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D - Ans 4 web - 001-024.

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Checkpoint Maths 2 Answers
SECTION ONE 5
London Dubai London Dubai
(local time) (local time)

Chapter 1 – Shape, space and Sunday 0200 1012 1400 2212
measures 1 Monday 0200 1012 1348 2200

Exercise 1.1 Tuesday 0310 1122 1510 2322

1 (a) 0830 (b) 0535 (c) 0955 Wednesday 0336 1148 1321 2133
(d) 1845 (e) 2330 (f) 1650 Thursday 0255 1107 1515 2327

2 (a) 1900 (b) 1200 (c) 0005 Friday 0057 0909 1436 2248
(d) 2210 (e) 0815 (f) 2015 Saturday 0638 1450 1648 0100
(g) 0745 (h) 1945
6 (a) 1 hour 2 min
(b) 1620
Exercise 1.2
(c) 1926
1 (a) 0840
(d) 2225
(b) 0820
(c) 0800 7 Pupils’ own questions and answers.

2 (a) 1630
(b) 1606 Chapter 2 – Number 1
(c) 1803
Exercise 2.1
3 (a) (b)
Depart Arrive Depart Arrive 1 (a) 14.8 (b) 31.14 (c) 9.66
(d) 100.01 (e) 44.44 (f) 9.1
0523 0631 5.23 am 6.31 am
2 (a) 11.1 (b) 10.9 (c) 15.04
0715 0823 7.15 am 8.23 am
(d) 0.01 (e) 11.7 (f) 10
0904 1012 9.04 am 10.12 am (g) 12 (h) 0
1028 1136 10.28 am 11.36 am 3 (a) 17.02 (b) 159.36 (c) 43.56
1445 1553 2.45 pm 3.53 pm (d) 4 (e) 35.1 (f) 5.1
(g) 18.63 (h) 10
1622 1730 4.22 pm 5.30 pm
1809 1917 6.09 pm 7.17 pm
2017 2125 8.17 pm 9.25 pm Exercise 2.2
1 (a) 20 (b) 30 (c) 24
4 (d) 14 (e) 43 (f) 18
Stansted 0500 0715 0915 1040 1315
Luton 0630 0845 1045 1210 1445 2 (a) 18 (b) 9 (c) 11
(d) 0 (e) 27 (f) 1
Gatwick 0805 1020 1220 1345 1620
3 (a) 15 (b) 18 (c) 2
Heathrow 0850 1105 1305 1430 1705
(d) 35 (e) 15 (f) 6
Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004, Hodder & Stoughton Educational 1 of 24

D - Ans 4 web - 001-024.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 2

2 Section 1 – Shape, space and measures 2

4 (a) (12  8)  2  8 Exercise 3.3
(b) 5  (2  4)  30 1 Pupils’ perpendicular bisector constructions.
(c) 2  (3  4  5)  4
2 The orientation of pupils’ diagrams may differ
(d) (10  4)  (3  3)  36 from the ones shown below.
(e) (9  6  3)  2  4  10 (a) (b)
(f) (9  6  3)  (2  4)  2
5 (a) 20  8  2  6  22
(b) (20  8)  2  6  12
(c) (20  8)  (2  6)  1.5
(d) 20  (8  2  6)  10 (d) (e)
(e) 20  8  (2  6)  19
6 (a) 8  3  4  6  14
(b) (8  3)  4  6  38
(c) (8  3)  (4  6)  22
(d) 8  3  (4  6)  2

Exercise 2.3
1 (a) 4 (b) 4 (c) 3
(d) 8 (e) 12 (f) 6
2 (a) 13 (b) 37 (c) 12
(f)
(d) 12.8 (e) 0.125 (f) 0.5

Chapter 3 – Shape, space and
measures 2
Exercise 3.1
1 Circumference
2 Radius, radii
3 Chord
4 Diameter (g)
5 Arc
6 Sector
7 Segment
8 Tangent

Exercise 3.2
1 Pupils’ drawings.
2 Pupils’ drawings.
3 Pupils’ own patterns.
Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004, Hodder & Stoughton Educational 2 of 24

19 17 4  4   4 18 4  4   4  Pupils’ own questions. although not covered in the text.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 3 Section 1 – Using and applying mathematics/ICT 3 3 Pupils’ construction of a regular octagon. 6 Pupils’ constructions.19 4 4 4 44  4 Pupils’ suggested research. mathematics/ICT 1 (c) Point of intersection is the same distance from points A. Ensure questions are clear.2 44 4  4 4 4  25 26 4!   Pupils’ rewritten questions. 4 29   4  4! 30 4  4  4   4 simple.3 4 Pupils’ own questions. Chapter 4 – Handling data 1 4 4 1 44  44 2    4 4 Exercise 4. 4 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. Investigation 5 Pupils’ constructions. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 3 of 24 . Some solutions have included the use of the factorial (!) which. 4 4 27 4!  4    28 4 4  4 4 Exercise 4. Only one possible solution for each number is given below. 11 4!  4    12  4 4 4 Q p.19 4 21 4!  4    22 4  4  4  4  Pupils’ own questions.001-024. Chapter 5 – Using and applying 4 (a). There are many other correct possibilities.Ans 4 web . B and C. 15 44  4  4 16 4  4  4  4 4 4 Q p.1 4 44 1 Primary 3 4  4   4   4 4 4 2 Secondary 4 44 3 Secondary 5 4  4   6   4 4 4 4 Primary 4 7 4  4   8 (4  4)  4  4 5 Secondary 4 4 44  4 9 4  4   10  Q p.19 13 4!  4    4 14 4  4  4  4  Question (c).D . (b) Pupils’ constructions. 4 23 (4!  4  4)  4 24 4  4  4  4 Exercise 4. 4  4  4 4 4 19 4!  4   20 4 Q p. unbiased and relevant. could be introduced for more able students.

