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MUED 376: Choral Music, Materials & Techniques (M2 & T)

A. 1a. WORKSHEET: Madsen- Research-A Personal Perspective


What are the influences of family or lack of family participation in our music programs? When do children begin to come to know
music, and when do they start to make meaningful connections between music and their separate experiences? What are the changing
social and familial contingencies that make a child want to participate or not participate in our music programs or to change their
participation? When is the best time to start various music activities? When and how do we get every child involved in music and,
much more important, how do we ensure keeping each child with us? How might we best use technology to capture and hold student
interest and to teach students? How do we get them through the difficult years? Is it appropriate for fast fingering and loud notes to
prevail, if but for a short time? What are the relationships between a child's needs at different times? Why do children accept or reject
"our" music as opposed to theirs? How do we equip them so that as adults they have their own personal relationship with music and a
firmly developed desire for lifelong involvement?

“Developing a research perspective starts from our own experience.” C. Madsen

1. Early Childhood Experiences: What were some of your pivotal early childhood
music experiences and what research questions stem from them?

I was put in several music classes before I started kindergarten, and when my parents and
teachers noticed that I grasped onto concepts with ease, they encouraged me to continue on. I
don’t remember having any negative experiences with music as a child.
Question: Was it nature or nurture that caused me to pursue music? If I had had negative
experiences, would I have ended up in the same path?

2. Elementary School Experiences: What research questions do you have that stem from
early elementary school experiences in music?

What experiences do students have while in elementary school that cause students to lose interest
in music?

How do we challenge students who are musically inclined and interested, while engaging students
who seem less interested?

How much does ‘labeling’ (categorizing students based on talent) affect a student’s performance
in the classroom?

3. Middle School Experiences: What were some of your pivotal middle school
music experiences and what research questions stem from them?

My middle school choir teacher was one of the most influential people in my life. She was
poised, confident, a wonderful musician, and very present and engaging teacher. She is the reason
I decided to go into music education.

Does requiring music (versus electing) in elementary school have an effect on enrollment
numbers in middle school?

4. High School Experiences: What research questions do you have that stem from
high school experiences in music?

There will be students that shine through the rest of the choir. How do we allow them to use their
experiences and talents to help other students who are there for the ‘typical experience?’
5. Undergraduate Experiences: What research questions do you have that stem from
your undergraduate music experiences?

In terms of ensembles, should students studying to be choir directors be denied the opportunity to
be in an advanced choir because of skill level in instrument production? Or should students be
allowed to experience different ensembles to become exposed to more repertoire to better inform
their teaching in the future?

6. Music Job Experiences: What research questions do you have that stem jobs you
may have already had in music?

Is it appropriate for an experienced student to become a teacher to gain experience in teaching? If


so, at what level of experience or mastery?

7. Pre-teaching Experiences: What research questions do you have that stem from pre-
teaching experiences (camps, practica, etc.) in music?

In practica, it is very difficult to experience what teaching in a classroom is like, because it is


controlled, you are usually being carefully observed, and are generally more nervous. How can
we mimic the feeling of a real classroom experience without taking away the necessary
observation element?