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Concept Design Report • 09.14.

2010
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table of contents
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Project Framework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Project Timeline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Functional Integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Space Needs Update. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Design Narratives
Architectural Narrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Concept Diagrams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Concept Floor Plans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Site and Landscape Narrative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Site Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Civil Narrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Structural Narrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Mechanical Narrative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Electrical Narrative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Code Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Systems Diagrams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Exhibits (under separate cover)
Exhibit A: Cost Estimate
Exhibit B: Full Space List
Exhibit C: Conditions Survey
Exhibit D: Topographic Survey
Exhibit E: Geotechnical Overview
Exhibit F: Haz-Mat Report
Exhibit G: Phase 1 Environmental Report

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Alaska’s Memory Keeper
acknowledgments
Owner/Client Core Design Team
State of Alaska, Department of Transportation ECI / Hyer Architecture & Interiors
and Public Facilities for 101 W. Benson Boulevard, Suite 306
State of Alaska, Department of Education and Anchorage, Alaska 99503
Early Development Brian Meissner, Principal-in-Charge
Division of Alaska State Libraries, Archives and 907.561.5543
Museums
Linda Thibodeau, Director THA Architecture
P.O. Box 110571 733 SW Oak Street, Suite 100
Juneau, AK 99811-0571 Portland, Oregon 97205
Thomas Hacker, Lead Designer
503.227.1254

Walker Macy • Landscape Architecture


111 SW Oak Street, Suite 200
Portland, OR 97204
Doug Macy, Landscape Planner
503.228.3122

Laura Millar • Archive Planner


1202-1245 Quayside Drive
New Westminster, BC V3M 6J6
604.515.4676

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT

ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Over the past few years a paradigm shift has The project has three key goals: Outreach
been occurring at the Alaska State Libraries, Initial outreach efforts included stakeholder
• Construct a new building that will protect
Archives and Museums. A dream for a new facil- interviews with representatives of 35 groups
Alaska’s collections while integrating the
ity that would integrate the three units is becom- statewide and an email poll of other state
library, archives and museum.
ing a reality. Simultaneously, the workings of libraries, archives and museums regarding their
the Division are becoming more integrated on • Improve service delivery and program of-
expansion projects. A project fact sheet outlined
a daily basis. These changes have Alaska on tar- ferings through integration of the three
the project need and approach. A project bro-
get to become an international leader in service groups.
chure was distributed with presentations to the
delivery for libraries, archives and museums. • Create an integrated digital portal for access annual meeting of the Alaska Historical Societies
This report summarizes the process that led to to information. and Museums Alaska.
where we are, presents the concepts that arose
from the process, and sets a course that will lead More recently, a series of public workshops and
Building Space Requirements discussions with staff has led to development
to a new Library, Archives and Museum Facility.
After extensive user interviews with staff mem- of an updated list of space requirements and a
At heart, this project is about protecting Alas- bers and stakeholders, the space requirements concept design for the new facility.
ka’s treasures. The existing collections of the have been updated and described in detail. In
Alaska Libraries, Archives and Museums are full summary, the new facility will include the follow- Over the next several months continued state-
of those treasures. Many, if damaged, are irre- ing components. wide outreach will be employed to educate citi-
placeable, yet they are housed in buildings that zens about the project and to generate feedback
can no longer adequately protect them. The • 124,000 sf new construction on the design concepts.
storage facilities are beyond their useful life and • 80 basement level parking stalls
beyond capacity. There are additional treasures
within the State and beyond that will eventually • 40 surface parking stalls
find their way into the collections. This project • site development and landscaping
promises to produce a facility capable of receiv-
ing and protecting valuable artifacts. Alaska
deserves to see the existing and future collec-
tions preserved for generations to come.

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Alaska Division of Libraries, Archives
and Museums
The U.S. Congress established the Alaska Histori-
cal Library and Museum in 1900. The first cura-
tor, Andrew Kashevaroff, was appointed in 1920
and shortly thereafter the Territory assumed
responsibility for its operations. When the new
federal building (now the State Capitol) was fin-
ished in 1931, the Library and Museum moved to
that building.
A new museum, built by the community of
Juneau, was turned over to the State of Alaska
in 1968 to honor the centennial of Alaska’s pur-
chase. At that time, the Alaska Historical Library
was separated from the Alaska State Museum
and became a part of the Alaska State Library,
which had been established in 1955. When the
Alaska State Archives was created in 1970, public
state records were transferred to it from the His-
torical Library, which retained all manuscript and
photograph records and papers produced by the
private sector. The State Archives entered the
current building in 1975. The State purchased the
Sheldon Jackson Museum in 1988. In 1991, the
Commissioner of Education created the Division
of Libraries, Archives and Museums.
STATEWIDE OUTREACH – EDUCATION LOOP


ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
project
FRAMEWORK
Mission
The mission of the Alaska Division of Libraries, Archives and Museums is to preserve Alaska’s cultural heritage and to facilitate access to information and
resources for research and lifelong learning.
In keeping with this mission to better protect and share our collections and to improve our programs and services, the division is working towards consoli-
dating and integrating the work of its three sections: the State Library, the State Archives and the State Museums. A new building should help us to work
more efficiently and effectively for Alaskans.

Alaska State Library Alaska State Archives Alaska State Museums


The Department of Library Service was estab- The Alaska State Archives was established in 1970 The purpose of the Museum, created in 1900,
lished in 1955 to provide library service in the Ter- and opened its doors to the public in 1972. The was to collect, preserve and exhibit the territo-
ritory of Alaska, to serve as a reference library State Archives is the repository that preserves ry’s objects. Initially the collection was stored
for Territorial offices and libraries, to coordinate the government records of Alaska’s history and wherever space could be found with no provi-
and assist library activities throughout the terri- makes these records accessible to its patrons in sion made for public access. In 1920, the collec-
tory, and to administer the annual grant-in-aid a safe, professional and responsible manner. tion was made available to the public in Juneau’s
to incorporated library associations. In 1959 the Arctic Brotherhood Building and in 1923, the
Government records with permanent histori-
Department was placed within the Department Territory assumed responsibility for operations.
cal value include legislative bills and histories,
of Education for administrative purposes; it By the mid-1940s, the collection had outgrown
audio recordings, meeting minutes, annual
assumed the title Alaska State Library. The His- its space and the Museum could no longer ade-
reports, birth and death records, naturalization
torical Library separated from the State Museum quately store and display its materials. In 1968, in
records, incorporation records, court and pro-
and joined the State Library in 1968. This section honor of the centennial purchase of Alaska from
bate records, correspondence, publications and
of the library is now known as the Historical Russia, Juneau citizens implemented a sales tax
other agency-related material. The Alaska State
Collections. to help fund a new facility—the existing museum
Archives does not collect personal manuscript
facility—subsequently turning over ownership
records, but holds records dated from 1874 -.
and governance to the State of Alaska. Since
present, with the majority of records created in
that time, the Museum’s collections have grown
the 20th century. Areas of strength include ter-
from 5,500 to 27,000 objects. The Alaska State
ritorial and state governor records, territorial
Museum was accredited by the American Associ-
court records, community-based state govern-
ation of Museums in 1975 and was re-accredited
ment records, and state era legislative records.
in 1987, and again in 2001.

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT

ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
project
timeline
Libraries Archives Museum Project Timeline to Date
• Initial design proposal unveiled in Juneau in June 2010; .
the project was christened the Library Archives Museum Project
• Staff and public meetings conducted in Juneau in April & May 2010
• Design contract awarded in spring 2010
• Released design request for proposals in November of 2009
• Pre-design program planning conducted in spring 2009
• Additional design funding provided by Legislature in 2008
• Needs Assessment completed November 2006
• Partial design funding secured 2005
• 1.8 acres acquired 2003, added to site of existing Museum

Next Steps
• Fall - Winter 2010 - 2011 • Fall - Winter 2011 - 2012
Schematic design Final construction documents
Statewide outreach campaign Initiate construction contract for long-lead
items, utilities and advanced site work
Contractor selection
• Spring 2012 - Summer 2014
• Spring - Summer 2011
Construction
Design development
• Fall 2014
Finalize construction timeline
Grand Opening
Secure project funding for construction

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT

ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
functional
integration
As web-based communications and digital tech- a result, everyone in the institution can see the • identifying and liaising with potential donors
nologies become increasingly common, a grow- full scope of new holdings and establish com- to coordinate communications and support
ing national and international trend is to inte- mon priorities for action. Similarly, the content positive relationships with the community
grate library, archives and museum processes, and structure of library, archives and museum
• documenting the preservation requirements
bringing together the work of different institu- catalogs, finding aids, and other descriptive
for all materials in all media to prioritize
tions into one or two integrated agencies, often tools can be coordinated so that users can
materials at risk while making best use of
under the umbrella term ‘memory institutions.’ easily find a wide-range of relevant materials
resources
Functional integration emphasizes the simi- on their research topic, whether the items are
larities between library, archives and museum publications, historical documents, or original • providing online access to descriptions and
services while respecting the distinct qualities artifacts. As an example, the description of a pair catalogs to ensure users are able to find rel-
of the materials being managed: publications, of beaded moccasins will be different from the evant materials from throughout the institu-
archival records and artifacts. Not only does the description of a booklet on Athabascan clothing tion regardless of format or type
integration of operations provide greater access or of a historical photograph of an Athabascan • digitizing historical materials, from historical
to a wide range of information resources, but woman in traditional clothing. By putting those publications to archival records to images of
the coordination of activities also allows insti- descriptions together in an integrated catalog, three-dimensional artifacts, to provide the
tutions to offer extensive public services while the user can access core information about each widest possible access to the institution’s
maximizing resources. item, making it easier to locate a wide body of holdings.
information and resources related to Athabas-
While each type of material – publications, his- Staff members across the division are work-
can traditions.
torical records, or three-dimensional objects –. ing closely on integration initiatives, bringing
presents its own challenge for preservation, The Library Archives Museum Project is mov- together their unique expertise and knowledge
description and access, many procedures can ing toward functional integration in many of its and looking beyond the traditional “silos” of
be coordinated effectively. For example, rather library/archives/museum operations. In particu- libraries versus archives versus museums.
than maintaining separate procedures for adding lar, the division is actively investigating new and
new items to library, archives or museum collec- coordinated processes for: The goal is to identify new and creative
tions, an integrated approach can centralize the approaches to collecting, documenting, pre-
• acquiring, collecting and documenting the serving and sharing the wealth of resources that
documentation of all new acquisitions. Donor
receipt of new materials to support a com- illustrate Alaska’s past and present.
information, descriptions of new accessions,
prehensive approach to acquisitions
conservation notes can all be consolidated; as

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 


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functional adjacency diagrams

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ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
SPACE NEEDS
update
Through numerous stimulating discussions Historical Collection (Library) have the most The preservation of these collections benefits
with the Executive Committee, staff and the issues with potential contamination. An isola- all Alaskans, a small child may develop a lifelong
Design Team, a collaborative method of working tion room will be used by these two sections interest in history by visiting the Museum; an
emerged. This will be facilitated by an integra- and by Archives when necessary. The Museum intern for a State Senator may look for prec-
tion of spaces in the new facility. Together the needs a direct access from the loading dock into edent in the State Archives.
Library, Archives, Museum, Administration and the Exhibit area for touring shows. Library and
Each section currently “explains” its collections
Technical and Imaging Services explained to the Archives also need a convenient way to bring
through a different catalog system. The end
Design Team what services they provide to the materials into the processing area from receiv-
goal of any cataloging system is clear collection
State and how work is accomplished within their ing. The loading/receiving area begins the back
access.
current space. From these meetings surfaced an of house integration of the sections.
understanding of what each section shares and When visiting the new building looking for infor-
Material preservation involves the treatment of
where potentially conflicting differences exist in mation on a subject, the public should be able to
objects for contaminants, repair and storage. All
the program requirements. It is important that see what is available from each of the sections
sections have some level of paper conservation,
the design and program create space that allows without having to run to different locations and
so an area to serve this need has been added
collaboration in new and yet unidentified ways. be confused by numerous cataloging methods.
to the program. Storage has different security
As the sections develop an understanding of
Each section collects, preserves, explains, inter- and environmental requirements for the various
what resources each has, they will better assist
prets, shares and communicates. Within each collections. The Museum collection requires the
patrons in their search for information. The staff
of these areas are both nuanced and notice- highest level of security. The Museum, Archives
is also looking at ways to make cataloging more
able procedural distinctions. The Design Team and Historical Collections all require specific
transparent. These issues impact the building
worked with the user group to understand all and similar environmental controls. Informa-
program in a number of ways.
the possible areas of integration that should be tion Service’s (Library) Collection is browsable
considered during the programming process and and has the lowest security and environmental Upon coming into the new facility it will be evi-
to find ways of addressing technical variations. demands. The various collections also grow or, dent where to enter the Museum Exhibit area
potentially, contract at different rates. A large and how to access the other collections. There
Collecting is done both through outreach result-
secure storage area shared between Archives will be one entrance to a reading/research room
ing in donations and through systematic collect-
and the Historical Collection gives potential for to serve Information Services, the Historical
ing and purchasing. New materials are evaluated
the line between these sections to move as stor- Collection and Archives. A service desk will be
for issues that must be addressed prior to being
age needs change. attended by staff who can direct patrons to
entered into the collection. The Museum and
items in all the collections or to another staff

