R

i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m

Slug_0-7
Title:
1st insert:
Version:
Pubs:
Color/B&W:
Pickup ref:
Live:
Trim:
Bleed:
Gutter:
Scale:
Art Director
Copywriter
Project Mgr
Print Prod
Studio Mgr
Buddy Check
Creative Dir
Acct Mgmt
Proofreader
Legal
Client
Product Info
8-2-2010 1:07 PM Updated: Printed at:
PUBLI CI S & HAL RI NEY
SAN FRANCI SCO
Approvals EPro:
Production notes:
Job: 6768PRM0060-024429
Prints Newspaper Colors:
- Slate prints C43, M3, Y7, K0
- Blue prints C100, M60, Y0, K5
- Red prints C0, M100, Y69, K5
- Legal prints K100
- .5 pt. black keyline on trim prints
- Vendor to convert Android Logo Green PMS376C to
newspaper colors
Final Art:
- All type, logos and clouds
FPO Art:
- Photographic Art
cgibson
Released
024429-PRM0060-USC_SN16.indd
Document
02
08-02
Promo 3A Nationwide 3G ROP 4C
By Date
Mike Whelan
Joe Bultman
Catherine Moore
Michael Blair
Inks, Images & Fonts :
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black
USC-PRD-10-099_4C.eps (CMYK; 272 ppi; 24.36%),
USC-PRD-10-100_4C.eps (CMYK; 334 ppi; 19.89%), C3_
dynamic_slate_newsprint.psd (CMYK; 193 ppi, -194 ppi;
155.43%, -155.43%), USC_believe_std_news_CMYK.
eps, facebook_favicon.eps, android_logo.eps
Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk (Medium Condensed,
Light Condensed), SanukOT (Regular, Bold), Matrix II
Script USC (Reg, Bold), Rosewood (Fill), Trade Gothic
(Condensed No. 18)
Inks, Images & Fonts Cont'd :
4C
None
9.5" x 11"
None
None
1" = 1" @ 100%
100%
8/10/10
SN16
See media rotation
CTA verification
Toll-free#/Acct Mgmt
URL/Acct Mgmt
Email/Acct Mgmt
By Date
Toll-free#/Proofreader
URL/Proofreader
Email/Proofreader
By Date
Things we want you to know: New two-year agreement (subject to early termination fee) and credit approval required. A $30 activation fee may apply. Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee applies; this is not a tax or government-required charge. Additional fees, taxes, terms, conditions
and coverage areas apply and vary by plan, service and phone. Use of service constitutes acceptance of the terms of our Customer Service Agreement. Promotional Phone subject to change. Mail-in rebate will be paid by U.S. Cellular in the form of a U.S. Cellular Visa Debit Card.
U.S. Cellular Visa Debit Card issued by MetaBank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. Allow 10–12 weeks for processing. Card does not have cash access and can be used at any merchant location that accepts Visa debit cards. Card valid for 120 days after issued. Required Data
Plan is $30 per month. Application and data network usage charges may apply when accessing applications. $20 Virtual Account: $20 virtual accounts are issued by MetaBank. Credit must be redeemed by 11/1/10. Customer must have or create a Google Checkout account in order
to redeem. Credit will be processed within four to eight hours and provided to customer via e-mail. Once redeemed, credit is valid for 120 days. Virtual account funds can be used only for online purchases with Google Checkout. BOGO: Buy one handset and get a second handset for
free. Mail-in rebate and activation required on each handset. See store for details or visit uscellular.com. Limited-time offer. Android, Android Market, Gmail and Google Maps are all trademarks of Google, Inc. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners.
Nationwide 3G Coverage not available on certain devices or in certain areas, including the greater St. Louis, Missouri, area. See store for details or visit uscellular.com. Limited-time offer. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners. ©2010 U.S. Cellular.
For more information about our Android: visit uscellular.com/android or call 1-888-BUY-USCC
• Access to over 50,000 useful and exciting apps—all readily available from Android Market
TM
• Faster browsing speed so you can navigate the Web more easily
• Full access to Gmail,
TM
Google Maps
TM
and Google Talk on your phone
Our exclusive new Samsung Acclaim
TM
gives you all the
advantages of an Android-powered phone, including:
ANDROID
TM
IS
now
AT U.S. CELLULAR.
®
Follow us on Facebook.
®
SAMSUNG ACCLAIM
get one free
when you buy one
for
$
99
95
After $70 mail-in rebates that come as Visa
®
debit cards. Requires
new 2-yr. agmts. and applicable Data Plans. $30 act. fees may apply.
USC-PRD-10-100 USC-PRD-10-099
Download and access your Android
TM
apps faster—wherever you are—
on our Nationwide 3G Network.
Eurographics 39496 Version:01 08-03-10 jv
Have a
few
apps on us.
Get $20 for cool apps from Android Market
when you buy the Samsung Acclaim.
TM
$20 virtual accounts are issued by MetaBank.
TM
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0

Constitution Day: Celebrate the Bill of Rights
by John W. Whitehead
Henry Lee despaired at the absence of protection
of “those essential rights of mankind without
which liberty cannot exist.” Although the Anti-
Federalists disliked the Constitution for a number
of reasons, they focused on its omission of a bill
of rights because that was their best argument for
enlisting public support to defeat it: “From the
start of the ratifcation controversy, the omission
of a bill of rights became an Anti-Federalist mace
with which to smash the Constitution,” writes
historian Leonard W. Levy.
Samuel Adams at frst opposed the ratifcation
of the Constitution but later changed his mind
when it was agreed that a series of amendments
would be introduced to protect fundamental
rights. Tese rights included, among others, the
freedom of speech, religion, and press, the right to
petition government for a redress of grievances,
the right to bear arms, and the right to be secure
against unreasonable searches and seizures by
government agents. Adams had feared that
without a bill of rights, the federal government
would take over the powers of the state
governments “and sink both in despotism.” As
Adams proclaimed: “I mean, my friend, to let you
know how deeply I am impressed with the sense
of the importance of amendments; that the good
people may clearly see the distinction – for there is
a distinction – between the federal powers vested
in Congress and the sovereign authority belonging
to the several states, which is the palladium of the
private and personal rights of the citizens.”
“At the time of their adoption, the Bill of Rights
represented the high point of a courageous struggle
to pass on the relatively new idea that rule of law
must forever stand as a check upon governmental
power.” – Bernard Swartz
O
n September 17, 1787, the fnal draf
of the Constitution was adopted
by members of the Constitutional
Convention. It was a momentous occasion in our
nation’s history – one that we continue to pay
tribute to today – and yet it pales in signifcance
to the adoption of the “Bill of Rights.” Without
those 462 words of the Bill of Rights, there would
be little standing between average citizens like you
and me and governmental tyranny.
Some states initially opposed the Constitution
because it didn’t include a bill of rights. And
while the Constitutional Convention had
considered including a bill of rights, the motion
to have a committee prepare such a document
was quickly and easily defeated. Roger Sherman
of Connecticut suggested that because the
Constitution did not give the federal government
the power to infringe upon fundamental rights, a
bill of rights was unnecessary. Te majority of the
delegates shared this view.
Supporters of the Constitution became known
as Federalists, and opponents of the Constitution
were labeled Anti-Federalists. Anti-Federalists
criticized the Constitution for several reasons, one
being its failure to include a bill of rights. Richard
Several of the states agreed to ratify the
Constitution on the condition that amendments
would be proposed to ensure fundamental rights.
But the existence of the Bill of Rights is due in
great part to James Madison, who actually drafed
the amendments and pushed them through
Congress.
Madison initially thought that a bill of rights
would be “unnecessary and dangerous.” Te
danger of a bill of rights, Madison and other
Federalists believed, was that by listing rights, the
drafers might accidentally omit some from the list
and thus fail to protect those rights not referenced.
In this way, a bill of rights was unnecessary,
Federalists argued, because the Constitution did
not grant the federal government the power to
deprive the people of their fundamental rights. A
bill of rights, then, would lead people to believe
that the Constitution empowered the federal
government to deprive the people of those rights
in the frst place. As Alexander Hamilton phrased
it in Te Federalist, “Why declare things should
not be done which there is no power to do?”
In the end, Madison recognized the political
necessity of allaying the fears of Anti-Federalists.
Madison also believed there was a moral
obligation imposed by those ratifying conventions
that had approved the Constitution with the
understanding that a bill of rights would be ofered
to the states.
While several of the arguments that Madison
would later use to support his change of position
(on a bill of rights) were strong, they can be traced
directly to arguments made earlier by Tomas
Jeferson. In his frst letter to Madison on the
subject of the Constitution, Jeferson began with
praise but ended with what he did not like: “First
the omission of a bill of rights.” Afer listing
rights he thought deserved special protection,
starting with the freedoms of religion and the
press, Jeferson dismissed as campaign rhetoric
justifcations for the omission of a bill of rights
and concluded: “Let me add that a bill of rights
is what the people are entitled to against every
government on earth, general or particular, and
what no just government should refuse, or rest on
inference.”
Jeferson’s personal opinion refuted Federalist
concerns about the bill of rights with clear logic.
Concerning the Federalist argument that a bill of
rights was unnecessary because the Constitution
did not grant the federal government the power to
deprive the people of fundamental rights, Jeferson
responded that “because the Constitution
protected some rights but ignored others, it raised
implications against them, making a bill of rights
‘necessary by way of supplement.’”
Many of the founders were concerned that
majorities could become oppressive and override
the decisions of so-called well-reasoning men.
As John Winthrop of Massachusetts wrote, a bill
of rights “serves to secure the minority against
the usurpations and tyranny of the majority.”
Continued On Page 17
SŽĚĞƌƐƚƌŽŵSŬŝŶlŶƐƟƚƵƚĞ͘ĐŽŵ
FREE Skin Cancer Screening FREE Skin Cancer Screening
If you can Spot It, You can Stop It!
Saturday,
Sept. 18
th
8am - 12pm
No Appointment Needed
Soderstrom SŬŝŶ lŶƐƟƚƵƚĞ
1800 E 54th Street
Davenport, Iowa
(563) 344-7546
Melanoma Can Strike Anyone
SŬŝŶ ĐĂŶĐĞƌ ŝƐ ƚŚĞ ŵŽƐƚ ĐŽŵŵŽŶ ĨŽƌŵ ŽĨ ĐĂŶĐĞƌ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ uŶŝƚĞĚ SƚĂƚĞƐ͘ MŽƌĞ ƚŚĂŶ ŽŶĞ ŵŝůůŝŽŶ ƐŬŝŶ
ĐĂŶĐĞƌƐ ĂƌĞ ĚŝĂŐŶŽƐĞĚ ĂŶŶƵĂůůLJ ʹ ϭϭ͕ϱϵϬ ŽĨ ƚŚĞƐĞ ĐĂƐĞƐ ǁŝůů ďĞ ĨĂƚĂů͘ -American Cancer Society
ϵϰ ŵĞůĂŶŽŵĂƐ ǁĞƌĞ ĨŽƵŶĚ ŽŶ MŝĚǁĞƐƚ ƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚƐ ĚƵƌŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ LJĞĂƌ ĂŶĚ Ăƚ ŽƵƌ l8LL SŬŝŶ CĂŶĐĞƌ
SĐƌĞĞŶŝŶŐƐ͘ Sŝdž ŽĨ ǁŚŝĐŚ ǁĞƌĞ ƐĞĞŶ ŝŶ CnL ĚĂLJ͘ lŽƵƌ ŝŶ CnL ŚŽƵƌ ĂŶĚ ŽŶĞ ŽŶ Ă 1LLnACL8͘
ĐƚƵĂůƉĂƟĞŶƚƐŽĨ^ŽĚĞƌƐƚƌŽŵ^ŬŝŶ/ŶƐƟƚƵƚĞ
Last O
ne
Of The Year
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m

B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0

start out with a signifcant local handicap.
Add to that any blame he gets for the
party’s national losses and he’ll be seriously
damaged goods – and his opponents will
undoubtedly use that against him.
Attorney General Lisa Madigan has long
been thought of as a potential mayoral
contender, but she seems satisfed right
where she is, at least for now. Madigan
passed on an opportunity for U.S.
Senate and governor last year, saying she
thoroughly enjoyed her job. Madigan is
the most popular politician in Illinois and
would enjoy union support that might not
coalesce behind
Emanuel, who
is not known
for being a pro-
union member
of President
Barack Obama’s
administration.
Cook County
Sherif Tom Dart,
a former state
legislator, signaled
his openness to
a run last week.
Dart is a popular,
capable politician
who enjoys a strong base of support. He’s
greatly expanded that base by protecting
homeowners facing foreclosure, crusading
against online prostitution advertising, and
being featured in a national cable series
about Cook County Jail.
Comptroller Dan Hynes was reportedly
approached by unions months ago about
preparing for a run, but many don’t expect
Hynes to jump in afer losing his second
statewide primary race. State Senator James
Meeks has talked about higher ofce for
years but has never pulled the trigger.
Tere are just too many more names to
delve into right now. Keep in mind that this
is a nonpartisan primary with a runof if no
candidate receives at least 50 percent plus
one. Te contest will be who can get into
that runof, which means that a whole host
of folks could think they might make it.
Te business community will
undoubtedly be more than a bit freaked out
about losing the stability and friendship
of Daley, so expect them to back a
candidate. Te runof calculation and the
current national mood means that even
some Republicans are musing about their
chances at making the fnal cut. Millionaire
Ron Gidwitz was just one of the names
mentioned last week. Gidwitz is chairing
Brady’s gubernatorial campaign.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol
Fax (a daily political newsletter) and
TeCapitolFaxBlog.com.
by Rich Miller
C
hicago Mayor Richard M. Daley’s
stunning decision to step down
at the end of this term has at least
temporarily sucked almost all the oxygen
out of Illinois politics and focused just
about everyone’s attention on an extremely
rare open-seat contest.
Tere hasn’t been an open seat race for
mayor since 1947, when Ed Kelly stepped
aside so the Machine could endorse
reformer Martin Kennelly. Richard J. Daley
defeated Kennelly in the 1955 primary, and
the rest is history. Tis upcoming open-seat
race is just about the rarest Illinois political
event most of us have
seen in our lifetimes.
Since this race
is unique, one of
the big worries of
state Democrats is
that groups allied
with them could
decide to husband
their resources in
anticipation of an
all-out Chicago war
next February. Te
mayor’s race will cost
a fortune, and several
aldermanic seats
look to be in contention. Most of the same
big groups who play statewide will also be
extremely interested in holding sway over
Chicago.
Some top union ofcials consulted last
week said they had no plans at all to alter
their November budgets, with one even
saying that his union would borrow money
if it needed the cash to compete in the
mayor’s race.
However, if Governor Pat Quinn can’t get
his act together and make this battle with
Republican Bill Brady a reasonably close
contest, then there might be no reason to
toss money down the drain with him. Better
to save the cash for the city contest.
White House Chief of Staf Rahm
Emanuel was perhaps the most prominently
featured potential candidate in last week’s
speculation. Te former congressman and
Clinton White House ofcial has long been
a Daley favorite.
Emanuel reportedly won’t announce a
decision until afer the November 2 election.
Tat means he and the rest of the White
House could be hugely damaged by the
national (and Illinois) election results, so
we’ll have to see how this plays out.
An Emanuel run might mean more
White House focus on his home state. Tat
could be helpful to Illinois Democrats,
particularly Quinn and U.S. Senate nominee
Alexi Giannoulias. If those two do poorly
in Chicago and the White House wasn’t
perceived as being “all in,” Emanuel will
What Daley’s Retirement
Means to November’s Election
Democrats worry that
groups allied with them
could husband their
resources in anticipation
of an all-out Chicago war
next February.
Feels likeVegas!
Tastes likeVegas...
Looks likeVegas...
Looking for real Vegas-style gaming excitement? The
loosest and biggest selection of slots? Weekly slot and poker tournaments? You’re
going to love Jumer’s Casino & Hotel, voted the “Best Casino” in the Quad Cities!
What a Deal Wednesdays! Get exciting mid-week perks like:
• Our Classic Evening Buffet (4pm-9pm) just $6.99(With IMAGE Players Club card, $9.99 without card.)
• Free Bust the Bank scratch card
– Every card is a potential winner–up to $1,000!
– Receive up to 10 additional cards based on play!
• Special $1 Bud Light draws and $2 Bud Light longnecks!
• Shrimp Cocktail only 99¢...Wednesday & every day!
• $1,000 Live-Action Blackjack Tournament at 6:30pm!
Music? We’ve got the Edje! We bring you the Quad Cities’ finest live entertain-
ment. Showtimes are 8pm-12am Fri. & Sat. Never a cover—always FREE!
September 17 uneXpected September 18 & 24 Premium Sellouts
September 25 Funk Daddies October 1 & 2 Gray Wolf Band
October 8 & 9 Dani Lynn Howe Band
It’s truly
Style at Jumer’s!
Looking for
V
eg
a
s
www.jumerscasinohotel.com
309-756-4600 • 800-477-7747 • Open 7am-5am daily
If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and
referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537).
A
LW
AYS SMOKE-FREE!
Visit Us On Facebook
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m

