereliction
 “Par in paren non habet imperium” – even the strongest state cannot  Cession
assume jurisdiction over another state, no matter how wake etc..  Revolution
 Subjugation
LEGAL EQUALITY VS. FACTUAL INEQUALITY  Prescription
 Erosion
 Not all states have equal eligibility with regard to elective membership  Natural causes
of the Security Council
 5 of them must be elected from the African and Asian states and only 1 DISCOVERY AND OCCUPATION
can come from the Eastern European State.
 Original mode of the acquisition by which territory not belonging to any
state is placed under the sovereignty of the discovering state.
 Territory need not be to be uninhabited provided it can be established that
the natives are not sufficient civilized and can be considered as possessing
not rights of sovereignty but only rights of habitation
 Open seas and outer space are not susceptible to discovery and
occupation.
CHAPTER 10
TERRITORY
2 REQUISITES OF A VALID DISCOVERY AND OCCUPATION
TERRITORY – Fixed portion of the surface of the earth inhabited by the people of the
state. 1. Possession
2. Administration
 Must be permanent and indicated with precision
 Big enough to provide for the needs of the population but not be so  Possession must be claimed on behalf of the state. Be effected through a
extensive as to be difficult to administer/defend from external aggression. formal proclamation and the symbolic act of raising the national flag in the
 The Philippines is committed to the renunciation of the war for territorial
territory.
aggrandizement but like other states, is not precluded from acquiring  Mere possession will not suffice
additional territories through any of the methods permitted under the law
of nations. INCHOATE TITLE OF DISCOVERY

ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF TERRITORY


 Performs the function of barring other states from entering the territory SUBJUGATION – Territory is deemed acquired by subjugation when, having been
until the lapse of a period within which the discovering state may establish previously conquered or occupied in the course of war by the enemy, it is formally
as settlement thereon and commence to administer it. annexed to it at the end of that war.

ISLAND OF PALMAS CASE  Conquest alone confers only an inchoate right on the occupying state; it is
the formal act of annexation that completes the acquisition.
 Discovery alone, without any subsequent act, cannot at the present time
suffice to prove sovereignty of Island of Palmas. ACCRETION – Mode of acquiring territory based on the principle of accession cedat
 An inchoate title could not prevail over the continuous and peaceful display principali. It is accomplished through both natural or artificial processes, as by the
of authority by another state for such display may prevail even over a prior, gradual and imperceptible deposit of soil on the coasts of the country through the
definitive title put forward by another state. action of the water or, more effectively, by reclamation projects like those
undertaken in Manila Bat and the polders of Holland.
CLIPPERTONE ISLAND CASE
COMPONENT OF TERRITORY
 Title was deemed acquired by France over an island it had formally claimed
but had never administered. He proclaimed and declared that the 1. Terrestrial domain
sovereignty of the said island beginning from that date belonged in 2. Maritime domain
perpetuity to his majesty. 3. Fluvial domain
 If a territory, by virtue of the fact that it was completely uninhabited, from 4. Aerial domain
the first moment when the occupying state makes its appearance there, at
THE TERRESTRIAL DOMAIN
the absolute and undisputed possession of that State, from that moment
the taking of possession is considered accomplished and the occupation is  Land mass
formally completed.
THE MARITIME AND FLUVIAL DOMAIN
DERELICTION – Territory is lost by dereliction when the state exercising sovereignty
over it physically withdraws from it with the intention of abandoning it altogether.  Bodies of water within the land mass and the waters adjacent to the
coasts of the state up to a specified limit.
 conditions must concur:
1. Acts of withdrawal RIVERS MAY BE CLASSIFIED INTO:
2. Intention to abandon
1. National Rivers – situated completely in the territory of one state
PRESCRIPTION – Prescription in international law requires long continued and 2. Multi-national Rivers – Flow through the territories of several states
adverse possession to vest acquisitive title in the claimant. 3. International Rivers – is navigable from the open sea and is open to the use
of vessels from all states
CESSION – Method by which territory is transferred from one state to another by 4. Boundary Rivers – divided the territories of the riparian states
agreement between them. Acquisition of territory by cession is usually effected by
such familiar transactions as sale, donation, barter or exchange, and even by THALWEG DOCTRINE – In the absence of a specific agreement between such
testamentary disposition. states, the boundary line is laid on the river. That is, on the center, not of the
river itself, but of its main channel.
 Examples are the purchase by the US of Alaska from Russia in 1867, the
gift by Austria of Lombardy to France in 1859
BAYS – Well-marked indentation whose penetration is in such proportion to the  United Kingdom questioned the use by Norway of the straight baseline
width of its mouth as t contain land-locked waters and constitute more than a mere method defining its territorial waters.
curvature of the coast.
THE AERIAL DOMAIN
THE TERRITORIAL SEA – Belt of waters adjacent to the coasts of the state, excluding
the internal waters in bays and gulfs, over which the state claims sovereignty and The airspace above the terrestrial domain and the maritime and fluvial domain of
jurisdiction the state, to an unlimited altitude but not including outer space.

THE UN Conference on the Law of the Sea

 3 international conferences have been called to formulate a new of the


sea.
 The 1st conference was held in 1958 at Geneva, Switzerland, and resulted
in the adoption of the Convention on the Territorial Sea and the
Contiguous Zone, the Convention on the High Seas, and the Convention on
the Fishing and the Living Resources of the High Seas, and the Convention
on the Continental Shelf.
 The new Convention provides among others for a uniform breadth of 12
miles for the territorial sea, a contiguous zone of 12 miles from the outer
limits of the territorial sea, and an economic zone or patrimonial sea
extending 200 miles from the low-water mark of the coastal state.

THE PHILIPPINE TERRITORIAL SEA

 The claim of the Philippines to its territorial sea was based on historic right
or title or as it often called, the TREATY LIMITS THEORY.
 The new Convention on the Law of the Sea now limits our territorial sea 12
miles from the low water mark of our coasts, as in the case of other states.

METHODS OF DEFINING THE TERRITORIAL SEA

1. NORMAL BASELINE METHOD – The territorial sea is simply drawn from the
low-water mark of the coast, to the breadth claimed, following its
sinuosities and curvatures but excluding the internal waters in bays and
gulfs.
2. STRAIGHT BASELINE METHOD – Straight lines are made to connect
appropriate points on the coast without departing radically from its general
direction.

FISHERIES CASE