(e) 0. (c) 1 cm  10 mm so to change from cm to mm multiply by 10. so to change from m to mm multiply by 1000. As the vertex is dragged. Answers may vary considerably.1 1 (a) One hundred (b) A hundredth Review 1A (c) One thousand (d) A thousandth (e) One thousand (f) A thousandth 1 (a) 1645 (b) 0030 (g) A thousandth (h) One thousand 2 0620 (i) A millilitre (j) One million 3 0900 2 (a) kg (b) cm 4 (a) (3  4)  5  35 (b) (8  6)  (7  4)  22 (c) m or cm (d) ml (c) 5  (8  3)  4  51 (e) t (f) m (g) litre (h) km 5 Pupils’ construction of a regular hexagon.5 m (f) 400 m 5 Pupils’ constructions of a perpendicular bisector.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 4 4 Section 2 – Number 2 ICT activity SECTION TWO Pupils’ constructions. (b) 1 m  1000 mm 7 Pupils’ questionnaires.2 1 (a) 1 m is 100 cm so to change from m to cm multiply by 100 tangent to change from cm to m divide by 100.001-024. 8 Pupils’ examples of a biased question which should not be used. 4 (a) 2 km (b) 26. not relevant or biased.6 (e) 2. Review 1B 2 (a) 40 mm (b) 62 mm 1 1625 (c) 280 mm (d) 1200 mm 2 2040 on Wednesday (e) 880 mm (f) 3650 mm 3 2300 (g) 8 mm (h) 2. so to change from mm to m divide by 1000. i. (c) 0.D .2 km (d) 0.e.75 km 8 Pupils’ examples of a badly written question.3 mm 4 (a) (7  8)  (3  2)  3 3 (a) 2.6 m (b) 89 m (b) (7  8)  3  2  7 (c) 2300 m (d) 750 m (c) 7  8  (3  2)  8.Ans 4 web . Hodder & Stoughton Educational 4 of 24 . to change from mm to cm divide by 10. (i) litre (j) cm 6 arc 3 Pupils’ lines and measurements.5 km 7 Pupils’ questionnaires. the shape of the triangle Chapter 6 – Number 2 changes but the circumference of the circle still passes through each of the three vertices. (g) 3800 m (h) 25 000 m 6 Pupils’ examples. chord Exercise 6. sector 4 Pupils’ estimates.6 km Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. Exercise 6.1 km (f) 5 km not clear. (g) 15 km (h) 75.

1 1 (a) a  2 (b) a  3 (c) a  4 Exercise 7.3 (d) a  6 (e) a  5 1 (a) a  3 (b) a  4 (c) a  4 (d) a  5 (e) a  1 2 (a) b  7 (b) b  7 (c) b  7 2 (a) b  2 (b) b  3 (c) b  5 (d) b  5 (e) b  8 (d) b  3 (e) b  12 3 (a) c  4 (b) c  8 (c) c  3 3 (a) c  3 (b) c  5 (c) c  9 (d) c  4 (e) c  8 (d) c  8 (e) c  1 4 (a) d  2 (b) d  4 (c) d  9 4 (a) d  9 (b) d  7 (c) d  4 (d) d  11 (e) d  9 (d) d  1 (e) d  5 5 (a) e  2 (b) e  4 (c) e  2 5 (a) e  3 (b) e  2 (c) e  2 (d) e  4 (e) e  3 (d) e  3 (e) e  2 6 (a) f  3 (b) f  3 (c) f  6 6 (a) f  8 (b) f  7 (c) f  3 (d) f  4 (e) f  7 (d) f  4 (e) f  6 7 (a) g  4 (b) g  12 (c) g  3 7 (a) g  4 (b) g  14 (c) g  3 (d) g  4 (e) g  6 (d) g  3 (e) g  5 8 (a) h  2 (b) h  4 (c) h  5 8 (a) h  2 (b) h  3 (c) h  10 (d) h  5 (e) h  11 (d) h  3 (e) h  3 9 (a) k  6 (b) k  4 (c) k  5 9 (a) j  8 (b) j  15 (c) j  32 (d) k  4 (e) k  2 (d) j  14 (e) j  27 10 (a) m  9 (b) m  17 (c) m  13 10 (a) k  6 (b) k  4 (c) k  6 (d) m  1 (e) m  4 (d) k  15 (e) k  16 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.5 litres (b) 5.D .001-024.025 litres 5 (a) e  1 (b) e  3 (c) e  2 9 138.8 kg (d) 0. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 5 of 24 .3 tonnes (d) e  3 (e) e  2 10 (a) 720 ml 6 (a) f  1.75 litres (d) 0.5 kg (h) 7000 kg 3 (a) c  2 (b) c  5 (c) c  3 7 (a) 2600 ml (b) 700 ml (d) c  4 (e) c  3 (c) 40 ml (d) 8 ml 4 (a) d  2 (b) d  3 (c) d  5 8 (a) 1.Ans 4 web .28 litres (d) d  3 (e) d  3 (c) 0.75 kg 2 (a) b  5 (b) b  2 (c) b  1 (e) 450 kg (f) 3 kg (d) b  2 (e) b  3 (g) 6.2 so to change kg to g multiply by 1000 to change g to kg divide by 1000.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 5 Section 2 – Algebra 1 5 5 1 kg is 1000 g Exercise 7.53 litres (d) f  3 (e) f  5 7 (a) g  1 (b) g  5 (c) g  5 (d) g  14 (e) g  1 Chapter 7 – Algebra 1 Exercise 7.5 (b) f  1 (c) f  1 (b) 0. 1 (a) a  2 (b) a  3 (c) a  1 (d) a  2 (e) a  2 6 (a) 2000 kg (b) 7200 kg (c) 2.