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LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
member who will help with the search. This is a Spaces will be provided for visiting State staff its will be interspersed throughout the facility,
collection for all Alaskans; remote access should and Library Archives Museum personnel will possibly suspending items from the ceiling in
be as comprehensive as possible. continue to share their resources through the public areas, such as the lobby, and sometimes
internet and through actual transport of items displaying them in secure cases. Within the read-
For the staff, collaboration will mean the poten-
throughout the State. The Museum shares its ing room, the Museum book collections will be
tial of cross-disciplinary projects with the goal of
objects in a number of ways. The most apparent accessible to the public.
enriching the understanding of these important
is the exhibit hall that provides large numbers
State resources. All staff from the Library and Meeting rooms, classrooms, and an auditorium
of visitors a broad look into Alaskan history.
Archives and some staff from the Museum will that seats 120 people will be used for numerous
Archives and Historical have very similar meth-
occupy a mostly open office space and share a educational functions. A store will offer items
ods of sharing collections. The documents need
large processing area. Special project rooms will appropriate to each of the collections and a café
to be monitored at all times and do not circulate
be located around the building to facilitate these will serve the public.
outside of the research room. Information Ser-
cross-disciplinary endeavors.
vices has both a circulating and non-circulating The centerpiece of the building is the main lobby.
Each of the sections interprets and commu- collection. It will serve not just as a passageway to other
nicates its collections for the public, though rooms and a large social gathering area but,
Understanding how each section shares its
method and level of interpretation vary. This adds most importantly, a place where the extraordi-
collection was essential to developing the pro-
to the discussion of overlapping endeavors. nary nature of this program will unfold to the
gram for each viewing area. By placing a secure
visitor. This building aspires to support a new era
Sharing the body of knowledge stored in the research room within the shared reading room,
of collaboration between the Library, Archives
building and staff with greater Alaska is a primary Archives, Historical and Information Services
and Museum, enriching the lives of all Alaskans
goal of the Library Archives Museum Project. can work side-by-side, sharing material and staff
with its rich resources.
Outreach will be facilitated through the use of resources. There are also ways to integrate the
distance learning technology in meeting rooms. Museum into other areas of the building. Exhib-

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SPACELISTSUMMARYSHEET NetSF TotalGrossSF

PublicArea 13,770 17,213


Lobbies 5,260
MeetingRooms/Auditorium/Classrooms 4,650
Retail 1,700
Misc. 2,160
Administration 4,527 5,885
Offices 827
MeetingRooms 800
Workrooms 1,600
Misc. 1,300
UnassignedSpace 16,150 17,765
Office/Workroom 450
MechanicalSpaces 10,700
Electrical/DataSpaces 2,520
JanitorialSpaces 180
Loading 1,420
Misc. 880
LAMReferenceArea 25,166 32,716
Offices 2,964
Reading/ResearchRooms 9,322
Workrooms 2,400
SecureStorage 10,000
Misc. 480
DigitalandImagingServices 4,769 6,200
Offices 1,069
Workrooms 1,100
StorageArea 400
LabArea 2,100
Misc. 100
Museum 34,253 44,529
Offices 1,453
GallerySpace 16,000
Workrooms 4,300
SecureStorage 10,000
StorageArea 1,300
Misc. 1,200

TOTAL 98,635 124,307

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the design concepts are inspired by waterside development patterns in juneau and statewide

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ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
ARCHITECTURAL.
NARRATIVE

Our Goals. The Building must: Building Planning


• Fit into Juneau’s historic urban fabric, while Building Siting and Entry: The building is sited
creating a vibrant Library Archives Museum facing east toward downtown Juneau. The main
Concept
that celebrates the State of Alaska’s past, entry connects to the large public plaza which
The new facility will occupy a site near present and future. is bounded to the east by Whittier Street. The
the State Capitol, serving the needs of extension of the northeastern café into the
• Integrate and streamline Library, Archives
state agencies locally and a broader plaza helps protect the covered entry from the
and Museum operations for greater efficien-
network of constituent agencies strong northeasterly Taku winds that occur peri-
cy and responsiveness to the public.
throughout the state. It will act as the odically during the winter season. The decision
central repository for the exceptional • Increase virtual access to the collections to place the entry at this location was driven by
historical collections of the State . and resources for the State’s residents and two primary concerns: 1) The new building and
Library and Archives, as well as the State beyond. entry plaza provide a civic focal point and strong
Museum’s diverse collection of cultural • Be lasting, energy-efficient and sustainable. terminus to the future plaza extending across
artifacts – a major public attraction Whittier Street to the State Office Building; 2) By
during the summer tourist season. The preliminary design of the facility is rooted placing the entry and circulation core towards
in the State’s cultural history. The site layout the northeast of the site, tremendous views to
The initial design ideas for the new reflects the fan of the docks that historically the north, south, and east could be preserved
Alaska State Library Archives and occupied the site and the roof form is reminis- for enjoyment by library users and staff alike.
Museum Project were developed cent of the wing and feathers of a bird in flight.
through a series of staff and commu- The building and site is viewed from many high General Building Order: The design includes a
nity workshops beginning in April of vantage points from around the city; including generous light-filled, double height entry lobby
2010. During the workshops a series . the Governor’s Mansion on Calhoun Avenue with a café, auditorium and shared public meet-
of themes emerged. These themes . and from State Office Building. An inspired and ing rooms on the main floor. The café, auditorium
are used to guide the design process: expressive roof form will be a beacon to the city, and meeting rooms are immediately accessible
embracing and welcoming visitors from around for evening use without impacting the security
the world. for library or museum. Washrooms are located
conveniently near the entry, servicing the after

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 15


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
hour use of these functions. The museum is maximum visual control by a minimal number of storage, which in turn is immediately accessible
located on the main floor to accommodate the staff members. from the northwest loading and service entry.
large groups of visitors during the active summer During the next phase of design, the interpretive
Ground Floor Planning: Entry to the interpre-
months and to protect artifacts from direct light. vision will be established and the body of the
tive portions of the museum is adjacent to the
The reading room is located on the second floor interpretive space will be fully understood.
museum store. This allows a single point of con-
made accessible by a large public stair allowing
trol that can be managed by 1-2 staff persons, and Upper Floor Planning: The main Reading Room
patrons to enjoy the dramatic, unfolding views
encourages patrons to purchase items from the is conceived as a high ceilinged ‘great room’ with
to the north, south and east. A staff entry, build-
store or visit the café. The interpretive space is stacks in the center and reading opportunities
ing loading and service components are located
immediately accessible from the back-of-house along the perimeter. Controllable daylight will
on the northwest corner. Space planning has
functions, including exhibit prep and museum enter the room from high clerestory windows
been greatly influenced by the desire to have
located around the room’s perimeter. The room
is easily reconfigurable in order to adapt to the
changing nature of libraries. Patrons may enjoy
views of Mount Juneau and Mount Roberts to
the north and east as well as distant views down
Gastineau Channel to the south. The south por-
tion of the great room is entirely glazed to give
the feeling of hovering above the amazing view.
Access to the library will be from the large land-
ing located at the top of the public stair. Patrons
will have clear and easy access to the circulation
desk and have controlled access into the adja-
cent research room.
Basement: The design includes a basement in
order to better accommodate the parking and
mechanical needs of the Library, Archives and
Museum. Eighty parking spaces are planned
with vehicular access from Whittier Street into
the northeast corner of the site. A large public
elevator and stair will provide access to the pub-
lic lobby for the Museum and Library above.
view opportunities from site

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Sustainable Design cooling will be handled primarily through natural
ventilation and economizer cooling. The more
Energy conservation is a primary concern for
highly controlled spaces in the museum and
the State Library, Archives and Museum Project.
storage spaces will likely require some means of
Maximizing the benefits of natural lighting and
mechanical cooling.
minimizing energy loss are achievable goals.
At the outset of the project, staff and patrons To ensure the success of these strategies, staff
expressed a strong desire to provide daylit and operations personnel will be comfortable
spaces and to minimize long-term operating with the design direction and should be part of
costs. Space planning and the design of the the start-up and testing phases of the project.
building “skin” will be carefully coordinated to Emphasis will be given to building systems that
take advantage of daylight. The goal moving for- can be easily maintained and operated by local historic Juneau dock forms
ward will be to integrate time-tested “passive” personnel.
and “low-tech” strategies with the economical
and complementary use of new technologies in Materials and Methods
an effort to save energy while at the same time In all areas of construction, emphasis will be
providing for the well-being of patrons. Deci- placed on materials and assemblies that provide
sions will be guided by real data based on energy low-tech and economical construction. This
modeling of the building. means of careful planning is based on standard
The energy-efficiency strategy will primarily focus material units that facilitate little construction
on the building “skin.” Roof and walls will have waste. Durable materials and assemblies will
continuous insulation without thermal bridges be favored over those that are complicated and
and will be a vast improvement over traditional have high maintenance. Wherever practical, fin- inspiration sketch
construction assemblies. Other assemblies, like ish materials will be avoided, allowing structural
windows, will be thermally “broken” and will materials to be expressed thus minimizing over-
be triple-glazed where appropriate. Since cool- all material consumption.
ing loads in southeast Alaska are relatively light,

site plan sketch

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LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
CONCEPT
dIAGRAMS

Ground Floor Planning Upper Floor Planning

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ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
... The site layout reflects the fan of the docks that
historically occupied the site, and the roof form is
reminiscent of the wing and feathers of a bird in flight ...

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LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
CONCEPT
FLOOR PLANS

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wd. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Wood Iso.
Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Work Volunteer Cafe
Sup. Staff
Shop M M Lock.
Elev.
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.

Cons.
Supply Store
Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab
Secure Storage
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con. Museum
Exhibit

M W
Col. Disp.

Ex.
Stor.

Coll.
Sup.

Ground Floor Plan


20
First Floor Plan ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
KEY

Public Activity Space

Museum Exhibit Space


KEY
Staff | Staff Support
Public Activity Space
Storage
Museum Exhibit Space
Building Support
Staff | Staff Support
Library Space
Storage

Building Support

Library Space
Roof 0 20 40 80’

Elev. 0 20 40 80’
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M Elev.
W

DN

Supply Open Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video
Conf. Research
Room
Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform
Storage
Readers

LAM
Offices
Roof
Terrace

Staff

Upper Floor Plan


Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 21
LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Second Floor Plan
KEY

Public Activity Space

Museum Exhibit Space

Staff | Staff Support

Storage

Building Support

Library Space

0 20 40 80’

HC

Elev.