O’Connor’s comments, saying that taking
politics out of the judicial process is
exactly what he’s afer in his efort.
“We believe it has been politicized, and
that is why we have the retention vote,”
Vander Plaats said. “Te retention vote
is an accountability mechanism. When
court gets out of balance, the people then
have a say and can rein it in. Te process
becomes political in our opponents’ eyes
when the people rise up to exercise their
freedom of speech as protected by the
Constitution and the courts.”
Branstad, Culver
Talk Veterans Issues
Republican gubernatorial nominee
Terry Branstad has unveiled proposals
for veterans, including a state-income-
tax exemption for active-duty personnel
serving outside of Iowa, a new jobs bank
to assist veterans in their search for
employment, and better oversight of the
Iowa Veterans Trust Fund.
“Since September 11, 2001, Iowa’s
military members have been called
upon for an inordinate amount of duty
at a great cost to the soldiers and their
families,” Branstad said. “At the same
time, the Iowa General Assembly has
provided a reasonable level of veterans’
benefts. Unfortunately, a breakdown
occurs in the outreach to and the
education of Iowa veterans as to the
benefts they have earned and for which
they are eligible.”
Governor Chet Culver criticized
Branstad’s plan, saying the former
governor opposes millions in I-JOBS
spending that is going toward projects to
support Iowa veterans.
Te projects Culver said Branstad
opposes include $22.9 million for
renovations to the Iowa Veterans Home
and $5 million for Linn County Veterans
Afairs. Branstad and Republican
lieutenant-governor nominee Kim
Reynolds also oppose unemployment
benefts for trailing military spouses,
Culver said.
For an expanded version of this article,
visit RiverCitiesReader.com.
Tis weekly summary comes from
IowaPolitics.com, an online government
and politics news service. Reporter Andrew
Dufelmeyer and other correspondents
contributed to this report.
by Lynn Campbell, IowaPolitics.com
R
etired U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Sandra Day O’Connor last week
touted Iowa’s merit system of
selecting judges and warned against
injecting politics into the court system
during a speech attended by about 500
business, labor, and civic leaders at the
Hotel Fort Des Moines.
“We have to address the pressures that
are being applied to that one safe place,
the courtroom,” O’Connor said. “We
have to have a place where judges are not
subject to outright retaliation for their
judicial decisions. Tat’s the concept.
Sure they can be ousted, and that’s part
of the system, but what the framers of
our federal constitution tried to do was
establish a system of judicial selection
where the judges would not be subject to
retaliation by the other branches for their
judicial actions.”
O’Connor was in Iowa at the invitation
of the Iowa State Bar Association, which
was key in forming the group Iowans
for Fair & Impartial Courts. Te group’s
eforts come as another group – Iowa
for Freedom, led by former Republican
gubernatorial candidate Bob Vander
Plaats – is working to oust three Iowa
Supreme Court justices who were part of
the unanimous decision legalizing same-
sex marriages.
Te retired justice said she and
Supreme Court Justice David Souter
were like-minded on the topic. “We both
looked at the court in our country, in
our community, as the one safe place
where a citizen can have a fair and
impartial hearing to resolve a legal issue,”
O’Connor said. “And we have to keep that
in our country, and the place we have to
keep it is in the heartland of the country.”
Among those attending Wednesday’s
event were Iowa Chief Justice Marsha
Ternus, First Lady Mari Culver, Attorney
General Tom Miller, Agriculture
Secretary Bill Northey, and State Auditor
David Vaudt.
Panelists at the event said if Iowans
vote this November to reject three
Iowa Supreme Court justices based
on their April 2009 decision legalizing
same-sex marriages, it would begin the
deterioration of Iowa’s judicial system.
Te panelists said judicial-retention
votes such as the one this November
should be about the ftness of judges over
a broad spectrum, not about a single
decision or about raising large sums of
money.
Vander Plaats put his own spin on
O’Connor Touts Iowa’s Merit
System of Selecting Judges
Thursday, October 14th will be the Rock Island
Library’s annual after work celebration of books,
dining, drinks, music and more. Call 309-732-7302
for more information and mark your calendar now!
OCTOBER 9 •7:30PM
ADLER THEATRE – DAVENPORT
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE ADLER THEATRE BOX OFFICE,
TICKETMASTER.COM AND ALL OUTLETS
DISCOUNTS FOR SUBSCRIBERS AND GROUPS! CALL 563-326-8522
Great Seats Still Available!
PRESENTS
SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE STILL AVAILABLE FOR THE 2010-2011 SEASON!
a
series
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0

Why Jonathan Narcisse Matters in the Iowa Gubernatorial Race
Enlarging the Conversation
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
G
iven the density of Jonathan
Narcisse’s ideas and plans, he’s
smart to dispense the easy-to-grasp
metaphor or example.
“Imagine you have a kid who hasn’t
cleaned his room for six months,” Narcisse
said in a phone interview last week. “And
you can try to go in and you can try to clean
the room. Or you can get some heavy-duty
garbage bags and just go through that room
and basically throw everything away, except
the bed, the dresser, and a couple other
things.”
Te 47-year-old Narcisse, a former
member of the Des Moines school board, is
running an independent candidacy for Iowa
governor, appearing on the ballot under
Te Iowa Party banner. And he wants to
approach Iowa state government with some
heavy-duty garbage bags in hand. (Full
disclosure: River Cities’ Reader Publisher
Todd McGreevy is a co-chair of Iowans for
a Fair Debate, which is pushing for Narcisse
to be included in gubernatorial debates.)
Narcisse’s proposals are radical in the
sense that they have no respect for the
status quo. Narcisse thinks the two major-
party candidates – Governor Chet Culver
and former Governor Terry Branstad – are
like parents who think a light cleaning is good
enough. He disagrees: “We just literally wipe
out the massive bureaucracy, because at the
end of the day, we spend that money wiser.”
In total, Narcisse is proposing cutting
state and local taxes by $1.5 billion to $2
billion a year, with the caveat that equivalent
spending reductions must precede tax cuts.
For perspective, the Iowa Revenue Estimating
Conference in March put the state’s Fiscal Year
2011 general-fund receipts at $6.6 billion.
Tat type of bold plan has the potential to
connect with voters who are dissatisfed with
government and politicians.
But whether you agree with Narcisse’s
assessments or his ideas is beside the point. In
a gubernatorial campaign featuring two people
who’ve already held the ofce, Narcisse is an
essential voice because he refuses to nibble
around the edges or accept the way things
have traditionally been done. He gives voters
the opportunity to consider core questions of
governance and talk about fundamentals.
He enlarges the discussion.
Governance Over Policy
Although he considered running in the
Democratic primary against Culver, Narcisse’s
politics are fundamentally conservative – in
just about every sense. He’s a small-government
guy, he’s pro-life on abortion and against gay
marriage, and he supports the death penalty in
theory.
But there’s nuance there. Narcisse is
cognizant of the separation of powers, and
makes a distinction between governance and
policy: Te frst is the purview of the governor
– the state’s chief executive – and the latter is
the realm of the legislature.
“Where there’s an issue of governance I feel
100 percent comfortable in acting,” Narcisse
said.
So while Narcisse opposes gay marriage, he
believes that the issue should be voted on by
the public. He also supports giving voters the
opportunity to have a direct say on abortion,
term limits, and the prohibition of marijuana.
Te death penalty is instructive on Narcisse’s
perspective. While he supports it, that’s frst
a policy issue. But on an administrative
level, Narcisse said capital punishment is
problematic, because of the potential for
innocent people being executed: “I completely
support the premise of the death penalty, but
the fact of the matter is government simply
isn’t competent to have that power. ... Te death
penalty is not just simply an issue of policy; it’s
an issue of governance.”
Tese subtleties arguably broaden Narcisse’s
appeal. His natural constituency is those who
believe in the inherent value of the smallest,
most-local government possible. But he adds to
that a populist bent, arguing compellingly that
state government is bloated and inefective.
And on top of that there’s a pragmatic
side. He doesn’t advocate blowing up state
government on ideological grounds; he argues
for orderly transitions to something leaner and
more efcient.
“We don’t cut irresponsibly,” he said at one
point in our 90-minute interview. He also
claimed that cuts don’t have to result in a loss
of services: “If you change the way we do
government, we can aford it [cuts].”
And he recognizes that “the governor also
has to function within the limitations of his
constitutional mandate.”
Yet he said that as governor he could
implement efciency components of his
agenda without legislative approval. For
example, Narcisse supports zero-based
budgeting, in which departments must
present and justify an entirely new budget
each year instead of working from previous
allocations.
Furthermore, he said the governor
has tremendous power as a check on
the legislature, “like vetoing every single
nonessential expenditure.”
But the line between policy and
governance ofen gets fuzzy, and Narcisse’s
education plan in particular seems
to have a foot on both sides of it. Te
efciency elements of it are pitched as
governance issues, but because the plan
would fundamentally change the delivery
of education in the state – from a public-
school-district model to more of a free-
market system that includes public-school
districts – it would require legislation.
Changes to the tax structure would also
need action from the legislature. And some of
his proposals would require changing the Iowa
Constitution.
Narcisse’s approach to this challenge is naïve
in many ways, but it has an idealistic charm;
the candidate believes that public outrage can
force the legislature’s hand, and he said he’ll
spend much of his time as governor traveling
the state and talking to constituents. He’ll be
conducting a perpetual campaign for his ideas.
“Sometimes the recourse you have is the
power of the bully pulpit,” he said. “Te
governor has incredible power, and he’s not
just a politician; he’s an institution. ... If I get
elected, I’m not really concerned about being
able to get things through.”
He used as an example highlighting poor
graduation rates in the Des Moines public
schools. Instead of the normal gubernatorial
model of defending state government, Narcisse
suggested that he would emphasize problems
as a way to push reform.
“A governor who stands up and starts
exposing the truth is going to have an awful lot
of support behind him ... ,” he said. “If you have
a governor who stands up and releases those
kind of numbers, legislators start jumping and
diving like cockroaches with the lights on. So
there is the ability of a governor to create a
great deal.”
Narcisse has also outlined a president/
prime-minister model for his administration
– an acknowledgment that as governor he
would have a big-picture perspective and leave
the details to others. “I’m not going to pretend
I know how to run a vast, multi-billion-dollar
bureaucracy like state government,” he said.
“But I know Culver and Branstad can’t, either.
Te diference is [that] I know how to structure
it so I compensate for my defciencies.”
Of the record, Narcisse ofered three people
that he could see running state government as
his “prime minister.” He also emphasized the
need for strong administrators to lead state
departments. “Te heads of the departments
are not policy wonks,” he explained. “You don’t
put the mental-health expert in charge of DHS
[the Iowa Department of Human Services].
You put someone who can run a multi-billion-
dollar bureaucracy in charge of DHS, and then
you put the mental-health expert in charge of
the division of mental health.”
“Change the Rules
of the System”
Narcisse’s primary value in this campaign
is demonstrating that starting with common
sense exposes the problems of beginning with
the status quo.
“Part of the challenge of redefning our
education system is redefning the terms,” he
said. “If we begin with the premise that the
way the system is set up now is reasonable,
then we accept that there are classrooms in
Des Moines and Davenport and Waterloo
generating three- or four- or fve-hundred-
thousand dollars [in education funding] where
the teacher has to buy supplies and the parents
have to send markers and tissue. But if we
begin with the premise that two- or three- or
four-hundred thousand is more than enough
to educate a child, then we can be really
creative and innovative. We have to change
the rules of the system in order to get to that
innovation.”
Narcisse is most efective in conversation.
His 14-page education plan (which he
released last week and can be downloaded at
RCReader.com/y/education) is single-spaced,
all-text, and begins: “Iowa’s public and private
education system evolved as a gif to our
children. An agrarian state, the eldest son was
most ofen named heir to our land and lifelong
labor.” It is not, in other words, a concise
campaign document. His 16-page publication
from 2009, “An Iowa Worth Fighting for: A 10-
Step Vision Plan for 21st Century Governance”
(which can downloaded at RCReader.com/y/
fghting), is similarly overwhelming – chock-
full of ideas and statistics and discussion, but
not suited for quick and easy digestion.
Narcisse’s education plan can be boiled
down to a few key concepts. One is that the
education bureaucracy needs to be collapsed
– that there is too much duplication, and that
the delivery of services can be improved.
Another is that the state’s decision to chase
federal dollars – through No Child Lef Behind
Continued On Page 18
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m