4 cm2 Exercise 9.7 cm (d) 121.5 cm2 (b) 78.66 mm (d) 3.0 cm2 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.3 1 (a) 25 cm2 (b) 19.40 mm (d) 39.99 cm (c) 75.D .qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 6 6 Section 2 – Shape.13 cm (b) 21.6 cm (b) 424 times 5 6.85 cm (b) 78.14 m 2 (a) 25.5% (1 dp) 4 (a) 268 cm2 (b) 81 cm 5 5969 m2 6 Ring 1  37.70 m 3 Exercise 8.1 1 (a) 18. space and measures 3 measures 4 Exercise 8.1 cm2 2 (a) 100. space and measures 4 Chapter 8 – Shape.8 cm2 Ring 3  88. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 6 of 24 .7 cm2 Ring 2  62.58 m 3 (a) 31.4 cm (b) 35.7 cm (c) 61.7 cm2 (c) 2.6 cm2 (1 dp) (c) 5.4 cm (f) 0.7 cm (f) 100. space and Chapter 9 – Shape.9 cm2 (d) 62.0 mm2 (d) 918.3 cm 6 37.4 cm2 4 Exercise 8.Ans 4 web .001-024.54 cm 1 (c) 125.3 cm2 (b) 176.4 cm2 (1 dp) 2 11.4 mm 2 (e) 13.1 cm2 (1 dp) 1 (b) 21.2 1 (a) 28.5 cm2 (c) 58.1 cm2 (e) 1.7 cm 4 (a) 235.1 Exercise 9.2 3 (a) 25.6 cm2 2 (e) 167.9 cm 2 (f) 43.

D . Hodder & Stoughton Educational 7 of 24 .4 The diagrams that follow show only two possible nets for the three-dimensional shapes in the question.001-024.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 7 Section 2 – Shape. Other nets are possible. 1 5 6 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. space and measures 4 7 2 Exercise 9.Ans 4 web .3 1 2 3 4 3 5 6 4 Exercise 9.

qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 8 8 Section 2 – Shape. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 8 of 24 .001-024. space and measures 4 2 4 5 3 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.Ans 4 web .D .

10 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Number of sides The results for odd and even-sided regular polygons can be combined on a graph as follows: Chapter 10 – Using and applying Perimeter/diagonal for regular polygons 3.85 2.25 3. so the value perimeter  diagonal gets closer to . but the results for even and odd-sided regular polygons differ because they approach  differently.3 3. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 9 of 24 .8 kg (c) 50 kg ICT activity 3 (a) 2300 ml (b) 400 ml (c) 8.9 ml 1–7 Pupils generate their own regular polygons and 4 1600 ml measure the perimeter and diagonal length of each. This is shown in the following graphs.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 35 51 cm Number of sides 8 20 8 20 Review 2A 1 (a) 40 mm (b) 284 mm (c) 850 mm 56 cm 2 (a) 7200 kg (b) 2.6 mathematics/ICT 2 3. as the 6 38.6 2.7 2. Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.1 P/D the smallest amount of card is shown below: 3. 5 (a) a  4 (b) b  13 (c) m  5 8 (a) Pupils’ results should show that.39 cm2 increases.90 2.2  Pupils will produce a variety of nets.9 2.50 3.20 3.30 P/D 3.D .001-024.80 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Number of sides Perimeter/diagonal for odd-sided regular polygons 3.15  3.40 3.15  3.95 2.00 P/D 2.Ans 4 web .0 2.96 cm (2 dp) number of sides of the regular polygon 7 452.8 cm2 (1 dp) (b) The value perimeter  diagonal gets closer to .4 Investigation 3. 8 18. The net using 3.05 3.5 3.45 3.8 2.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 9 Section 2 – Using and applying mathematics/ICT 9 6 Perimeter/diagonal for even-sided regular polygons 3.10 3.

Hodder & Stoughton Educational 10 of 24 .qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 10 10 Section 3 – Algebra 2 9 Different nets are possible to this one. SECTION THREE 5 cm Chapter 11 – Algebra 2 10 cm 4 cm Exercise 11.28 m (c) z is less than or equal to 10 2 (a) 800 g (b) 4100 g (c) 70 g 3 (a) d is greater than 4 3 (a) 0.3 4 cm 1 a  10 2 b 7 3 c 5 4 d 6 5 e  10 6 f 76 7 g 12 8 h5 9 j 4 10 k  7 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.6 m (b) 5656 m2 (b) t is greater than or equal to 9 9 Different nets are possible to this one.Ans 4 web .19 cm2 5 (a) s is less than or equal to 6 8 (a) 345.D .16 cm (2 dp) (c) f is not equal to 5 7 226. 10 Different nets are possible to this one.2 1  2  3  4  5 12 cm 6 7  8  9 10  Exercise 11.001-024.32 litres (c) f is not equal to 8 5 (a) a  8 (b) b  1.005 litre (b) e is less than 7 4 2. 5 cm 4 cm 5 cm 4 cm 5 cm 4 cm 10 cm 12 cm 5 cm 4 cm 10 Different nets are possible to this one.7 litres (b) 20 litres (c) 0.75 m (c) 0.5 (c) c  5 4 (a) m is less than 8 (b) n is greater than 5 6 42. (c) u is not equal to 3 4 cm Exercise 11.1 1 (a) a is less than 6 (b) b is greater than 5 4 cm (c) c is not equal to 10 2 (a) x is less than or equal to 7 Review 2B (b) y is greater than or equal to 3 1 (a) 3500 m (b) 0.

