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SH a ce a At the very beginning of the Cobra program, AC Cars, Lid. had no idea: how lun, for to what extent would be taken up by Cobra produc- net was far.50 ears, of AC's resources, it vir future, in 1962, as began was not all: they did Cobra praduetion was beginning to ramp up thi work om a prototy replace the AC Ace, na long iginal AC Ace, and the «mal don ae in production look Cobra that assis designed by 0 in the 1950s, It consisted of a pair of large parallel main ni ich neverse leat were mounted at each end; the spindles were d two the frame by u nlled hy the w car AC's in-house designer, miki conctived @ square-tube space frame fit ard rear ise brakes,» high-mounted rack assembly and coil-over shock ightly larger than the Cobra jhase was six inches longer 4" the track was 3° wider, overall Cobra's was 151.5%; and with 2 8 wider than a Cobra. A five- igned for the car and this, th several other engineering innovations, were 1960s and travel © ZT, Maree ted with inb than the 90° Cobr mngth was 17Z bof 67" it. w sp en inta the 1970s. The MA-200 was originally designed fit engine but Marzewski was asked to modi Ford 289 V8 for reasons af cost savings. A engine had been presented to AC Chairman Derek Harlock b al Motor Company the company's assistance in its first foray nt LeMans, Wo specially prepared Cobras with fastbuek-style hard tops had been entered in the 1963 24-hou: under the AC Cars banner and the other by early Cobra ler Ed Hugus of Pittsburgh. The thinking was that by did not want to take the chanice of being end unfavorable publicity if the Cobras faile ish. The Hugus ents at the balfiray point, sidelined by a broken od, The AC car finished 3rd in the GT class owerall. It was an excellent showing and Ford rewarded Hurlack by giving him the lefl-over spare race éngine, one of only 5 for the event ‘The body was made f was slab-sided and rectangular. It was unlike thing else of that period but in the 1960s and 1970s was ac ally quite ca ary. AC records show that on November 1 completed car was registered for use, Rather than receive a serial number which fit into the AC numbering system, it was assigned (he num- he shape 0 was used by Derek Hurlock a his person transportation during its development stage as well as over the next few years. He seemed to prefer it over a Cobra roadster, must likely hecause it represented a 20 fx parked in frant of AC Cars shovronhs. Nate new Cabras parked inside."The Cobra dngine way‘not the dtl part taken ofthe shelf for xr taloa had Cabra T2-poke wire wheels and a Cobra $-spoked weed wieeriag whos 905 Ges don the AC Ace, by the time red very few pieces with its British Throughout Cobra production, eat AC Cars they were building a ear that uly "their y ware ing a vehicl oly supy # specifications someone MA-200 was never put into production and only the ‘one prototype was ever built. Hurlock contin until 1968, when it was eéld. Tt had been t served as the inspiration for the AC that is not likely because th Italian coachbuilders. The lines of a eoincidenee, ‘The car was sold by AC Cars to Roger F Tk was put in storage for many years and th it was purchased by Peter Hague, MA. tained in original condition and only recently received Hew paint and a rebuild of the original engine In 20 the sar was purchased by SAAC Miami, FL ue driving it ought that it 8 Frua madels but a is the produet of is more along the in 1968, i, in 1983, 00 was main: 906 MA-200: AC’s LOST PROTOTYPE At the very beginning of the Cobra program, AC Cars, Lid, it would last or to what extent its fa wa produc- tion. Shelby Ameri and although this consumed a lot of AC's resour was not all they did. Looking to their future, in 1962, 4 Cobra production was beginning to ramp up they began work on a prototype two-seat, open sports ear which they felt could replace the AC Ace, no longer in production. The original AC Ace, and the small block Cabra that came after it, were both based on a chassis designed by dohn Tojeiro in the 1950s. Tt consisted of a pair of large Hel main tubes separated by perpendicular cross- bes much like the rungs of a ladder, Transverse leaf springs were mounted at each end; the spindles were attached to the frame by unequal-length A-arms with their travel controlled hy the end of the leaf spring. It was a dated design for a new ear. AC’s in-house designer, 2.1, Marzewski conceived a square-tube space frame fit- ted with inboard rear disc brakes, a hiyh-mounted rack- and-pinion steering assembly and coil-aver shock absorbers. It was slightly larger than the Cobra in almast every dimension: wheelbase was six inches longer than the 90° Cobra, at {4° the track was 3” wider; overall length 72° (the Cobra’s was 151.5%; and with a ith of 67” it was six inches wider than a Cobra. A five- speed transmission was designed for the car and this, ig with several other engineering innovations, were visioned a8 carrying this car through the 1960s and even inte the 1970s, al contract was for 50 cars, it MA-250 ts parked in front of AC Cars” shawraam. Noto new Cab The MA-200 was originally designed for a 6-cylinder » but Marzewski was asked to modify it to accept a Ford 289 V8 for reasons of cost savings. A 289 race engine had been presented to AC Chairman Derek Hurlock by the Ford Motor Company in recognition of the company’s assistance in it’s first foray at LeMans. ‘Two specially prepared Cobras with fasthack-style hard tops had been entered in the 1963 24-hour event, one under the AC Cars banner and the other by early Cobra dealer Ed Hugus of Pittsburgh. The thinking was that Ford and Shelby did not want to take the chance of being on the receiving end of unfavorable publicity if the Cobras failed to finish. The Hugus entry retired at the halfway point, sidelined hy a broken connecting rod. The AC car finished 3rd in the GT class and 7th overall. It was an exeellent showing and Ford rewarded Hurlock by giving him the left-over spare race engine, one of only 5 built for the event. The body was made from aluminum and the shape was slab-sided and rectangular, It was unlike anything else of that period but in the 1960s and 1970s was actu- ally quite contemporary, AC records show that on November 19, 1963 the completed car was registered for road use. Rather than receive a serial number which fit into the AC numbering system, it was assigned the num- ber “NLA-200," MA-200 was used by Derek Hurlock as his personal transportation during its development stage as well as over the next few years. He seemed to prefer it over a Cobra roadster, most likely because it represented a parked inside. The Cobra engine was ot the only part taken off tle éhel€ foe this car; Italao Kad Cobes 72-spalee wire wheels and « Cobra 3-spoked wood steoring wheel 905 vehicle that was purely an AC design. Although the Cobra was based on the AC Ace, by the time production had begun it shared very few pieces with its British cousin. Throughout Cobra production, no one at AC Cars believed they were building a car that was truly “their own.” They were merely supplying a vehicle built to someone else's spec ns MA-200 was never put into production and only the one prototype was ever built. Hurlock continue driving it until 1968, when it was sold, It had been thought that it served as the inspiration for the AC 428 Frua models hut that is not likely because their design is the product of Italian coachbuilders. The resemblance is more along the lines of a coincidence. The car was sold by AC Cars to Roger Field in 1968, It was put in storage for many years and then, in 1983, it was purchased by Peter Hague. MA-200 was main- tained in original condition and only recently received new paint and @ rebuild of the original engine. In 2006 the ear was purchased by SAAC member Mark Geld of Miami, FL. 906 & GT40s ise lier) At the very beginning of the ¢ am, AC The MA-200 was origi ea for a G-cylindor hhow long i wo what engine but Marzewski was asked to mediify it to accept ties would be taken up hy Cobra produe- Ford 289 V8 for reasons of cout. saving race ton ial contract was tor 60 gine had been preseited io AC Chuirman Derek sumed a lot of AC's resoures Hurlock by the Ford Motor yy in reopgnition oF was not all they did. Looking to thei¢ the oo assistance in it's first foray at LeMans. Cobra. praciuction was beginn ‘Two specially prepared Cobras with fasthack-style hard on a prototype Ewe. tops had been entered in the 1963 24-hour event, « AC Ace, no longer in prody under the AC Cars banner ad the other by early he small block Cobra that dealer Ed Hugus of Pittsburgh. The thinking was by did not want to take the ehrince af hein ving end worable publicity. if the could re The original AC Ace, and came after it, were both based on a chassis-designed by John Tjeira in the 1850s, Te ca parallel main tubes separated by perpendicular eross- to finish, The Hijgue entry retired at ti Transverse leaf a broken connecting vod. The vehicle that was purely an AC design. Although the springs were mounted at « pindles. were hed Srd in the OT class and Tth overall. It Cobra was based on the AC Ace, by the time produc cos with its British 0 one at AC Cars very few p roughout Cobra “ord ew ca ms with 1g. It as an exeellent showing are fewer spare Length end of the lei tached to the fram their travel eontralled by th one of only section, spr was a dated design for ACs in-house designer, built for t ding a ear that was truly “their ZT. Marrewski conceived a square-tube space frame fit- ‘The body was made from aluminum. e shape 2 morcly supplying a vehicle built to ted with inboard rear disc brakes, « hi k- was slab-sided and rectangular. It was unlike anything specifications os embly and coil-over shock lge of that period but in the 1960s. and 1970s was acta ly larger than the Cobra in ally quite contemporary, AC-records show that 00 was never put into. production and only the one prototype was.ever built, Hurlock continue driving until 1968, when it was sold. It had beer that it served as the inspiration for the AC 428 Fra models but rember 19, 1963 the completed ear w ad use. Rathor than rec yas 151.5%), and with a intothe AC numbering system, it was assigned the n ra, A five: ber"MA-200/ that is not likely because their e product of 0 was used by Devek Hurlock ay his pe Malian eoachbuilders, Tho res hor engineering innovations, were ts development stage as well ax linea of a coincidence, arrying this car through the 1960s and over the next few years. Ho seemed to prefur it over a The car was sald by AC Cars oven into the 197 Cobra roadster, most likely because it represented a Te was put in storage for many year: it was purchased by Peter Hague. tained in original condition and only new paint and 4 rebuild of the ori the car was parchased by SAAC me Miami, FL. wheelbase was six inches longer ches wider than a Ct designed for the ear and this, nee is more nlang the main= ently received ine, In, 2006 a parked ia front wf AC Cars showroem, Noto new Cobrak parks iide,, ‘Thm Cabra enytie was nly part taken off the abet ur Ft abs had Cokira 72apuko wire wbelaland a Cobra 3-spoleed mond steering. whee 905