I
t’s doubtful anyone
needs to be told
that launching a
new theatre company
– particularly in an area
already rife with theatre
companies – can be a
risky venture, which is
likely why Quad Cities-
based organizations
have tended to debut
with relatively low-
risk oferings. In 2008,
the Harrison Hilltop
Teatre chose to stage,
as its frst production,
David Auburn’s
intimate, four-character
drama Proof; a week
later, the Curtainbox
Teatre Company
arrived on the scene
with Tree Viewings, a trio of Jefrey Hatcher
monologues.
And what is Davenport native Nathan
Porteshawver, the founder of the Internet Players,
presenting for his new theatre company’s debut
ofering? An original drama that Porteshawver
himself wrote.
In verse.
With a cast of 17 actors.
And nine musicians.
“I have other plays that have fewer characters
in them,” says Porteshawver of the decision to
premiere his large-scale drama Te Tragedy of
Sarah Klein, running September 16 through 26 at
Davenport’s Nighswander Teatre. “And plays that
aren’t quite as ambitious as this one. But in order to
get our name out there, I wanted to really show the
capacity of the Internet Players. It’s an idea that I
have big plans for.”
A 2009 graduate of Brandeis University with
degrees in theatre arts and politics, the 24-year-old
Iowa City resident explains that his notion for the
Internet Players stemmed from his experiences
as a fedgling author. “I know that ‘overnight
success,’ as a playwright, generally means ‘20
years,’” Porteshawver says with a laugh. “But you
need to build experience. So what do you do in the
meantime? How do you get shows produced?”
His idea, as the name suggests, was to create a
company that would employ the resources of the
Internet, providing theatre artists with a Web site
(TeInternetPlayers.com) where they could submit
original works for production consideration. Afer
a particular stage piece was chosen, playwrights
and other theatrical talents – such as Tennessee
composer Tony Hartman, who wrote the original
score for Sarah Klein and serves as the play’s music
director – would then be brought in to work on
the show and, as Porteshawver says, “have the
opportunity to really get their hands dirty with a
script.
“So this company,” he continues, “is a way for
me, and people like me, to expedite the production
process. We can use the Internet as a paper-less
resource to fnd playwrights, to fnd production-
crew people, to fnd actors, to fnd musicians ... .
To fnd whoever we need, bring them to a central
location, and produce their work.”
Te Internet Players’ board of directors includes
Wally Chappell (the former director of the
University of Iowa’s Hancher Auditorium), Tara
Barney (the CEO of the Quad Cities Chamber),
and playwright Will Chalmus, and in describing
the type of material the company is seeking,
Porteshawver says, “We’re looking for thought-
provoking plays. New and original works by people
who are highly motivated, driven, and have a
huge desire to get their plays produced.” He adds
that it made sense, then, for the company’s trial
production to be one of his own works that had yet
to be staged.
“We’re just getting started,” says Porteshawver,
who also serves as Sarah Klein’s director, “and I
knew it would be hard to fnd a play out of the
blue, when we’re just getting our name out there.
So I just said, ‘Okay, it has to be one of my plays,
so let’s give this one a try.’” (Regarding the choice
to debut with a piece that he wrote and directed,
the Internet Players’ founder insists, “It really is
about getting our name out. It’s not about Nathan
Porteshawver and his play.”)
Concerning an up-and-coming CEO struggling
with professional and family obligations, Te
Tragedy of Sarah Klein is, according to its author,
“a call to step up and take on the difcult issues we
face on a daily basis. You
know, we have this urge
in us to make money
and to be successful, but
we also have this urge to
love and feel loved and
feel comfortable at home.
And when you’re busy all
the time, it’s hard to fnd
that balance. So the play,
in a nutshell, is about
that balance.”
Yet his description
doesn’t hint at Sarah
Klein’s many stylistic
fourishes. “Te play
takes place in Illyria,”
says Porteshawver,
“which is a mystical
land that playwrights
have used many times
throughout history to
show dystopia. So the play’s very dream-like, and
has music that’s adding a ‘dream feel’ to it; at times,
characters are being moved by the music, and at
other times, they’re purposely at opposition with
that music.”
Adding to the ambitious nature of the work is
the characters’ tendency to speak in a verse style
that Porteshawver calls “impossible to describe. It’s
a mix between poetry and almost a David Mamet-
esque writing – something that hits on the realism
within the poetry. You know, when you have ideas
and try to communicate them, the words don’t
always come out the way they sound in your head,
so we’re trying to be true to that.”
He laughs. “It’s a very surreal kind of thing we’re
going for.”
Helping bring this surreal world to life are set
designer Kelsey Nagel, a graduate of Oklahoma
City University, and lighting designer – and
Davenport Junior Teatre Artistic Director
– Daniel D.P. Sheridan, who says he was impressed
by Porteshawver, and his theatrical concept, from
the start.
“For me, as both a designer and a producer
of theatre of late, I’m really excited about this
opportunity for the area to stage some new work,”
says Sheridan. “Nathan has a lot of energy and a
lot of charisma that’s extremely contagious, and he
kind of propels people around him to want to be
involved.
“And one of the things that’s exciting about it,”
he continues, “is that all the people involved are
from all over the theatre community.” With Sarah
Klein’s cast members and designers including
veterans of numerous productions at Genesius
’Net Gain
The Internet Players Debut with Nathan Porteshawver’s The Tragedy of Sarah Klein, Opening September 16
Vol. 1, No. 1
September 1 - 9, 010
532 W. 3rd St.
Davenport IA 52801
RiverCitiesReader.com
(563)324-0049 (phone)
(563)323-3101 (fax)
Publishing since 1993
The River Cities’ Reader is an independent newspaper
published every other Thursday, and available free
throughout the Quad Cities and surrounding areas.
© 2010 River Cities’ Reader
DEADLINES
• To purchase a display ad,
(sales@rcreader.com): 5 p.m. Wednesday
• To purchase a classifed ad,
(classifeds@rcreader.com): 10 a.m. Monday
PUBLISHER
Todd McGreevy
EDITOR
Kathleen McCarthy
EDITORIAL
Managing Editor: Jef Ignatius • jef@rcreader.com
Arts Editor, Calendar Editor: Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Contributing Writers: Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Lynn Campbell,
Luke Hamilton, Rich Miller, Thom White
ADVERTISING
Account Executive:
Chris Walljasper • chris@rcreader.com
Advertising Coordinator: Nathan Klaus
Advertising rates, publishing schedule, demographics,
and more are available at
QCAdvertising.com
PRODUCTION
Art Director, Production Manager: Shawn Eldridge •
shawn@rcreader.com
Graphic Artist - Nathan Klaus
ADMINISTRATION
Business Manager: Kathleen McCarthy
Ofce Administrator, Classifeds Manager, Circulation Manager:
Rick Martin • rick@rcreader.com
Distribution: William Cook, Cheri DeLay, Greg FitzPatrick, Tyler
Gibson, Daniel Levsen, J.K. Martin, Jay Strickland
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 22
Don Faust, Dawson Tucker, Regan Tucker, Alexa Florence, Andrew Cole, Bill Peifer,
and Ruby Nancy in The Tragedy of Sarah Klein
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
9
a shoe-box-sized wooden crate, featuring a painted
portrait in the the top half, with the bottom half
comprising a poem and a basket carved from a
walnut. Te title refers to the work as a reliquary, an
ornate container that houses an object associated with
a saint, with the walnut basket taking the place of the
traditional artifact.
Tis work is beautiful not only in its appearance
but in the subtle tone of Midwestern practicality
meeting the ancient and magical. Te loving detail
applied to the box’s exterior
– including a heart-shaped rock
mounted as a type of handle
and Emil’s name and life span
painted in ornate, medieval-
looking lettering – and the
gold-leaf efect of the painting’s
background make this a
captivating work. Te modern,
painterly style of the portrait
and the uncle’s contemporary
pose and clothing – crouching
down with a dog while wearing
business-casual attire – contrast
with the overall antique feeling
of the container’s fnish. Tis
work speaks to the surreal
quality of our memories of
lost loved ones – seemingly
gone forever but somehow still
present.
Te found-object sculpture
Multigenerational, by Mary
Pat LaMair, stands out because
of its conceptual nature.
Reminiscent of Fluxus boxes
or the work of Jef Koons,
it features a clear plastic box like those holding
treasured objects in museums. In the box are three
glass dishes with neat ponytails of hair atop them. On
inspection, the three sets of hair are similar – reddish-
brown and straight, medium texture – but seem
progressively older when viewed lef to right. Human
hair removed from a head can carry connotations
of beauty, vanity, rites of passage, or death. When
Q
uad City Arts has hosted
a variety of themed shows
over the years – such as Te
Cat Show, Te Dog Show, Te Artist
in You– but the current Roots: Who’s
Your Momma? reveals an emotional
intellectualism in many of our local
artists. Running through October 1,
the exhibit features 49 artworks by 29
regional artists, and in a novel move, the
exhibit has been divided between two
venues: Quad City Arts in Rock Island
and the German American Heritage
Center in Davenport.
Te artists who truly tackled the
theme of Roots generated some thought-
provoking pieces that make the viewer
contemplate diferent aspects of the
concept of “home.” While several
works are too loosely connected to the
theme, poignant and well executed art
dominates. And the inclusion of artists’
statements makes the show accessible to
the casual viewer, connecting the work to the theme.
(Full disclosure: I have a piece in the show and work
occasionally at the Quad City Arts gallery.)
One great aspect of these open-call themed shows
is that they shake out a lot of fresh talent; many artists
who lack the consistent portfolio to apply for an
individual or small-group exhibit are able to produce
a viable piece for a show such as Roots.Tracy White,
for example, is better known
for his poetry but contributed
two strong works of visual art
to Roots – including a striking
abstract and simplifed lit-glass
sculpture. (Unless otherwise
noted, all the works discussed
in this article are on display at
Quad City Arts.)
Another exciting newcomer
is Corbett Fogue, whose two sets
of photographs are hopefully
harbingers. Fogue’s untitled
series of four photographs has
the same man as their subject,
staring at the viewer with folded
hands and a blank expression.
In each photo, he is wearing a
diferent, simply cut dress, and
is posed against a background
made from the same fabric.
Tis is an odd domestic
camoufage, refecting the
situation of a person who is
“diferent”: His clothing (unusual
for a man) blends in, yet his face
and hands (which are normal)
stand out. Fogue uses straightforward technique
– neutral but clear lighting, rich but not bright colors,
and a calm, centered composition. Te depth of feld
is shallow, making viewers feel as though they are a
conversational distance from the man in a cozy-sized
room. Te large format of the photographs and their
unobtrusive framing enhance the efect, making
viewers feel almost physically present with the subject.
Another standout is Mimzi Haut’s St. Emil
Reliquary. Tis mixed-media piece is contained in
Your Roots Are Showing
Roots: Who’s Your Momma?, at Quad City Arts through October 1
by Michelle Garrison
michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com
Continued On Page 20
John Paul Schaefer - Mothership
Corbett Fogue - Untitled
RC reader
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26 • ADLER THEATRE
PRESENTED BY
JAM & JAY GOLDBERG EVENTS
BUY TICKETS AT THE ADLER THEATRE BOX OFFICE
ALL TICKETMASTER OUTLETS • 800-745-3000 • ONLINE AT TICKETMASTER.COM
ON
SALE THIS
SATURDAY
AT NOON
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
10
FLIPPED
Rob Reiner’s 1986 Stand by Me told us that
we’ll never have better, more meaningful friends
than the ones we had when we were 12. His new
flm, Flipped, tells us
that we’ll never have
better, more meaningful
romances than the
ones we had when we
were 12. It’s touching,
if a little sad, that it’s
all apparently been
downhill for the director
since hitting his teen
years, but does Reiner’s
nostalgic yearning
somehow excuse his
latest for being so bland,
saccharine, and childish? Set just a few years afer
Reiner’s summer-of-’59 hit, Flipped is like Stand
by Me without profanity, dirty jokes, unforced
camaraderie, and Kiefer Sutherland. In other
words, it’s just a stone’s throw away from utterly
excruciating.
If the turnout at my opening-day matinée is
any indication – I was the only one there – there’s
probably little point in a lengthy screed on the
movie. But for a work that doesn’t aim to be
anything more than a sweet, sincere coming-of-
age saga, Flipped is a drippy, irritating bushel of
corn; you don’t feel like ignoring it so much as
knocking it down and stealing its lunch money.
Meanwhile, if you’re a viewer who refexively
groans upon hearing trite voice-over narration,
you’re to be especially warned: Flipped ofers
not one but two pubescent commentators
– middle-schoolers Juli (Madeline Carroll) and
Bryce (Callan McAulife) – whose reminiscences
continually underscore actions and feelings that
are already painfully obvious and who never shut
the hell up. (Te flm’s only laugh, and I think it’s
an unintentional one, comes when the of-screen
Bryce says, “I’ve never been one to dwell,” because
all he does is dwell.)
Designed as a pre-teen, early-’60s He Said,
She Said, the movie concerns the puppy-love
infatuation between its young leads, and it should
be said that Carroll and McAulife are earnest
and genial here, even if they don’t exude much
personality. (It’s something of a shame when
the duo takes over from Morgan Lily and Ryan
Ketzner, who play Juli and Bryce at age eight, and
are far more natural and entertaining in the roles.)
Yet almost nothing about Flipped feels remotely
believable. Te period details look right, and one
could hardly fault the era-appropriate soundtrack,
but the flm is populated less with characters than
cartoonish archetypes; Aidan Quinn and Penelope
Ann Miller, as Juli’s salt-of-the-earth parents,
are as phony in their lower-middle-class squalor
as Anthony Edwards and Rebecca De Mornay,
as Bryce’s folks, are in their upper-middle-class
haughtiness. (Edwards’ loutish, patronizing bully is
the least convincing, most charmless portrayal of
his career.) And Reiner’s and Andrew Scheinman’s
script – based on Wendelin Van Draanen’s novel
– is so achingly coy and insuferably sentimental
that there’s no chance for honest emotion to sneak
out. Listening to such banalities as “Somehow the
silence seemed to connect
us in the way words never
could,” I spent much of my
time trying to determine
which of Flipped’s dreary,
awkward sequences
was its second-worst.
(Te no-contest-worst
involves Quinn’s mentally
challenged brother played
by Kevin Weisman, whose
hideously mannered turn
makes you want to hide
your face in embarrassment.)
What happened to Rob Reiner? To be sure,
he’s never displayed a terribly strong directorial
presence, but for a time – during an ’80s/’90s run
that included, without interruption, Tis Is Spinal
Tap, Te Sure Ting, Stand by Me, Te Princess
Bride, When Harry Met Sally ... , Misery, and A
Few Good Men – he was as reliable a helmer of
solid, audience-pleasing Hollywood fare as you
could ask for. Over the past decade-plus, though,
Reiner has morphed into a director whose works
are to be steadfastly avoided, and perhaps none
more so than his latest, which has the added
detriment of continually reminding you of one
of the man’s fnest achievements while emerging
as one of his worst. It’s not the flm’s characters
who’ve fipped; it’s Reiner, and given his slow
descent into complete irrelevance, the purportedly
“feel-good” Flipped makes some of us feel very
bad indeed.
16 TO LIFE
Another coming-of-age tale, and a superior
one, opened this past weekend with the local
premiere of Iowa native Becky Smith’s 16 to
Life. Detailing a day spent with 16-year old Kate
(Hallee Hirsch) – who celebrates her birthday
with a double-shif at a Marquette, Iowa, fast-food
stand – writer/director Smith’s low-budget indie
comedy is a little aimless and a lot formulaic;
as with Flipped, the people on-screen are less
characters than types. Yet here, they’re funny,
engaging types, and while the flm’s Long Day’s
Journey Into Curfew trajectory is rather obvious,
the movie boasts a lovely, end-of-summer
relaxedness and sharp wit that makes it tough to
resist. Plus, Teresa Russell shows up as Kate’s
boss, and is more human and efortlessly likable
than she’s been in more than three decades on-
screen. 16 to Life may be small-scale, but her
sensational work with Russell – and at least half
a dozen relative novices to flm – indicates that
Smith might just be capable of miracles.
For reviews of Resident Evil: Aferlife and other
current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com.
LISTEN TO MIkE EVERY FRIDAY AT 9AM ON ROCk 10-9 FM WITh DAVE & DARREN
The Blunder Years
Movi e Revi ews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Movi e Revi ews
Madeline Carroll and Callan McAulife in
Flipped