6 1 1 3 a 6 2 4b 7 2 3 4 5 6 7 3 6 c9 4 0 d3 2 5 2 e 1 6 3  f  3 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 1  g 4 8 3 h 2 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 5  i  1 10 4 j  4 4 2 3 4 5 6 7 Exercise 11.2 10 1 (a) a  c  b (b) b  c  a –1 0 1 2 3 4 2 (a) a  b  c (b) c  a  b Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.Ans 4 web .7 0.D .9 1.4 2.3 2.7 5 1 11 a 18 2 21  a 40 2 3 4 5 6 7 6 3 160 h  200 4 14 t 28 2 3 4 5 6 7 5 300 n 400 6 155 h 185 7 7 7 n 11 8 1 n 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10  d  12 10 40  n  50 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 0.5 2 (a) p  m  d (b) m  d  p 1 rs 3 (a) s  r  3t (b) t   2 3 4 5 6 7 3 2 xc 4 (a) d   (b) c  2d  x 2 3 4 5 6 7 2 3 d  3b d  2a 5 (a) a   (b) b   7 8 9 10 11 12 2 3 4 p  5s 3r  p 6 (a) r   (b) s   1 2 3 4 5 6 3 5 m m 5 7 (a) r    p (b) p  r   2 2 2 3 4 5 6 7   w 1 w 6 8 (a) r    2p (b) p   r   5 2 5 2 3 4 5 6 7 wr 7 9 (a) r  w  dt (b) t   d –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 yc c 8 10 (a) m   (b) m   x yx –9 –8 –7 –6 –5 –4 9 –2 –1 0 1 2 3 Exercise 12.4 Exercise 11.8 0.001-024.6 2.2 2.7 1 (a) p  m  q (b) q  m  p Exercise 11.5 2.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 11 Section 3 – Algebra 3 11 Exercise 11.6 0.1 2. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 11 of 24 .5 0.0 Chapter 12 – Algebra 3 10 Exercise 12.

space and 6 l  70° m  110° measures 5 7 n  80° o  100° p  100° q  80° Exercise 13. 3p  n 3x  q 3 Pupils’ drawings and measured angles.4 4 (a) p   (b) r   q p 1 Pupils’ drawings and measured angles.1 8 r  43° s  137° t  137° u  43° 1 a  130° 2 b  140° 9 v  35° w  145° x  145° y  35° z  145° 3 c  135° 4 d  70° 10 a  36° Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. 6 (a) m   (b) p   2 2 4 Pupils’ own observations leading to: uv rs corresponding angles are equal. 7 (a) x   (b) p   y q 2p  5 6q  5 8 (a) q   (b) p   Exercise 13.3   1 1 1 10 (a) w   (b) m   t   t  mn n w 1 Pupils’ drawings and measured angles.5 6 2 3x  7y 3x  4z 1 a  40° b  140° 9 (a) z   (b) y   4 7 2 c  60° d  120° 8q 10 (a) r   (b) q  2pr  8 3 e  40° f  140° 2p 4 g  48° h  132° 5 j  144° k  36° Chapter 13 – Shape. space and measures 5 s s 5 e  62° 6 f  55° 3 (a) p   (b) r   qr pq 7 g  90° 8 h  144° rq 4 (a) q  r  3p (b) p   9 i  154° 10 j  35° 3 tp 5 (a) p  t  mn (b) n   m Exercise 13.Ans 4 web .qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 12 12 Section 3 – Shape. r qs 3 (a) q   (b) r   p p r3 q4 Exercise 13. 5 (a) n  r  m (b) n  m  p 2 Pupils’ drawings and measured angles.2 r  3q r  2p 1 a  110° 2 b  145° 6 (a) p   (b) q   2 3 3 c  55° 4 d  95° m 7 (a) m  rn (b) n   5 e  100° 6 f  125° r vw ds 7 g  106° 8 h  150° 8 (a) d   (b) v   s w 9 i  90° 10 j  60° tw mn 9 (a) m   (b) w   n t Exercise 13. 1 (a) q  r  p (b) q  s  2r 4 Pupils’ own observations leading to: vertically 2 (a) r  4p  2q (b) q  2p  3s opposite angles are equal.3 3 Pupils’ drawings and measured angles. Exercise 12. 2 Pupils’ drawings and measured angles. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 12 of 24 .D .001-024.

3 (c) Likely to be a positive correlation. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 (c) Pupils’ explanations. Male life expectancy (years) life expectancy in different countries (c) Pupils’ explanations. explanations. 100 2 (a) 80 Distance from school 60 plotted against travel time 45 40 35 20 Time (min) 25 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 15 Adult illiteracy rate (%) 5 (b) Pupils’ explanations. once adulthood is illiteracy and infant mortality reached there is no correlation. 4 (a) Correlation between adult (g) Up to adulthood there is a positive correlation. (d) 75 Distance from school 65 plotted against travel time 55 45 45 35 35 Time (min) 25 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 15 Female life expectancy (years) 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Distance (km) Chapter 15 – Using and applying (e) About 11 km mathematics/ICT 3 Investigation Pupils will each produce a table of results and a graph of their results. though there will be exceptions for vintage 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 motorcycles.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 13 Section 3 – Using and applying mathematics/ICT 3 13 Chapter 14 – Handling data 2 3 (a) Rainfall compared with hours of sunshine Exercise 14. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 13 of 24 . However.001-024. Hours of sunshine (e) Different correlations possible – check (b) Very little/no correlation. 2 1 (d) Likely to be a negative correlation.D . Answers to questions will depend on class results.1 8 7 1 Pupils’ own explanations should accompany 6 Rainfall (mm) each answer.Ans 4 web . Distance (km) (d) Correlation between male and female (b) Strong/moderate positive correlation. 120 Infant mortality per 100 (h) Likely to be a positive correlation. Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. 5 (a) Likely to be a positive correlation. Pupils’ explanation for justification. 4 (b) No correlation. (f) Likely to be a negative correlation.