HC
HC

HC

Parking

Mechanical

Lower Level Parking Plan


22
Lower Level Parking Plan ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
project location

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 23


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
landscaping will be informed by local textures and native plantings

24
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
SITE & LANDSCAPE.
NARRATIVE

Site Context and Location Site Conditions surface parking and loading facilities are relo-
cated to the north side of the building and will
Situated at the confluence of important natural The site is built on rock fill that dates from the
accommodate up to two tractor trailers and two
borders and urban corridors, the site presents city’s hard-rock mining period. The fill is porous
smaller delivery vehicles. Public parking is under
opportunities to create connections, to link the and is subject to inundation by tidal waters.
the building.
waterfront to the site, to further develop the Generous precipitation and maritime conditions
arboretum, and to create a public plaza as an make this area conducive to growing plants from
important outdoor space. most parts of Alaska. Prevailing winds enter the
Pedestrian Circulation and Entrance
site from the southeast with the occasional Taku Plaza
Located between the Gastineau Channel and
winds coming from the northeast. Pedestrian access to the site will come primar-
Mount Juneau, the site occupies an area that
ily from the east with clear views into the entry
was once a tidal beach. A spillway or tailrace The area to the east of the site is typified by a
plaza. This east access from downtown and the
from an historic hydroelectric plant and a shop- lack of clear connectivity and scattered parking
State Office Building will be further strengthened
ping center form the western boundary to the lots, in spite of being a major pedestrian pas-
by the plaza’s future extension into the eastern
site. Egan Drive, an important highway, along sageway. The tailrace on the west side of the
parcel across Whittier Street.
with a restaurant, hotel and radio station forms site is partially exposed with the power com-
the southern boundary, with the waterfront one pany planning on completing the piping within The other important pedestrian access to the
block further south. The eastern site boundary the next four years. Currently, tour buses enter site is from the south. Pedestrian access over
is Whittier Street, which separates the museum the site and pull directly to the building entry. A Egan Drive is addressed with a path that can
site from a collection of surface parking lots, collection of trees and shrubs with interpretive connect to a proposed pedestrian bridge that
Willoughby Street, the State Office Building and signs forms an arboretum on-site. will link the existing waterfront path to a north-
downtown Juneau. Immediately north of the south pedestrian path. This passage will provide
site is a motel, restaurant and Willoughby Street Vehicular Access and Circulation an opportunity for tourists to cross the highway
where the outline of the beach is still somewhat This plan proposes to relocate the bus drop-off to the site. The path will continue north through
visible. Two well used pedestrian corridors serve zone to the Whittier Street edge. This move will a naturalized corridor along the western site
the site: between the State Office Building and allow the site to reclaim its frontage as a plaza boundary connecting to Willoughby Street.
the shopping center (east-west) and from the and event space, keeping buses close to the
waterfront to the museum (south to north). street for easy arrival and departure. The staff

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 25


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
2

Landscape
The entry plaza is designed to be low mainte-
nance, safe and flexible enough to accommo-
3
date a variety of event programs and uses, and
1 to be an elegant and enjoyable public space. This
entry plaza is seen as a first step towards creat-
ing a public open space and arboretum that later
expands towards the east to create additional
1 New LAM building public space and to continue uniting the district.
2 State Office Building The plaza landscape will represent a balance of
plantings and hardscape, reflecting local materi-
3 proposed pedestrian mall
als and textures. Due to the rock fill at the site,
Mall Concept -- Interim Build-out trees will be placed in a raised planting area sup-
ported by stone and good topsoil. Sightlines are
maintained throughout the planted areas by the
use of low growing herbaceous plants. Raised
plantings will define paths within the plaza space
2 and provide ample topsoil depth for trees and
other plants.
The arboretum will be a lightly forested zone
on the south side of the museum, providing an
3
entry to the north-south trail. On the north side
of the building, tree plantings will buffer the staff
1
entry and parking area. Plaza paving and planter
designs will reflect the glacial activity typical
of the region: exposed rock faces; scored and
grooved paving surfaces will provide a sense of
detail and directionality. Seating and other fur-
nishings will further reflect the rock outcrops
found in the nearby mountains and the forms of
dugout canoes.
Mall Concept -- Full Build-out

26
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
y Ave
n ue
CONCEPT
Wil
lough
b
Site Plan

Wh
ittie
r S
tre
6 3

et
9
4

2 8
1

8
5

1 building footprint
5
2 entry plaza

3 underground parking entry

4 bus drop-off

5 pedestrian trails
5 6 service/maintenance area

7 staff parking
venue
Egan A 8 art/sculpture

9 outdoor café seating

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 27


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
This page intentionally left blank.
Civil
Narrative

Introduction elevator, parking garage and other uses. Domes- AJ rock fill are often referred to as outwash and
tic/fire water supply and sanitary sewer system glacio-marine deposits. These soils commonly
The proposed Library Archives Museum project
will be supplied through the CBJ public utilities. consist of gray to brownish light gray sand with
site is on property owned by the State of Alaska.
gravel with pockets of fine sand/silt deposits
ECI/Hyer provided R&M the LAM Concept Design The topographic survey prepared for the site
some of which offer low bearing values.
Full Report on September 2, 2010 to assist in reveals that Lots 4, 5, and 6 are developed as
preparing the civil concept narrative. Site topo- the existing State of Alaska Museum. With the
graphic survey has been previously been per- exception of the museum building and the tem-
Ground Water
formed by our firm and included as an Exhibit to porary annex, Lots 4, 5 and 6 are relatively flat Ground water at this site will be dependent
the concept narrative report. and are covered by lawn areas, landscaping, upon the tide level of Gastineau Channel and
sidewalks, an asphalt paved access road and most likely fluctuate within the tide range on
The proposed LAM Building is located adjacent any given day. Structural foundation members
parking areas accessing Whittier Street. Lots 9
to Willoughby Avenue to the north and to the and site construction activities below elevation
and 12 FR are predominantly developed as fairly
east by Whittier Avenue, both which is City and +20’ mean lower low water would be influenced
level gravel surfaced parking areas accessing
Borough of Juneau (CBJ) maintained and owned by the tide. Dewatering the project site during
onto Willoughby Avenue.
paved roadways. To the northwest is located construction is important. Mitigation methods
private developed property including the Drift- The following is our conceptual civil design for controlling construction surface and ground-
wood Lodge and Salvation Army Church. To the based on our understanding of the Project. Site water include but are not limited to:
south lie the Prospector Hotel and the KTOO civil issues will be further refined to determine
Radio building. To the west lie the Alaska Electric the most economical and intelligent solutions 1. All below-grade portions of the building are
Light and Power (AEL&P) Gold Creek Tailrace for the Project during the Schematic and Design properly water and moisture-proofed by
Flume and Foodland Shopping Center. The legal Development design phases. waterproofing the below grade foundation
description of the LAM property is Lots 4, 5, 6, 9 walls and placement of a plastic vapor bar-
and 12 Front (FR), Block Sixty Six (66), Tidelands Site Geology and Soils rier below the floor slabs.
Addition to the CBJ. Preliminary research of general site geology and 2. Surface water is effectively isolated from
The LAM Building proposal consists of a ground soils on adjacent properties indicates that the entering all soils below foundation footings
floor, upper floor and lower level below grade site was originally an alluvial soils formed by Gold and floor slabs.
parking structure. The facility will include spaces Creek. The alluvial soils were filled with mine tail-
3. Surface grading is accomplished in a man-
for museum, archives, auditorium, meeting ings waste rock from the Alaska Juneau (AJ) Mine
ner that will positively divert surface water
rooms, offices, restrooms, mechanical room, from the 1910 through 1940’s. The depth of this
runoff away from the structure.
material varies. The granular deposits below the

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 29


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
4. Concentrated runoff is controlled by install- loughby Avenue and Whittier Street. No onsite line to the existing 8” line and installing a new
ing perimeter foundation and roof drain disposal of wastewater or private well water is 6” gate valve. The existing museum building is
systems to route surface and subsurface anticipated. No unusual difficulties are foreseen connected to the water line in Whittier Street.
drainage away from the building. provided standard design and construction tech-
niques are employed, such as, proper bedding of Sanitary Water Service
Driving and Parking Surfaces buried pipes, compacting trench backfill to 95% Two options exist for routing wastewater
Proposed access road to the below grade park- of modified proctor and sufficient pipe embed- generated from the building via gravity sewer
ing garage is assumed to be a two lane asphalt ment to prevent freezing (5’ to top of waterline). methods to the CBJ public sewer system. The
paved surface with concrete curb and gutters on Sewer and water lines should be constructed in first involves connecting to the existing 10” PVC
both sides and sidewalk on one side of the road. accordance with applicable codes and standards sanitary sewer main line located west of the site
Asphalt surfaced staff parking areas, bus drop of the State of Alaska Department of Trans- on Lot 13A. The sewer main is reported to be
off zone, and the access road to the lower level portation/Public Facilities and CBJ Engineering installed over 9’ in depth below the existing fin-
parking garage are anticipated to have 3” asphalt Department. ished surfaces. The new sewer line in this option
pavement with 9” depth of base course, grading would have to be routed below the existing
D-1 pending outcome of geotechnical exploration Water Service AEL&P 60” CMP which carries water from the
recommendations. Concrete curbs with sidewalk An existing 16” ductile iron water main with 6” upstream power plant. Permission would need
will be installed at the bus drop off. Architectural ductile iron water service stub out with gate to be granted from AEL&P, the owner of Lot 13A
concrete 4” thick with 6” depth of D-1 beneath valve is located near the northeast corner of Lot and CBJ to make this connection. The second
having varying widths are planned in the plaza 9. A 6-inch water main is assumed to be installed option involves connecting to the existing 10”
area. Parking stalls should be delineated with 4” to meet domestic and fire protection (sprin- AC sanitary sewer line located in Whittier Street.
wide yellow parking stripes and accessible park- klered system) needs for the building per AMC This line is also fairly deep below the existing
ing stalls delineated with accessible blue painted Engineers. Connection to this existing water ground surface.
stripes and appropriate accessible signage. service will be made and the new 6” water line
Collection and discharge of wastewater from the
Traffic control signs (Stop, No Parking, Loading installed to the building mechanical room. It is
new LAM building is assumed to be via gravity
Zone, Accessible etc.) will meet current Manual assumed that there will be adequate water flow
methods through 8” PVC piping. Final sizing of
of Uniform Control Devices. D-1 gravel paths are and pressure with a 6” water line but this will be
the wastewater line will be confirmed with the
also planned around the site. Path width will be confirmed during the schematic design phase of
mechanical design engineers in the schematic
approximately 5’ with 4” depth of D-1. the project. An alternative option for water ser-
design phase. Sanitary sewer cleanouts will be
vice to the building involves connecting to the
installed 5’ from the building wall and sanitary
Site Utilities existing 8” ductile iron water main in Whittier
sewer manholes installed as necessary. Asphalt
Water and sewer utilities will be connected Street. This would involve cutting across Whit-
pavement removal and replacement will be
to the CBJ public systems located within Wil- tier Street to connect the new 6” ductile iron

30
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
required for the installation in either option. All Strategically placed storm drain structures with
wastewater generated from this site would be 12” CPP gravity storm piping between them
treated at the CBJ wastewater treatment plant. will drain the drop-off zone, hard-scape areas,
access roads and sidewalks. Roof drains would
Storm Water System be routed to the ground surface and routed
Storm drain systems exist within Willoughby away from the building foundation walls. Foun-
Avenue and Whittier Street. It is assumed for dation drains would be routed to storm drain
this concept narrative that site storm drainage catch basins/manholes if elevations are found
will be designed to be routed to each of these to be adequate. The lower level parking garage
areas. An 18” CPP storm drain line with curb will require a storm drain collection system and
inlets exists on Willoughby Avenue which would an electronic submersible pumping system with
be connected to new storm drain pipe from high level alarms to discharge any storm water
this project. This system is not deep (5’ below accumulated in the parking garage to the gravity
finish street grade) but we assume there will storm system.
be enough elevation drop to allow storm water
from the proposed staff parking area and service Required Development Permits
area to be collected in storm drain structures The following is a list of potential development
and piped underground in 12” CPP pipe to the permits that may be required for this project:
Willoughby Avenue system. Foundation and
• CBJ Conditional Use Permit
roof drains would also be routed to this side of
the site where feasible. Loading dock walls are • CBJ Grading and Drainage Permit
assumed to be elevated above grade, therefore • CBJ Building Permit
no separate system is required for drainage.
• CBJ Utility Connection Permit
Storm drainage collected on the eastern half of
the site where the underground parking access • Utility service coordination for telephone,
road, entry plaza, bus drop-off zone and art/ electric and Cable TV.
sculpture areas have been identified, will drain It is assumed the site is classified as “uplands”
into the existing storm drain system on Whittier and that it would not fall under the jurisdiction
Street. An existing 18” CPP storm drain pipe with of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE).
storm drain structures is located on the east side
of Whittier Street. The existing museum storm
drain is currently connected to this system.