B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
11
works in multiple personality traits – mixing
compassion with authority and anger with
patience – and as expected, Czekalski sings
beautifully throughout, hampered only by
some awkward melodies.
Overall, however, the songs are encumbered
by their
lyrics. Stoller’s
phrasing is
wordy, generally
lacking in
musicality and
poetic fow,
and while the
lyrics serve
their purpose
in advancing
the storyline,
they don’t lend
themselves
easily to melody.
Understanding
that a musical’s
success is ofentimes dependent on how
memorable its songs are, I made the efort to
try to remember some of the show’s choruses.
But even while walking to my car afer the
fnal bows, I couldn’t recall a single one, and
unfortunately, I think that was due to their
lyrics being so forgettable.
I did, however, remember the impressions
some numbers were meant to leave us with,
thanks mainly to those performing them.
Jonathan Schrader is a crowd-pleasingly
smarmy televangelist named Phaz, Aaron Doyle
is engaging as the awkward and meek Bildad,
and Brian Nelson seems to relish his role as
the tree-hugging, blogging, New Age follower
Zophar; add Workman to the mix, and the four
men perform the work’s tightest harmonies
in delightful barbershop-quartet mode.
(Unfortunately, strong harmonies were lacking
in the chorus of women made up of Linell
Ferguson, Kris Preston, Sara Laufer, and Megan
Elliott, who would’ve likely benefted from more
rehearsal time to fnd their notes together.)
It’s worth noting that the Hard to Believe
program doesn’t list a choreographer, and it shows
in the performance; the dancing within numbers
is typically one move – a basic waltz, for instance
– repeated over and over. More interesting
choreography would have helped this production,
although Morrow, at least, does incorporate some
clever elements in his direction, particularly
during the characters’ interactions while setting
God’s throne in place. And while Playcrafers’
latest just wasn’t to my liking, there are many who
will like it, and those who are usually sitting in a
pew on Sunday morning will no doubt appreciate
this local efort.
For tickets and information, call (309)764-0330
or visit Playcrafers.com.
Tom White covers entertainment news for
WQAD Quad Cities News 8.
I
have little doubt that many patrons of
the Playcrafers Barn Teatre will enjoy
its current production of Hard to Believe,
as there’s consistently an audience appetite
for shows on themes of faith and God. Te
opening-night premiere of this locally written
musical, however,
reminded me too
much of church
performances of
which I’ve seen
or been a part.
I’m not sure
Hard to Believe
will fnd a place
in community
theatres alongside
other musicals,
but it could very
well fnd its place
within many a
church’s walls.
With a book
and lyrics by Timothy Stoller and music by
Jonathan Turner, Hard to Believe – directed
here by Tom Morrow – is the musical account
of the Biblical story of Job (Reader employee
Chris Walljasper). In it, Satan (Paul Workman)
bets God (Wendy Czekalski) that Job will turn
away from his faith if all of his blessings are
taken from him; Job is subsequently stripped
of his family, farm, and fnances early on in the
play, and spends the rest of the show lamenting
his losses and praising, or denying, God.
Walljasper ofers a performance that’s much
more nuanced than those I’ve typically seen
from him. He manages to maintain an air
of sincere faith (with undertones of sorrow)
in the frst act, which changes into a bitter,
almost resentful attitude (with undertones of
dwindling trust in God) in the second. And
when he’s not forcing the notes, his voice has a
pleasingly rich timbre to it. Katherine Zerull,
meanwhile, is well-paired with Walljasper in
her role as Job’s wife, Sitis, and matches the
earnestness of his depiction.
Workman gives the most delightfully
dynamic performance of the cast, creating a
Satan that’s the most likable, even the most
relatable, character on stage. His Satan isn’t
pure evil, which would be the easier portrayal
route to take; instead, he’s condescending,
with a dismissive attitude toward humans and
a respectful decorum in his role as heavenly
interloper. Workman also works his way
through Satan’s songs with gusto, seeming to
enjoy every dripping-with-cunning moment.
Czekalski has the task of lending shading
to a depiction of the Almighty. It’s somewhat
expected to fnd God played with lofy wisdom
and without much emotion, à la the voice in
Te Ten Commandments, and that seems to
be Czekalski’s approach through much of the
musical, with the performer adding a slight
sense of loving admiration for Job. It isn’t until
Hard to Believe’s fnal scene, though, that she
Bible Versus
Hard to Believe, at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre through September 19
By Thom White
Megan Elliot, Linell Ferguson, Wendy Czekalski,
Sara Laufer, and Kris Preston
888-9-PAY-FINE PayTheFineIowa.gov
NOW’S THE TIME
TO PAY THE FINE.
Program expires November 30, 2010.
More than four years late paying
an Iowa fne or court fee? You could
pay only half of what you owe.
Applicants
now being
accepted for
Voss Brothers
Lofts
Located at: 219 21st St.
Rock Island, IL
A community for
individuals & families.
Call 309-788-7940
To request an
application.
Certain Income
Restrictions Apply
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
1
or overplay the sentiment. Instead,
she stages Cline’s songs simply, while
directing Walljasper to add amusing bits
here and there, and creates a perfect ft
– an evening that’s smile-inducing and
gently pleasing.
Nieman’s handling of the fnal scene,
however, sent goosebumps up my arms
and chills down my spine. I hesitate to
provide specifcs, so as not to take the
edge of its emotional power. But at the
mention of Cline’s death, the revue’s
writers chose an apt reprise, with an
even more apt verse starting it of, and
Nieman’s presentation adds an ethereal
element to the moment that – when
accompanied by Beck’s voice – is deeply
moving.
It is designer Susan D. Holgersson’s
giant jukebox of a set piece, however,
that carries the most drama, with its
projected images – of the jukebox’s track
selection, of stained-glass windows, of
theatre marquees – creating a stunning
backdrop for Circa ’21’s ofering. And
lighting designer Ron Breedlove’s efects
make Holgersson’s creation all the more
efective, with their changing colors and
patterns creating dynamic visuals.
A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline is really
just a genteel celebration of the songstress
and her music. Yet with its classy air,
Circa ’21’s presentation seems to truly
honor Cline through its respectful
rendering of her hits, and Beck’s exquisite
singing of them.
For tickets and information, call (309)786-
7733, extension 2, or visit Circa21.com.
Tom White covers entertainment news for
WQAD Quad Cities News 8.
I
can’t imagine
anyone
who likes
the music of
Patsy Cline not
liking the Circa
’21 Dinner
Playhouse’s
current ofering,
A Closer Walk
with Patsy Cline.
Personally, I
don’t much care
for the mid-
20th-Century
country style of
Cline’s songs.
However, I
very much
appreciated
September
3’s opening-
night performance for its staging and
its remarkable singing, and therefore,
enjoyed music I’d otherwise ignore were I
to hear it on the radio.
A Closer Walk is barely a scripted
show, playing much more as a Patsy
Cline concert, with a radio DJ, Grand Ole
Opry comic, and Las Vegas comedian (all
played by Tom Walljasper) interjecting
tidbits about the popular artist in between
every third song or so. (When Cline’s
numbers are sung during the radio
show within this musical, the band also
performs the station’s call-letters jingle
and a couple of classic commercials, and
does so with beautiful harmonies.) On
the whole, though, there’s not a lot of
storytelling, with the piece progressing
from one Patsy Cline hit to the next,
moving along at a minimally interrupted
pace. We do not watch Cline’s life unfold
on stage; instead, we simply sit back and
enjoy her life’s work.
Tis being the case, almost the entire
weight of the revue falls on the shoulders
of the actress portraying Cline: Heather
Beck. I’m not familiar enough with the
real Cline’s mannerisms and vocal tone
and quality to say, with any authority,
whether Beck seems to channel the singer
in her own performance. But I can say,
with complete conviction, that Beck’s
singing is stunning. She has a rich, pitch-
perfect sound that could easily be sultry
enough to melt any man’s heart. Beck
doesn’t allow any sultriness to sneak into
her depiction of Patsy Cline, however, and
sings the part sweetly and unassumingly,
with no pretense whatsoever.
Tat the piece itself also lacks pretense
is due to director Ann Nieman’s handling
of it. She hasn’t attempted to add drama
Gotta Lot of Rhythm in her Soul
A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline, at the Circa ‘21 Dinner Playhouse
through November 6
By Thom White
Tristan Tapscott, Danny White, Heather Beck, Justin Droegemueller,
and Dave Maxwell
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
1
101 West River Drive
Davenport, IA 52801
563-328-8000
www.rhythmcitycasino.com
© 2010 Isle of Capri Casinos, Inc.
Must be 21. Gambling a problem? There
is help. And hope. Call 1-800-BETS-OFF.
Valid now through 9/30/10
Must be 21 or older to enter the casino. Management
reserves the right to cancel or change the promotion
at any time without prior notifcation. Limit one per
person per promotion. Not valid with any other offer.
Gambling a problem? There is help. And hope.
Call 1-800-BETS-OFF.
EÆMM BO EOIM3G,
OE3 BIO EMEE
MOMMG EIÆN
572 RC 9/16
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
1
What’s happenin’
Music
Synergy Brass Quintet
Galvin Fine Arts Center, St. Ambrose
University
Saturday, September 25, 7:30 p.m.
“M
ike, I need you to cut part of
your piece on the upcoming
concert with the Synergy Brass Quartet.”
“What are you talking about, Jef? I
fnally wrote a What’s Happenin’ article
that’s fewer than 200 words!”
“It needs to be shorter.”
“But I kept it direct and to-the-
point, like you’re always telling me
to! I mention that the acclaimed
musicians are based in Boston, and
that their unique stylings fnd them
covering every musical genre from
classical to ska, and that they perform
upwards of 300 concerts per year, with
recent appearances including sets at
the Ravinia Music Festival in Illinois,
the Tanglewood Music Festival in
Massachusetts, and the Bethlehem
Musikfest in Pennsylvania!”
“Yes.”
“I mention that the Synergy Brass
Quintet is ofen heard on National
Public Radio and performed with the
Mormon Tabernacle Choir on NBC, and
that the group has enjoyed residencies at
the Boston Conservatory, Northwestern
University, and the University of
California at Los Angeles, and that New
York’s Watertown Daily Times raved
about the ensemble’s ‘blazing precision
and amazing technique’!”
“Right.”
“I mention that local audiences can
hear the quintet’s extraordinary blend
of trumpets, French horn, trombone,
and tuba at St. Ambrose University’s
Galvin Fine Arts Center on September
25, that tickets are only $6 to $11, and
that reservations can be made by calling
(563)333-6251 or visiting http://Web.
SAU.edu/galvin!”
“Indeed.”
“So what could you possibly want me
to cut?”
“Te opening line.”
“You don’t like ‘So who’s feeling
horn-y?’!? Inappropriate for an event St.
Ambrose?”
“Inappropriate for anything, Mike.”
Music
The Taj Mahal Trio
Riverside Casino & Golf Resort
Friday, September 24, 7:30 p.m.
A
ccording to this press
release I received on
Hancher Auditorium’s
2010-11 Performing Arts
Series, the University of
Iowa venue is currently
inviting audiences to view
the Taj Mahal for as little
as $10. Seriously, I don’t
know how this series
makes a proft, given that plane tickets
to India have to cost at least ... !
Oh, wait. By “the Taj Mahal,”
it appears they’re referring to the
legendary blues and roots musician
who’ll be playing the Riverside Casino
& Golf Resort on September 24. Yeah,
that makes a lot more sense.
Ten dollars, though, still seems like
an incredible bargain for a night spent
enjoying Taj Mahal and his gifed
backup musicians, who together form
the Taj Mahal Trio. With a career
spanning nearly 50 years, Mahal
– born Henry St. Claire Fredericks
– has long been at the forefront of
the American blues scene, his talents
on guitar, banjo, harmonica, and
piano internationally-recognized, and
his vibrant, soulful work rewarded
with two Grammy Awards for Best
Contemporary Blues Album.
And joined by bandmates Bill Rich
(on bass) and Kester
Smith (on drums),
the Taj Mahal Trio
has been acclaimed
literally worldwide,
with its members
recently demonstrating
their exhilarating
musicianship on tours in
North America, Europe,
Latin America, the Caribbean, and
West Africa. Don’t, however, expect
any sort of downbeat experience in an
evening of Taj Mahal’s blues. As the
artist is quoted as saying, “You can
listen to my music from front to back,
and you don’t ever hear me moaning
and crying about how bad you done
treated me.” Man, he would so not ft in
on the Reader staf.
For more information on, and
tickets to, the Taj Mahal Trio’s
Riverside Casino concert, call the
Hancher box ofce at (319)335-1160,
or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.
edu.
Literature
Simon J. Ortiz
Centennial Hall,
Augustana College
Thursday, September 23, 7 p.m.
(Te following haiku were written in
tribute to the famed writer who opens
the 2010-11 season of River Readings at
Augustana.)
Simon J. Ortiz,
Te Native American
Author of fction
(Also poetry,
and children’s literature,
and nonfction, too),
Will take the stage in
Augustana College’s
Centennial Hall.
At seven-thirty
On September twenty-third,
He’ll read from his works,
Inaugurating
Te school year’s River Readings
Series with a bang.
Sharing stories of
His people’s struggles, conficts,
And community,
Te acclaimed Ortiz
Will orate passages from
Titles including
Men on the Moon and
Woven Stone and From Sand Creek,
And help demonstrate
Why he received the
Arts Discovery Award
From the NEA.
Te reading is free,
As is the art-museum
Reception afer,
And there’s another
Perk to Ortiz’s visit
I haven’t mentioned:
I guarantee that
He won’t deliver any
Insipid haiku.
Theatre
Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of
Florence Foster Jenkins
Village Theatre
Friday, September 17, through Sunday,
September 26
T
he frst play in New Ground Teatre’s
2010-11 season is the two-character
piece Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of
Florence Foster Jenkins, and I’ll admit that
before hearing the title, I had no earthly
idea who Florence Foster Jenkins was. It
turns out, though, that she was a wealthy
American socialite from
the 1930s who once
performed a sold-out
engagement at Carnegie
Hall, and thanks to the
miracle of YouTube, I’ve
been lucky enough to hear
recordings of her voice.
With apologies to those of you reading
this in print, click here for a sampling of
the legendary Florence Foster Jenkins
sound. I guarantee it’ll make you cry. With
laughter.
Tat’s right, years before William
Hung made ears bleed on American Idol,
Jenkins was the inspiration for every
wannabe vocalist who wasn’t thwarted
by an utter lack of talent. And with
playwright Stephen Temperley’s Tony
Award-nominated Souvenir – which tells
of Jenkins’ relationship with her longtime
accompanist – audiences are shown just
what made this tone-deaf chanteuse such
a national sensation, in a touching comedy
(with music) that, according to CurtainUp.
com, “ofers a humorous and insightful
look at the woman and her unusual career.”
Performed by area favorites Susan
Perrin-Sallak and Bryan Tank, and directed
by Lora Adams, Souvenir is sure to be
both moving and, in the best possible way,
cringe-inducing, at least if Perrin-Sallak’s
approximation of her character’s “style”
is at all close to the genuine article. Just
’cause I can’t resist, here’s another Jenkins
sampling that lef me weeping.
And again, I’m sorry if you’re landing
on this What’s Happenin’ piece in print
instead of online. I’ll try to make it up to
you in the next issue by making one of
these things a scratch-’n’-snif.
Souvenir runs September 17 through
26 – with tickets available for $15
for adults and $12 for students and
seniors – and reservations can be made
by calling (563)326-7529 or visiting
NewGroundTeatre.org.
Well, Hello...
TodayÕs the Day.
When are you going to
free yourself from pain
and take that next step
toward health?
Chiropractic. Nutrition. Wellness.
563.323.0151
www.starkchiro.com
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
1
What’s happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 22
What Else
Is happenin’
MUSIC
Friday, September 17 – Nappy Roots.
Alternative Southern rappers in concert, with
openers Mac Lethal and DJ Carlo Rossi. Rock
Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue,
Rock Island). 9 p.m. $15. For information, call
(309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com.
Saturday, September 18 – Sammy Kershaw.
Chart-topping country musician in concert.
Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777
Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $15-30. For
tickets and information, call (800)843-4753 or
visit Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Saturday, September 18 – Iowa Women’s
Music Festival. 17th-annual celebration of
female musicians, with headliners The Refugees,
and performers including Ruth King, Mary
McAdams, and the Chris Pureka Band. Upper City
Park (Dubuque Road and Park Street, Iowa City).
Noon-6 p.m. Free admission. For information, call
(319)335-1486 or visit PrairieVoices.net.
Sunday, September 19 – The Petra Van Nuis
Quartet. Jazz ensemble performs and educates
as part of Polyrhythms’ Third Sunday Jazz Matinée
& Workshop Series. The Redstone Room (129
Main Street, Davenport). 3 p.m. all-ages workshop
– $5/adult, children free; 6 p.m. concert – $10-15.
For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or
visit Polyrhythms.org or RedstoneRoom.com.
Tuesday, September 21 – Gaelic Storm.
Chart-topping Celtic rockers in concert. The
Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport).
8 p.m. $25-30. For tickets and information, call
(563)326-1333 or visit RedstoneRoom.com.
Tuesday, September 21 – The Texas Tenors.
Acclaimed country musicians in concert. Quad-
Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777
Music
Synergy Brass Quintet
Galvin Fine Arts Center, St. Ambrose
University
Saturday, September 25, 7:30 p.m.
“M
ike, I need you to cut part of
your piece on the upcoming
concert with the Synergy Brass Quartet.”
“What are you talking about, Jef? I
fnally wrote a What’s Happenin’ article
that’s fewer than 200 words!”
“It needs to be shorter.”
“But I kept it direct and to-the-
point, like you’re always telling me
to! I mention that the acclaimed
musicians are based in Boston, and
that their unique stylings fnd them
covering every musical genre from
classical to ska, and that they perform
upwards of 300 concerts per year, with
recent appearances including sets at
the Ravinia Music Festival in Illinois,
the Tanglewood Music Festival in
Massachusetts, and the Bethlehem
Musikfest in Pennsylvania!”
“Yes.”
“I mention that the Synergy Brass
Quintet is ofen heard on National
Public Radio and performed with the
Mormon Tabernacle Choir on NBC, and
that the group has enjoyed residencies at
the Boston Conservatory, Northwestern
University, and the University of
California at Los Angeles, and that New
York’s Watertown Daily Times raved
about the ensemble’s ‘blazing precision
and amazing technique’!”
“Right.”
“I mention that local audiences can
hear the quintet’s extraordinary blend
of trumpets, French horn, trombone,
and tuba at St. Ambrose University’s
Galvin Fine Arts Center on September
25, that tickets are only $6 to $11, and
that reservations can be made by calling
(563)333-6251 or visiting http://Web.
SAU.edu/galvin!”
“Indeed.”
“So what could you possibly want me
to cut?”
“Te opening line.”
“You don’t like ‘So who’s feeling
horn-y?’!? Inappropriate for an event St.
Ambrose?”
“Inappropriate for anything, Mike.”
Music
The Emmitt-Nershi Band
Rock Island Brewing Company
Wednesday, September 22, 8 p.m.
I
t was in the fall of 2007 that musicians
Drew Emmitt and Bill Nershi
originally teamed up to form the much-
admired touring outft Te Emmitt-
Nershi Band. Considering that the
gentlemen are, respectively, also members
of the popular jam bands Lefover Salmon
and Te String Cheese Incident, trust me,
the group’s name could’ve easily been a far
less appetizing hybrid.
Yet for bluegrass fans, the duo’s tunes
would no doubt be tasty no matter the
band moniker, as audiences will discover
when Te Emmitt-Nershi Band plays
the Rock Island Brewing Company on
September 22. Joined by guitarist Tyler
Grant and banjo player Andy Torn,
Emmitt (the lead singer who plays
mandolin, fddle, and acoustic and
electric guitar) and Nershi (the lap-steel
guitarist also expert at the bass and
dobro) will rock the Rock Island venue
with their modern, passionate take on the
traditional bluegrass sound, performing
genre classics and originals from their
2009 CD, New Country Blues.
Featuring compositions that include
the dynamic songs “I Come from the
Country” and “Tese Days” and the
blazing instrumentals “Mango Tango” and
“Surfng the Red Sea,” New Country Blues
was a smash with both fans and critics,
with StereoSubversion.com praising Te
Emmitt-Nershi Band’s “amazing picking
and soulful harmonies.” And writing for
JamBands.com, Brian Robbins stated that
the group’s “wicked picking and good
vibes” made it sound “like you’re sitting
in the middle of the living-room foor
scratching the dog’s ears with the band in
a circle around you,” an experience that
will likely be replicated during the gents’
RIBCO engagement. If, that is, the venue
is okay with you sitting in the middle of
the stage. And, you know, if they allow
pets.
Te Emmitt-Nershi Band performs
with opener Chicago Farmer, tickets
are $13 in advance and $16 at the door,
and more information on the concert is
available by visiting RIBCO.com.
Literature
Simon J. Ortiz
Centennial Hall,
Augustana College
Thursday, September 23, 7 p.m.
(Te following haiku were written in
tribute to the famed writer who opens
the 2010-11 season of River Readings at
Augustana.)
Simon J. Ortiz,
Te Native American
Author of fction
(Also poetry,
and children’s literature,
and nonfction, too),
Will take the stage in
Augustana College’s
Centennial Hall.
At seven-thirty
On September twenty-third,
He’ll read from his works,
Inaugurating
Te school year’s River Readings
Series with a bang.
Sharing stories of
His people’s struggles, conficts,
And community,
Te acclaimed Ortiz
Will orate passages from
Titles including
Men on the Moon and
Woven Stone and From Sand Creek,
And help demonstrate
Why he received the
Arts Discovery Award
From the NEA.
Te reading is free,
As is the art-museum
Reception afer,
And there’s another
Perk to Ortiz’s visit
I haven’t mentioned:
I guarantee that
He won’t deliver any
Insipid haiku.
Examples of Ortiz’s writings and readings can be found at
RCReader.com/y/ortiz, and more information the River
Readings at Augustana series is available by contacting the
college’s Margaret Rogal at (309)794-7823.
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
1
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
1
convention proposals, especially Virginia’s. All
power, he argued, was subject to abuse and should
be guarded against by constitutionally securing
“the great rights of mankind.”
Madison argued that the government had only
limited powers but that it might, unless prohibited,
abuse its discretion. Te great objective he had in
mind, Madison declared, was to limit the powers
of government, thus preventing legislative as
well as executive abuse and, above all, preventing
abuses of power by “the body of the people,
operating by the majority against the minority.”
Madison also used Jeferson’s argument that the
