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Hypochondria / Health Anxiety Test

Hypochondria / Health Anxiety is an obsessive preoccupation with having a serious illness,


disease, or medical condition.

The OCD Center of Los Angeles offers this free and confidential test to help you get a better
idea of whether or not you are exhibiting signs of Hypochondria / Health Anxiety. Simply
check those items that apply to you, and email the test to us using the simple form below.
While this Hypochondria test is not meant to replace a thorough evaluation, it may help in
identifying traits of Health Anxiety.

1. I worry more than most people I know about having a serious illness, disease, or
medical condition.

2. I am very aware of sensations occurring in my body, and notice many aches, pains,
and/or other symptoms of what I think may be illnesses, diseases, or medical conditions.

3. I frequently check my body for signs of illnesses, diseases, or medical conditions.

4. I sometimes check others (my spouse, children, parents, and/or friends) for signs
of illnesses, diseases, or medical conditions, and/or ask them to check themselves.

5. I own special equpment for checking my body (i.e. blood pressure cuff).

6. I spend time a lot of time talking to friends and family about my health concerns.

7. I often ask friends/family to reassure me that I do not have an illness or disease.

8. I often ask friends/family to reassure me that they do not have an illness or disease.
9. I frequently wash or shower in an effort to make sure I do not get an illness or disease.

10. I sometimes ask others to wash, shower, or avoid touching me if I think they have
been exposed to an illness.

11. I avoid certain people, places, things, or situations for fear of disease or illness.

12. I spend a lot of time on the internet looking up information about illnesses and
diseases.

13. I own medical texts or other health-related books, and/or spend a lot of time
researching in books about specific illnesses, diseases, or medical conditions.

14. I avoid TV shows, movies, newspaper articles, and/or internet reports with medical
themes.

15. I go out of my way to view TV shows, movies, newspaper articles, and/or internet
reports with medical themes.

16. I often visit or call doctors because of concerns that I have a serious illness, disease,
and/or medical emergency.

17. I usually avoid doctors, even if I am worried that I have a serious illness, disease,
and/or medical emergency.
18. I often worry that doctors have not correctly diagnosed me when they are
unable to find something wrong with me.

19. I sometimes go to more than one doctor for the same medical concern because I
doubt the first doctor’s diagnosis and/or lab results (i.e., multiple HIV tests).

20. If I hear about a disease or illness (through the media, or from someone I
know), I worry that I have that illness or disease.

21. I am significantly distressed, anxious, and/or depressed about my health concerns.

22. My concerns about my health are interfering with my relationships and/or with my
academic or professional functioning.

23. I have visited doctors times in the past 12 months due to fears that I have a
disease, illness, or medical condition.

24. I spend hours per day obsessing about my health, and/or doing compulsive
behaviors specifically related to my health.

25. The following are the diseases, illnesses, and/or medical conditions that I worry about
most frequently:

OCD Test
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a condition in which an individual experiences
obsessions (repetitive, unwanted thoughts, ideas, or images), and/or performs
compulsions (repetitive behaviors) in an effort to avoid or decrease the anxiety created
by these obsessions.
The OCD Center of Los Angeles offers this free and confidential test to help you get a better
idea of whether or not you are exhibiting signs of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).
Simply check those items that apply to you, and email the test to us using the simple form
below. While this OCD test is not meant to replace a thorough evaluation, it may help in
identifying traits of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

1. I wash my hands or shower more often, or for longer periods of time, than most other
people.

2. I have, and regularly use, hand sanitizers, anti-bacterial wipes or other special
cleaners.

3. I prefer to avoid close contact with people (i.e., shaking hands, sitting next to people
in theatres, hugging, kissing, sexual activity).

4. I avoid contact with everyday objects that most other people have no difficulty
touching (e.g., clothes, underwear, socks, money, ATM machines, bed sheets, towels,
household items, furniture, school books, pens, shoes, etc.).

5. I excessively clean everyday objects (e.g., clothes, underwear, socks, money, bed
sheets, towels, household items, furniture, school books, pens, shoes, my car interior, etc.).

6. I repeatedly check, either visually or manually, to be sure that I have properly


performed a just-completed task (e.g., looking to be sure I have signed a check, re-opening a
mailbox to be sure I have deposited a letter, etc.).

7. I often count when doing routine behaviors (e.g., locking doors, turning off light
switches, turning off stove burners, etc.), and must continue counting until it feels ‘right’
or ‘OK’ (or until I reach a certain number).
8. I often repeat routine behaviors (e.g., locking doors, turning off light switches, turning
off stove burners, etc.) because I am not sure that I have done these behaviors or done them
“just right”.

9. I frequently ask others for reassurance that tasks have been properly completed (e.g.,
Did I close the garage door? or Did you lock up the house when we left?” etc.).

10. I frequently straighten, arrange, order, or tidy common household objects (i.e.,
window blinds, rugs, the contents of my desk, closets, cabinets, refrigerator, bookshelves,
etc.), in an effort to make them symmetrical or “just right”?