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 31


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
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Structural.
Narrative

General • Functional performance: How well will the It is anticipated that more than one material
structural systems perform during normal will eventually be selected for a given structural
The structural design will be developed accord-
use? (For example, is there perceptible vibra- system (e.g. multiple framing systems for the
ing to the applicable building codes and design
tion of the floor plate underfoot?) building floor plates), based on the answers to
standards. These codes and standards include,
the above questions.
but are not limited to the following: • Functional compatibility: Are the structural
systems compatible with the other design
• 2009 International Building Code (IBC)
disciplines’ functional needs (e.g. fire rat-
Foundations and Garage Floor Slab
• ASCE 7-08 Minimum Design Loads for Build- ings, routing of mechanical systems)? The foundation design will be developed accord-
ings and Other Structures ing to the recommendations of the geotechnical
• Constructability: Do the structural systems engineer, based on the site-specific soils condi-
• AISC 341 Seismic Provisions for Steel Build- work with the construction sequencing? Are tions. It is known that the general soil make-up
ings they consistent with locally available labor? consists of man-made granular fill over native
The building will be designed as an Occupancy • Cost effectiveness: Are we achieving “bang tidal beach soils. The granular fill is subject to
Category II structure (standard occupancy), per for the buck” and staying within the project regular tidal saltwater inundation.
ASCE 7 Table 1-1. As a result, importance factors budget? The foundations are anticipated to consist
for snow, wind and seismic loads are all 1.0. This
• Cleanliness: In areas where the building con- of driven steel piles, most likely H sections.
level of design is intended to ensure life safety
tents are sensitive to contamination, can the Depending on the structural loads, piles may be
during a design-level event.
structural systems be selected to minimize placed in groups or standalone. For example, at
potential contamination? (For example, in heavily loaded interior columns, pile groups may
Structural Systems Selection be required to support the loads, whereas along
the storage/vault areas, are there structural
In general, many factors will be considered systems that do not need spray-applied a uniformly loaded basement wall, single piles
when selecting the materials and systems for fireproofing that may degrade over time?) may be spaced at regular intervals.
the building’s structure. Some of the questions
that will be answered during design include the • Aesthetics: In areas where structure will be Piles will be capped with cast-in-place concrete
following: exposed to view, are the materials compat- pile caps at concentrated load locations, and
ible with the architectural form? In areas cast-in-place concrete grade beams at uniform
• Life safety: How well will the structural where the structure is NOT exposed to view, load locations.
systems perform during catastrophic wind, are the structural members (e.g. seismic
seismic and snow events? The parking garage floor slab is anticipated to be
braces) able to be concealed? a cast-in-place, mildly reinforced (i.e. non-post-

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 33


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
tensioned) structural concrete slab. The slab will Factors that will determine the basement wall fireproofing or gypsum board column wraps,
probably be designed for 2-way action, spanning system selection include construction sequenc- which could deteriorate over time and con-
both directions to supporting grade beams and ing, cost, waterproofing design and geotechni- taminate the spaces below.
slab beam strips. For pricing purposes, the slab is cal considerations.
3. Second floor framing over conventional ar-
assumed to be 8 inches thick, with double mats
eas: Where contamination is not a concern,
of steel reinforcing. Elevated Floor Framing the second floor plate will be a concrete
Several different floor framing systems are topping slab on composite steel floor deck
Basement Walls anticipated, depending on the functional needs (6-1/2” total slab thickness) on wide-flange
At least two systems will be considered for the of the spaces above and below the floor plates. structural steel beam and girder framing.
basement wall construction: These systems are as follows: Beams and girder would be supported on
1. Cast-in-place concrete walls: With a con- 1. First floor framing over the parking garage: steel columns.
crete wall system, the site would be fully The first floor plate is anticipated to be a
excavated before the basement walls are concrete topping slab on composite steel Roof Framing
constructed. The walls would be built on top floor deck (6-1/2” typical total slab thickness, The roof framing systems will vary depending on
of perimeter grade beams, after the founda- 8” minimum thickness at vibration-sensitive the architectural form, as follows:
tion piling, pile caps and garage floor slab floor areas) on wide-flange structural steel
1. Architecturally exposed library/lobby roof:
are installed. The walls would be backfilled beam and girder framing. Beams and girder
Where the roof structure is exposed and
after the main floor plate is constructed. The would be supported on interior columns and
integrated into the architectural form, the
concrete walls are assumed to be 12 inches perimeter basement walls.
framing is anticipated to consist of plywood
thick, with double mats of steel reinforcing.
2. Second floor framing over “clean” areas: sheathing on timber decking on curved
2. Steel sheet piling: With a sheet pile system, Where potential contamination of the glu-lam timber and/or HSS beam framing.
the sheets would be driven before the building contents in the space below is a The beams will connect to architecturally
foundation is excavated. After the sheets consideration, the second floor plate will exposed precast concrete columns with cus-
are driven, the foundation would be exca- consist of a cast-in-pace concrete topping tom fabricated steel connection hardware.
vated and the interior foundations and floor slab (4” minimum thickness) over one-way
2. Conventional low slope roof areas: Where
slab would be constructed. The sheet piling precast concrete slabs (hollow core planks)
architectural expression is not required,
would take the place of the H piling and supported on precast concrete girders. Gird-
roofs will be framed with steel roof deck on
concrete grade beams around the perimeter ers will be supported by interior columns
wide-flange structural steel beam and girder
walls, and would be designed to resist both and perimeter concrete bearing walls. This
framing, supported on steel columns.
gravity and lateral (soil retaining) loads. system eliminates the need for spray-applied

34
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Column Framing Lateral Force Resisting System The vertical resisting elements (braced frames
and shear walls) will vary according to the loca-
The column construction will vary depending The building will be subjected to lateral forces
tion in the building, as follows:
on the functional needs of the surrounding due to wind and seismic events, and the struc-
spaces, and the architectural aesthetic needs, as ture will be designed to resist these forces and 1. Library/lobby roof: The architecturally
follows: resolve them into the ground. exposed roof structure will be braced on all
sides by diagonal steel rod tension bracing,
1. Lower level parking/mechanical areas: In Lateral wind forces are the result of pressure and
deployed in X configurations. Braces may be
these areas, columns are anticipated to be suction on the building’s vertical surfaces. Wind
constructed with clevises and turnbuckles,
structural steel (W shapes). Where fire rating loads are transferred to the horizontal roof and
or other similar mechanisms for making the
is required, columns may be wrapped and/or floor diaphragms by the building’s exterior wall
connections.
fireproofed. Where vehicle impact resistance assemblies.
is a concern, columns may be protected by a 2. Conventional low-slope roofs: Roof dia-
Seismic forces are inertial forces, generated
waist-high concrete encasement. phragms will be connected to buckling-
when the ground accelerates beneath the
restrained braced frames (BRBF’s), which
2. First and second floor “clean” areas: In the building. Inertial forces will concentrate at the
consist of wide-flange beams and columns
Secure Storage and any other sensitive roof and second floor levels, where the seismic
and manufactured diagonal BRB bracing
areas, columns will be concrete (precast or mass is greatest. Foundations and ground floor
members (Star Seismic “Powercat” braces
cast-in-place). This will eliminate the need slabs are in phase with the ground, and do not
or equivalent www.starseismic.net). Braces
for fireproofing and/or column wraps, which contribute seismic forces to the above-ground
are generally oriented in single-diagonal or
could break down over time and contami- structure.
chevron (inverted V) configurations. Diago-
nate the room contents.
The roof or floor deck at each level acts as a hori- nal bracing members will be configured
3. First floor, second floor, and roof areas with zontal diaphragm to transfer lateral loads to the to avoid conflicts with the floor plan and
exposed structure: Where the columns are vertical resisting elements (steel braced frames window/door openings. BRB members and
exposed to view, they will be precast con- and concrete shear walls). The diaphragms are their end connections (gusset plates and
crete. Columns may be cast into expressive connected to collector beams (drag struts), welds) are engineered by the brace manu-
forms according to the architectural design. which accumulate and deliver the lateral loads facturer, using the geometry and loading
Embedded steel hardware will accept the to the vertical resisting elements. Collector ele- criteria supplied by the Engineer of Record.
connections of the surrounding floor and ments are designed for special load combina- Bracing connections are field welded to gus-
roof framing members. tions and detailing provisions as required by the set plates (approximately 120” total of 5/16”
building codes. In general, the collectors consist fillet weld is assumed for each connection).
4. First and second floor perimeter columns
of steel beams, with slip-critical bolted or welded
and columns at braced frame bays: In these 3. Garage, basement mechanical room and first
end connections.
areas, columns will be structural steel (HSS level Secure Storage walls: Where concrete
or W shapes).

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 35


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
walls are necessitated by other aspects
of the building design, the walls may be
incorporated into the lateral force resisting
system. Where this occurs, the walls will
be designed as special reinforced concrete
shear walls (12” thickness assumed). Note
that if the garage perimeter walls are con-
structed with sheet piling, the sheet piles
will be designed to act as shear walls.
The seismic design will account for the overall
redundancy of the seismic load resisting sys-
tems, as prescribed by ASCE 7 section 12.3.4.2.
For each direction of seismic loading, the build-
ing is assigned a value of rho, which acts as a
multiplier on the calculated nominal seismic
loads. A rho value of 1.3 is used for loading in
both directions.

36
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Mechanical.
Narrative

General be based on standard commercial/institutional • International Building Code (IBC)


grade components and packaged systems for
The design of the mechanical systems to sup- • International Mechanical Code (IMC)
ease of maintenance and vender support. Sys-
port the new State of Alaska Library Archives
tems will be designed to be safe, reliable and • Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC)
Museum will focus on providing the appropriate
efficient using proven techniques and current • International Fire Code (IFC)
indoor environment(s) for the preservation of
technology. Special consideration will be given
its historical collections. This “appropriate” envi- • National Electric Code (NEC)
to incorporating energy saving systems when
ronment will fall somewhere between the ideal
feasible. Mechanical system designs will focus Applicable Standards include, but are not limited
and the practical as the ultimate function of the
on logical equipment placement, ease of opera- to, the following:
facility will be to allow both public and scholarly
tion and accessibility for both preventative and
access to these collections. • American National Standards Institute, ANSI
corrective maintenance.
General design factors to be considered will • American Society for Testing and Materials,
Our design team will work closely with the
include light, relative humidity, temperature, air ASTM
client’s administrators, collections managers,
pollution, pest infestation (i.e.: mold, fungus and
curators, conservators and security personnel to • Underwriters Laboratory, UL
bacteria), shock and vibration, natural emergen-
solicit further design input to allow us to provide
cies and security. • National Fire Codes and Standards, NFPA
the appropriate mechanical systems and their
During follow-on design phases, the types of proper level of environmental control for this • American Society of Heating, Refrigerating
collections to be housed within this faculty will facility. and Air Conditioning Engineers, ASHRAE
be further defined and indoor environmental
The following is our conceptual mechanical • Duct Construction Standards, SMACNA
performance targets defined. General safety
design based on our current understanding of
and health, comfort, economy of operation and
collection requirements (preservation indexes
the Project. Indoor environmental performance Heating System
targets will be finalized and approved, mechani-
for organic materials) will be considered and Load Estimate
cal equipment and systems selected, sized and
acceptable levels of risk established.
located by the end of Design Development Our conceptual heating load estimate for this
Centralized heating, ventilating and air condi- phase. facility located in Juneau, Alaska is 3,850,000
tioning systems, plumbing, fire protection and BTU/HR for design day heating conditions. This
building automation systems will be designed Applicable Codes and Standards estimate includes outside air ventilation require-
to achieve the client approved indoor environ- Applicable Codes include, but are not limited to, ments in accordance with general ASHRAE
mental performance targets. The design will the following: guidelines.

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 37


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Central Hydronic Plant The secondary building heating loop supply tem- located along an exterior wall will receive radi-
perature will vary following an adjustable reset ant ceiling panels.
The baseline central hydronic heating system
schedule based on outside air temperature.
will utilize three (3) identical forced draft, high The main entry vestibule will be heated with
efficiency fuel oil fired boilers with modulating The HVAC system will be designed to eliminate forced air/radiant floor heat. The remaining ves-
burner controls. Each boiler will be sized for 40% the need for secondary glycol heating loops tibules/entries will receive wall or floor mounted
of the gross heating load providing a 20% design which are often used to provide freeze protec- cabinet unit heaters. The mechanical and electri-
safety factor. Should one (1) boiler be shut-down tion to AHU coils. cal rooms, utility and other storage areas will be
for maintenance, the two remaining boilers will heated with hydronic unit heaters.
Larger diameter hydronic heating piping (4"
provide the buildings heating load requirement.
and 6") will be schedule 40 welded black steel.
Basis of design boilers will be Weil McLain, Model
Smaller diameter hydronic piping (3” and
DX Cooling Systems
788 (1,700,000 BTU/HR gross outputs each).
smaller) will be Type L copper with 95-5 tin-anti- Central Cooling System
As the project progresses and our HVAC design mony or 430 silver solder. Piping will be routed
becomes further developed, we will explore some away from areas subject to water damage. Any Each central air handling system will be equipped
possible alternative heating sources (i.e. ground piping in locations that may be difficult to access with a direct expansion cooling coil and dedi-
source heat pumps). after installation will be brazed. cated condensing unit. Each condensing unit will
be identical (except for size) and equipped with
Heating System Arrangement Terminal Heating Units digital scroll compressors to provide modulating
supply air temperature control. Each condensing
The central boilers will be connected in a primary/ Remote duct mounted reheat coils, located unit will be located close to its associated air han-
secondary loop arrangement with each boiler above the ceilings (return air plenums) will be dling unit to limit refrigerant piping runs. Type
having its own primary loop circulator pump limited to zones not susceptible to water dam- R-410A refrigerant will be specified. Preliminary
sized for a 30° F differential temperature drop age. In general, reheat coils will be located in load estimates indicate a maximum mechanical
across the boiler at rated output. The primary their associated air handling unit cabinet (multi- cooling capacity of between 250 - 300 tons will
boiler loop will be connected to the secondary zone units) or fan room serving the area when- be required.
building heating loop using a primary/secondary ever possible.
cross-over bridge piping arrangement. Computer/Server Rooms
Hydronic radiant floor heating will be provided
Secondary loop variable speed circulator pumps for the first floor of the facility. The underside of Computer/Server rooms will have the capabil-
will transfer hydronic heat to the building’s air the first floor slab will be insulated to a minimum ity of being cooled independently from the
handling unit heating coils, the first floor radiant of R-13 to direct heat up into the heated zones. building’s central ventilation systems utilizing
floor heating system and the facilities terminal dedicated packaged data room air-condition-
Second floor perimeter offices will receive perim-
hydronic heating units. ing units. Critical rooms may have redundant
eter baseboard auxiliary heating. Toilet rooms if

38
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
cooling units. Packaged air-conditioning units will have the ability to be shut-off during when be a constant volume system with variable
will include a wall or floor mounted evaporator the building is unoccupied to save energy. speed fan motor to allow the fine adjustment
section and a separate remote condenser unit. of air change rates per hour within zone. This
Cooling equipment suspended from the ceiling AHU-2 System system will incorporate precise humidity control
will be avoided to prevent interference with AHU-2 (42,000 CFM) will serve the museum (primary) and temperature control (secondary).
cable routing. An indirect floor drain will be pro- lobby and exhibit areas. This system will be a Outside air intake will be kept to the absolute
vided for condensate drainage. constant volume multi-zone system with variable minimum level necessary to provide positive
speed fan control to allow the adjustment of air zone pressurization and gas dilution (if neces-
Ventilation Systems changeover rates within the zone. This system sary. The need for redundant supply fans and
The primary building ventilation systems will will be capable of high precision humidity and “ready for use” spare parts will be determined
include six (6) separate and independent central temperature control. At this point the museum/ as part of the project risk assessment.
air handling units (AHU’s). Each unit may include exhibit area is a single large open volume. The Special indoor environments required for media
some or all of the following sections: mixing box, system will have the capability to control this storage will be provided using air tight vaults
pre-filter (MERV 7), final filter (MERV 14), desic- area as a single zone and the flexibility to con- “cocooned” with the archive area. These spe-
cant dehumidifier, gas phase filtration, supply trol it as several independent zones depending cialty vaults will incorporate dedicated cooling
fan, DX cooling coil, heating coil, humidification on how the space is being utilized. and dehumidification systems.
steam dispersion panel, silencer and discharge
plenum. Service plenums (18” to 24” wide) will AHU-3 System AHU-6 will serve the second floor secure storage
be provided between specific AHU sections (archive area) and will be identical to AHU-4.
AHU-3 (27,000 CFM) will serve the central first
to allow for proper maintenance and cleaning and second floor staff collections and processing AHU-5 System
access. Supply fans will be equipped with vari- areas. This system will be setup with VAV supply
able speed drive (VSD) controllers to allow pre- terminal units and corresponding exhaust air AHU-5 (24,000 CFM) will serve the second floor
cise supply air volume control. Basis of design valves (EAVs). The system will provide precise reading/research rooms, LAMP offices and cen-
for AHUs will be Scott Springfield, Haakon or a pressure control using an “air flow tracking” tral processing areas. This system will be setup
pre-approved equal. control strategy similar to a laboratory. with VAV supply terminal units and correspond-
ing exhaust air valves (EAVs) similar to AHU-3.
AHU-1 System Wet lab areas will include general use fume It will provide precise pressure control using an
hoods with dedicated roof mounted exhaust “air flow tracking” control strategy similar to a
AHU-1 (38,000 CFM) will serve the main entry
fans. laboratory.
and first and second floor lobbies, café, audito-
rium, administration, staff and technical service AHU-4 and 6 Systems General Exhaust Air
and general use areas. This system will be a con-
ventional variable air volume (VAV) system and AHU-4 (26,500 CFM) will serve the first floor Toilet rooms and janitor closest will have exhaust
secure storage (archive area). This system will systems sized to provide between 8 and 12 air

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 39


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
changes per hour. Exhaust fans will operate To provide full humidity control, dehumidifica- Plumbing Systems
continuously when the associated ventilation tion will also be required. Baseline dehumidifica-
systems are operating. tion control will be accomplished using the DX Domestic Water
cooling coil. A desiccant system will be added Domestic water will be provided from the
Shop Ventilation in series to provide precise dehumidification municipal water system. It is assumed that water
The wood shop will ventilated from the AHU-3 control. pressure is adequate. If water supply water pres-
system whenever the room is occupied and not sure is found to be in excess of 80 psig, pressure
recirculated. A small commercial hard ducted Acoustical Control regulators will be used to reduce domestic water
saw dust collection system with remote exhaust Mechanical systems will be designed and speci- pressure to below 80 psig. If water pressure is
fan will be provided. fied in accordance with current ASHRAE guide- below 40 psig, a variable speed domestic water
lines (Room Criteria (RC)) to provide a comfort- booster pump system will be provided.
Parking Garage Ventilation able indoor acoustical environment. Special
Domestic hot water will be provided using an
Four (4) propeller type exhaust fans (16,000 CFM sound attenuation will be provided at central
indirect water heater utilizing the central heat-
each) equipped with motor operated relief lou- AHUs, ventilation return air transfer openings
ing system as a heat source.
vers will ventilate the unheated parking garage. and at the auditorium to control sound power
The fans will be interlocked with corresponding levels. Rotating equipment will incorporate Process Water
outside air intake louvers equipped with motor vibration isolation and/or thickened housekeep-
ing pads as required to reduce the transmission Local domestic water will be tested and evalu-
operated dampers which will provide make-up
of equipment vibration to adjacent areas. Initial ated for use with the HVAC humidification
air to the parking garage. The fans will oper-
room background sound goals are as follows: system. The use of straight tap or deionized
ate intermittently using air sensors to control
(DI) water and the associated maintenance
parking garage exhaust fume concentrations to Lobby: RC (N) 35-45 requirements associated with each water purity
within safe levels.
Office Areas: RC (N) < 35 level will be considered. The mechanical system
necessary to provide the appropriate quality of
Humidification System Auditorium: RC (N) 25 humidification system make-up water will be
Each building zone will include humidity con- Library/Museum: RC (N) 30-40 provided.
trol. Relative humidity levels and tolerances will
determined as the design progresses for each Processing: RC (N) 40-50 (w/ fume hoods) Non-Potable Water (Processing Areas)
ventilation system. A separate electric humidi- Storage: RC (N) 40-50 Where processing chemicals are used and/or
fier with dedicated air handler mounted steam
where the possibility of cross-contamination may
dispersion panel will be provided for each cen-
be of concern, additional backflow protection of
tral air handling system. The maximum humidifi-
the domestic water system will be provided at
cation load is estimated to be 800 LBS/HR.
the zone and/or fixture level.

40
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Tempered Water System • Sanitary and storm drain piping will be cast include an indoor seasonal shut-off ball valve
iron, except drains from processing areas above the ceiling.
A dedicated tempered water system (85
will be chemical resistant up to a point of
Degrees F supply temperature (adjustable)) will Processing/Wet Lab Area Plumbing Fixtures
dilution, typically downstream of major rest-
be provided to serve the facilities combination
rooms. Below ground piping will use no-hub • Sinks and counters will be integral units
emergency shower/eyewashes (EWS). Water
fittings. No-hub fittings are also acceptable specified by the Architect.
temperature will be controlled using a dedicated
for above ground piping.
hydronically heated indirect water heater and a • Associated faucets will be institutional
single tempering valve designed for multi-emer- • Plumbing fixture groups will be provided grade.
gency shower usage. Tempered water recircula- with isolation valves to facilitate mainte-
tion will be provided utilizing an inline circulator nance. Valves two inches and smaller will be • Drain, waste and vent piping will be stan-
pump to continuously provide tempered water quarter-turn ball valves. dard DWV piping.
to each combination emergency shower/eye- • Acid resistant DWV system will be provided
wash location. Our design will assume that only General Plumbing Fixtures if required.
one EWS will be operational at any given time. • Plumbing Fixtures will be vitreous china and • Emergency shower and eyewash station
stainless steel as applicable. designs will be based on HAWS or Guard-
Compressed Air
• Wall hung toilets, urinals and lavatories will ian and supported by local tempered water
A compressed air system will be provided to systems.
be specified based on American Standard or
serve the wood shop. Remote compressed air
as approved.
outlets will be provided at other locations identi- Elevator Pits
fied by the Client (i.e. fume hoods) as the design • Public toilets and urinals will have 120VAC
progresses. Compressed air will typically be automatic infrared flush valves. Staff toilets An automatic elevator sump pump with oil sens-
piped at 80 to 90 psig, with local regulators at and urinals shall have manual flush valves. ing shut-off will be provided for each elevator pit
each point of use. All point of use regulators will sump. Pumps will indirect drain to the building
• Drinking fountains with push-bar type exterior.
be furnished with filters. faucet operators will be specified for handi-
capped operation. Fire Protection
Plumbing Piping
• Floor drains will be provided for all rest- The facility will receive its water from the munici-
• Domestic water piping will be type L copper.
rooms and mechanical rooms, as well as pal water system. Backflow protection will be
Solder will be 95-5 tin-antimony or 430 silver
janitor closets equipped with mop sinks. provided at the fire protection system connec-
solder. Lead-tin (50-50) solder will not be
accepted. • Exterior hose bibbs will be non-freeze, auto- tion point to the service water riser. If water
matic draining will be provided at a mini- pressure is inadequate, a fire pump/jockey pump
• Vent piping above ground will be DWV system will be provided.
mum of 100 FT intervals. Each hose bibb will
(drain, waste, and vent) copper or cast iron.

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 41


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
The facility will be protected by a full coverage, Mechanical and Electrical Rooms water damage to collections, reduce sound and
wet type, fire sprinkler protection system with vibration transmission to adjacent sound sensi-
fast reaction sprinkler heads in accordance with Central Mechanical Room tive areas simplify/shorten duct runs and mini-
the latest requirements of NFPA 13. The required mechanical (boiler) room size is mize system pressure drops. Total required fan
currently estimated at 950 SF. The mechanical room area is estimated at 9,200 SF.
A pre-action sprinkler is currently designated for
the Museum/Exhibit and Secure Storage (Archive) room will be located with direct access to at Fan rooms will include a cabinet fans and unit
areas. Recent studies show that wet systems are least one building exterior wall for combustion heaters similar to the mechanical room.
the most reliable type of fire protection system and ventilation air intake. Double doors will be
available and are currently being used at the provided for equipment replacement and main- Electrical Room
Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institute and tenance access. Rated chases to accommodate
A cooling exhaust fan will be provided to cool
other prominent museums. The need for a pre- boiler exhaust stacks will be provided. The room
the electrical room. Supplemental heating in the
action sprinkler system will be reevaluated during should be located to minimize potential fire/
electrical room will be provided with hydronic
follow-on design phases. In addition, the need for explosion damage to the collections.
unit heaters if necessary.
a stand-alone “clean agent” fire suppression sys- A boiler room will include a cabinet fan with
tem for the main telecommunications room will mixing box and filter sections to maintain the Building Automation System
also be evaluated. mechanical room temperature below 80°F The buildings mechanical system is designed
Dry pipe sprinkler systems will be provided for (adjustable). Excess air will relieve through the to operate using a direct digital control (DDC)
areas subject to freezing (i.e. basement parking combustion air opening(s). Supplemental heat- building automation system (BAS). The design
garage and loading dock). ing in the boiler room will be provided with will be based on Siemens Building Technology or
hydronic unit heaters. a pre-approved equal.
A dedicated sprinkler riser room will be provided
with fully accessible zone shut-off valves. Wet An engineered boiler room combustion air
sprinkler mains will be strategically routed to opening will be designed and sized to meet the Engineering Design Parameters
minimize potential water damage to collections. combustion requirements of the fuel fired equip- Location: Juneau, Alaska: 58.36 N Latitude,
ment in the space. 134.58 W Longitudes
Fire hose standpipes will be provided as required
by NFPA 13. Fan Rooms Elevation: 25 FT
The fire department connection (FDC) location Fan rooms will be located to minimize potential
and connection type will be fully coordinated
Design Parameters
with the local fire department. Outside Temperatures: Winter (99.6% Design) 3.8oF
Summer.
69.9/58.2oF
(1% DB/MWB Design)
Inside Design Temperatures: Winter 68oF ± 2oF
Spring/Fall 68oF ± 2oF

42
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Electrical.
Narrative

General video for auditorium, access control, CCTV and • Underwriters Laboratory, UL
burglary/intrusion detection. The following is
The design of the electrical systems to sup-
port the new Statewide Library, Archives and
our conceptual electrical design based on our Service and Distribution
current understanding of the Project.
Museum will focus on providing the appropri- Incoming Service
ate indoor environment(s) for the preservation,
viewing and security of its historical collections.
Applicable Codes and Standards A new electrical service will be provided to sup-
Applicable Codes include, but are not limited to, port the Library Archives Museum Building. The
The project design will utilize information pro- the following: new electrical service will be fed from existing
vided by the Alaska Department of Transporta- Alaska Electric Light and Power (AEL&P) facili-
tion and Public Facilities State Libraries, Archives • International Building Code (IBC) ties located near the site. A pad mounted trans-
and Museums Needs Assessment dated Septem- • International Mechanical Code (IMC) former will be provided near the building service
ber 2009. Our design team will work closely with entrance adjacent to the building wing with the
the client’s administrators, collections manag- • International Fire Code (IFC)
main electrical room.
ers, curators, conservators and security person- • National Electric Code (NEC)
nel to solicit further design input to allow us to Main Distribution
provide the appropriate electrical systems and Applicable Standards include, but are not limited
to, the following: Preliminary load calculations estimate the size
their proper level of control for this facility.
of the Main Distribution Switchboard to be
While the Library, Archives and Museum project • Illuminating Engineering Society of North approximately 2,500 Amps at 480Y/277 Volts.
is not pursuing LEED certification, the principles America, IESNA The switchboard will be located in a dedicated
for energy efficiency and environmentally sen- • National Electrical Contractors Association main electrical room. The main switchboard will
sitive design will play a key role in the decision - NECA distribute power to satellite electrical rooms
making process regarding electrical systems. located on each level. The satellite electrical
In addition, emphasis will be given to build- • National Electrical Manufacturers' Associa-
rooms will be placed strategically throughout
ing systems that can be easily maintained and tion - NEMA
the facility to minimize branch circuit homerun
operated. • National Fire Protection Association - NFPA lengths.
Electrical systems will include lighting, normal/ • EIA/TIA Telecommunications Standards The Library Archive Museum will be served at
emergency/standby power distribution and 480Y/277 volts, 3 phase, 4 wires. Dry type step
• BiCSi Telecommunications Distribution Meth-
special systems. Special systems will include fire down transformers will be provided to derive
ods Manual
alarm, telecommunications distribution, audio/ 208Y/120V power for required loads.

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 43


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
480Y/277V power will typically be utilized for: Emergency/Standby Power • Air Handling Units and Exhaust Fans in the
collections areas
• 3 phase motors/compressors An onsite diesel powered generation system will
be provided to support building emergency and • Freezers
• Equipment requiring 480V or 277V power
standby loads. The generator will be classified
• Refrigerators
• Elevators as a Level 1, Class X, Type 10 in accordance with
NFPA 110. The generator will provide power to • Other equipment as determined during
• Lighting (277V)
NEC Article 700 Emergency loads and NEC Arti- design
208Y/120V power will typically be utilized for: cle 702 Optional Standby loads via two separate The generator location will be determined dur-
• Receptacles transfer switches. ing the next design phase. The location may be
• Equipment requiring 208V or 120V power On site fuel storage will be provided and will be within the building or located adjacent to the
sized to operate the generator for a minimum of building in a heated weatherproof enclosure. If
• Utilization equipment 96 hours in accordance with NFPA 110 require- installed in the building, the generator will be
ments for Level 1 systems installed in areas des- required to be located in a separate room with
Electrical Distribution and Branch Circuit ignated as Seismic Design Category D. a minimum 2-hour fire rating. The room will be
Panels designed and located to minimize damage from
The following loads will be supported by the
Branch circuit distribution panels will be pro- flooding.
Emergency generation system:
vided throughout the building as required by
the load density. These panels will typically be • Emergency egress lighting and exit signage Surge Protective Devices (SPDs)
located in dedicated electric rooms and will be • Fire alarm system (battery backup will also A surge protective device (SPD) is a device that
surface mounted on the walls of the electric be provided; fire alarm system requires two attenuates (reduces in magnitude) random,
rooms. Panels that are not located in dedicated sources of power per Code) high energy, short duration electrical power
rooms will be flush mounted in walls. anomalies caused by utilities, atmospheric phe-
The following loads will be supported by the nomena or inductive loads such as motors. Such
In addition, emergency and standby power Standby generation system:
panels will be provided as required to serve anomalies occur in the form of voltage and cur-
emergency and standby power loads. These • Standby Lighting rent spikes with durations of less than half an
power panels will be located in the vicinity of AC cycle. These high energy power spikes can
• Heating system (freeze protection, e.g., boil-
equipment requiring emergency and standby damage sensitive electronic equipment, such
ers and pumps)
power. See below for additional information as computers, instrumentation and process
regarding equipment that will be supported by • Telecom equipment controllers.
the generator. • ACS/Security equipment (battery backup will SPDs will be provided on the Main Distribution
also be provided for this equipment) Switchboard and on all 208Y/120V branch circuit

44
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
panelboards serving specialty electronic equip- flexible and will compliment the architecture in control will be via switches located within the
ment, telecommunications equipment or other their respective spaces. Fluorescent lamps will spaces to be controlled. Switches for public
sensitive loads. be T5 or T5HO, RE841 type with a high color- spaces will be key switches or will be located in
rendering index and a 4100 degree K color tem- areas occupied by facility staff.
Lighting Systems perature. Higher color rendering index sources
In individual work areas occupant control will be
will be investigated during the design for use in
General specified to support optimum productivity and
critical work areas. Lamps will be low mercury
comfort conditions. Occupancy sensors will be
Lighting will typically be furnished in accor- type and will meet the requirements for classifi-
provided to maximize energy savings.
dance with the IES Lighting Handbook, 9th Edi- cation as non-hazardous waste when subjected
tion. Design lighting levels will be coordinated to the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure Daylight activated control will be considered for
with the recommendations of the IES and the (TCLP) prescribed by the Environmental Protec- areas with daylight contributions.
requirements for preservation of the collec- tion Agency. Selected fixtures will be connected to generator/
tions. The architectural design will provide a A combination of other lamp sources will be standby power to allow limited operation during
generous amount of daylight in those spaces utilized where the function, maintenance, or power outage conditions. Refer to the system
where it is desirable. The lighting design will control scheme require their use. These lamp diagrams for a representation of these areas at
take advantage of this natural light while pro- sources will include high intensity discharge (HID) this stage of design. These areas will be further
viding a smooth transition from daytime to metal halide, solid state (LED) and incandescent. defined during the next design phase.
nighttime operations. Efforts will be made to consolidate lamp types Emergency egress lighting and exit signs will be
and reduce future maintenance costs. connected to generator/emergency power to
Lighting Concepts
provide Code required egress lighting. Under
Lighting concepts will be developed with the Lighting Control
normal circumstances the fixtures will be
architect and interior designer during the next Lighting control schemes will vary from areas switched along with the other room fixtures, but
design phase. Lighting will be conducive to the with highly specialized control to areas with during a power failure the emergency fixtures
building architecture and will enhance the visi- basic lighting control. Refer to the system dia- will fail “ON”.
tor’s experience and interest. Fixture types and grams for a representation of these areas at this
geometric layout patterns will compliment room stage of design. Exterior Lighting
shapes, functions and operational goals.
General lighting control in public areas will be With the recent improvements in the develop-
The most prevalent light source will be high accomplished with manual and automatic con- ment of solid state light sources, it is anticipated
efficiency fluorescent lighting which will be trol. Automatic control will be actuated by Build- that the exterior lighting will utilize LED (Light
employed throughout the interior spaces. A ing Automation System (BAS) output signals Emitting Diodes) as the light source. This light
variety of fixture types will be used to distribute and will control the lighting circuits via lighting source minimizes energy consumption will pro-
light in a controlled way that will be efficient, contactors located in electrical rooms. Manual viding excellent control and long life. Source

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 45


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
color temperature is anticipated to be 4100K (a Telecommunications Distribution adopted EIA/TIA standards for telecommunica-
“white” light source). System tions. Conduit from the data outlets in rooms/
offices will be stubbed up into the accessible ceil-
Exterior open parking spaces will be illuminated
Incoming Service ing space to the nearest cable tray. The cable tray
by pole mounted area lighting fixtures. The entry
A new telephone service will be provided to sup- will run in the accessible ceiling space to the near-
plaza will be illuminated by a combination of
port the Library Archives Museum. The new tele- est telecommunications room. Pathway (conduit
specialty pedestrian scale pole mounted fixtures
phone service will be fed from existing Alaska and/or cable tray) will also be provided between
and low level light bollards. The lower level park-
Communications Systems facilities located adja- the Main Telecom Room (MTR) and each satel-
ing garage will be illuminated with fixtures that
cent to the Library Archive Museum property. lite Telecom Rooms (TRs) needed to support the
minimize glare in the direct viewing zone while
Four 4 inch conduits only (PVC with GRC elbows) configuration of the building. High bandwidth
projecting light into the parking spaces.
will be stubbed out from the building’s Main backbone fiber optic cabling will be provided to
Exterior fixtures, supports and pole assemblies connect the MTR to each satellite TR.
Telecom Room to the property line. One 4 inch
will be specified to be capable of withstanding 100
conduit will be for use of the local phone util-
mph winds with 130 mph gusts with no damage Overview
ity for phone service, one 4 inch conduit will be
and will be suitable for the marine environment. The system will include outlets, conduit, cable
for use by the local cable TV company for cable
TV service, the third 4 inch conduit will be for trays, cables, terminations, specifying test docu-
Exposure Effects of Lighting
potential use by ETS for providing data service to mentation and other “passive” components. A
Light is radiant energy and therefore exposure the Library Archives Museum from other State partial system description includes:
to light gradually causes damage to artifacts. facilities. The fourth 4 inch conduit will be spare a) Telecommunication outlets in the labs/class-
The annual extent of exposure is governed by for future use. The telephone service conduit rooms/offices/miscellaneous areas
the intensity of the light over time and the spec- may be run in the same trench as the building’s
tral power distribution of the light. These factors power service feeder subject to coordination b) Horizontal cabling from the outlets to the
will be considered in all areas where artifacts are with AEL&P. modular patch panels in the MTR or TR
stored, analyzed, processed or viewed. Where
c) Patch cables in the MTR and TRs
it is determined that an object will be at risk Standards
for damage due to light exposure, lighting con- d) Backbone cabling (copper and fiber) be-
A Structured Cabling System will be provided
trols and lighting filters (both infrared (IR) and tween the MTR and the TRs
for telecommunications distribution within the
ultraviolet (UV) will be applied as appropriate to e) Phone Switch/Service and associated cabling
building. The building will be prewired to EIA/TIA
reduce the exposure to acceptable levels. (owner provided)
Category 6 level of network performance using
unshielded, twisted pair products. The system Telecommunication cabling will be run in conduit
will be in accordance with the latest currently or cable tray. All cabling will be plenum rated.

46
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Main Telecom Room: The MTR will serve as the Satellite telecom rooms or TRs should be at least • Access portals between public and secure
main hub for the communications systems for 14 feet long by 18 feet wide with at least 10 foot spaces and semi-ultra spaces (semi-ultra
the facility and will contain the following: ceilings. Exact location and quantities of TRs will secure or Level 3 access control).
be determined during design, but a minimum of
a) Telephone service entrance • Access portals between public, secure and
two satellite TRs in addition to the MTR are envi-
semi-ultra secure spaces and ultra secure
b) Modular patch panels for termination of lo- sioned to adequately serve the building square
spaces (ultra secure or Level 4 access con-
cal horizontal telecom cabling footage and required special systems head end
trol).
c) Fiber Optic distribution panels for connect- equipment.
The system will be capable of providing differ-
ing the MTR to each satellite TR for the Cable Tray: A cable tray system will be provided
ent levels of access. The system will use proxim-
purposes of providing data connectivity and for telecommunications cabling. Cable tray will
ity or contactless card readers. The exact place-
for voice communications if a Voice Over IP be provided to serve the various areas of the
ment and types will be coordinated during the
telephone system (VoIP) (owner provided) facility and provide pathway back to the MTR
design process.
d) Voice riser terminations for connecting the and TRs. Cabling will be plenum rate for use in
the cable tray in accordance with Code. A badging system will be provided to allow
MTR to each satellite TR if a VoIP telephone
production of access control cards on site. A
system (owner provided) is not intended for Conduit will be provided from the devices (tele-
badging system typically consists of a worksta-
use in the facility communication outlets, television outlets, etc.)
tion with access to the access control system
e) Data Network switches (owner provided) to the accessible ceiling space and then to the
server, a camera for taking of badge photos and
nearest cable tray.
f) Data Network equipment (owner provided) a badge printer for printing of badges. The loca-
Where devices are not capable of being served tion of the badging system will be coordinated
g) VoIP network switches (owner provided) by the cable tray system, conduit will be pro- during the design process.
h) VoIP server (owner provided) vided from the devices, direct to the nearest TR
Remote control operation of a lobby entry door
or the MTR.
To accommodate head end equipment for the or a loading dock/delivery door can be provided
access control system (see below), the Closed should the need be identified during design.
Access Control System Such remote control operation could rely on
Circuit Television System (CCTV), and other
An access control system will be provided to CCTV cameras and a small local intercom system
special systems, we recommend the Main Tele-
control access to the following areas: to verify the validity of a request to enter.
com Room (MTR) be at least 20 feet long by 18
feet wide with at least 10 foot ceilings. Should • Building entrances including overhead doors The access control system will be capable of
the need or desire arise to co-locate any of the (basic or Level 1 access control). being accessed and will be monitored from the
intended digital archival storage into the MTR, Security Office.
• Access portals between public spaces and
an increase in size of the MTR will be required.
secure spaces (secure or Level 2 access
control).

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 47


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
The access control system will be designed to increase the frame-recording rate dur- provided, including control unit, power supplies,
around Lenel and will be an IP based system. ing alarms (during times when the security alarm initiating and indicating devices, conduit,
system is armed). wire, fittings and all accessories required to pro-
Video Surveillance (CCTV) CCTV monitoring will only be provided as specifi-
vide a complete operating system.
Video surveillance or closed circuit TV (CCTV) will cally directed by Library Archives Museum staff, The system will comply with the applicable pro-
be provided that includes video recording and but at a minimum we recommend monitoring of visions of the current NFPA Standard 72 National
archival storage. The system will consist of the the CCTV system in the Security Office. Fire Alarm Code, local building codes, and meet
following features: the requirements by Underwriters Laboratories
The desired level of video surveillance to be
• All cameras will be "fixed" only (no pan/tilt/ Inc. and/or the Factory Mutual System. All wir-
implemented for this project will be confirmed
zoom capabilities). The cameras will be IP ing will be in accordance with Article 760 of
by Library Archives Museum before proceeding
network based. the National Electrical Code and local electrical
with design development.
codes and will be in raceways.
• The following areas will be monitored:
Intrusion Detection Security System The system will operate as a low voltage, non-
o Exterior of the building: Outdoor CCTV coded general evacuation fire alarm system.
A remote reporting security system will be pro-
camera locations will be coordinated dur- Initiating circuits will be wired as two-wire, Class
vided. The system will be monitored by the local
ing the design process and will be housed B.
monitoring service contracted by the Owner.
in heated weatherproof enclosures.
Detection: Door contacts will be provided on all In addition to Code required actions, alarms will
o High density surveillance of the museum signal the intrusion detection system. Common
exterior doors. Glass break detectors will be pro-
exhibit space, the museum lobby, and the area lights and site lighting will be energized
vided at grade level accessible glazing locations.
2D and 3D conservation rooms. (unless prohibited by photocell) upon alarm.
The Security system will be intertied with light-
o Low density surveillance of the public Alarms will be annunciated at the fire alarm
ing via the BAS to turn on building common
spaces and the secure corridor. annunciator panel located in the main entry and
area lights and site lighting whenever an alarm
o Building entry portals. is received. in the security office. A complete building floor
plan showing all alarm zones oriented to the
• A SAN (Storage Area Network) and a CCTV The system will be zoned based on input from physical location of the panel including “You Are
System server will be provided to record State Library and Museum staff during design Here” notation will be provided at each annun-
the camera images at frame rates, storage development. ciator location.
capacity and retention time as coordinated
during the design. Fire Alarm System Both audible and visual alarms will be provided
throughout the building to meet the require-
• An “alarm” output from the security system An electrically operated, electrically supervised ments of the International Fire Code and Author-
to the CCTV system to command the system analog addressable fire alarm system will be ity Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) requirements.

48
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Audio-visual horn/strobe units with combination Auditorium Audio/Video System
horn and flashing alarm strobe will be used.
A complete audio/video distribution system will
Comprehensive smoke and heat detection will be provided in the Auditorium to allow distribu-
be provided throughout the building. Smoke tion of multiple sources and allow flexible use of
detectors will utilize multiple detection meth- the space for presentations, teaching, movies,
odologies and time based algorithms to provide etc. The system will include high quality sound
increased detection sensitivity while minimizing system, microphones (including wireless), over-
false alarms. In addition smoke detection will be head projector(s), powered projection screen(s),
provided as noted below: A/V control system and sophisticated lighting
and controls.
a) Smoke detectors will be installed in me-
chanical return air systems in accordance Teleconference/video conference capabilities
with International Mechanical Code (IMC) will also be provided as determined during
requirements. design.
b) For control of smoke control doors.
c) For control of fire/smoke dampers.
Sprinkler Switches: Sprinkler flow and tamper
switches will be monitored to indicate flow in
any part of the system or a partial or complete
shutdown of the system at the gate valves.
Sprinkler Pre-Action Systems, Clean Agent
Systems and Fire Suppression Systems will be
monitored by the Fire Alarm System. Smoke
detection required for initiation of these systems
(e.g., cross zoned smoke detectors) will be pro-
vided and monitored by the Fire Alarm System.
Appropriate relay outputs will be provided from
the Fire Alarm System to activate these systems
upon a verified alarm.

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 49


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
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Code
Summary

Assumptions • Basic Allowable area – 3-stories and 15,500 sf • Book Drop – 2 Hr fire resistant rated con-
per story. struction.
Two-story building with a total building area
of approximately 114,000 sf plus 10,600 sf of • Allowable Increase – based on 200% allow- Structural Frame: type II-A buildings
mechanical space and 82 stalls of parking below able area increase per floor (IBC 506.3) plus
• 1 Hr fire protection as required per table 601
grade. Building will be constructed according to a 75% allowable area increase for frontage
and 602.
the 2009 International Building Code (IBC) and per section 506.2 = 58,125 sf allowable per
all applicable local and state code amendments. floor. Exterior Walls: type II-A buildings
The following study is based on the 2006 IBC as • No fire protection is required for type II-A
• Height increase: automatic sprinkler increase
the 2009 version has yet to be adopted. buildings which are equal to or greater than
to 4-stories and shall not exceed 85’ per IBC
Occupancy 504.2 30 feet from a property line per table 601
and 602.
• A-3 – Assembly (Library, museum, audito- • Area separation between the A-3 and S-1 oc-
rium and meeting rooms) cupancies. • 1 Hr fire protection is required for type II-A
buildings which are less than 30 feet from a
• B – Business (Offices); most likely an acces- Fire Resistance Rated Construction
property line per table 601 and 602.
sory occupancy to A-3
Incidental Use Areas
Interior Non bearing Walls: type II-A buildings
• S-1 – Moderate-hazard storage: Archives
• Boiler Room – An automatic sprinkler system
(books, files and artifacts) • No fire protection required per table 601 and
is provided, therefore a separation capable
602.
• S-2 – Low-hazard storage: Parking garage of resisting the passage of smoke is required
per section 508.2.2.1. Floor Construction type II-A buildings
Occupancy Separation: Non-separated use per
section 508.3.2. Use the most restrictive, A-3, for • Storage Rooms over 100 sf – An automatic • 1 Hr fire protection as required per table 601
construction purposes. sprinkler system is provided, therefore a and 602.
separation capable of resisting the passage Roof Construction type II-A buildings
Construction Type
of smoke is required per section 508.2.2.1.
II-A • 1 Hr fire protection as required per table 601
• Furnace Rooms w/ any piece of equipment is and 602.
Allowable Area and Height over 400,000 Btu/hour input - An automatic
sprinkler system is provided, therefore a • Fire retardant-treated wood members shall
• Based on A-3 occupancy, type II-A construc-
separation capable of resisting the passage be allowed at 20’ or more above finished
tion and fully sprinklered.
of smoke is required per section 508.2.2.1. floor (table 601, exception C).