1 (a) 5% (b) 6% (c) 8% (b) Likely to be a negative correlation (with the (d) 712% (e) 412% exception of vintage cars). pupils’ explanations. 1 (a) (b) (c)  (d) (c) Likely to be no correlation. 7 (a) Likely to be a negative correlation.001-024.2 9 75% 10 70% qp   1 t 3 (a) r   (b) r   5   3 2 m Exercise 16.8 0. pupils’ explanations.3% (1 dp) Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. it is likely to be a positive correlation. Pupils’ explanations.0 1. though.1 1.7 0. 2 (a) c  b  a (b) b   3 pn w (c) q   (d) t   m 2(mn  5) SECTION FOUR 3 (a) p  70° q  70° r  110° (b) s  104° t  38° u  38° Chapter 16 – Number 3 4 b  100° c  80° d  35° e  105° Exercise 16.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 14 14 Section 4 – Number 3 ICT activity 6 (a) Weak negative correlation (b) Strong positive correlation Pupils produce their own angle booklets. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 14 of 24 .9 1.3 1 €20 loss 2 €6 loss 3 €3 profit 4 €5 loss 5 €1400 loss Review 3B 1 (a) x 50% (b) 21 x 55 Exercise 16.67 (d) €850 painter at a particular point in time.4 2 (a) 1 70% 2 50% 3 75% 4 25% 4 5 6 7 8 9 5 50% 6 60% 7 25% 8 75% (b) 0. For a given (c) €466. 2 (a) €400 (b) €800 (c) Many factors may affect this. Exercise 16. Review 3A (b) Likely to be a positive correlation.1 f  40° g  35° h  80° 1 (a) €30 (b) €160 (c) €90 5 (a) (b) (d) €60 (e) €450 2 (a) 3 years (b) 4 years (c) 5 years (d) 6 years (e) 312 years 6 (a) Likely to be a positive correlation.5% (c) v   (d) p   r   m 5 3 2 60% 4 (a) r  30° q  150° 3 50% (b) p  57° q  57° r  87° s  93° 4 30% 5 a  130° b  130° c  50° d  65° e  65° f  115° g  115° h  65° i  65° 5 33.Ans 4 web . pupils’ Exercise 16.5 t(n  2)   1 2q 1 62.D .2 explanations. xw pupils’ explanations. pupils’ explanations.

6% (1 dp) Exercise 17. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 15 of 24 .1 8 (a) 3ab(c  3d) (b) 5a(a  2b) 1 (a) 2(2a  5) (b) 5(2a  3) (c) 3(3a  7) 9 (a) 2ab(4a  3b) (b) p2(2q2  3r2) 2 (a) 3(2b  1) (b) 5(2b  1) (c) 5(5b  2) 10 (a) 12(a  2) (b) 21(2a  3) 3 (a) 5(3c  5) (b) 4(3c  2) (c) 8(a  3) 11 (a) 11a(1  b) (b) 4a(1  4  2b) 4 (a) 4(2  d) (b) 2(3  2d) (c) 6(3  2d) 12 (a) 5b(a  2c  3b) (b) 2b2(4a  3) 5 (a) 2(3a  2b) (b) 7(c  2d) (c) 4(3a  4b) 13 (a) a(a 1) (b) b(1  b) 6 (a) 4(6p  7q) (b) 6(a  5b) (c) 7(3d  2e) 14 (a) b (1  b) 2 (b) a(a2  a  1) 7 (a) 3(2a  3b  4c) (b) 2(4a  b  2c) 15 (a) p(p2  2p  3) (b) m(7m2  9m  4) (c) 3(2p  3q  5r) 16 (a) 3a(2a2  a  4) (b) 5a(a2  2a  5) 8 (a) 4(3m  4n  9r) (b) 7(a  2b  5c) (c) 8(8p  4q  2r) 17 (a) 28ab(2a  b) (b) 12b(6a  3c  4d) 9 (a) 3(3a  b  6c) (b) 4(6p  8q  3r) 18 (a) 2a (2b  3c) 3 (b) 7m2n(2mn  3) (c) 3(a  b  c) 19 (a) 6ab(ab  2) (b) 3c2(1  5c) 10 (a) 6(a  2b  3c) (b) 7(p  q  r) 20 (a) 5a(b  c) (b) 13bc(b  2c) (c) 15(2p  4q  r) Exercise 17.4 7 40% 1 (a) 3(3m  5) (b) 2(8  3p) 8 35% 2 (a) 2(2p  3) (b) 6(3  2b) 9 42% 3 (a) 3(2y  1) (b) 2(2a  3b) 10 37.Ans 4 web .qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 15 Section 4 – Algebra 4 15 6 28.001-024.5 Exercise 17.D .2 1 (a) (a  b)(c  d) (b) (p  q)(r  s) 1 (a) x(2a  3b  4c) (b) b(7a  8c) 2 (a) (m  n)(p  q) (b) (a  c)(b  d) 2 (a) q(3p  4  5s) (b) n(2m  3r  5p) 3 (a) (a  2)(b  c) (b) (a  3)(b  c) 3 (a) x(4a  3x) (b) b(4a  3b) 4 (a) (a  4)(b  c) (b) (a  3)(b  c) 4 (a) p(6p  5q) (b) m(7n  2m) 5 (a) (p  q)(m  n) (b) (p  q)(n  m) 5 (a) x(x  a) (b) p(qr  p) 6 (a) (a  b)(c  d) (b) (r  t)(s  v) 7 (a) (x  y)(w  v) (b) (a  b)(a  c) Exercise 17.5% 4 (a) 3(a  b) (b) 4(2a  3b  5c) 5 (a) a(3b  4c  5d) (b) 2p(4q  3r  2s) Chapter 17 – Algebra 4 6 (a) b(b  c) (b) 2a(2a  5b) 7 (a) ab(c  d  e) (b) m(2m  3) Exercise 17.3 8 (a) (x  y)(z  x) (b) (p  r)(q  p) 1 (a) 2y(2x  3z) (b) 3q(3p  4r) 9 (a) (m  n)(n  r) (b) (p  r)(x  y) 2 (a) 5m(3n  2p) (b) 7c(2b  3c) 10 (a) (a  3c)(b  2c) (b) (a  d)(b  1) 3 (a) 6p(q  5p) (b) 5x(3x  2y) 4 (a) 4xy(3x  2y) (b) 5ab(2b  5a) 5 (a) 7a(x  2y  3z) (b) 3x2(10a  2b  3c) Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.