Bill of Rights would encourage courts to “check”
the other branches of the federal government.
Madison’s political courage and determination
cannot be overstated. He was insistent, compelling,
unyielding, and ultimately triumphant. By the end
of the summer, Congress proposed to the states
the amendments that eventually became the Bill
of Rights.
Constitutional attorney and author John W.
Whitehead is founder and president of Te
Rutherford Institute (Rutherford.org). His book Te
Change Manifesto is available in bookstores and
online.
Continued From Page 3
With regard to such concerns about overbearing
majorities, Jeferson believed that an independent
court could withstand oppressive majority
impulses by holding unconstitutional any acts
violating a bill of rights. Jeferson was anticipating
the role of the courts in curbing the power of the
government, even if it feigned to speak for the
people. Jeferson added “that a bill of rights ‘will
be the text whereby to try all the acts of the federal
government.’”
With regard to the position that compiling a
list of rights runs the danger of omitting some
rights, Jeferson replied with the adage that half
a loaf is better than none. Even if all rights could
not be secured, “let us secure what we can.” Others
believed that a bill of rights was a good education
tool in that it taught “truths” upon which freedom
depends.
Incredibly, when Madison introduced his
proposals for the Bill of Rights in the First
Congress, the Federalists thought the House had
more important matters with which to deal. And
the Anti-Federalists feared that the adoption of
such amendments would efectively ruin their
quest to oppose the Constitution. But Madison
persevered and on June 8, 1789, made a long,
memorable speech before an apathetic House of
Representatives, introducing amendments culled
mainly from state constitutions and state ratifying-
by John W. Whitehead
Constitution Day:
Celebrate the Bill of Rights
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
1
Narcisse called the “education confederation.”
She would be required to fle a core academic
plan, as well as a plan to show how she planned
to meet her academy’s “unique academic
mission” – for instance, language or science.
Each academy would be held accountable for
results and expenditures, Narcisse emphasized:
“Tere is a mechanism in there that is
dedicated to ensuring accountability. ... You
have to demonstrate that kids are learning.”
Tis would not necessarily be a dismantling
of the public-school system, Narcisse said.
Rather, it would foster competition and
innovation without sacrifcing accountability,
he claims. “Districts would have certain
advantages,” he said. “For example, they’d still
be able to get ... physical-plant- and equipment-
levy money, they would have certain traditions,
they have buildings, they have infrastructure. If
school districts were to innovate – if they were
to streamline their bureaucracies, if they were
to invest in quality education – they should be
able to compete.”
He also said the 1-percent sales tax now
dedicated to school infrastructure should be
changed so districts can spend it however they
choose.
While parents could vote with their feet
under Narcisse’s plan, the candidate also said
that schools will have the opportunity to get rid
of students who don’t meet basic expectations
in areas such as attendance. “Parents have to do
their job,” he said. “If parents do their job, kids
will learn. If parents don’t do their job, then it
makes it a lot tougher for the rest of us.”
“Deal with It”
Narcisse has also sketched out proposals on
tax cuts, and they’re worth exploring because
of how he envisions them working.
He wants to phase out the corporate income
tax and eliminate business tax credits, shif the
property tax to 1 or 1.5 percent of the last sale
price, reduce the sales tax to 3 percent (from
the current 6 percent) afer four years, and
make several changes to the personal income
tax: reduce the top rate to 6 percent (from
the present top rate of nearly 9 percent) and
eliminate taxation beyond 40 hours of work
in a week. (He also supports maintaining the
deductibility of federal income taxes.)
But Narcisse doesn’t just want to cut taxes;
he wants to encourage investment in Iowa in
the process.
So a company could reduce its income tax
to nothing through a rebate system; for every
dollar a company puts into its Iowa operation
or spends with an Iowa vendor, its income-tax
liability is reduced by a dollar.
“We have to jump-start the free-market
engine in Iowa,” Narcisse said.
Tying property taxes to purchase price,
he said, would encourage investment in that
property, with the aim of “really allow[ing] the
restoration of wealth and power to working
Iowans.”
On personal income taxes, Narcisse said,
Continued From Page 7
and Race to the Top – has hurt education in
Iowa.
Narcisse supports opting out of No Child
Lef Behind and leaving behind the money
associated with it. “It’s a negligible fnancial
consequence,” he argued. More importantly,
“the money we’re taking from the feds in
exchange for complying with No Child Lef
Behind is destroying education in our state,”
he said, because the program emphasizes
standardized tests over engaging students and
teachers individually.
But the centerpiece of Narcisse’s education
plan is allowing for greater competition among
publicly funded educational institutions.
“I support allowing parents to decide where
the money goes,” Narcisse explained. “And
then where the child goes to school, the money
follows. Tat means that we can efectively have
the school board and traditional education
bureaucracy taken out of the equation. I
absolutely support education being very close
to the community, but we take it one step
further, where the power exists primarily in the
hands of parents and in the hands of teachers,
and then all other systems are subordinate
to those two components of the education
system.”
Tis would be done by allowing
Independent Academic Academies. Narcisse
uses the hypothetical example of Mrs. Smith,
a teacher in the Davenport school district with
20 years’ experience, a class of 25 students,
and a current salary of between $40,000 and
$60,000. Her students might generate state
and local education funding of $10,000 apiece,
Narcisse said.
“And the rest of the money is dissipated
throughout the education system,” he said.
“What we’re proposing is that Mrs. Smith would
be able to say, ‘You know what? I think I can
do it better than the Davenport school district.’
And now Mrs. Smith can compete directly for
those dollars. Now we can’t say Mrs. Smith isn’t
qualifed to educate kids, because she’s been
doing it. So Mrs. Smith, who was hired by the
superintendent, now gets to compete against
the superintendent, the school board, the
school district directly for those dollars.
“Now what would happen if she were able to
get all $250,000? Maybe she would pay herself
$100,000, or $90,000, maybe she would hire a
second adult [teacher] at $50,000, or $70,000.
And [she would] still have signifcant resources
lef over to purchase technology, rent quality
space, buy supplies, not have to buy them
out of her own pocket. Would that system be
better than the existing system? Remember:
We start out with the very same person that
the superintendent has said, ‘Tis is the most
qualifed person to teach your kids.’ Te only
diference is: She now has half the kids, makes
twice the money, and has signifcant resources
to be able to invest in things like technology
and supplies for kids.”
Mrs. Smith’s Independent Academic
Academy would be monitored by what
Enlarging the Conversation
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
“we’d like to get to 100-percent rebates within
the next decade, and then shortly thereafer see
the individual income tax eliminated in Iowa.”
Initially, however, Narcisse said he’d like to
ofer a 5-percent rebate for contributions to
not-for-profts, meaning that tax liability up to
5 percent would be reduced dollar-for-dollar
by donations.
Another 15-percent rebate would be
available for investments in Iowa businesses.
“You make every working Iowan a free-market
investor,” he said. Taxpayers can either give that
money to state government through taxes, or
they can invest it, making it essentially “zero
risk for investing,” Narcisse said.
In creating these incentives for investment,
of course, Narcisse’s proposals would reduce
the amount of money going to state and local
governments – to the tune of $1.5 billion to $2
billion annually by his estimate.
And Narcisse’s plan would reverse the
process of property taxation, whose rates are
typically based on budgets approved by taxing
authorities and on assessed valuation. Using
a fxed property-tax rate statewide would
necessitate changing the way that money is
distributed.
Narcisse wants to take it further, saying that
the patchwork of state and local government
needs to be streamlined. “Local government
as we know it, state government as we know
it has to be restructured,” Narcisse said. He
said he’s in favor of eliminating many taxing
authorities that currently rely on the property
tax and integrating their functions elsewhere.
He also said that state resources alone might be
adequate to fund education.
At the local level, Narcisse said, property-
tax-dependent bodies will simply need to “deal
with it.”
At the state level, he said, “before we cut
taxes, we cut spending.”
Narcisse said he’s identifed where he would
cut, and began talking about administration of
the state’s regents institutions: the University
of Iowa, the University of Northern Iowa,
and Iowa State University. His education plan
states: “Te Regents Universities would retain
their unique identities and classic missions but
they would be merged administratively and
headed by a Chancellor of Regents who would
replace the multiple presidents at our state
universities and community colleges.”
Tat gives some sense of the threat the
Narcisse represents to people and organizations
with a vested interest in the status quo of
government.
“I’ve Already Won”
Tat’s also one reason that Narcisse
believes that it’s “in my best interest to be
underestimated rather than to be taken
seriously at an earlier stage.” His ideas might
be popular with angry and distrustful voters,
but if he were seen as even a remotely plausible
candidate by the political establishment, he’d be
attacked from all sides.
Beyond his positions, his personal history
would also be fair game. Narcisse has admitted
having problems with sex and food in the past.
“I will struggle with my personal challenges,”
he said. “Tat’s not going to afect my
governance. ... And if people want to use my
past or my past sins against me, then don’t vote
for me.”
His term on the Des Moines school board
was also contentious by all accounts – which is
hardly a surprise given that he likes to slaughter
sacred cows, but it could still be used against
him by opponents.
So Narcisse’s low-profle campaign has been
to a large degree necessary. But with less than
two months until the November 2 election,
time is running out.
“It could turn out to completely blow up in
my face,” Narcisse said of his strategy. “On the
one hand, I really like where we’re positioned.
But there’s a very real possibility we may have
waited too late to make our move.”
Tis is an issue of funding. In a July
campaign-fnance disclosure, Narcisse reported
less than $3,000 cash on hand.
“If we raise the money, I win,” he said. “Te
question is: Can we raise the money? Because
I’ve not typically been that kind of politician. ...
“If I raise a half-million dollars, I’m going to
be Iowa’s next governor.”
At $250,000, “I really like my chances.”
And at $100,000, “I think we have a shot.”
Tere’s little evidence that Narcisse can
marshal those kinds of fnancial resources.
But he said he’s convinced that the anti-
incumbent atmosphere could catapult him,
given Governor Culver and former Governor
Branstad.
“We can’t waste time. We can’t waste money,”
Narcisse said. “But the fact of the matter is
that there’s a mathematical path to victory that
exists for me that just simply doesn’t exist for
Chet Culver at this point.”
And he thinks that Branstad’s formidable
lead in the polls also works in his favor: “If
the media calls the election for Branstad, that
actually helps me, because it means that people
can just vote without worrying about voting for
the lesser of two evils.”
Narcisse insists that even if it loses, his
campaign has been successful. He said he
began his campaign with three objectives:
“One: to advance an agenda. Two: to engage
Iowans in solution-oriented discourse.
And three: to create a 99-county impact
organization. At the end of this election,
all three of those objectives will have been
completed. ...
“I’ve already won in terms of what my
original objectives are. [But] I’m going to work
really, really hard, because I actually have a
chance to pull this of. I actually have a chance
to be Iowa’s next governor.”
Jonathan Narcisse’s campaign Web site can be
found at NarcisseForIowa.com. Te Web site of
Iowans for a Fair Debate is DebateIowa.com.
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
19
MAKE A RESERVATION AT
309-762
-
0330
OR VISIT playcrafters.com
ADMISSION
~
$
10
SUPPORTED IN
PART BY A
GRANT FROM
presents
September
10‡11‡12 17‡18‡19
Friday & Saturday - 7:30PM
Sunday Matinee - 3:00PM
AD PROOF:
(DH)
Proof Due Back By: 09/09 5pm
Ad #: P07968-f-12827-4x5
Deadline To Pub: 09/10 3pm
First Run: 09/16/10
Publication: Moline Dispatch
Section: Education/Career Training
Specs: 4.94 x 5.625
T
Approved as is.
T
Approved with revisions.
TRevise and resend.
Ìnitial _________ Date __________
M
I
S
N
P
We’ve Moved
to a Larger Location in Bettendorf!
Some of the improvements
include a complete
renovation, new medical labs,
new computer labs, and
expanded program offerings.
Classes starting soon!
Meo
6a=,as
M
eo
6
a=
,as
t||1 6.r|=»ecia Þa.
be¡¡eoaec+. |A 9t7tt
OUR NEW LOCATION
2119 E. KimberIy Road
Bettendorf, IA 52722
Move your education ahead with
Brown Mackie College – Quad Cities
Accredited Member, ACICS
©2010 Brown Mackie College 2432-09/10
Our convenient
ONE COURSE A MONTH
schedule fts your life.
Expanded Program
Offerings Coming Soon!
Call for more information!
1.888.870.5543
ClickBrownMackie3.com
Lujack.com
Just South of the Northpark Mall
VOLKSWAGEN
°| °¯'!º'í\ '¯º!°'í. !|( M''¯° º¯º \¯/º. !¯¯¯º° ¯/º'º¯
°¯ºí¯Mº¯º º|í!. º³ M!1í! '¯/°¯. º!!í/1. ºº M!1í!°.
!'í! ¯'º°í º/\M¯1í '!¯ /í °'1''1'. º'!° í// . ¯¯¯°
ON 2010 VW
JETTA TDI
2010 VW
ROUTAN
$
27,800
DOWN,
$
0 /MO!
$
379
MSRP......................$33,300
!'í! /ººº!!¯' 'º¯''í í!º! !'' ¯'1/1''/' í!º!
°¯ºí¯Mº¯º º|í!. °¯¯ '¯/'¯º ¯!º '¯í/''°
DCAN
?JHI
PER MO.
2010 VW
JETTA LTD
EDITION
AUTOMATIC
l¯º! °¯'!º'í\ '¯º!°'í. º³ M!1í!
'¯/°¯. !|( M''¯° º¯º \¯/º. !¯¯¯º
¯/º'º¯° |³/º|/!|. !'í! °¨-³³ '!¯
/í °''1'1'. º'!° í// . ¯¯¯°.
$
199
?JHI
?JHI6CCDJC8:9
SAVE BIG WITH
0
% APR
FINANCING
LBH7BAÇGA887GBJ4<GHAG<?G;88A7
B9G;8L84E9BEG;8?BJ8FGCE<68F
VOLKSWAGEN
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
0
Continued From Page 9
worry.
Schafer also delivers
with a painting on display
at the German American
Heritage Center. Campaign
Stop is a mixed-media
canvas the size and format
of a state fag, and it’s
even divided into thirds,
evoking the Iowa state fag.
Te lef and right panels
are striped cottony fabric,
stretched as one would
when preparing a canvas.
Te center panel contains
an oil painting, depicting
an old-fashioned straw
campaign hat and a rolled-
up, hand-sized American
fag, with subtle geometric
shapes and textural efects
under glazes of paint in the
background.
Te color scheme of
muted and warm reds,
blues, and of-whites
matches the Americana
aesthetic ofen found in
patriotic folk art and crafs. Tis painting suggests the
“for the people” vibe that candidates ofen strive for
during campaigns. Tis seems particularly relevant in
Iowa, where every four years the ofcial presidential-
nominating process begins.
Te show contains many other strong works.
Te Holy Communicator by Paul Algueseva III is a
placed on seemingly scientifc or archival display, that
ambiguity is compounded.
Upon reading the artist’s statement, we learn
that this sculpture began when LaMair found
an unexplained plastic bag of her grandmother’s
hair. Te other bundles came from LaMair herself
and her mother. Te similarity of the hair, from
diferent generations of the same family, serves as a
visual reminder of genetic similarity. But much of
the intrigue of this piece lies in mystery: Why did
LaMair’s grandmother store her hair for years in a
basement? Te tangible nature and treatment of the
real hair efectively explore both the show’s theme and
the true-story genesis of Multigenerational.
Refecting shared American heritage is Mothership
by John Paul Schafer. Te center of the painting
depicts a set of 1950s drinking cups displayed on a
rack. Presented without context, these cups seem
like illustrated geometric fgures from a visual-math
problem. On the perimeter of the painting, Schafer
creates a “frame” of collaged Cold War- and space-
race-era advertisements and periodicals – some
serious and scientifc in tone, others whimsical and
childlike. Schafer’s method of painting makes slick
use of textures; viewed from afar, everything looks
smooth and pristine, but closer up, there are slightly
rough visible brush strokes and hidden layers of color.
Mothership works as visual summary of
mid-century American culture while remaining
both cryptic (through the seemingly signifcant
presentation of the cups) and fun (through the kitschy
print media and bright colors). Te piece conjures
memories of contradictory feelings: about astounding
scientifc progress, mass media, and emerging
consumerism; hopes for future innovation; and subtle
by Michelle Garrison
michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com
realistically
rendered fred-clay sculpture that blends concepts of
family, religion, and science in one fantastical portrait.
His use of a bust of an aged woman brings to mind
motherhood, with her fruit necklace referencing the
Biblical forbidden fruit, and the monkeys clinging to
her head recalling mankind’s evolution.
Peter Xiao contributes a painting that refects his
identity as a China-born
American through a
touching single moment of
watching the Philadelphia
Symphony Orchestra
perform on Chinese
TV. Susan Mart’s My
Neighborhood provides a
window into her childhood
experience of walking
to school in East Moline
through an unusual format:
10 small canvases of close-
up and abstracted scenes.
Te premise of Roots
inspired smart, intelligent,
and varied mediations on
heritage, culture, family
and home, and provided a
platform for many newer
talents. Te meaningful
theme allowed local artists
to show that their roots
indeed run deep.
Roots: Who’s Your Momma
runs through October 1 at
Quad City Arts (1715 Second
Avenue in Rock Island) and the German American
Heritage Center (712 West Second Street in Davenport).
For more information, visit QuadCityArts.com.
Michelle Garrison is a mixed-media artist who teaches
art and design at Geneseo Middle School and J.D.
Darnell High School.
Your Roots Are Showing
ABOVE: Mimzi Haut - St. Emil Reli-
quary; TOP RIGHT: John Paul Schae-
fer - Campaign Stop; RIGHT: Mary
Pat LaMair - Multigenerational
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
1
El Ten Eleven partly fnanced It’s Still
Like a Secret through fans, who were ofered
incentive packages at certain contribution
levels. A hundred bucks: “You get a signed
copy of It’s Still Like a Secret and you get to
punch Tim in the face
(but you have to wear
a boxing glove). To
be flmed and put on
YouTube, of course!”
At $750, investors were
ofered a package that
included “an hour-long
helicopter fight with
Kristian in Los Angeles
(includes lunch).”
Dunn said the band
raised “in the low
thousands” – including
one contribution of
$750 and a few of $100.
“A couple of them
said, ‘Don’t worry about
it. I don’t need to punch
him.’” Dunn said. “But
one guy when we get
back to L.A. is going to
punch him.”
Dunn insists that Fogarty didn’t draw the
short straw: “He loves that shit. ... He’s a weird
dude. You’ve got to question someone who
beats things with sticks for his instrument.”
El Ten Eleven formed in 2002, and it found
its format quickly. “I had all these ideas and
I couldn’t quite put them together,” Dunn
said. Fogarty told him about a looping pedal,
and when Dunn tried one, “our eyes kind of
popped open,” he said. “Tis could work. We
could do this just the two of us.”
Dunn then got the idea of using a double-
neck watching Mike Rutherford in an old
Genesis video. “I started developing ways of
playing both necks at the same time,” he said.
Because Dunn’s setup has only one output,
in the studio he records his parts separately so
that the band can apply standard efects such
as panning. He admitted it’s cheating, “but the
fact that we can pull it of live makes it okay,
I think.”
And that double-neck and all those pedals
aren’t gimmicks, Dunn stressed. “It would be
silly if I didn’t use them. ... I think of them
as an instrument, really. It’s what creates my
voice.”
El Ten Eleven will perform on Monday,
September 27, at RIBCO (1815 Second Avenue
in Rock Island). Te show starts at 7 p.m.,
and the bill also includes the bands Dosh and
Baths. Tickets are $10 and available from
RIBCO.com.
For more information on El Ten Eleven, visit
ElTenEleven.com.
I
t’s a sentiment that should come standard-
issue with any virtuosity.
“I do have to check myself, because
sometimes I can fnd myself doing overly
complicated things, and I think, ‘Wait, am
I doing this because it
makes the song good
or because I’m trying to
show of?’” said Kristian
Dunn in a recent phone
interview. “It usually
ends up being the latter,
and it gets cut. You’ve got
to be tough with yourself
in this kind of situation.”
“Tis kind of
situation” is pretty funny,
because it’s unlikely
that El Ten Eleven has
much company in what
it does. An instrumental
duo featuring Dunn on
guitars (ofen a double-
neck) and drummer Tim
Fogarty, the band makes
extensive use of looping
and efects pedals to
build tunes that would
seem to need three or more players. “Fat Gym
Riot,” from 2008’s Tese Promises Are Being
Videotaped, climaxes with thick bass and twin
(or perhaps triplet) lead guitars.
But when El Ten Eleven returns to RIBCO
on September 27, there will be just Fogarty
and Dunn and the latter’s 13 pedals, trying to
make the extraordinarily complicated seem
like merely good music.
“I want people to just like the music
because of the music, not because they know
it’s just two dudes doing it with looping
pedals and all that challenging stuf,” Dunn
said. “Te music should just stand on its own.
It should just be good on its own.”
Despite their combined technical wizardry,
Dunn doesn’t think the duo has quite
met that standard. (He’s being too hard
on himself. While knowing the technical
requirements of the music enhances
appreciation of it, Tese Promises has
consistently strong, dynamic compositions,
which are all the more impressive for being
vocal-less.)
Dunn said he thinks the duo’s fourth full-
length, It’s Still Like a Secret (due November
9), addresses that self-perceived shortcoming.
“We’ve learned some lessons from each one,
mostly about what worked and what didn’t
work,” he said of their albums. “A lot about
what we don’t like and don’t want to do again.
Tis fourth one is sort of a summary of ... the
best parts of the frst three records – at least
to us.” Gone are the post-rock elements of the
frst album, he said, and the electro fxation of
Tese Promises.
It’s Complicated
El Ten Eleven, September 27 at RIBCO
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
Come dressed to impress & express
Visit midwestwritingcenter.org or
call 563.324.1410 to join this party of misfits!
$35 / person
$30 / 2 or more
Performances by
the Barley House Band,
Burlesque Le’ Moustache &
other acts of wonder!
Oct. 16, 7-10 p.m. - Putnam Museum
Photo by Amanda Fogarty
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m