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 51


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Corridors required per IFC 404.2.1. Employee training every room or space that is an assembly
in response procedures is required per Sec- occupancy shall have the occupant load of
• Corridors in sprinklered ‘A’ occupancy build-
tion 406. Quarterly fire drills for employees the room or space posted in a conspicuous
ings are not required to be fire rated per
are required per Table 405.2. A detailed seat- place, near the main exit or exit access door-
section 1017.1 and table 1017.1.
ing plan, occupant load and occupant load way from the room or space. Posted signs
Roof Coverings limit shall be provided as part of the plan per shall be of an approved legible permanent
• Per table 1505.1, a class ‘B’ roof covering is 408.2.1. design and shall be maintained by the owner
required. or authorized agent.
• Fire Apparatus Access Roads – At the discre-
Fire Protection System & Requirements tion of the Fire Chief, fire apparatus road- • Exit Separation – Where two exits are
ways are required to extend within 150 feet required, the distance between exit doors
• Sprinklering – Section 506.3 requires an au- of all portions of the facility or any portion must be a distance apart that is a minimum
tomatic sprinkler system to help achieve the of the exterior wall as measured along an of one-third the diagonal of the area served-
desired floor area and construction type. An approved access route per an Alaska State per section 1015.2.1, exception 2 for auto-
automatic sprinkler system is also required amendment to IFC 503.1.1. The code official matic sprinkler systems.
per Section 903.2.1.3 for fire areas exceed- is authorized to increase the dimension of
ing 12,000 sf and when the fire area has an • Number of exits – Two exits or exit access
150 feet where the building is sprinkled, or
occupant load of 300 or more. The sprinkler doorways are required from any space with
the roads cannot be installed due to topog-
system shall be designed to the require- an occupant load greater than 49 per sec-
raphy.
ments of NFPA 13. tion 1015.1.
Exiting
• Fire Extinguishers – one type 2A, 10BC fire • Maximum Travel Distance – 250 feet per
extinguisher is required for each 3,000 sf • Occupant load – per table 1004.1.1, the table 1016.1.
of floor area with no more than 75 feet of occupant load is calculated at 300 sf gross
• Maximum Dead End – not to exceed 20 feet
travel distance to an extinguisher per sec- for accessory storage areas and mechani-
per section 1017.3. However, per exception
tion 906 of the International Fire Code (IFC). cal equipment rooms, 7 sf net for assembly
3, a dead-end corridor shall not be limited
areas with concentrated and non-fixed chair
• Fire Alarms – An alarm system with manual in length where the length of the dead-end
seating, 5 net sf for assembly areas with
pull stations is required per section 907.2.1 corridor is less than 2.5 times the least width
standing space, 15 net sf for unconcentrated
where the occupant load is greater than 300. of the dead-end corridor.
tables and chairs, 100 gross sf for business
The exception to this section allows for the areas, 200 gross sf for kitchens, 50 net sf • Maximum Common Path of Egress Travel – .
pull stations to be eliminated when there is for reading rooms and 100 gross sf for book not to exceed 75 feet per section 1014.3.
an automatic fire extinguishing system. stack areas. • Panic Hardware – Panic and fire exit hard-
• Fire Safety and Evacuation Plan – An ap- • Occupancy signage – per section 1004.3, ware is required at each means of egress
proved fire safety and evacuation plan is

52
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
serving an occupant load of 50 or more per • Landscaping – Will meet planning and zon-
section 1008.1.9. ing requirements.
• Corridor Width – Corridors may be no less • Parking – per City of Juneau Planning
than 44 inches in width per section 1017.2. Department with anticipated extension of
Cultural District Overlay (60% reduction).
• Emergency Lights & Exit Signs – The entire
building is required to have emergency • Loading zones – 4 required
lighting and exit signs per section 1006.1
and 1011.1. Exceptions: Approved exit sign
illumination means that provide continuous
illumination independent of external power
sources for duration of not less than 90 min-
utes, in case of primary power loss, are not
required to be connected to an emergency
electrical system per section 1011.5.3.
• Address Numbers – The Fire Chief may
require address numbers plainly visible and
legible from the street.
• Key Boxes – The Fire Chief may require an
approved key box.
Zoning Requirements
Per Zoning requirements for the City and Bor-
ough of Juneau:
• Setbacks – 5’ all sides
• Height Limitations – 35 feet max. (Possible
height increase to 45 feet with CBJ credits,
or with a variance or planned rezoning of
the area).

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 53


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Collections Areas

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.

Cons.
Supply Store
Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con.

KEY
M W
Collection

Collections
Ex.
Stor.

Coll.
Sup.

First Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

54
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Collections Areas

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform
Storage
Readers
Media 1
KEY

LAMP
Media 2 Offices
Collections
Roof
Terrace

Staff

Second Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 55


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Floor Structure

HC

Elev.

HC
HC

HC

Parking

KEY
Mechanical
Cast in Place
Concrete Slab on
Concrete Grade Beams
over Steel Piles
Precast Concrete
Columns Over
Steel Piles
Steel Columns Over
Steel Piles
Cast In Place Concrete
Wall with Pilasters
Over Steel Piles

Note: Wall and column thickness


Parking Level are exaggerated for graphic clarity

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

56
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Floor Structure

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.
KEY
Cons.
Supply Store
Wet Lab Museum
Lobby Cast in Place Concrete Slab
Photo
on Concrete Grade Beams
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
over Steel Piles
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Concrete Slab on
Con. Composite Steel Deck

Concrete Topping Slab on


Concrete Pre-cast Planks

M W Pre-Cast Concrete Column


Collection

Ex.
Stor.
Steel Columns
Buckling-Restrained
Coll.
Sup.
Braced Frame (BRBF)

Cast In Place Concrete Wall

Note: Wall and column thickness


First Floor Plan are exaggerated for graphic clarity

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 57


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Floor Structure

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
KEY
Secure Room
Storage Concrete Slab on
Composite Steel Deck
Microform
Storage
Readers Concrete Topping Slab on
Concrete Pre-cast Planks
Pre-Cast Concrete
LAMP
Offices
Roof Steel Columns
Terrace
Buckling-Restrained
Staff Braced Frame (BRBF)
Cast In Place Concrete Wall

Note: Wall and column thickness


Second Floor Plan are exaggerated for graphic clarity

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

58
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Roof Structure

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply

Processing Special
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room KEY
Reading
Secure Room Architecturally Exposed,
Storage Curved Timber Frame Roof

Microform
Conventional
Storage Low Slope Roof
Readers

Pre-Cast Concrete

LAMP Steel Columns


Offices
Tension Rod Cross Bracing
from High Roof to Low Roof
Staff Cast In Place Concrete Wall

Note:
Wall and column and bracing
Roof Structure Diagram thickness are exaggerated for graphic

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 59


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Air Handler Zones

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.

Cons.
Supply Store
Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con.

KEY
M W
Collection

Ex.
Air Handler -1, VAV
Stor. Air Handler -2, CV
Coll. Air Handler -3, VAV
Sup.
Air Handler -4, CV
Air Handler -5, VAV
Air Handler -6, CV

First Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

60
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Air Handler Zones

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform
Storage
Readers

KEY

LAMP
Offices Air Handler -1, VAV
Roof
Terrace
Air Handler -2, CV
Air Handler -3, VAV
Staff
Air Handler -4, CV
Air Handler -5, VAV
Air Handler -6, CV

Second Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 61


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Building Environment

(0)
Loading
(0)
Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum (+) (+)
Shop Sup. Volunteer (0) Cafe
Staff M Lock.
(0) (0) (0) M (0)
(0) (0) (+) (+)
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.
(+)

Clean (+) (0)


Lobby
Shop
(+) (+)
UP Vest.
(+)
3D
(+) Con.
(0)
Cons.
Supply Store
(+) Wet Lab Museum
( - ) Lobby (+)
Photo
(+) Wet Lab Museum (+)
(-) Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro- ( ++ )
cessing 2D
( ++ ) Con. KEY
(+)
(0)
Environmental Pressure
Air Quality Level

M W
Ultra Clean ( ++ )
Collection

(0)
( ++ )

Semi-Clean (+)
Ex.
( + ) Stor. Semi-Dirty (0)
Coll.
Ultra Dirty (-)
Sup.
(+) Neutral Pressure
Pressure Flow

Note: Outside Reference


First Floor Plan Air Pressure Level = ( 0 )

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

62
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Building Environment

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M (+) (+) (+) M (+)
(+) Elev. (0) (+)
(0) (0)
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof
(+) (+)
(+)
(+)
Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects (+)
Video Research
Conf. ( ++ ) (+) Room
(+)
(+)
Reading
Secure Room
Storage
(+)
( ++ ) KEY
Microform
Storage
Readers Environmental Pressure
(+)
(0) Air Quality Level
Ultra Clean ( ++ )
LAMP
Offices Semi-Clean (+)
(+) Roof
Terrace
Semi-Dirty (0)
(0) Ultra Dirty (-)
Staff
(+) Neutral Pressure
Pressure Flow

Note: Outside Reference


Second Floor Plan Air Pressure Level = ( 0 )

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 63


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Fire Protection

HC

Elev.

HC
HC

HC

Parking

Mechanical

KEY

Wet Sprinklers

Dry Pipe Sprinklers

Parking Level

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

64
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Fire Protection

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.

Cons.
Supply Store
Vault Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con.

KEY
M W
Collection

Pre-action Sprinklers
Ex.
Stor.
Wet Sprinklers
Coll.
Sup. Dry Pipe Sprinklers

First Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 65


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Fire Protection

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform
Storage
Readers
Media 1
KEY

LAMP
Media 2 Offices
Pre-action Sprinklers
Roof
Terrace Wet Sprinklers

Staff

Second Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

66
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Emergency Power

HC

Elev.

HC
HC

HC

Parking

KEY
Mechanical

Fully Operational
( HVAC, Lighting, and Power )

Limited Emergency
Power Operation
( HVAC, Reduced Lighting,
and Limited Power )

Basic Freeze Protection and


Emergency Egress Lighting
(All Areas)

Parking Level

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 67


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Emergency Power

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.

Cons.
Supply Store
Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con.
KEY

Fully Operational
M W ( HVAC, Lighting, and Power )
Collection

Ex.
Stor. Limited Emergency
Power Operation
Coll. ( HVAC, Reduced Lighting,
Sup.
and Limited Power )

Basic Freeze Protection and


Emergency Egress Lighting
(All Areas)
First Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

68
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Emergency Power

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform KEY
Storage
Readers
Media 1
Fully Operational
( HVAC, Lighting, and Power )
LAMP
Media 2 Offices
Roof Limited Emergency
Terrace
Power Operation
( HVAC, Reduced Lighting,
Staff
and Limited Power )

Basic Freeze Protection and


Emergency Egress Lighting
(All Areas)
Second Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 69


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Light Control

HC

Elev.

HC
HC

HC

Parking

Mechanical

KEY

BASIC LIGHTING

Parking Level

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

70
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Light Control

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.

Cons.
Supply Store
Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con.

KEY
M W
Collection

Ex.
HIGHLY SPECIALIZED
Stor.
SPECIALIZED
Coll.
Sup. FULL CONTROL
MODERATE CONTROL

BASIC LIGHTING

First Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 71


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Lighting Control

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform
Storage
Readers
Media 1
KEY

LAMP
Media 2 Offices HIGHLY SPECIALIZED
Roof
Terrace SPECIALIZED

Staff FULL CONTROL


MODERATE CONTROL

BASIC LIGHTING

Second Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

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72
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Access Control

Secure Public

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D Public
Con. High Value
Objects
Cons. Public
Supply Store Surveillance
Vault Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con.

KEY
M W
Collection

Public
Ex.
Stor.
Public Surveillance
Coll. Secure
Sup.
Semi-Ultra Secure
Ultra Secure

First Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 73


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Access Control

Secure Public
Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform
Storage
Readers
Media 1
KEY

LAMP
Media 2 Offices
Public
Roof
Terrace Public Surveillance
Secure
Staff
Ultra Secure

Second Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

74
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Closed Circuit Surveillance

HC

Elev.

HC
HC

HC

Parking

Mechanical

KEY

Low Density Surveillance

No CC TV Surveillance

Exterior Surveillance

Parking Level

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 75


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
Systems Diagrams
Closed Circuit Surveillance

Loading

Elev.
W Security
Wood Wd. Iso. Crate Ed. Classroom Off.
Work Stor. Storage Coll. Museum
Shop Sup. Volunteer Cafe
Staff M Lock.
M
Conf. Conf. Auditorium
W Elev.

Clean
Lobby
Shop
UP Vest.

3D
Con.

Cons.
Supply Store
Vault Wet Lab Museum
Photo Lobby
Wet Lab Museum
Exhibit Storage
Secure
Storage Pro-
cessing 2D
Con.

KEY
M W
Collection

High Density Surveillance


Ex.
Stor.
Low Density Surveillance
Coll. No CC TV Surveillance
Sup.
Exterior Surveillance

First Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

76
ECI/HYER :: THA ARCHITECTURE
Systems Diagrams
Closed Circuit Surveillance

Roof

Elev.
W
Micrographics Special Technical and Class-
Administration Outreach Staff
Projects Service room
Workspace M M
Elev.
W

DN

Open
Supply Roof

Service
Special Desk
Processing
Projects
Video Research
Conf. Room

Reading
Secure Room
Storage

Microform
Storage
Readers
Media 1
KEY

LAMP
Media 2 Offices
Low Density Surveillance
Roof
Terrace No CC TV Surveillance
Staff

Second Floor Plan

S TAT E OF A LASKA 0 20 40 80’

LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM September 14, 2010

Concept Design Report • 09.14.2010 77


LIBRARY ARCHIVES MUSEUM PROJECT
ECI / Hyer Architecture & Interiors
101 W. Benson Boulevard, Suite 306
Anchorage, Alaska 99503
907.561.5543

THA Architecture
733 SW Oak Street, Suite 100
Portland, Oregon 97205
503.227.1254