5 1 1  8 1 8 cm 1 2  12 2 (a) 5 cm (b) 6.2 1 1 (a) (3a  b)(b  c) (b) (2p  q)(3r  s) 1  36 5 2 (a) (x  y)(z  y) (b) (4a  b)(2c  b) 2  8 1 2 2 3 3 (a) (r  2s)(3t  r) (b) (2m  3n)(q  2m) 3 (a)  5 (b)  5 (c)  25 (d)  5 4 (a) (5f  g)(f 2  h) (b) (ab  c)(d  c) 5 (a) (2gh  i)(jk  i) (b) (a  b)(c  b) Exercise 19.1 2 1 9  10  25 25 1 (a) 24 cm3 (b) 150 cm3 (c) 40 cm3 17 15 11  25 12  25 or 35 (d) 4000 cm3 (e) 1500 cm3 25 20 13  25 or 1 14  25 or 45 2 (a) 120 cm3 (b) 120 cm3 (c) 270 cm3 8 13 15  16  (d) 4000 cm3 (e) 3861 cm3 25 25 12 7 17  18  3 (a) 339.3 Exercise 19.1 9 0 (it is impossible to throw a red face on the 1 Independent 2 Independent dodecahedron) 96 3 They are mutually exclusive events.0 cm3 (1 dp) Exercise 19.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 16 16 Section 4 – Handling data 3 Exercise 17.6 Exercise 19.3 cm3 (1 dp) (d) 924. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 16 of 24 .3 cm3 (1 dp) (b) 2827.D .3 7 8 1  2  25 25 5 Chapter 18 – Shape. 10  or 1 96 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. space and 3  25 or 15 4 1  25 2 2 measures 6 5  25 6  25 3 7  8 Mutually exclusive 25 Exercise 18.7 cm3 (1 dp) 19  25 20  25 (e) 155.2 1  1  1 36 2 36 1 224 cm3 4 3  36 or 19 4 20  36 or 59 2 225 cm3 1 11 5  6  36 36 3 3200 cm3 1 16 7  18 8  36 or 49 3 4 1500 cm 1 16 9  18 10  36 or 49 5 3930 cm3 (3 sf) Exercise 18.4 cm3 (1 dp) 25 25 4 3 (c) 954.4 Exercise 18.001-024.5 cm 19 3  96 3 (a) 9 cm (b) 81 cm2 1 4  96 4 10 cm 3 5  8 5 1.51 cm (2 dp) 2 6  12 or 16 46 7  or 2438 Chapter 19 – Handling data 3 96 6 8  96 or 116 Exercise 19.Ans 4 web .

6 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to y  12x  3 Review 4A 7 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to 1 €2600 2 4. SECTION FIVE ICT activity Chapter 21 – Algebra 5 The screenshot below shows an example of the Exercise 21.1 formulae that can be used: 1 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to y  2x 2 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to y  12x  1 3 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to yx2 4 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to y  12x  3 5 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to y  x Pupils prepare a report based on their findings.4 Pupils investigate the relationship between scale 4 factor of enlargement and its effect on the area 8 (a)  6 or 23 (b) 26 or 13 (c) 2  9 factor and volume factor of enlargement.D .7% (1 dp) 4 600% 8 Pupils’ tables of sets of co-ordinates leading to x  3 5 (a) 4(4a  3) (b) x(4x  1) (c) 2bc(3b  1  2c) 9 Pupils’ explanations.9 cm Volume of enlarged prism  1344 cm3 4 7 (a)  10 or 25 (b) 2  10 or 15 (c) 6  10 or 35 3.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 17 Section 5 – Algebra 5 17 Chapter 20 – Using and applying Review 4B mathematics/ICT 4 1 7 years 2 66.2% y4 3 66.5% Investigation 3 (a) 4(2p  q) (b) 7r(2r  3) 1 (a) 8 cm2 (b) 40 cm3 (c) 3t(2t2  3t  m) (c) 32 cm2 (d) 320 cm3 4 (a) (r  3s)(2t  r) (b) (4ab2  c)(a  d) 2 (a) Small triangular cross-section  21 cm2 Enlarged triangular cross-section  84 cm2 5 48 cm3 (b) Volume of small prism  168 cm 3 6 8. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 17 of 24 .001-024.3 cm3 (1 dp) Exercise 22. 1 Sloping 2 Sloping 3 Vertical 4 Sloping Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.Ans 4 web . the area factor of enlargement is n2 and the volume factor of enlargement is n3. 6 (a) (2c  a)(3b  c) (b) (4p  q2)(2p  r) 7 251. If the scale factor of enlargement is n. (b) Pupils’ examples.2 8 (a) Pupils’ examples.

D .Ans 4 web .qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 18 18 Section 5 – Algebra 5 5 Horizontal 4 y 6 Vertical 4 y=3 7 Sloping 8 Horizontal 2 9 Sloping –2 0 2 4 x 10 Sloping –2 Exercise 21.001-024.3 1 5 y y 6 4 4 y=x+2 2 y – x = –1 2 –2 0 2 4 6 x –4 –2 0 2 4 x –2 –2 6 y 2 y 4 x = –2 4 2 2 y = 2x – 3 0 x –4 –2 2 4 –2 0 2 4 6 x –2 –2 7 y 6 3 y 4 4 2y = x + 6 2 2 1 y= 2x +1 –4 –2 0 2 4 x –2 0 2 4 x –2 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 18 of 24 .

(d) Gradient  1 y intercept  0 1 Gradient  1 2 Gradient  2 (e) Gradient  4 y intercept  8 3 Gradient  12 4 Gradient  2 (f) Gradient  3 y intercept  3 5 Gradient  12 6 Gradient  4 (g) Gradient  0 y intercept  4 1 (h) Gradient   2 y intercept  3 7 Gradient  13 8 Gradient  3 9 Gradient  0 10 Gradient  infinite 11 Pupils’ own observations. 4 Exercise 21.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 19 Section 5 – Algebra 5 19 8 y Exercise 21.5 6 1 (a) y  x  1 (b) Gradient  1 (c) y intercept  1 4 y = –x + 3 2 (a) y  3x  1 (b) Gradient  3 2 (c) y intercept  1 3 (a) y  12x  2 (b) Gradient  12 (c) y intercept  2 –4 –2 0 2 4 x 4 (a) y  4x  4 (b) Gradient  4 –2 (c) y intercept  4 5 (a) y  x  3 (b) Gradient  1 9 y 6 (c) y intercept  3 6 Pupils’ observations.001-024.4 (c) Gradient  3 y intercept  1 Pupils’ own line graphs accompany questions 1–10. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 19 of 24 . Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.D .Ans 4 web .6 2 y = –2x + 2 1 (a) Gradient  2 y intercept  1 (b) Gradient  3 y intercept  1 0 (c) Gradient  12 y intercept  3 –2 2 4 x (d) Gradient  1 y intercept  0 –2 (e) Gradient  1 y intercept  12 (f) Gradient  3 y intercept  4 10 y (g) Gradient  1 y intercept  4 (h) Gradient  1 y intercept  0 4 2 (a) Gradient  2 y intercept  4 (b) Gradient  1 y intercept  2 2 (c) Gradient  3 y intercept  0 (d) Gradient  2 y intercept  4 –4 –2 0 2 4 x (e) Gradient  3 y intercept  1 y + x = –1 (f) Gradient  1 y intercept  1 –2 (g) Gradient  5 y intercept  4 (h) Gradient  2 y intercept  4 –4 3 (a) Gradient  1 y intercept  2 (b) Gradient  2 y intercept  1 Exercise 21.

1 6 m  120° n  60° p  120° q  60° 1 a  40° 2 b  43° r  60° s  120° t  120° 3 c  30° 4 d  45° 5 e  25°. f  35° 6 g  27°.D .3 cm (1 dp) (b) 2226 cm2 3 4 (a) 13 cm (b) 450 cm2 Number of 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 12 sides 5 2 mm Sum of the 180° 360° 540° 720° 1080° 1260° 1440° 1800° interior angles Chapter 24 – Handling data 4 Size of each 60° 90° 108° 120° 135° 140° 144° 150° interior Exercise 24. space and measures 8 Exercise 22.001-024.2 12 dodecagon 10 10  180°  1800° 1 9 cm 2 The number of sides is always 2 more than the 2 3 cm number of triangles.2 Exercise 23. 3 (a) 11.2 3 d  104° Pupils’ examples.7 cm2 (1 dp) 6 hexagon 4 4  180°  720° 6 155. i  36° Chapter 23 – Shape. h  27°.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 20 20 Section 5 – Handling data 4 Chapter 22 – Shape.Ans 4 web . Hodder & Stoughton Educational 20 of 24 .3 9 Continuous (usually) 10 Discrete 1 a  75° 2 b  70° c  120° Exercise 24.1 1 1 150 cm2 Number Name Number Total sum of of sides of polygon of triangles interior angles 2 138 cm2 3 triangle 1 180° 3 288 cm2 4 quadrilateral 2 2  180°  360° 4 108 cm2 5 pentagon 3 3  180°  540° 5 703. Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.5 cm2 (1 dp) 7 480 cm2 8 octagon 6 6  180°  1080° 8 262 cm2 9 nonagon 7 7  180°  1260° 10 decagon 8 8  180°  1440° Exercise 23. space and 4 e  48° f  84° g  132° h  132° i  48° j  48° measures 7 5 k  108° l  108° Exercise 22.1 angle 1 Discrete 2 Continuous Size of each 120° 90° 72° 60° 45° 40° 36° 30° 3 Discrete 4 Continuous exterior angle 5 Continuous 6 Continuous 7 Discrete 8 Continuous Exercise 22.

Hodder & Stoughton Educational 21 of 24 .4 0– 0– 0– 0– 0– 0 19 1 13 14 15 16 17 Mean annual 0– Height (cm) temperatures in two cities 18 30 4 city B Temperatures in 50 towns in July 25 20 18 20 Frequency 16 14 15 Frequency 12 10 10 city A 8 5 6 4 0 2 – – 0– – – – 0 –5 20 10 10 20 30 0 – – 40 15– 20– 25– 30– 35 – 40 Temperature (°C) Temperature (°C) Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 21 Section 5 – Handling data 4 21 Exercise 24.3 5 Distances travelled to school 70 1 Scores in a golf competition 60 20 18 50 Frequency 16 40 14 Frequency 12 30 10 20 8 6 10 4 0 2 0– 1– 2– 3– 4– 5– 6– 7 – Distance (km) 8 0 65– 70– 75– 80– 85– 90 – Scores 95 6 Mass (kg) 0– 1– 2– 3– 4– 5– 6– 7– 8– 9– 10–11 2 Maths test results Frequency 0 1 2 4 3 5 8 4 2 1 0 12 10 7 Frequency 8 Time (secs) 8– 10– 12– 14– 16– 18– 20– 22–24 6 Frequency 0 3 14 8 1 2 2 0 4 2 8 Number of books 0– 10– 20– 30– 40– 50–60 0– 10– 30– 50– 70– 90 – Mark (%) 100 Frequency 8 14 26 20 8 4 3 Heights of students 9 40 30 Points scored 0– 10– 20– 30– 40– 50– 60– 70–80 Frequency 20 Frequency 0 1 3 5 11 6 4 2 10 0 Exercise 24.D .Ans 4 web .001-024.

(c) Gradient  12. 6 Pupils’ sketches of frequency polygons. football 25 Frequency (1000s) golf ICT activity 20 Pupils’ analyses of test results.D . y intercept  1 (d) Gradient  2. y intercept  1 9 Pupils’ sketches of frequency polygons. 4 120° 10 Pupils’ sketches of frequency polygons. (b) Gradient  1. pupils at school A travel less distance to school than those –2 at school B. b  135° 6 226. 3 (a) Gradient  4. 2 5 Distances travelled by pupils to two schools –2 0 2 4 x 45 40 school A 35 –2 30 school B Frequency 25 (b) y 20 15 4 10 y = 12 x + 2 5 2 0 0– 1– 2– 3– 4– 5– 6– 8 7– Distance (km) –4 –2 0 2 4 x Pupils’ explanations.2 cm2 Chapter 25 – Using and applying 7 8 cm mathematics/ICT 5 Investigation Pupils’ calculations based on their packaging. 5 a  75°.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 22 22 Section 5 – Reviews 2 Ages of spectators compared 1 Pupils’ observations based on their results. 30 2 Pupils’ examples. y intercept  0 8 Pupils’ sketches of frequency polygons. 15 10 Review 5A 5 1 yx2 0 2 (a) y 0– – – – – – 70 – 0 –8 10 20 30 40 50 60 Age 4 3 Pupils’ sketches of frequency polygons. Hodder & Stoughton Educational 22 of 24 .Ans 4 web . Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. y = 2x – 1 4 Pupils’ sketches of frequency polygons. ‘On average’. y intercept  5 7 Pupils’ sketches of frequency polygons.001-024.

D . Hodder & Stoughton Educational 23 of 24 . y intercept  12 4 72° 5 a  100°. y intercept  4 (c) Gradient  2.001-024.Ans 4 web . c  220° 6 176 cm2 7 628. y intercept  2 (d) Gradient  2. Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004.3 cm2 8 Pupils’ reports. y intercept  1 (b) Gradient  1.qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 23 Section 5 – Reviews 23 8 Maths test results 8 Frequency 6 4 2 0 0– 10– 20– 30– 40– 50– 60– 70– 80– 90 – 100 Score Review 5B 1 y  2x  2 2 (a) y 4 y=x+3 2 –4 –2 0 2 4 x –2 (b) y 4 y = –x + 3 2 –2 0 2 4 x –2 3 (a) Gradient  3. b  80°.

b 60°.D . Hodder & Stoughton Educational 24 of 24 .qxd 17/8/04 11:14 am Page 24 24 Section 6 – Handling data SECTION SIX – Shape.001-024. 2 t   (b) 14 a 3 3x(5x  2) 4 x2  5x  6 5 (2ab  c)(4b  c) 6 3 7 (a) p  12 (b) q  7 (c) r  3 8 (a) 2. space and measures CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS 1 (a) a 60°. 2 (b) Pupils’ graphs with line y  x  2 drawn.Ans 4 web . 7 (a) 13 km/litre (c) (i) 39 cents (b) 117 km (ii) 11 cents 8 (a) (i) 80° (ii) 30° 4 (a) (i) 32 litres (b) (i) 35° (ii) 55° (iii) 55° (ii) $36 2 9 (a) 384 cm (b) 512 cm3 (b) 54 (km) 40 (min) 10 (a) 444. (c) 23 Checkpoint Maths 2 © 2004. 1. c 60° (b) Equilateral Number 2 172 cm2 1 5 or 6 3 6 cm 2 About 47 000 feet 4 4 cm 3 (a) (i) Each small division on the scale shows 5 12 cm2 10 grams 6 4 minutes (ii) Arrow X shows a mass of 280 grams (b) Pupils’ scales marked to show 70 g.2 m (b) 14 350 m2 60 (km/h) Handling data Algebra 1 (a) Primary 1 (a) (7x  6) cm (b) (i) Pupils’ explanations (b) 7x  6  20 (ii) Pupils’ own questions (c) 8 cm 2 (a) Pupils’ scatter diagrams with line of best fit vu drawn. 1.