Continued From Page 8
from that time. So the Internet Players would like
to join the ongoing efort of bringing theatrical
attention to this area.
“For the dream to become a reality, it’s going to
take a lot of work, but I really don’t have any other
options,” Porteshawver adds with a laugh. “Tis is
what I’m interested in doing, so I’ve gotta do it.”
Te Tragedy of Sarah Klein is being staged at the
Nighswander Teatre in the Annie Wittenmyer
Complex (2822 Eastern Avenue) September 16
through 26, with performances Tursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets
are $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors,
and reservations can be made by calling (563)383-
6089 or visiting TeInternetPlayers.com.
Guild, the Playcrafers Barn Teatre, Quad City
Music Guild, and venues in Iowa City, “Nathan
has really broken those boundaries a little bit, and
considering the production challenge of bringing
together all those people – given the fact that most
theatre artists around here have full-time jobs – it’s
being managed extremely well. You have to have
ambition not to burn out on such an ambitious
project.”
“It’s ridiculous how great the theatre community
is in the Quad City area,” says Porteshawver. “and
how the area is somehow full of good actors. I
knew that going to college – my infuences from
this area were partly what made my college
experience a success – but coming back was even
more of a shock, because things had grown even
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
’Net Gain
Continued From Page 15
What Else Is happenin’
Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $22-32. For
tickets and information, call (800)843-4753 or visit
Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Thursday, September 23 – A Night of Sunshine.
Cabaret evening featuring Circa ’21 Bootlegger
Sunshine Ramsey and musical accompanists. Circa
’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue, Rock
Island). 7 p.m. $10-12. For tickets and information,
call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Saturday, September 25 – Doo Wop ’n’ Roll.
Fundraising concert for Bethany Children & Families,
featuring Jay & the Americans, Johnny Tillotson, and
The Shirelles’ Shirley Allston Reeves. Adler Theatre
(136 East Third Street). 7:30 p.m. $27-67. For tickets,
call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.
THEATRE
Sunday, September 19 – Godspell. Stephen
Schwartz’s beloved nonsecular musical, in a
presentation by the Center for Living Arts. Trinity
Episcopal Cathedral (121 West 12th Street,
Davenport). 2 p.m. Donations encouraged.
For information, call (563)323-9989 or visit
Center4Living.com.
DANCE
Friday, September 17, through Wednesday,
September 22 – Ballet West II. A Hancher
Auditorium presentation, with outdoor
performances by the noted touring ensemble.
September 17 – Central Park Square (Main Street
and Burlington Avenue, Fairfeld). September 18
– Hancher Green (Riverside Drive and Park Road,
Iowa City). September 19 – Shiloh Amphitheater
(100 Shiloh Drive, Kalona). September 22
– Riverfront Park (West Mississippi Drive and Iowa
Avenue, Muscatine). All performances at 6 p.m.; all
performances free. For information, call (319)335-
1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu.
ART
Saturday, September 18, and Sunday,
September 19 – Riverssance Festival of Fine Art.
23rd-annual outdoor event featuring visual artists
showcasing and selling their works, live music, food
vendors, a children’s art tent, and more. Lindsay
Park (River Drive and Mound Street, Davenport).
Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $3.
For information, visit Midcoast.org.
Saturday, September 18, through Sunday,
January 9 – Dancing Towards Death. Exhibit
examining “Dance of Death” imagery, with works
by artists including Hans Holbein, Albrecht Dürer,
Rembrandt, Max Klinger, Käthe Kollwitz, Georg
Grosz, James Ensor, and Sue Coe. Figge Art Museum
(225 West Second Street, Davenport). Tuesdays-
Saturdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sundays noon-5 p.m.;
Thursdays 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Free with museum
admission ($4-7). For information, call (563)326-
7804 or visit FiggeArtMuseum.org.
Friday, September 24, through Friday,
October 29 – Living Proof. Exhibit of artworks, in
all media, created by breast-cancer survivors, with
performances by Lisa Fox, Christina Marie Myatt,
Bobbi Smith, and ComedySportz at the September
24 opening reception. Bucktown Center for the Arts
(225 East Second Street, Davenport). Reception 6-9
p.m. Gallery hours: Wednesdays-Saturdays 11 a.m.-6
p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)737-
2066 or visit BucktownArts.com.
LITERATURE
Friday, September 24 – Banned Books
Reading. Local authors, librarians, and artists
read favorite passages from books, poems, and
plays that have been frequently contested in the
United States, in an event hosted by the Davenport
Public Libraries and the Midwest Writing Center.
Bucktown Center for the Arts (225 East Second
Street, Davenport). 7-9 p.m. Free admission.
For information, call (563)324-1410 or visit
MidwestWritingCenter.org.
Monday, September 27 – Fahrenheit 451: “The
Big Read”Kick-Of Event. Featuring a presentation
by Ray Bradbury biographer Sam Weller, and a
panel discussion on intellectual freedom. Moline
Public Library (3210 41st Street, Moline). 6:30 p.m.
Free. For information, call (309)524-2470 or visit
MolineLibrary.com. For an interview with Weller and
a schedule of “The Big Read” events, visit RCReader.
com/y/bradbury.
COMEDY
Saturday, September 18 – Sad on Vacation.
An evening with the Chicago-based sketch-comedy
troupe. The Circa ’21 Speakeasy (1818 Third Avenue,
Rock Island). 8 p.m. $15. For tickets and information,
call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Saturday, September 25 – The Second
City National Touring Company. An evening
with members of the famed sketch-comedy
and improvisation troupe. Augustana College’s
Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island).
8 p.m. $10; free for Augustana students with ID. For
information and tickets, call (309)794-7306.
EVENTS
Friday, September 17, and Saturday, September
18 – Our Big Fat Greek Festival. Annual event
featuring Greek cuisine, a wine tasting, live music,
performances by Chicago’s Hellas Dancers, Greek
souvenirs and jewelry, children’s games and activities,
and more. St. George Greek Orthodox Church (2930
31st Avenue, Rock Island). 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $2; ages 12
and under free. For information, call (309)786-8163.
Saturday, September 18 – 2010 Celtic Festival
and Highland Games. Annual event featuring
Scottish athletics, Highland dance, children’s games,
workshops, food and beverages, and more, with
evening Ceilidh entertainment by Laura MacKenzie
& the Lads, Highland Reign, and New Grass News.
Centennial Park (Beiderbecke Drive and Marquette
Street, Davenport). Athletic competitions begin
at 8 a.m. Free daytime admission, $5 Ceilidh
admission. For information, call (309)794-0449 or visit
CelticHighlandGames.org.
Saturday, September 18 – 2010 Brew Ha Ha.
Annual event co-sponsored by WQPT-TV, ofering
samples of hundreds of local, national, and international
brews, and featuring live music by Corporate Rock, the
improv comedians of ComedySportz, games, and more.
LeClaire Park (River Drive and Ripley Street, Davenport).
1-5 p.m. $20-25. For information, call (309)796-2424 or
visit WQPT.org/brew.
Sunday, September 19 – Fall Tour of Historic
Homes. A visit to fve houses built between 1850
and 1900, in an event sponsored by the Scott County
Historic Preservation Society. Davenport and the
Village of East Davenport. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 for
adults; ages 12 and under free. For information, call
(563)323-4077.
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0