11. I repeatedly count mundane items that do not really merit counting (e.g., ceiling tiles,
floor tiles, books, CDs, clothes, light poles, cars, words, letters, etc.)?

12. I often have repetitive, intrusive, unwanted thoughts or images in my mind that
upset me or make me anxious, and I can’t get them out of my mind no matter how
much I try.

13. I frequently worry excessively about purposely acting in a manner that is harmful or
violent (i.e. stabbing or shooting someone).

14. I often worry excessively about accidentally harming someone (i.e., running over a
pedestrian or poisoning my children).

15. I excessively worry that I will be indirectly responsible for something bad occurring
(i.e., “If I don’t pick up this trash, someone may slip on it and break their neck and it will be
my fault”).
16. I frequently worry that, if I don’t perform certain superstitious behaviors, bad
things will occur and it will be my fault (i.e. needing to knock on wood, cross my legs a
certain way, etc. in order to prevent mom from dying).

17. I often need to count to a certain number when doing certain behaviors to ensure that
bad things do not occur.

18. I worry excessively about my sexual orientation, and am very upset by these
thoughts.

19. I worry excessively that I do not really love, or am not really attracted to my spouse
or partner.

20. I worry excessively about acting in a manner that is sexually inappropriate or illegal
(i.e., molesting children, committing incest, committing bestiality).

21. I worry excessively about offending God or acting in a manner that is counter to my
religious beliefs or is sacrilegious.

22. I often avoid certain people, places, objects, or situations in an effort to ensure that I
will not have unwanted thoughts about things which I consider harmful, violent, sexually
inappropriate, immoral, or sacrilegious.

23. I often recite prayers or repeat certain phrases in an effort to rid myself of unwanted
thoughts or to ensure that nothing bad happens.

24. I often repeat routine, daily activities to ensure that I did not harm someone (e.g.,
driving back to a certain place in the road to reassure myself that I did not run over a
pedestrian).
25. I repeatedly ask others for reassurance that I have not done something “wrong,”
“bad,” or inappropriate, harmful, immoral, or sacrilegious.

26. I excessively think about normal bodily experiences (i.e., blinking, swallowing,
breathing, digesting, sleeping, hearing sounds), and am upset that I cannot control these
thoughts.

27. I am significantly distressed, anxious, and/or depressed about my obsessions and


compulsions.

28. My obsessions and compulsions are interfering with my relationships and/or with my
academic or professional functioning.

29. Hours per day having obsessions and/or doing compulsions:

30. The primary focus of my obsessions and compulsions is:

Research

The naturally occurring sugar inositol has been suggested as a treatment for OCD.[125]

Nutrition deficiencies may also contribute to OCD and other mental disorders. Vitamin
and mineral supplements may aid in such disorders and provide nutrients necessary for
proper mental functioning.[126]

μ-Opioids, such as hydrocodone and tramadol, may improve OCD symptoms.[127]


Administration of opiate treatment may be contraindicated in individuals concurrently
taking CYP2D6 inhibitors such as fluoxetine and paroxetine.[128]

Much current research is devoted to the therapeutic potential of the agents that affect
the release of the neurotransmitter glutamate or the binding to its receptors. These
include riluzole,[129] memantine, gabapentin, N-acetylcysteine, topiramate and
lamotrigine.[citation needed]
Legumes and sprouts are also considered as foods high in inositol. Vegetables, such as bell peppers,
tomatoes, potatoes, and asparagus, along with green leafy vegetables, are also good sources of
Inositol. Nuts and seeds also contain a good amount of inositol.

5 Foods High In Inositol

Inositol is not officially recognized as a vitamin, because it is synthesized from glucose by


the bacteria within our intestines. While inositol is synthesized in the body, human beings do
need external sources of inositol. The most common forms of inositol are myo-inositol and d-
chiro inositol. Studies indicate the largest amount of myo-inositol is found in fresh fruits and
vegetables (as opposed to frozen or canned foodstuffs).

 Inositol is also found in meat sources and eggs. While meat sources are rich in inositol, it is
important to consume only those sources which are grass fed and chemical free sources. If
the meat sources are raised on steroids and antibiotics, they can do more harm than good.
 Fruit sources of inositol include oranges, peaches, and pears. Potassium-rich fruits like
banana are also considered as foods high in inositol.
 Grains are among the foods high in inositol. Note that inositol occurs in whole grains and not
processed, refined grains.
 Legumes and sprouts are also considered as foods high in inositol. Vegetables, such as bell
peppers, tomatoes, potatoes, and asparagus, along with green leafy vegetables, are also
good sources of Inositol.
 Nuts and seeds also contain a good amount of inositol

Food sources

Inositol can be found naturally in food; rich sources of which are the cantaloupe melon,
oranges and other citrus fruits. Inositol can also be sourced naturally in lecithin oil, seeds,
whole grains, pulses, nuts, yeast, liver, brown rice, cereals, soy flour and green leafy
vegetables.

Inositol, Can we call it Vitamin B8?


Inositol is a water-soluble vitamin-like structure commonly called vitamin B8, yet it’s not
strictly an essential B vitamin because it can be synthesised in the body. Inositol is an organic
component of every cell membrane and functions in a similar way to choline. The body
naturally produces a few grams of inositol each day.1 It can be found in large amounts in
heart, liver and skeletal muscles. Referred to as a pseudovitamin, it can be classified as an
important nutrient which is required to support certain crucial functions in the body. Closely
related to the carbohydrate, glucose, its structure is classified as the alcohol form of
cyclohexane. There are nine isomers of Inositol, but the only active form is Myo-Inositol.2

Food sources

Inositol can be found naturally in food; rich sources of which are the cantaloupe melon,
oranges and other citrus fruits. Inositol can also be sourced naturally in lecithin oil, seeds,
whole grains, pulses, nuts, yeast, liver, brown rice, cereals, soy flour and green leafy
vegetables.

History of Inositol

The name ‘Inositol’ is derived from the Greek word “inos” which loosely translates to
“muscle”. This clever pseudovitamin was first discovered in 1850 by a German physician
named Johannes Joseph Scherer, who found it in muscle tissue. Initially, it was referred to as
‘muscle sugar’, then given the name Inositol. It was first classified as a B vitamin in the
1940’s. Although Inositol has now lost this status, because it isn’t technically an essential
vitamin as it occurs naturally in the human body, it nonetheless has a number of crucial
functions to perform in the body and can be classified as a ‘conditionally’ essential nutrient.3

Role of Inositol in the body

A major role undertaken by Inositol in the body is the transportation of fats and to help break
down fats. This is particularly useful in areas such as the brain and heart where fat deposits
are harmful to health.

Inositol functions as a neurotransmitter, acting as a secondary messenger in a number of


signal transduction pathways; helping to support nervous system function.4 It’s required by
neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, acetylcholine, and GABA to
send messages, so plays a vital role in mental health and cognitive function. The ability of
inositol to promote brain cell health has meant it’s used to support memory and concentration
and generally good for overall cognitive activity; and is used also to treat depression, anxiety
and improve mood. “Because all major neurotransmitters require inositol in order to relay
messages, it’s essential to communication between brain cells and thus has a significant
impact on mood and cognition.”5

 Inositol plays a vital role in the regulation of gene expression.6


 Inositol is key to various crucial elements of cell biology and is paramount to the regulation,
health, differentiation and migration of cells.7
 Inositol helps maintain the health of cell membrane.
 Inositol has an active role in Insulin signalling; critical for regulation of glucose and lipid
metabolism.
 Inositol has an important part to play in regulating intracellular calcium concentration and
release in the body.8
 Inositol serves a crucial function in the regulation of the Cytoskeleton assembly.9

Health benefits of Inositol

 Active in promoting brain & liver health


 Has a role to play in regulating mood and nerve signalling
 Improves insulin sensitivity for PCOS, fertility & weight loss10

Range of Uses

 Diabetic nerve pain


 Increase energy levels
 Increase mental alertness and focus
 Panic disorder
 Anxiety
 High cholesterol
 Liver disorders
 Improve blood circulation and lower blood pressure
 Insomnia
 Anti-Cancer capabilities
 Depression
 Schizophrenia
 Alzheimer’s disease
 Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
 Autism
 Respiratory conditions
 Constipation
 Promoting hair growth and general health of hair
 Psoriasis, Eczema and other skin conditions 11

Useful Inositol

Inositol; though perhaps not a name familiar to most of us, is actually very familiar to our
bodies; it’s present in every cell membrane, so very much a part of our biological makeup
and its presence in the body is vital for human health.

Inositol plays a crucial part in enabling the brain, nerves and muscles to function properly. It
has a range of important and diverse roles to play in the human body and a deficiency in this
nutrient can cause an imbalance in areas such as cognitive function, for example, and
potentially lead to nerve related conditions, such as depression and anxiety. A deficiency in
Inositol can also cause other issues such as hair loss; constipation and high cholesterol.12

As a supplement, it’s a naturally sweet powder (being closely related to glucose)13 and is used
as both a preventive and treatment for a host of different health conditions, such as Eczema;
Schizophrenia; Alzheimer’s disease and ADHD.
Inositol is favoured by those wishing to lose weight or maintain a regular healthy body
weight, as it plays a vital role in regulating metabolism and stimulating the breakdown of fats
in the body.

If suffering from sleepless nights Inositol could be a great supplement to take, especially
effective when combined with other sleep-inducing supplements such as Green Tea, for its L-
theanine content; and 5-HTP. These both synthesise serotonin and melatonin (crucial
hormones required by the body for sleep). Coupled with Inositols ability to improve serotonin
receptor sensitivity, this trio could help regulate wake-sleep cycles.

It’s worth noting, both caffeine and antibiotics can decrease the amount of Inositol in the
body so if you regularly consume lots of caffeine or are on antibiotics for a prolonged period
of time an Inositol supplement could be advisable