R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m

September 2 Answers: Right
ACROSS
1. Bindlestif
5. Diagnostic image
9. Pause
13. Refrigerate
18. Part of DAR: abbr.
19. Value
21. Fit
22. Wheel spokes
23. Skedaddle: 4 wds.
26. Too heavy
27. Ruminant animal
28. Buenos _
29. Diet’s undoing
30. “Friends” character
31. Legless creature
32. Zola novel
33. Newly
36. OT prophet
37. Salad of a kind
41. Legal instruments
42. Lesions
43. Dispensed (with “out”)
44. “I _ _ Camera”
45. TV extraterrestrial
46. “Ragtime King” _ Joplin
47. Angel
48. Indefnite amount
49. Merriment
51. Toodle-oo!
52. Nephrite
53. Rousseau title
55. Like pottery items
57. City in Bulgaria
58. Poured
59. Flighty: 4 wds.
63. Elaborate meal
66. Checks
67. “_ and Old Lace”
71. Variety of beet
72. Name on a lithograph
73. _ Hayworth
75. Title of Indian nobility
76. Balderdash
77. Stagnation
80. Substandard dwelling
81. Doily
82. Numero _
83. Bay window
84. NFL player
85. Temper tantrum
87. Fundraising events
89. Concatenation
90. Scholar type
91. Reptiles
92. Buckskin fnish
93. Ratifcation
94. Morally pure
97. Seven: prefx
98. Resembling Betelgeuse, e.g.
102. “_ di Lammermoor”
103. Numismatics item: 3 wds.
105. Bird
106. Anuran
107. Eat to excess
108. Western Indian
109. _ it’s at
110. Has
111. Toby’s contents
112. Drags
DOWN
1. Punch-line response
2. Sign
3. Bushed
4. Arranged
5. Nike brand logo
6. _ de ballet
7. Museo de _
8. Ultimate degree
9. Counties in England and Wales
10. Old German coin
11. “_ fair in love ...”
12. You bet!
13. Royals: 2 wds.
14. _ corpus
15. _ fxe
16. Lean
17. Rests
20. Gear for a phone rep
24. Embroidery thread
25. Goes underground
29. Orchid-four drink
31. Big artery
32. Part of NB
33. Saw
34. Dude
35. Direct
36. Open to argument
37. Granola
38. Ecclesiastical language
39. Soaproot
40. Grew smaller
42. Native of Norway or Denmark:
abbr.
43. Corpsman
46. Place
47. Yegg’s targets
50. Old anesthetic
52. St. _ bread
54. Pinchfst
56. National leaders: 3 wds.
57. Pens
58. Campestral
60. Parts of eyes
61. “On the Beach” author _ Shute
62. Of a grain
63. Cancel, as a mission
64. Kind of tag
65. Boca _
68. Designated
69. Lacking sense
70. Quotes
73. Girl in “Chicago”
74. Pavlov or Turgenev
78. Something worthless
79. Islets
80. Direction of movement
84. Greek letter
85. Acute
86. Hoard
88. _ said than done
89. Valentine fgures
90. Bookworm
92. Passenger vehicle
93. Put on
94. Ball of yarn
95. Hefner or Jackman
96. Field measure
97. Deceive with fattery
98. Withered
99. Obi accessory
100. Recognized
101. Watches
103. Japanese statesman
104. Gremlin
September 1, 010 TETE-A-TETE
EMPLOYMENT
PROTEINSMOOThIE MAkERS Needed. 2 - 4 hours a day.
Unlimited income potential. New clubs opening now. Train to be a
team leader. Call Paul at 563-579-2202.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
$625.00 1 BRVICTORIANAPARTMENT. Village Historic District.
Hardwood foors, bay window with river view, large shady yard.
HEAT, SEWER, WATER PAID. No pets/no smoking-frm. 563-324-0257.
hOME SERVICES
handy Man Services Call Paul Weathers 563-570-5888 Roofng,
Drywall, Construction & More!
hEALTh SERVICES
FREEWELLNESS PROFILES and Body Analysis. Protein
smoothies for health & wellness. Call 563-355-6713.
WEIGhT LOSS ChALLENGE starting Sept 8th. Cash pool fund.
Nutritional training, free Wellness Profle w/personal coach. QC
Fusion 563-579-2202.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
Want to Earn CASH and Wear Fabulous Jewelry? Up and coming
jewelry company seeking highly self-motivated partners in this area
to join our dynamic sales team! Interested candidates call 563-299-
1295 FREE JEWELRY! FREE TRIPS!
Work-Life balance…Be your own boss!
have Fun! Make $$! Start AVON
No expensive kits to buy!
No quotas!
Only $10 to start OR 2 for price of 1!
FREE full-size product at sign-up!
Call Kara at 563-940-9141 or Lori at 563-441-9397 xt2
COMMUNITY EVENTS
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral welcomes The Center for Living Arts,
as they present “Godspell” on Sunday, September 19 at 2 p.m.
The public is invited to attend. A freewill ofering will beneft the
Churches United and their feeding ministries in the Quad Cities.
C.R.O.P. Hunger Walk of the Quad Cities sponsored by Churches
United. Walk 6 miles including across the beautiful Centennial
Bridge, get some exercise and raise money for hunger issues. For
more information, contact Churches United at 563-332-5002.
CRAFT FAIRS/BAZAARS
HUGE FLEA MARKET, ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLES SHOW!
Sunday, Sept 26th at the Jackson Co. Fairgrounds,
Maquoketa, Iowa. 8:30am- 3:30pm. Admission $3.00.
Eastern Iowa’s LARGEST showwith 150 sellers. Early bird
admission $10,00 (6:30am- 8:30am). Info: 563-462-0135.
CALL TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY!
() -009 or visit
RiverCitiesReader.com/classifeds
September Crossword Answers
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0

Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow
Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
2010/09/17 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Com-
modore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St. Daven-
port, IA
Big Funk Guarantee (6:30pm) -Pedestrian
Plaza, Downtown Iowa City, IA
Brown Bag Lunch at Noon: Redeemed
Voi ces Gospel Choi r -Bettendor f
Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus
Bettendorf, IA
Churchstock 2010 Gospelfest -Veterans
Memori al Park Bandshel l , Betten-
dorf, IA
Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th
St Davenport, IA
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
DJ Scott Keller & Karaoke (weather per-
mitting) -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Euforquestra - Roster McCabe -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ
Service -Shannon’s Bar and Grill, 252 S
State Ave Hampton, IL
Friday Live at 5 w/ Tim Stop Trio on the
Courtyard (5pm) -RME (River Music Expe-
rience) Courtyard, Davenport, IA
Funktastic Five -Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
Ha Ha Tonka - Death Ships - Grand
Tetons -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
HotChaCha - The Sound of Thoughts
-Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Jazz After Five (5pm) -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody
Rd. N. LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd
St Davenport, IA
Lee Blackmon & The Gamblers (6:30pm)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Ren Estrand (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Lojo Russo - The Vagabonds - Sarah Cram
and the Derelicts - Natalie Brown -
Kelly Carrell -The Blue Moose Tap, 211
Iowa Ave. Iowa City, IA
Nappy Roots - Mac Lethal - DJ Carlo Rossi
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Nashville Songwriters Association (6pm)
-Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St.
Rock Island, IL
New Invaders -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Open Mic Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Phyllis & the Sharks -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
River City 6 -Rhythm City Casino, 101 W.
River Dr. Davenport, IA
Rotate the DJ w/ Chronik Solutionz -M.D.
Green’s, 1808 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Slough Buoys -Mr. Z’s Sports Bar, Route
84 Thomson, IL
The Bucktown Revue -River Music Experi-
ence, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Toucan’s Can-
tina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street
Milan, IL
The Lovedogs -The Dew Drop Inn, 602 5th
St Durant, IA
The Nadas - The Coal Men -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Upper Room Coffee House: The Deutsch
Polka Band -First Christian Church
of Davenport, 510 E 15th St Daven-
port, IA
Wes Weeber & Friends -Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
2010/09/18 (Sat)
1st Impression -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104
State St Bettendorf, IA
Barlowe & James (6pm) -Toucan’s Can-
tina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street
Milan, IL
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Crabby’s,
826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Cheese Pizza -Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
Cornmeal -The Blue Moose Tap, 211 Iowa
Ave. Iowa City, IA
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
Dustin Lee -Mojo’s (River Music Experience),
130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Emily Jawoisz -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Hi-Fi -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th
Street and the Rock River Moline, IL
Iowa Women’s Music Festival: The Refu-
gees - The Chris Pureka Band - Ruth
King - Desdamona with Carnage
- Mary McAdams - Rae, Emily Louise,
& Jenny Kohls (noon) -Upper City Park,
Dubuque Rd & Park St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -Cheers Bar & Grill, 1814
7th St Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Caman-
che Ave Clinton, IA
Keep Off The Grass -River House, 1510
River Dr. Moline, IL
Lee Blackmon & the Gamblers (6pm)
-Rhythm City Casino, 101 W. River Dr.
Davenport, IA
Lethal I njekti on - The Pear Devi ce
- Jaiguru -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Lynn Allen -Rascals Rock Memorabilia
Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Meet the Press -Peterson’s Bullseye Bar,
103 W. 3rd St. Sterling, IL
Mr. Whoopie -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
New Invaders -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Open Mic Night -Coffee Dive, 226 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -One Library, 230 W. 3rd
Street Davenport, IA
Pulse-Ox (6pm) -Starlite Ballroom, Missis-
sippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust
St. Davenport, IA
RiverCity 6 -Downtown Macomb, Ma-
comb, IL
Riverssance Festival of Fine Art: Lojo
Russo (11am) - Milltown (1pm) - The
Barley House Band (3pm) -Lindsay
Park, River Drive and Mound Street
Davenport, IA
Rootless Experience -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Salsa and Cumbia DJ Night -La Primavera,
601 15th St. Moline, IL
Salsa Dancing -Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St. Moline, IL
Sammy Kershaw -Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway
Bettendorf, IA
Sound Healing Concert: Carl Davis -The
Healing Heart Center, 3481 Utica Ridge
Rd. Bettendorf, IA
Sound of Southern Breeze -Engl er t
Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Spatterdash -Route 61 Bar & Grill, 4320 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
The Pena Brothers -Beer Belly’s - Rock
Island, 1704 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
The State Of - SONiA & Disappear Fear
- Congress of Starlings -The Mill, 120
E Burlington Iowa City, IA
2010/09/15 (Wed)
Bl ack Hawk Col l ege Jazz Ensembl e
(6:30pm) -Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St
Rock Island, IL
Buddy Olson (5:30pm) -Figge Art Mu-
seum, 225 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
“Candy” Jam Session w/ Alan Sweet
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Euforquestra - Ragaman -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Flat Black Studios’ New Belgium Battle
III -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Hart to Hart DJ Service / Music Trivia
Night -Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Iowa Women’s Music Festival Kick-Off
Concert -Englert Theatre, 221 East
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone,
1516 5th Ave Moline, IL
Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Leslie & the LY’s - Bitch - Caroline Smith
& the Goodnight Sleeps -Engl er t
Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Melissa Greener (6:30pm) -Mojo’s (River
Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Dav-
enport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
Rock Art w/ The Dads -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Roster McCabe -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport,
IA
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring
Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL Continued On Page 26
17 FRIday
18 Saturday
16 Thursday
Live Music Live Music Live
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Drive-by Truckers @ Englert Theatre – September 29
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m

Troy Harris, Pianist (11:30am) -Bass Street
Chop House, 1601 River Dr Moline, IL
2010/09/20 (Mon)
Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports
Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Singer & the Song -Englert Theatre, 221
East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
2010/09/21 (Tue)
Buddy Olson (6pm) -Greenbri ar Res-
taurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St
Moline, IL
Dance Party USA -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Gaelic Storm -The Redstone Room, 129 Main
St Davenport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Sup-
per Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock
Island, IL
Karaoke Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Jonathan Turner (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate (6:30pm)
-Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier
Stube Davenpor t, 2228 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ the Pena Brothers -Racer’s
Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL
Ri verCi ty 6 (6pm) -Downtown New
Windsor, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
The Texas Tenors -Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway
Bettendorf, IA
Coupe de Ville (5pm) -Clinton Riverview
Bandshell, Clinton, IA
Dana Alexandra -Brew by the Slough,
Augustana College Library Rock Is-
land, IL
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ
Service -Shannon’s Bar and Grill, 252
S State Ave Hampton, IL
Friday Fest with Dwyer & Michaels
- Lynn Allen -Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
Friday Live at 5 w/ Dani Lynn Howe Band
(5pm) -RME (River Music Experience)
Courtyard, Davenport, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Jeff Chin -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325
30th St. Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody
Rd. N. LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
Kenge Kenge (6pm) - Cordero (7:30pm)
-Greene Square Park, Cedar Rapids, IA
Live Lunch with Tony Hoeppner (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St Davenport, IA
Manny Lopez III -Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Mike Bloome Trio (6pm) -Toucan’s Can-
tina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street
Milan, IL
Minus Six -RI BCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Radio Moscow - Mondo Drag - Clean
Livin’ -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
Retro Ron (6pm) -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Flat Black Studios’ New Belgium Battle
III -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Great American Songbook -U.S. Cellular
Center, 370 1st Ave NE Cedar Rapids, IA
Half-Pint Jones -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Hart to Hart DJ Service / Music Trivia
Night -Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone,
1516 5th Ave Moline, IL
Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Jazz Jam with The North Scott Jazz Combo
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Dave Maxwell (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
Red Baraat (6pm) - Cimarrón(7:30pm)
-Greene Square Park, Cedar Rapids, IA
Somasphere -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Sunshine Ramsey -Circa ‘21 Dinner Play-
house, 1828 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring
Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille,
2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
2010/09/24 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Allmost Brothers (6pm) -Rhythm City Ca-
sino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Commo-
dore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Bob Pace Band featuring Steve George
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
2010/09/22 (Wed)
Barbara Furtuna (6pm) - Mahala Rai
Banda(7:15pm) -Greene Square Park,
Cedar Rapids, IA
Dave Ellis -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Michelle Shocked -Englert Theatre, 221
East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Old Stardust Sports
Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Shawn Pittman -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Social Dancing, Listening, & Fellowship
(1pm) -CASI (Center for Active Seniors),
1035 W. Kimberly Road Davenport, IA
The Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -
The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport,
IA
The Emmitt-Nershi Band - Chicago
Farmer -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Wild Bill’s Rodeo Show featuring Billy
Peiffer -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar,
1414 15th St. Moline, IL
2010/09/23 (Thu)
Barbara Furtuna (6:45pm) -First Presbyte-
rian Church - Cedar Rapids, 310 5th St
SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Bl ack Hawk Col l ege Jazz Ensembl e
(6:30pm) -Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St
Rock Island, IL
Buddy Olson (5:30pm) -Figge Art Museum,
225 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
“Candy” Jam Session w/ Alan Sweet
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Carver - The Post Mortems - Searching for
Security - ieatmyfriends -River Music
Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
DJ Johnny O -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Third Sunday Jazz Series featuring
the Petra Van Nuis Quartet (6pm)
-The Redstone Room, 129 Mai n St
Davenport, IA
Tony Hartman (3pm) -Mojo’s (River
Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Tronicity -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th
St Davenport, IA
Wylde Nept -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
2010/09/19 (Sun)
Anthony Catalfano Quartet (10am) -
Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC
Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA
Blue Collar Band (4pm) -Blueport Junc-
tion, 6605 W River Dr Davenport, IA
Breille -The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Concerts on the Lawn: Dixie Cats (4pm)
-Broadway Presbyterian Church, 710
23rd St. Rock Island, IL
E11eventh Hour (1pm) -Poopy’s Pub &
Grub, 1030 Viaduct Rd Savanna, IL
Karaoke Night -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Polka Club of Iowa, Inc. - Eastern Chapter
Dance (1:30pm) -Walcott Coliseum,
116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Ri verssance Festi val of Fi ne Ar t:
Paige Popejoy (10:30am) - Firesale
(12: 30pm) - Ragaman (2: 30pm)
-Lindsay Park, River Drive and Mound
Street Davenport, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch
performance) -The Lodge Hotel, Spruce
Hills & Utica Ridge Bettendorf, IA
The Avey Brothers -Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Live Music Live Music Live Music Live Music
Half-Pint Jones @ RIBCO – September 23
Continued From Page 25
24 FRIDAY
23 thursday
21 tuesday
20 monday
22 wednesday
19 sunday
Live Music captions for issue #761
Thanks much!
BROADWAY
At The Adler Theatre In Davenport
PRESENTS
OCT. 9, 2010 NOV. 21, 2010
FEB. 1, 2011 FEB. 25, 2011 MAR. 18, 2011
Farewell
Performance!
Time Is Running
Out To Subscribe!
Subscribing Is Easy! • Call 563-326-8522
visit the adler theatre box office or www.adlertheatre.com
OR FOLLOW US ON
a
series
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0

2010/09/30 (Thu)
Big John Bates & the Voodoo Dollz - The
Krank Daddies -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Black Hawk College Jazz Ensemble
(6:30pm) -Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St
Rock Island, IL
Buddy Olson (5:30pm) -Figge Art Mu-
seum, 225 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
“Candy” Jam Session w/ Alan Sweet
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Dumpstaphunk w/ Lubri phoni c
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Flat Black Studios’ New Belgium Battle
III -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Hart to Hart DJ Service / Music Trivia
Night -Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone,
1516 5th Ave Moline, IL
Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Chris Dunn (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
The Fiyah -Mojo’s (River Music Experience),
130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
The Poison Control Center - Utopia Park -
Mumford’s -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring
Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow
Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
Dance Party USA -Iowa City Yacht Club,
13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Sup-
per Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock
Island, IL
Karaoke Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Steve Couch (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier
Stube Davenpor t, 2228 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ the Pena Brothers -Racer’s
Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Unicycle Loves You - The Wheelers -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
2010/09/29 (Wed)
Dave Ellis -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
David Dondero - Darren Hanlon -The Mill,
120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Drive-By Truckers -Englert Theatre, 221
East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Old Stardust Sports
Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Social Dancing, Listening & Fellowship
(1pm) -CASI (Center for Active Seniors),
1035 W. Kimberly Road Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport,
IA
Wild Bill’s Rodeo Show featuring Billy
Peiffer -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar,
1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Elephant Revival -The Blue Moose Tap, 211
Iowa Ave. Iowa City, IA
Even Steven -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
Good Times Oldies -Ri versi de Casi no
and Gol f Resor t, 3184 Hi ghway 22
Riverside, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Chopper’s Bar & Grill,
17228 Rt. 5 & 92 East Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Cheers Bar & Grill, 1814
7th St Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Caman-
che Ave Clinton, IA
Maylane CD Release Party - Centaur Noir
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Mi ke Swenson (noon & 7pm) -Moj o’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Milltown Blue Grass (6pm) -Toucan’s
Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st
Street Milan, IL
Open Mic Night -Coffee Dive, 226 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -One Library, 230 W. 3rd
Street Davenport, IA
Pappa-Razzi -KJ’s Bar & Grill, 115 West Main
St. Morrison, IL
Quad City Prayer Breakfast -RiverCenter,
136 E. 3rd St Davenport, IA
RiverCity 6 (6:30pm) -DeSoto House
Hotel, Galena,
Salaam (2pm & 6:30pm) -First Presbyterian
Church - Cedar Rapids, 310 5th St SE
Cedar Rapids, IA
Salsa and Cumbia DJ Night -La Primavera,
601 15th St. Moline, IL
Salsa Dancing -Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St. Moline, IL
Sublime Tribute w/ Second Hand Smoke
- Item 9 & the Mad Hatters -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Richie Lee -Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Rotate the DJ w/ Chronik Solutionz -M.D.
Green’s, 1808 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Slough Buoys -Legends, 109 E Orange St
Geneseo, IL
Taj Mahal & the Trio -Riverside Casino
and Gol f Resor t, 3184 Hi ghway 22
Riverside, IA
The Portico Quartet (6:45pm) -First Pres-
byterian Church - Cedar Rapids, 310 5th
St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Those Darlins - Turbo Fruits - The Blood
Beats -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa
City, IA
uneXpected -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St Bettendorf, IA
2010/09/25 (Sat)
Allmost Brothers (6pm) -Rhythm City Ca-
sino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Crabby’s,
826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Blood of the Tyrant - Bible of the Devil
- Snow Demon -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Bluegrass @ The Beanz featuring The
Leftovers -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Community Drum Circle (10:30am) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Cosmic -Mound Street Landi ng, 1029
Mound St. Davenport, IA
Danika Holmes -Route 61 Bar & Grill, 4320
N. Brady St. Davenport, IA
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
Doo-Wop ‘n’ Rock: Jay & the Americans
- Johnny Tillotson - Shirley Allston
Reeves -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Sugar Nipples & Halo of Flies -Rascals
Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St.
Moline, IL
Synergy Brass Quintet -Galvin Fine Arts
Center, 2101 Gaines St. Davenport, IA
Turkana (1:30pm) - Calle Sur (4pm) -
Zedashe Ensemble (5:30pm) - Nation
Beat (7pm) - The Sway Machinery
(8:30pm) -Greene Square Park, Cedar
Rapids, IA
uneXpected -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th
Ave Andalusia, IL
2010/09/26 (Sun)
A.J. Haut -Racer’s Edge, 936 15th Ave East
Moline, IL
Breille -The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Cobalt Blue (4pm) -Blueport Junction,
6605 W River Dr Davenport, IA
High Cotton Blues Band (5:45pm) -Putnam
Museum & IMAX Theatre, 1717 W 12th St
Davenport, IA
John & Kay Retzl (11am) -St. Mary’s Catho-
lic Church - Rock Island, 2208 4th Ave
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch
performance) -The Lodge Hotel, Spruce
Hills & Utica Ridge Bettendorf, IA
The Avey Brothers -Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
The Five Bridges Jazz Band (10am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza
Hotel Davenport, IA
Troy Harris, Pianist (11:30am) -Bass Street
Chop House, 1601 River Dr Moline, IL
2010/09/27 (Mon)
El Ten Eleven - Dosh - Baths -RIBCO, 1815
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports
Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2010/09/28 (Tue)
Buddy Olson (6pm) -Greenbriar Res-
taurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St
Moline, IL
Gaelic Storm @ The Redstone Room – September 21
29 wednesday
Get Your Gig or Venue
HIGHLIGHTED
Advertise in the Reader.
Call 563-324-0049
27 monday 26 SUNday
25 Saturday
Live Music Live Music Live Music Live Music
28 TUESDAY
30 Thursday
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful