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Subject Area Biology 30

Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

The following unit plan is framed around the inquiry question:

What are the risks and challenges associated with DNA


modification?

The content related to this inquiry question is rooted in Unit C of Biology 30 (Cell Divison, Genetic,
and Molecular Biology), and will thus be taught at a grade twelve level.

Molecular biology is a crucial component of Biology 30, making up approximately 40% of the overall
course focus. However, with molecular biology concentrating on very tiny aspects of biology,
students sometimes have a hard time connecting this content to the world at large. As a result, the
inquiry question was designed to not only encompass an exploration of molecular biology content,
but also to expand the scope of exploration into related ethical issues, job opportunities, and
research opportunities.

This unit is very strongly connected to the discipline of science because without the foundation of
molecular biology, many other scientific theories don’t make sense. For example, evolution via
natural selection does not make sense without an understanding of mutation in DNA at the
molecular level. Furthermore, this unit investigates important historical developments that have
contributed to the field of science and highlights the importance of experimentation in science.
Molecular biology is also becoming ever more relevant in the world we live in. Namely, over the last
decade, huge progress has been made in areas of cloning and DNA modification. With such progress
comes ethical concerns, as well as research and job opportunities. By addressing this inquiry
question, students will be better equipped to make future informed decisions on possible ethical
implication of cloning or DNA modification. In addition, a familiarity with molecular biology will
allow students to competently consider whether they would like to explore future research or
careers in Biosteel, the Glowing Plant Project, agriculture, and medicine.
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Focusing Questions and Rationale

In this unit, students acquire foundational content needed to enhance understanding of previously
learned biological concepts as well as future biological concepts. In Unit B of the Biology 30
curriculum, human reproduction is discussed in terms of creating gametes for both males and
females. Unit B then goes through how a human develops from conception to birth but does not go
into detail about heredity or gene expression. Unit C is where heredity and gene expression
(phenotypes) is explained, filling in this missing information. Unit C also discusses meiosis and
mitosis which can be related back to unit B because these are the mechanisms used to create
gametes and develop an embryo. Looking forward, Unit D discusses how the gene-pool of a
population impacts its survival, which is an application of gene expression learned in unit C. From
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

unit B to D there is an overarching theme about the importance of molecular biology and how it
affects humans and other populations.

Beginning this unit, we assume that students recall from science 9 the basics of genetics and their
role in developing traits throughout generations. In addition, students should already know how
different species have different traits/genetics and how these traits can vary very even within a
species. This unit can also allow for the possibility of cross-curricular teaching. In chemistry 30,
learning about DNA, mRNA, and amino acid chains can be an excellent introduction to organic
chemistry. Students can also relate chemistry to biology through learning about organic molecules,
functional groups, drawing organic molecules, and IUPAC names for molecules. Physics 30 can be
connected to this unit of study by learning how DNA can be destroyed (i.e. radiation) or
investigating the half-life of DNA. Social studies SLO’s (i.e. S.1, S.4, S.5, S.6, S.7, and S.8) are prevalent
throughout this unit due to the nature of investigating issues and forming reasoned judgments.
Therefore, this unit can be closely tied to a variety of social studies projects.

Throughout this unit, a variety of subquestions will be explored. These subquestions will require
students to go beyond simply acquiring content knowledge. That is to say, by framing each lesson
around an essential question, students will have to analyze and evaluate course content in order to
form answers and solutions. Such a method of lesson planning also stands to enhance student
engagement. Instead of having students sit and receive knowledge, students are required to think
critically, participate in discussions with one another, and engage in hands on activities.
Some subquestions found in this unit include: what is molecular biology? what determines
heritability? to what extent do genetics shape our characteristics / qualities? how does
understanding the structure of DNA lead to advancements in molecular biology? what happens if
there are errors made in the genetic code? how does genetic material (genetic code) express a
characteristic or trait? how do we genetically modify organisms? should genetic engineering be
permissible? how can we form a reasoned judgment on an issue?

Beyond knowledge and critical inquiry, students will also gain insight into the Nature of Science
(NOS) throughout this unit. Specifically, students will perform labs that will give them a sense that
science strives for accurate record keeping, peer reviewing, and replicability. Labs also serve to
demonstrate that there are multiple ways to go about doing science, some being more creative than
others. In this unit’s labs, students will also see how science relies on observation, evidence, and
skepticism, all in the hopes of reporting knew knowledge openly (although this sometimes does not
happen). Investigating historical discoveries (such as Watson and Crick’s discovery of DNA) is
incorporated throughout this unit. By investigating historical aspects of science, students will see
that scientific knowledge is tentative, since some knowledge has changed and been disproven, but
also durable as some discoveries are still heavily relied on today. In some historical investigations,
students will also see the messiness of science; that is, how certain individuals did not receive the
credit that they deserved or how advancements to molecular biology were influenced by the social
and political contexts of the time. FNMI content will also be incorporated as a demonstration that a
variety of people and cultures contribute to scientist knowledge and ways of knowing.
Students will get the chance to research scientific articles and resources, enhancing scientific
literacy and gaining an understanding of how scientific research is generated, authenticated, and
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

can become controversial. Lastly, on a field trip, students will be introduced to a University
laboratory, where they will see how technological developments have allowed for much more
advanced research and, in turn, much more advanced research has lead to technological
developments.

Sample Lesson Plans

Day 7

Name of Instructor: Kolton Krein

Grade: 12 Biology 30 Activity: Phenotype lab

Goals/Key questions
Goals: For students to understand the risks and challenges associated with genetic engineering they
must first understand the complexity of gene expression. They will understand
how the same genetics (from their parents) can get expressed differently
between them, their siblings, and their parents. Also, they will realise how
many traits they share with their classmates.

Objective: Students will:


-Understand heredity

-Understand how many phenotypes can come from one genotype and vice versa

-Analyse their phenotypic data, their family’s phenotypic data, and their classmate’s phenotypic
data
-Identify the average phenotypes of specific ethnicities

GLO:
2. explain the basic rules and processes associated with the transmission of genetic characteristics
SLO:
30-C2.2K: compare ratios and probabilities of genotypes and phenotypes for dominant and
recessive, multiple, incompletely dominant, and codominant alleles
30-C2.4K: explain the relationship between variability and the number of genes controlling a trait.
30-C2.1S: formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions,
ideas, problems, and issues
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

30-C2.2S: conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and
use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and
information
30-C2.3S: analyse data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess
possible solutions
30-C2.4S: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of
science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results.
30-C2.1STS: explain that decisions regarding the application of scientific and technological
development involve perspective, including social, cultural, environmental,
ethical, and economic considerations.
30-C3.1STS explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences
for humans and the environment

Pre-lesson Considerations
Students will get to see the range of dominant, recessive, codominant phenotypes that humans have.
Also, understand that these phenotypes can be created by a mixture of
phenotypes. They will practice their data collection and analysis, and then use
this knowledge to make statements about their phenotypes, their family’s
phenotypes, and their friend’s phenotypes. Using these results we can also
analyse if specific ethnicities have certain common phenotypes. Once this
knowledge and application have been achieved we can talk about how it
relates to genetic engineering and how it can be used to choose specific
phenotypes.

Materials needed/preset up required/logistical considerations needed (seating


arrangement):
Each student needs a worksheet Students will be put into groups of three
Piece of paper for bell time and exit slip

For Labs/demos: Safety considerations/factors/equipment required:

This lab has no equipment or safety considerations to be taken into account.

Content:
What is the teacher doing? What are the students doing?

-The teacher will have the bell -When students enter the classroom they
Introduction time question posted before know that every day starts will bell time;
students have entered the room. because of this when students enter the
Time classroom they will start working on the
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

-This lessons bell time question question of the day.


estimation: 15 is “can an offspring display a
minutes total different phenotype than it’s -Once the students have finished their bell
parents, why or why not?” time they must hand it in.
Bell time: 5 (SLOs covered last class and -After finishing bell time they will go back to
minutes relevant to the lab in the current their desks and start listening to the
class) discussion.
Intro discussion
and getting into -Once the students have -They will be engaged and waiting to be
groups: 10 completed bell time I will start called on during the discussion.
minutes the lecture by pointing out
some of my phenotypes. For -Students will then get into their groups and
example I have a round chin get the worksheets that they will need.
shape which is a dominant trait.
After pointing out a couple of
my phenotypes I will point out a
couple of student phenotypes
that differ from my own.

-This will start a discussion


where we quickly recap what
was learned in the previous day
about phenotypes and
genotypes.

-During the discussion I will be


calling on students to have them
recall information that was
taught yesterday.

-Once we have done a quick


recap I will discuss the purpose
and procedure of today’s lab.

- Students will then get into


groups that were premade and
random. They will also get their
worksheet at this time.

- I will leave the procedure on


the board in case students need
to reference it during the lab.
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Transition Students can start working once


considerations I have explained the lab
everyone does not need to start
at the same time since there are
no safety issues.
-I will be walking around the - In groups of three students will be
Activity 1 classroom ensuring that identifying each other’s phenotypes. With
students understand the lab three group members they should be able to
Time est: and what is expected of them. reach a consensus on what phenotype an
individual is.
20 minutes -I will also be listening to try
total and hear what phenotypes - As they go through the worksheet they
people are. must collect their data and both of their
gathering classmate’s data on the table provided in the
information: 15 -Once students have collected worksheet.
minutes their data and put it into the
excel sheet I will calculate how - The worksheet is straightforward and
many students have each trait. should be easy for students to complete.
Starting
problems in - Once the data has been -Once students have collected all the data
worksheet: 5 collected for everyone I will ask the need for their worksheet they can put
minutes everyone to go back to their their information into the excel sheet that I
seats. would have started on my computer.

start answering questions that they have the


information for.

Transition The students just have to make


considerations their way back to their desks.
-I will put the class data on the - Students are back in their seats listening.
Activity 2 smartboard or through a
projector. - When I instruct them they will look at their
Time Est: results, their group's results, and then the
- We will then go through class results. When doing this they will try
20 minutes another class discussion. and look for common trends within the
total data.
- The first thing I will ask them
Group to do is look at their results, - Everyone will differ from the class data in
discussion: 15 their group's results, and the one way or another. They should try and
minutes class results. I will have them hypothesise why this is.
look to see how many traits
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Work time: 5 they had in common with each - Students should be interjecting their
minutes group and have them try and thoughts on why we see these different
come up with reasons to why phenotypes
they did or did not differ from
the other groups. - When given permission students can start
to work on their worksheets again.
- Each culture will have their
specific phenotypes so
depending on the ethnicity of
the class certain students may
deviate farther from the average
than others.

- After acknowledging that


certain ethnicities can have
different phenotypes it is
important to note that know of
these phenotypes give a distinct
selective advantage over the
other or else we would all have
the same phenotype. Also, it is
important to note how complex
the gene expression is even for
our most basic features.

- Once there has been an


adequate discussion regarding
different phenotypes and gene
expression the student can
continue to work on their
worksheets.

-Exit slip question “if it were - Students will complete their exit slip and
possible and ethical, do you get their quiz back.
Conclusion think people would start
genetically modifying their
Time estimate: offspring for one or more of the
5 minutes total traits you analysed today, why
or why not?”

-After they hand in their exit


slip I will give them back their
topic two quiz, for you find
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

them you fix them an


assignment. This assignment
will be completed for
homework.

Assessment: I will look at the bell work submissions after class to ensure that students understand
the basic concepts involved with phenotypes and genotypes (For learning). Both the discussions
before and after the lab can be used as an assessment for learning to see if students understood the
purpose of the lab and how it relates back to the course material (For learning). The worksheet will
be taken in for marks (Of learning). It will be graded based on their ability to collect data, accurately
analysis that data, and apply their analysis to a conclusion about phenotypes. Finally, I will also look
at the exit slips after class to see if students understand the connection to our overarching essential
question. With all of these assessments in mind I should know if students reached the goals of the
lesson or not.

Accommodations/Modifications: There are a limited amount of words used throughout the lab
worksheet and there are plenty of visual aids. If there are ESL students in the class who struggle
with English the simple sentences and visual aids should allow them to still grasp the assignment.
Also based on the nature of the assignment students with hearing difficulties should also still be
able to complete the assignment as it is. The instructions for the lab will be written on the board,
which would allow students with ADD or ADHD stay focused on the task.

Phenotypes Lab

Answer the following questions regarding your physical traits. Determine how many
dominant and recessive traits you have. Test your parent(s) to see which versions of the traits
you inherited:
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

1. Unattached/free earlobes (dominant trait) or attached earlobe (recessive trait)

2. Hairy ears: hair present( recessive) or hair absent( dominant)


3. Face Shape: round (dominant) or square (recessive)

4. Freckles or moles (facial): present (dominant) or absent (recessive)


5. Chin Shape: very prominent (dominant) or less prominent(recessive)

6. Chin Shape: round (dominant) or square(recessive)

7. Cleft Chin: present (dominant) or Absent (recessive)


8. Hair's natural body: Curly (homo. dom.) or Wavy (hetero.) or Straight (homo.
rec.)
9. Widow’s peak: Present (dominant) or absent (recessive)
10. Eyebrows: bushy (dominant) or fine(recessive)

11. Eyebrows: connected (recessive) or not connected (dominant)


12. Eye Distance: close (homo. dom.) or average(hetero.) or far (homo. rec.)

13. Eye size: large (homo. dom.) or medium (hetero.) or small (homo. rec.)

14. Eye shape: almond (dominant) or round (recessive)

15. Eye Slant: horizontal (dominant) or upward (recessive)

16. Eyelash length: long (dominant) or short (recessive)

17. Dimples (dominant trait) vs. No dimples (recessive trait)


Dimples are natural dents in the face to the right or left of the mouth. If a person
has only one dimple, they should be counted as having dimples
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

18. Mouth Shape: long (homo. dom.) or average (hetero.) or small (homo. rec.)

19. Lip Size: thick (dominant) or fine (recessive)

20. Hapsburg lip: protruding(homo. dom.) or slight (hetero.) or absent (homo.


rec.)

21. Tongue roll- Can the tongue curl or roll into a “u”-shaped tongue?(Dom.)
22. Tongue flip - tongue can be turned completely over(Dom.)
23. Ski tongue: tongue can extend out and touch nose, forming a “ski”(Dom.)
24. Nostril Shape: rounded (dominant) or flared (recessive)

25. Nose size: big (homo. dom.) or medium (hetero.) or small (homo. rec.)

26. Nose shape: rounded (dominant) or pointed(recessive)

27. Ear to Nose relationship: Large ears/ wide nose (dominant) or small
ears/narrow nose(recessive)

28. Second toe longer than great toe (Dominant) - See trait graphic at bottom.
29. Hitch hikers/bent thumb(dominant trait) or straight thumb (recessive
trait)

30. Thumbness: Right or left thumbed? Have student put hands together,
interweaving his/her fingers (See graphic). Check which thumb is on top. Since
some students can’t decide by this method, then ask which index finger is on top.
That will be which thumb should also be on top. After they have figured this out,
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

have them replace their hands together with the opposite thumb on top..... This
feels very strange! ) Right is Dominant.
31. Long or short index finger - Put hand on the edge of a piece of paper so
that the middle finger is slightly above the edge and the 3rd finger of each hand is
right on the edge. Where is the index finger? Even with or LONGER than the 3rd
finger? Shorter? Dominant = even with the 3rd finger. (see graphic below)
32. Bent little finger (dominant trait), or straight (recessive trait)

33. Mid-digit hair (dominant trait) vs. No mid-digit hair (recessive trait)

34. Handedness: Right or left handed? (Right is Dominant)


35. "Witch's fingers" (Dominant) It is when the person can keep the proximal
phalanx and middle phalanx straight and bend the distal phalanx. (1st two
joints straight, and bend tip of finger)
36. Angel’s wings (Dominant) "Angels Wings" is the ability to semi-dislocate
the shoulder bone. When a person who can do this presses their two palms
together, pushing with their arms, their shoulder blades "jump out" looking like
two wings! It’s pretty amazing if you've never seen it!
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Phenotypes Lab Write-Up

1) How many dominant traits do you have?


2) How many recessive traits do you have?

3) What is your dominant to recessive ratio?

DOMINANT: RECESSIVE

4) Compare your dominant traits to your parent(s), how many traits do you share in
common?

5) Do you have traits that neither of your parent(s) show?

6) Compare your dominant traits to your sibling or other relative, how many traits do you
share in common?
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

7) Compare your dominant traits to your friend(s), how many traits do you share in
common?

8) Do you have more traits in common with your parents, siblings, or friends?

9) Make one Punnett square that describes a trait you inherited from your parents.
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Name______________

What trait Dominant Recessive Other (codominant,


incomplete
dominance , etc.)
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Name______________

What trait Dominant Recessive Other (codominant,


incomplete
dominance , etc.)
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Name______________

What trait Dominant Recessive Other (codominant,


incomplete
dominance , etc.)
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Day 9
Goals: What am I hoping the students will get out of this experience?
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

 An understanding of how DNA replication works, why it both an important biological process, and why it is
important that we understand this biological process.

Main Ideas: What are the ideas at the heart of this experience? What concepts am I
hoping the students will understand as a result of this lesson? (How
does it connect to the big question?)
 DNA creates copies of itself so that we have identical material for cell division (growth and reproduction)
 Helicase enzymes are a type of restriction enzyme that cuts DNA and allows for DNA replication to occur.
 Ligase enzymes are enzymes that splice nucleotides together.
 DNA polymerases are enzymes that add corresponding nucleotides to template strands and also proof
read the DNA sequence for errors.
 DNA replication related to the bigger questions of genetic modification because it allows us to see how
changing one DNA sequence can manifest itself in all genes. In other words, change one DNA sequence
and this gene gets replicated over and over until multiple cells express the new gene sequences.

Procedures:
Engage How will I spark students’ interest in the topic?
 Foster class discussions / inquires
 Hands on activities

Explore Activity: What will the students be examining and exploring on behalf
of their own learning?
 The process of DNA replication

Explain What kind of meaning will students understand from this experience? How
can I help students by scaffolding their ideas?
 Students will be able to reflect on how DNA replication relates to the previously learned content of mitosis
and meiosis. Students will then be able to more meaningfully understand the big picture of mitosis and
meiosis.

Elaborate How will the activity connect to what we have been doing in class? (How will I
help students organize their thinking and pull this lesson together?
 By working together, students will build collaboration skills and help each other understand the processes
of DNA replication.

Evaluate How will I know what the students have learned?


 Observation of student engagement and understanding will be continuously performed throughout the
lesson.
 An exit slip will be given at the end of class to assess student understanding of the material for that lesson.
 A topic quiz will be presented next class on this material.
 Bell work on this material will be performed in the next class as a formative assessment.
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Name of Instructor: Kolton Krein


Grade: 12 Activity: DNA Replication Lesson
Goals/Key questions
Goals: By understanding DNA repletion, students will be able to expand on their prior knowledge of
mitosis and meiosis. In addition, having an understanding of DNA replication is
necessary in developing an understanding of how DNA modification would work.
Objective (connected to PofS): How does DNA make exact copies of itself? Why is it important that
DNA make exact copies of itself?
GL0s/SL0s addressed (Include Skill and Attitude Outcomes):
30-C3.4s work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in
communicating information and ideas and in assessing results work cooperatively
with team members to investigate the impact of an environmental factor on the
expression of a gene and to solve problems as they arise (CT–NS1) debate the
advantages and disadvantages of corporate funding and patenting of genetic
research results, including Aboriginal and other perspectives of ownership (CT–
SEC2, CT–SEC3) [ICT C1–4.4].
30-C3.2k describe, in general, how genetic information is contained in the sequence of bases in DNA
molecules in chromosomes and how the DNA molecules replicate themselves
30-C3.4k explain, in general, how restriction enzymes cut DNA molecules into smaller fragments and
how ligases reassemble them

Pre lesson Considerations


Materials needed/preset up required/logistical considerations needed (seating
arrangement):
Powerpoint slides, DNA cut-out models, Exit slips, and Topic Quizzes.
Content:
What is the teacher doing? What are the students doing?
Needs to include step by step
procedures: Be specific to what they will be doing to be
Include Key questions, engaged in the learning.
logistics, key concepts that will Consider how they are organized, (eg
be addressed, methods of working alone/pairs etc).
formative assessment
 Students will work on level 1 and level 2
Introduction  Using the powerpoint slides, problems, then check with the teacher
(how will you engage the teacher will display the when they think they have the answer.
students?  Students who have successfully answered
Bell Work questions on the
Connections to
previous learning?) smartboard. A habit has both problems will become experts who
already been established for help their fellow students answer the level
Time students to start working on 1 and 2 problems.
estimation: the Bell work problems as  Students will listen to the teacher’s
soon as they arrive. The instructions for the introduction
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

teacher should still be discussion.


5 mins for bell checking that all students  Students will discuss the questions posed
work, 5 - 10 are beginning to work on the by the teacher
mins for Intro bell work questions. Level 1  Students will share their answers to the
discussion (10- problem (What are the questions with the class.
15mins) structural components of  Students will listen to the teacher expand
DNA) answer is phosphate on the discussion questions.
group, nitrogenous base,
and deoxyribose sugar. For
the level 2 problem (Draw a
simplified structure of DNA),
students should show you
complementary base pairs
(A-T, G-C) with a sugar and
phosphate group attached
to the nucleotides. When a
student confirms to you that
they have answered both
problems correctly, you can
name them an expert and
instruct them to move
around the room and help
other students finish the
problems. Continue to move
around the room, checking
students work, and helping
other students.

 Instruct students to sit back


down in their seats. When
students are settled, tell
them that today we will be
discussing how DNA
replicates itself. Have
students, in their seated
groups, spend 2-3 minutes
discussing why it might be
important for DNA to make
copies of itself and why
might it also be important
for us to know about and
understand this replication
process.

 After 3-4 minutes, have the


class come back together
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

and here two responses.


Ensure, if these answers
weren’t already stated, to
say that DNA must replicate
so that we have enough
identical information
available for cell division.
Have the class recall from
the topic of mitosis that cell
division is important for
organism growth,
maintenance, and
reproduction. Also, suggest
that understanding DNA
replication offers insight into
how damages cells (errors in
replication), such as
cancerous cells, come about.

Transition
considerations

 The teacher will describe  Students will listen to the teacher, take
Activity 1: how replication is divided notes, and ask questions.
Powerpoint into three stages: initiation,
Presentation of elongation, and termination.
information Throughout describing these
stages, the teacher should
20 mins encourage students to ask
questions if they are
confused or need
clarification.
 The teacher will describe
how initiation begins with
the helicase enzyme finding
and binding to a recognized
sequence called the
replication origon. At the
replication origin, helicase
“unzips” DNA. The unwound
DNA strand serves as a
template for the next stage.
 Describe how elongation
begins with the enzyme DNA
Polymerase adding
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

nucleotides to the template


strand. Discuss that the
addition of nucleotides take
place in a 5” – 3” direction
and therefore one strand is
copied continuously (leading
strand), while the other is
copied in short bursts
(lagging strand). In order to
connect the delayed copying
on the lagging strand, an
enzyme called ligase splices
together the fragments of
DNA.
 Describe that in the
termination stage DNA is
proofread by DNA
polymerase. After possible
corrections are made, DNA
begins to rewind into its
original helix structure (this
time as two DNA helices
instead of the original one).
Transition
considerations
 Tell students that, in their  Students will listen to the teacher provide
Activity 2: DNA seated groups of 3-4, they instructions for the activity.
replication will be using the DNA model  Students will grab DNA model cut outs and
model inquiry cut outs to re-enact the return to their seats.
process of DNA replication.  Students will work as a group to model the
10 mins  After answering students’ process of DNA replication.
questions about the task,  Students will ask the teacher questions if
instruct them to grab the needed.
baggie of DNA model cut
outs at the front of the room
and return to their groups to
work.
 The teacher will move
around the room, observing
student engagement and
correcting any
misconceptions regarding
the process of DNA
replication.
 The teacher will instruct  Students will return DNA models to the
students to return their DNA front of the room and return to their seats
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Conclusion model cut outs to the front ready to move onto the next task.
3 mins for of the class then return to  Students will listen to the teach
closure their seats ready to summarize the key points of the lesson.
10 mins for continue.  Students will clear off their desks and
topic quiz  The teacher will bring write their topic quiz.
2-3 mins for closure to the lesson by  Students will complete their exit slip after
exit slip after summing up the information finishing their topic quiz.
topic quiz presented. List the various  Students will hand in their topic quiz and
enzymes we looked at and exit slip to the teacher and work on
their function: helicase, homework quietly until the bell rings for
(total 15 mins)
ligase, and polymerase. The next class.
teacher should bring
attention to other terms
such as leading and lagging
strand.
 The teacher will ask students
to settle and remove open
textbooks from their desks.
 The teacher will hand out
the Topic quizzes and exit
slips at the same time.
Instruct students to
complete the topic quiz,
then the exit slip. If students
finish early they should sit
quietly and work on other
homework.

Assessment:
 Observation of student engagement and understanding will be continuously performed throughout the
lesson.
 An exit slip will be given at the end of class to assess student understanding of the material for that lesson.
 A topic quiz will be presented next class on this material.
 Bell work on this material will be performed in the next class as a formative assessment

Extension and extra time activity:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=8kK2zwjRV0M
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Established Goals – GLO(s):
1. describe the processes of mitosis and meiosis
2. explain the basic rules and processes associated with the transmission of genetic characteristics
3. explain classical genetics at the molecular level

Understandings: Essential Questions:


Students will understand that…
-What are the risks and challenges associated with DNA
- The function of chromosomes modification?

- The cell cycles and each stage -Should genetic engineering be permissible?

- The differences between mitosis and meiosis -To what extent do genetics shape our characteristics /
qualities?
- Genotypes and phenotypes
-What would happen to us if we could not replicate our
- How a single genotype can create multiple DNA?
phenotypes

-The chemical properties of DNA and DNA


replication

-How DNA is transcribed into mRNA and


translated into proteins

-Genetic engineering and understand the factors


used to modify genetics

-How changes in base pairs (DNA) impact the


proteins made

- How/why gene-pools can change over time


Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Prior understandings… Where does this lead?

Science 9: Biology 30:

-In science 9 students learn the basics of -In the last unit students will learn about the Hardy-
genetics and their role in developing traits. Weinberg principle and how it is affected by the gene-
pool of a population.
-They learn how different species have different
traits/genetics and how these traits can vary -They will also learn about how gene-pool impacts the
very even within a species. diversity of a population and how their gene-pool can
lead to evolution.
-They also learn about the heredity of DNA and
traits Chemistry 30

-Learning about DNA, mRNA, and amino acid chains


(proteins) is an excellent introduction to organic
chemistry

-Students learn the basics about organic molecules,


functional groups, drawing organic molecules, and
IUPAC names for multiple molecules.

Physics 30

-When learning about the chemical properties of DNA


students will learn how DNA can be destroyed and the
consequences that arise from the destruction.

Students will know…

30-C1.1k define and explain the significance of chromosome number in somatic and sex cells; i.e.,
haploidy, diploidy and polyploidy
30-C1.2k explain, in general terms, the events of the cell cycle; i.e., interphase, mitosis and cytokinesis
30-C1.3k describe the process of meiosis (spermatogenesis and oogenesis) and the necessity for the
reduction of chromosome number
30-C1.4k compare the processes of mitosis and meiosis
30-C1.5k describe the processes of crossing over and nondisjunction and evaluate their significance to
organism inheritance and development
30-C2.2k compare ratios and probabilities of genotypes and phenotypes for dominant and recessive,
multiple, incompletely dominant, and codominant alleles
30-C2.4k explain the relationship between variability and the number of genes controlling a trait; e.g., one
pair of genes, as for Rh factor, versus two or more pairs of genes, as for skin colour and height
30-C3.1k summarize the historical events that led to the discovery of the structure of the DNA molecule,
including the work of Franklin and Watson and Crick
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

30-C3.2k describe, in general, how genetic information is contained in the sequence of bases in DNA
molecules in chromosomes and how the DNA molecules replicate themselves
30-C3.3k describe, in general, how genetic information is transcribed into sequences of bases in RNA
molecules and is finally translated into sequences of amino acids in proteins
30-C3.4k explain, in general, how restriction enzymes cut DNA molecules into smaller fragments and how
ligases reassemble them
30-C3.5k explain, in general, how cells may be transformed by inserting new DNA sequences into their
genomes
30-C3.6k explain how a random change (mutation) in the sequence of bases results in abnormalities or
provides a source of genetic variability
30-C3.7k explain how base sequences in nucleic acids contained in the nucleus, mitochondrion and
chloroplast give evidence for the relationships among organisms of different species
30-D1.4k describe the molecular basis of gene-pool change and the significance of these changes over time;
i.e., mutations and natural selection (e.g., drug-resistant bacteria, herbicideresistant plants)

Students will be able to do…

30-C1.1s formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas,
problems and issues
• define questions related to mitosis and meiosis, such as chromosome shortening, conditions/stimuli
for meiosis, aging and mitosis, cytokinesis (IP–NS1)
30-C1.2s conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and use a broad
range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information
• perform a simulation to demonstrate the behaviour of chromosomes during mitosis (PR–NS3) • use
a microscope and prepared slides of onion root tip cells to identify the stages of a cell cycle and
calculate the duration of each stage (PR–NS3, AI–NS2)
• research and compare a range of reproductive strategies in organisms and present them in the form
of charts, tables or diagrams; e.g., binary fission, budding, the sexual and asexual phases of
alternation of generations (PR–NS1, PR–NS4) [ICT C6–4.3]
• prepare microscope slides to demonstrate some stages of mitosis and meiosis (PR–NS2, PR–NS3,
PR–NS4)
30-C1.4s work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in
communicating information and ideas and in assessing results
• work collaboratively in the preparation of mitosis slides (CT–NS1)
• present two contrasting reproductive strategies, emphasizing the differences
30-C2.1s formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas,
problems and issues
• design a plan for collecting data to demonstrate human inheritance (IP–NS2).

30-C2.2s conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and use a broad
range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information
• perform an experiment to demonstrate inheritance of a trait controlled by a single pair of genes;
e.g., albino corn, Drosophila or Arabidopsis (PR–NS2, PR–NS3, PR–NS4)
• design and perform an experiment to demonstrate that an environmental factor can cause a change
in the expression of genetic information in an organism (IP–NS2, IP–NS3, IP–NS4, PR–NS3, PR–
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

NS4, PR–NS5) [ICT F1–4.2].


30-C2.3s analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess possible
solutions
• interpret patterns and trends of inheritance of traits and predict, quantitatively, the probability of
inheritance of traits illustrated in monohybrid, dihybrid and sex-linked inheritance, using pedigrees
and Punnett squares [ICT C7–4.2]
• perform experiments to record and explain predicted phenotypic ratios versus actual counts in
genetic crosses to show a relationship between chance and genetic results (PR–NS2, PR–NS3, PR–
NS4, AI–NS3)
• draw and interpret pedigree charts from data on human single-allele and multiple-allele inheritance
patterns; e.g., hemophilia, blood types (PR–NS4, AI–NS2) [ICT C7–4.2] • analyze crossover data for
a single pair of chromosomes to create a chromosome map showing gene arrangement and relative
distance (AI–NS2) [ICT C7–4.2]
• identify limitations of data associated with phenotypic ratios for small populations in which the
ratios may not conform with the theoretical ratios expected (AI–NS4).
30-C2.4s work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in
communicating information and ideas and in assessing results • work cooperatively with team members to
investigate a monohybrid cross (tongue rolling, attached earlobes) and solve problems as they arise (CT–
NS1, CT–NS2).

30-C3.1s formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas,
problems and issues • design an experiment to identify the proteins produced in a cell at a particular point in
time or development (IP–NS2, IP–NS3, IP–NS4).

30-C3.2s conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and use a broad
range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information
• construct models of DNA to demonstrate the general structure and base arrangement (PR–ST2)
[ICT C6–4.4]
• perform simulations to demonstrate the replication of DNA and the transcription and translation of
its information (PR–NS2, PR–NS4)
• perform simulations to demonstrate the use of restriction enzymes and ligases (PR–NS3, PR–NS4)
• perform an investigation to extract DNA from cells in green peas, beans, bananas or onions (PR–
NS2, PR–NS3, PR–NS4, PR–NS5)
• research gel electrophoresis techniques and their applications in medical diagnostics and forensics
(PR–ST1).
30-C3.3s analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess possible
solutions
• analyze, from published data, relationships between human activities and changes in genetic
information that lead to heritable mutations and cancer (AI–NS2) [ICT C7–4.2]
• analyze DNA fingerprints (AI–NS2)
• compare and contrast homologous DNA sequences to infer ancestry of various species (AI–NS2).
30-C3.4s work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in
communicating information and ideas and in assessing results
• work cooperatively with team members to investigate the impact of an environmental factor on the
expression of a gene and to solve problems as they arise (CT–NS1)
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

• debate the advantages and disadvantages of corporate funding and patenting of genetic research
results, including Aboriginal and other perspectives of ownership (CT–SEC2, CT–SEC3) [ICT C1–
4.4].

30-C1.1sts explain that science and technology are developed to meet societal needs and expand human
capability (SEC1)
• discuss the role of mitosis and biotechnology in regenerating whole, damaged or missing parts of
organisms (stem cells, skin tissue)
• evaluate how knowledge of cell division or development of nanotechnology might be applied to
the regulation of cancerous growth in plants or animals
• discuss and assess the impact of research in plant and animal reproduction on our understanding of
mitosis and meiosis in humans (cloning, chromosome shortening)
• discuss the types and sources of teratogenic compounds found in the environment and the
technological means by which they can be removed or controlled to ensure quality of life for future
generations.
30-C2.1sts explain that decisions regarding the application of scientific and technological development
involve a variety of perspectives, including social, cultural, environmental, ethical and economic
considerations (SEC4b) [ICT F2–4.2, F3–4.1]
• evaluate the needs and interests of society and the role of genetic counselling and technology in the
identification and treatment of potentially disabling genetic disorders (phenylketonuria, cystic
fibrosis, germ-cell modification)
• discuss the contributions of Aboriginal peoples in the development of early plant hybrids
• discuss the application of genetic crosses in the development of specific breeds or hybrids (wheat
and corn).
30-C3.1sts explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for
humans and the environment (SEC3) [ICT F3–4.1]
• discuss the implications for society of corporations being able to patent genes, such as the gene for
herbicide resistance in canola
• assess the concerns and benefits of genetically modified organisms, such as transgenic food
organisms or tree cloning for reforestation
30-C3.2sts explain that scientific research and technological development help achieve a sustainable
society, economy and environment (SEC4a) [ICT F2–4.2, F2–4.8]
• discuss the Human Genome Project and the potential of proteomic technologies, in terms of the
needs, interests and financial support of society
• discuss biotechnology and gene replacement therapy in the treatment of human genetic disorders
• assess the impact and value of DNA sequencing on the study of genetic relationships and variations
in population ecology
• explore the application of nanotechnology and its implications for clinical diagnostics,
pharmacology, biological research or proteomic programs.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Pre-Assessment:
-allow us to gather information that will inform future instructional decisions. We use speed dating and dry-
erase boards to acquire data on our students’ verbal, writing, and reading skills. By way of this, we can
make decisions for what content areas need focus on and differentiate the delivery and expression of that
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

content in order to enhance student success. Specifically, we will be assessing the knowledge students have
from science nine SLOs: A2, A2.2, A2.3, A2.4, and A2.5. Also, the pre-assessment can be used to assess
what students already know about the topics we are going to cover. This will let us track the students
progression through the unit.

Speed Dating: Each student will be provided with a topic or definition, from science nine, that he or she is
responsible for explaining. After students have been given time to refresh themselves on the topic, they will
then be placed in pairs and given a short amount of time to teach each other their topics. After the time limit
is up, students will move to different pairs and teach their topic again. This activity allows teachers to assess
the verbal skills of the students and gauge the level of understanding students have for the content, thereby
informing future decisions for differentiation.

Dry erase boards: We will ask the students questions about concepts from science nine and students must
answer using their whiteboard. When signaled, students will raise their whiteboards for the teacher to view.
This activity promotes the active participation of every student and provides the teacher with immediate
information needed to modify future content and decide if any differentiation (i.e. writing preference)
should be made moving forward.
Quizzes, Tests, Assignments Performance Tasks, Projects

Unit Test Position defense on genetic modification (Presentation in


groups or individual paper)
Eight Topic Quizzes (7 taken for marks)

Lab worksheet and report.


Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Other Evidence (observations, work samples, Student self-assessment


dialogues)
You find them you fix them (Post Topic Quizzes)
Pre-Assessments: Dry-Erase boards and speed
dating.

Recording answers to Bell Work questions

Recording answers to Exit Slips

Observing student engagement and competency


during labs

Topic 1: Identify the basics chromosomes, hereditary, and the cell cycles. Knowledge needed for
understanding mitosis and meiosis (GLO) (SLO: C1.1K, C1.2K, C1.1S, C1.2S, C1.4S, C2.1S, C1.1STS):

-C1.1K: Define and explain the significance of chromosome number in somatic and sex cells; i.e.,
haploidy, diploidy and polyploidy

-C1.2K: Explain, in general terms, the events of the cell cycle; i.e., interphase, mitosis and
cytokinesis

-C1.1S: Formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions,
ideas, problems and issues
• define questions related to mitosis and meiosis, such as chromosome shortening,
conditions/stimuli for meiosis, aging and mitosis, cytokinesis

-C1.1S: Conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and
use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information
• perform a simulation to demonstrate the behaviour of chromosomes during mitosis
• use a microscope and prepared slides of onion root tip cells to identify the stages
of a cell cycle and calculate the duration of each stage
• research and compare a range of reproductive strategies in organisms and present them
in the form of charts, tables or diagrams; e.g., binary fission, budding, the sexual and
asexual phases of alternation of generations
• prepare microscope slides to demonstrate some stages of mitosis and meiosis
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

-C1.4S: Work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of
science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results
• work collaboratively in the preparation of mitosis slides

-C2.1S: Formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions,
ideas, problems and issues
• design a plan for collecting data to demonstrate human inheritance

-C1.1STS: Explain that science and technology are developed to meet societal needs and expand
human capability
• discuss the role of mitosis and biotechnology in regenerating whole, damaged or missing
parts of organisms (stem cells, skin tissue)
• evaluate how knowledge of cell division or development of nanotechnology might be
applied to the regulation of cancerous growth in plants or animals
• discuss and assess the impact of research in plant and animal reproduction on our
understanding of mitosis and meiosis in humans (cloning, chromosome shortening)
• discuss the types and sources of teratogenic compounds found in the environment and
the technological means by which they can be removed or controlled to ensure quality of
life for future generations.

Topic 2: describe the processes of mitosis and meiosis (GLO) (SLO: C1.3K, C1.4K, C1.5K, C1.1S,
C1.2S, C1.4S, C2.1S):

-C1.3K: Describe the process of meiosis (spermatogenesis and oogenesis) and the necessity for
the reduction of chromosome number

-C1.4K: Compare the processes of mitosis and meiosis

-C1.5K: Describe the processes of crossing over and nondisjunction and evaluate their
significance to organism inheritance and development

C1.1S as highlighted above

C1.2S as highlighted above

C1.4S as highlighted above

C2.1S as highlighted above

Topic 3: explain the basic rules and processes associated with the transmission of genetic characteristics
(GLO) (SLO: C2.2K, C2.4K, C2.2S, C2.3S, C2.4S)

-C2.2K: Compare ratios and probabilities of genotypes and phenotypes for dominant and
recessive, multiple, incompletely dominant, and codominant alleles
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

-C2.4K: Explain the relationship between variability and the number of genes controlling a trait;
e.g., one pair of genes, as for Rh factor, versus two or more pairs of genes, as for skin colour and
height

-C2.2S: Conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and
use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information
• perform an experiment to demonstrate inheritance of a trait controlled by a single pair of
genes; e.g., albino corn, Drosophila or Arabidopsis
• design and perform an experiment to demonstrate that an environmental factor can
cause a change in the expression of genetic information in an organism

-C2.3S: Analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess
possible solutions
• interpret patterns and trends of inheritance of traits and predict, quantitatively, the
probability of inheritance of traits illustrated in monohybrid, dihybrid and sex-linked
inheritance, using pedigrees and Punnett squares
• perform experiments to record and explain predicted phenotypic ratios versus actual
counts in genetic crosses to show a relationship between chance and genetic results
• draw and interpret pedigree charts from data on human single-allele and multiple-allele
inheritance patterns; e.g., hemophilia, blood types
• analyze crossover data for a single pair of chromosomes to create a chromosome map
showing gene arrangement and relative distance
• identify limitations of data associated with phenotypic ratios for small populations in
which the ratios may not conform with the theoretical ratios expected

-C2.4S: Work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of
science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results • work cooperatively
with team members to investigate a monohybrid cross (tongue rolling, attached earlobes) and
solve problems as they arise

Topic 4: explain classical genetics at the molecular level (GLO) (SLO: C3.1K, C3.2K, C3.1S, C3.2S)

-C3.1K: Summarize the historical events that led to the discovery of the structure of the DNA
molecule, including the work of Franklin and Watson and Crick

-C3.2K: Describe, in general, how genetic information is contained in the sequence of bases in
DNA molecules in chromosomes and how the DNA molecules replicate themselves

-C3.1S: Formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions,
Ideas, problems and issues
• design an experiment to identify the proteins produced in a cell at a particular point in
time or development
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

-C3.2S: Conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and
use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information
• construct models of DNA to demonstrate the general structure and base arrangement
• perform simulations to demonstrate the replication of DNA and the transcription and
translation of its information
• perform simulations to demonstrate the use of restriction enzymes and ligases
• perform an investigation to extract DNA from cells in green peas, beans, bananas or
onions
• research gel electrophoresis techniques and their applications in medical diagnostics
and forensics.

Topic 5: explain classical genetics at the molecular level (GLO) (SLO: C3.4K, C3.1S, C3.2S, C3.3S,
C3.4S , C1.1STS, C2.1 STS, C3.1STS, C3.2STS)

-C3.4K: Explain, in general, how restriction enzymes cut DNA molecules into smaller fragments
and how ligases reassemble them

-C3.1S as highlighted above

-C3.2S as highlighted

-C3.3S: Analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess
possible solutions
• analyze, from published data, relationships between human activities and changes in
genetic information that lead to heritable mutations and cancer.
• analyze DNA fingerprints
• compare and contrast homologous DNA sequences to infer ancestry of various species.

-C3.4S: Work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of
science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results
• work cooperatively with team members to investigate the impact of an environmental
factor on the expression of a gene and to solve problems as they arise
• debate the advantages and disadvantages of corporate funding and patenting of genetic
research results, including Aboriginal and other perspectives of ownership.

-C1.1STS: Explain that science and technology are developed to meet societal needs and
expand human capability
• discuss the role of mitosis and biotechnology in regenerating whole, damaged or missing
parts of organisms (stem cells, skin tissue)
• evaluate how knowledge of cell division or development of nanotechnology might be
applied to the regulation of cancerous growth in plants or animals
• discuss and assess the impact of research in plant and animal reproduction on our
understanding of mitosis and meiosis in humans (cloning, chromosome shortening)
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

• discuss the types and sources of teratogenic compounds found in the environment and
the technological means by which they can be removed or controlled to ensure quality of l
ife for future generations.

-C2.1STS: Explain that decisions regarding the application of scientific and technological
development involve a variety of perspectives, including social, cultural, environmental, ethical
and economic considerations
• evaluate the needs and interests of society and the role of genetic counselling and
technology in the identification and treatment of potentially disabling genetic disorders
(phenylketonuria, cystic fibrosis, germ-cell modification)
• discuss the contributions of Aboriginal peoples in the development of early plant hybrids
• discuss the application of genetic crosses in the development of specific breeds or
hybrids (wheat and corn).
-C3.1STS: Explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended
consequences for humans and the environment
• discuss the implications for society of corporations being able to patent genes, such as
the gene for herbicide resistance in canola
• assess the concerns and benefits of genetically modified organisms, such as transgenic
food organisms or tree cloning for reforestation

-C3.2STS: Explain that scientific research and technological development help achieve a
sustainable society, economy and environment
• discuss the Human Genome Project and the potential of proteomic technologies, in
terms of the needs, interests and financial support of society
• discuss biotechnology and gene replacement therapy in the treatment of human genetic
disorders
• assess the impact and value of DNA sequencing on the study of genetic relationships
and variations in population ecology
• explore the application of nanotechnology and its implications for clinical diagnostics,
pharmacology, biological research or proteomic programs.

Topic 6: explain classical genetics at the molecular level (GLO) (SLO: C3.3K, C3.1S, C3.2S, C3.3S,
C3.4S, C1.1STS, C2.1 STS, C3.1STS, C3.2STS)

-C3.3K: Describe, in general, how genetic information is transcribed into sequences of bases in
RNA molecules and is finally translated into sequences of amino acids in proteins

-C3.1S: as highlighted above

-C3.2S: as highlighted above

-C3.3S: as highlighted above

-C3.4S: as highlighted above


Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

-C1.1STS: as highlighted above

-C2.1STS: as highlighted above

-C3.1STS: as highlighted above

-C3.2STS: as highlighted above

Topic 7: Students will take their knowledge of classical genetics and apply it to the field of genetic
engineering and bioethics. (SLO: C3.4K, C3.5K, C3.6K, C3.1S, C3.2S, C3.3S, C3.4S, C1.1STS, C2.1
STS, C3.1STS, C3.2STS)

C3.4K: Explain, in general, how restriction enzymes cut DNA molecules into smaller fragments
and how ligases reassemble them

C3.5K: Explain, in general, how cells may be transformed by inserting new DNA sequences into
their genomes

C3.6K: Explain how a random change (mutation) in the sequence of bases results in
abnormalities or provides a source of genetic variability

-C3.1S: as highlighted above

-C3.2S: as highlighted above

-C3.3S: as highlighted above

-C3.4S: as highlighted above

-C1.1STS: as highlighted above

-C2.1STS: as highlighted above

-C3.1STS: as highlighted above

-C3.2STS: as highlighted above

Topic 8: Students will take their knowledge of classical genetics and apply it to population ecology and
evolution. (SLO: C3.7K, D1.4K, C1.1STS)

-C3.7K: Explain how base sequences in nucleic acids contained in the nucleus, mitochondrion
and chloroplast give evidence for the relationships among organisms of different species
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

-D1.4K: Describe the molecular basis of gene-pool change and the significance of these changes
over time; i.e., mutations and natural selection (e.g., drug-resistant bacteria, herbicideresistant
plants)

-C1.1STS: as highlighted above


Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Assessments
Pre- Exit
Bell Work You Find
Assessment Slips Mulligan Performance Unit Topic Labs
Title (class to Them You Labs Task
s (for each (class to Test Quizzes
class) Fix Them
topic) class)
Learning
Type
Outcomes
(Format Formative Summativ Summativ Summativ
Formative Formative Formative Formative Formative Summative
e
ive/Sum e e
mative)
Weighti N/A 20% 25%
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 25% 30%
ng
Topic 1:
Chromosomes and
Stages of Cell Cycle
X X X X X X X X X
SLO: C1.1K, C1.2K,
C1.1S, C1.2S, C1.4S,
C2.1S, C1.1STS

Topic 2: Mitosis and


Meiosis
X X X X X X X X X
SLO: C1.3K, C1.4K,
C1.5K, C1.1S, C1.2S,
C1.4S, C2.1S
Topic 3: phenotypes
and genotypes
X
X X X X X X X
SLO: C2.2K, C2.4K, X X
C2.2S, C2.3S, C2.4S
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Topic 4: DNA
structure X X
X X X X X X X X
SLO: C3.1K, C3.2K,
C3.1S, C3.2S
Topic 5: DNA
replication

SLO: C3.4K, C3.1S, X


C3.2S, C3.3S, X X X X X X X X X
C3.4S , C1.1STS,
C2.1 STS, C3.1STS,
C3.2STS

Topic 6: Transcription
and Translation

SLO: C3.3K, C3.1S, X X X X X X X X X X


C3.2S, C3.3S, C3.4S,
C1.1STS, C2.1 STS,
C3.1STS, C3.2STS
Topic 7: DNA
modification/genetic
engineering

SLO: C3.4K, C3.5K, X X X X X X X X X X


C3.6K, C3.1S, C3.2S,
C3.3S, C3.4S,
C1.1STS, C2.1 STS,
C3.1STS, C3.2STS
Topic 8: Mutations X X X X X X
and population
X X
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

SLO: C3.7K, D1.4K,


C1.1STS
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Assessment Tool Overview


Assessment Assessment Assessment
Assessment
Brief Description FOR AS OF
Tool
Learning Learning Learning
Pre-Assessments - We will perform a pre-
assessment at the beginning of every topic to
determine the level of understanding that
students have with previously learned the
material needed for that topic. Furthermore,
our pre-assessments will aim to assess
Pre-
whether or not our students have any
Assessment
knowledge about the material covered in our X
(for each
topic beforehand. These pre-assessments can
topic)
be used to check any knowledge SLOs
highlighted above. As a result of performing
these pre-assessments, we can accurately
track our student’s progress and
understanding of knowledge SLOs
(Assessment FOR Learning).
Bell Work Bell Work (Class-to-Class) - At the X
(class to beginning of every class, a couple of
class) questions will be put on the board for students
to contend with. This acts as a daily pre-
assessment, allowing students to attempt to
recall information while we check for
understanding of the material previously
covered. By constantly checking for
understanding of the material, we can gather
information that will guide future lesson
objectives (Assessment FOR Learning).
Throughout our Bell Work assessment, we
will ensure differentiation by having level 1
questions (easier to answer) and level 2
questions (challenging to answer) that
students can choose from. Furthermore, as a
means of differentiation, we will provide
students with the option to work on the
questions in groups or verbally answer the
questions. A variety of knowledge SLOs will
be assessed under our Bell Work assessment.
For example, after learning about 30-C1.2k
(explain, in general terms, the events of the
cell cycle; i.e., interphase, mitosis and
cytokinesis) on Monday, we would then have
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

a level 1 Bell Work question on Tuesday that


asks: what is the shortest phase of the cell
cycle and what goes on in that phase?

Exit slips (Class-to-Class) - At the end of


every class, we will work to develop a routine
of having students answer a few questions on
a slip of paper that will be turned into us for
formative assessment. The questions being
asked on the exit slips will be essential
questions that ask students to contend with
and recall the big ideas from the lesson.
Furthermore, there will sometimes be
questions that act as a feedback loop for the
teacher, such as “what did or didn’t you like
about this lesson”. The questions asked on the
Exit Slips
exit slip allow us to determine how effective
(class to X
our lesson was and if there is any material that
class)
students are still struggling with (Assessment
FOR Learning). As a result, we can make
adjustments to future lessons, focusing extra
time on certain topics or enhancing
differentiation in areas that students are
struggling in. Our Exit Slip assessments will
be connected to a variety of knowledge SLOs.
For example, after teaching a lesson on
mitosis and meiosis (30-C1.4k), an exit slip
might have the question: what are two key
ways to differentiate between mitosis cell
division and meiosis cell division?
You Find After a topic quiz has been marked it will be X
Them You handed back to the students. The students are
Fix Them on required to go through their test and reflect
quizzes (Assessment AS Learning) on the answers
(formative) they selected by making corrections. If a
student receives 100% and has no changes or
reflections to make on the quiz, then he or she
will be asked to assess her own knowledge
and understanding by creating possible future
quiz questions. Differentiation will be a focus
throughout all the quizzes. That is to say, our
topic quizzes will include a wide range of
opportunities to demonstrate understanding:
multiple-choice oriented quizzes, short
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

answer-oriented quizzes, or fill in the blank


oriented quizzes.

Labs formative: Two out of the fours labs will


be dedicated to building lab related skills. In
the first lab students analysis an onion root
that has cells in the different stages of the cell
cycle. Doing this lab students will practice
their microscopy skills, data collection,
observation skills, and scientific drawings.
During the lab the teacher will visit every
student and give them feedback on their skills
(Assessment FOR Learning). The third lab
Labs that has students create a model of DNA will
X X
(formative) develop their questions posing, scientific
process, data collection, data analysis, and
problem solving. After completing the lab the
students will have to write a lab report that
will get peer reviewed and then the students
will have to make corrections to the lab report
(Assessment AS Learning). These two labs
will developed the skills highlighted in SLO:
1.1S, 1.2S, 1.4S, 2.1S, 2.2S, 2.3S, 2.4S, 3.2S,
3.3S, and 3.4S.

Performance For this assessment, students will be asked to X


Task take a position on genetic modification. That
is to say, students will choose to either be in
the group that supports the practising of
genetic modification, or the group the rejects
the practice of genetic modification. In these
groups, students will be asked to imagine that
they are presenting a pitch to a group of
politicians that are currently deciding on the
laws surrounding genetic engineering. In
other words, students will need to use their
knowledge from topics 1-6 to support their
reasoned judgment on genetic engineering,
while at the same time persuading an
audience that their position is the best one to
adopt. When it comes to the assessment of
students, students will receive a grade that
indicates the level of mastery they have
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

regarding the knowledge and STS SLOs


(Assessment OF Learning). In this case, one
half of the student's grade is determined by
the quality of their contribution to the
assigned topic area in their group, while the
other half is determined by the quality of the
group presentation as a whole. To differentiate
this assessment, instead of requiring students
to be a part of a presentation, students will
have the option to write a defense paper on
their own.
The Mulligan is an Assessment AS Learning
that is designed to prepare students for the
Unit Test by reflecting on which content they
struggle with. Specifically, students will be
given a replica unit test to write two days
prior to the actual unit test. After completing
the replica unit test on the first day, students
will be handed back the replica unit test on
Mulligan the second day, unmarked. On the second day, X
in groups, students will use the course
material (open book) to create an answer key
for the replica unit test so they can mark their
own exam. By way of this, students can
assess what content they are comfortable with
(need to study less) and what content they are
struggling with (need to focus on for the
actual unit test on day three).
The unit test will follow a format similar to
the diploma exam (Assessment OF Learning).
The amount of type I, type II, and type III
questions will mimic the diploma. Also, the
Unit Test unit test will only have multiple choice and X
numerical response style questions. The unit
test will only test knowledge SLOs similar to
the diploma exam. The unit test will only be
used as an assessment of learning.
Topic To conclude every topic, we will have X
Quizzes students write a short, low risk (2.85% each)
(summative) quiz. This summative assessment (Assessment
OF Learning) allows us to measure our
student’s capabilities against what is
expected. The students will write eight topic
quizzes but only seven out of the eight will
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

count for marks.

Labs summative: labs two and four will test


the skills that were learned in the previous
lab. For lab two (testing skills build in lab one)
the students will be doing a lab revolving
around phenotypes. This lab will have a
worksheet that has the students going
through the scientific process, microscopy,
posing questions, gathering data, and
Labs analysing data. The worksheet will then be X
(summative) taken in for marks (Assessment OF
Learning). The forth lab will test the skills
learned in lab three inducing: questions
posing, scientific process, data collection,
data analysis, and problem solving. They will
demonstrate their knowledge through a lab
report (Assessment OF Learning).

Bibliography:

Scientific resources:

Ritter, B., Fraser, D., & Burely, K. L. (2007). Nelson biology: Alberta 20-30. Australia: Thomson
Nelson

Nelson biology is a textbook approved by the Alberta government to follow the curriculum. It
provides the base knowledge needed to engage in the inquiry-based projects at the end of the
unit. The foundational concepts were derived from both the program of studies and the Nelson
textbook. It is an extremely useful resource in regards to developing knowledge.

Wenemoser, D., & Reddien, P. W. (2010). Planarian regeneration involves distinct stem cell
responses to wounds and tissue absence. Developmental biology, 344(2), 979-991.

When discussing the application of mitosis we talk about regeneration. Humans can do basic
regeneration most. Notably, we can regenerate skin and muscles cells, but Planarian can
regenerate every cell in their body. This paper discusses the mitotic processes that allow this to
happen and how studying these organisms could lead to humans having these regenerative
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

capabilities. When talking about this topic in class, we will have to be somewhat brief, so if there
are any students who get their curiosity peaks from the video shown in class, I can give them this
paper to help build their knowledge.

B. (2016, October 05). Planarian Regeneration and Stem Cells | HHMI BioInteractive Video.
Retrieved February 17, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roZeOBZAa2Q

Planarian regeneration is almost unbelievable when you first read or hear about it. If a Planarian
gets cut in half, from each half, a new Planarian will grow. One researcher cut a Planarian to
1/256th its original size and is fully regenerated. This video will introduce how Planarians use
the mitosis of stem cells to create this astonishing regeneration. Not only does this topic relate to
mitosis (the matter we are coving when the video will be shown), but it also refers to the
essential question. It would be nice to incorporate a genome that would all humans to regenerate
like that; however, there are over 250 genes required to perform this action and splicing that into
a human genome is not feasible. This is an excellent look at one of the challenges associated with
DNA modification.

Genetic details of controversial 'three-parent baby' revealed. (n.d.). Retrieved February 17, 2018,
fromhttps://www.nature.com/news/genetic-details-of-controversial-three-parent-baby-revealed-
1.21761

This article is an excellent resource for introducing the controversy behind genetic engineering
and shows how relevant this topic is currently. On April 3rd, 2017 the world's first three-parent
baby was born. The mitochondrial DNA that a child gets only comes from the mother, there is
zero of the father genetics present; because of this if the mother has a hereditary mitochondrial
disease there is a one hundred percent chance the child will also get that disease. In this case, the
mother had a mitochondrial DNA linked disease and scientists spliced the original mother’s
mitochondrial DNA for a healthy women’s DNA. This meant that the child would not inherit the
disease from its mother, but this operation has been meeting with a lot of controversies based on
the ethics of the procedure and whether that should be permissible. This article will show the
students where they can go with their inquiry projects and what kind of reasoned judgments they
will have to make.

Teacher resources:

Field trip to Dr Kovalchuk’s lab at the University of Lethbridge.

Dr Igor Kovalchuk does research involving plant biotechnology. One topic he researches on is
the genetic modification of plants to be resistant to specific pathogens. He uses a CRISPR
machine to do the modification. Taking a field trip to his lab would allow students to see how
CRISPR is used in a real lab and how CRISPR is used on plants. During our unit, we will only
be discussing the implications of CRISPR on an animal, but CRISPR also can have a significant
impact on plant research. This should give students an excellent lesson in the nature of science as
well as the practical applications of genetic engineering.
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

L. (2016, June 19). Will Genetic Modification Create Perfect Humans? Retrieved February 17,
2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRJ7T9dEbJY

An excellent video describing the basics of CRISPR. Also, the short video highlights the ethical
issues that are associated with CRISPR. The video uses terminology that the students will
already have and will be a base for them as they grow their knowledge. Also, this video gives a
couple of examples of the controversy that students would be able to peruse more.

S. (2012, July 30). Mitosis Rap: Mr. W's Cell Division Song. Retrieved February 17, 2018, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOsAbTi9tHw

Mr W’s raps are impressive. Associating concepts with music is an excellent way of memorising.
Also, the video has visual aids throughout that goes through each stage as well as some specific
examples of how mitosis impacts our everyday lives. Explaining scientific concepts through
music or art could help engage a student who may not think science is for them because of their
artistic background.

C. (2012, April 2). DNA Structure and Replication. Retrieved February 17, 2018, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=8kK2zwjRV0M

Crash course performs an in-depth review of the structure of DNA. In addition, Crash Course
runs through the intricacies of DNA replication quite elegantly. One of the highlights of this video is that
it explains why it is important to learn and understand the structure of DNA and DNA replication.

F. (2008, April 08). Meiosis Square Dance. Retrieved February 17, 2018, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCL6d0OwKt8

A similar concept to Mr W’s rap my biology 30 teacher played this song, and it still gets stuck in
my head to this day. This song does a great job going through each stage of meiosis to an
infectious beat. If students listen to this song more than five times, I can almost guarantee that
they will be humming it during an exam or test.

Paul-Elder Model of Critical Thinking - qepcafe. (n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from
https://sites.google.com/site/qepcafe/modules/overview/paul-elder

When students are researching and formulating their project, I will continuously be reinforcing
the intellectual traits into them. If students approach any issue in this course or life by following
the intellectual traits they have the highest chance of growing. The intellectual traits or standards
of critical thinking outline the standards needed to make a reasoned decision. If students make
sure that each standard is being met, then they most likely will get a high grade.
Subject Area Biology 30
Grade Level 12
Unit Plan
Topic Unit C Cell Division, Genetics, and
By Kolton Krein Molecular Biology
Length of Unit (days) 22

Activities/Apps:

Biology Games & Virtual Labs! (n.d.). Retrieved February 17, 2018, from
https://www.biomanbio.com/HTML5GamesandLabs/LifeChemgames/protsynthracehtml
5page.html

Bioman has a plethora of excellent games for educational use. We do not use them in our unit
plan due to time shortages; however, if a student were struggling with the concept of
transcription and translation I would direct them to this game. These games harness the
educational power of instant feedback, goals, and engagement. In this games students to take a
DNA strand through translation and transcription. They must complete each level before being
able to move on, so if a student is struggling with transcription they cannot proceed until they
improve (sometimes students will just skip over what they do not understand). Also, matching
DNA to mRNA or mRNA to proteins by hand is very tedious, and this game does a great job of
eliminating the tediousness while still building their skills. In between the games, there are quick
multiple choice questions that test the vital information regarding translation and transcription
which is another way of making sure they are not just skipping over concepts they do not
understand. Finally, as a teacher you can set up classes on this game where you can monitor what
questions and process students are struggling; this could be an extremely powerful formative
assessment tool because you can see if your class is struggling with a particular concept.

Biology Games & Virtual Labs! (n.d.). Retrieved February 17, 2018, from
https://www.biomanbio.com/HTML5GamesandLabs/LifeChemgames/bioagenthtml5page.html

All the logic I used above also applies to this bioman game, but this game cover genetic
engineering instead of translation and transcription. The game has the student picking restriction
endonucleases, making sticky ends, adding recombinant DNA, and making genetically modified
DNA. All these stages cover vital knowledge that students will need to understand to do well in
their presentations.

(n.d.). Retrieved February 17, 2018, from


http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_22/BL_22.html

This virtual lab combines all the knowledge that we have taught about genetic engineering and
DNA modification. It goes through the mechanics, ethical considerations, and whether or not the
splice would be feasible. The can go through the process with six different organisms with six
different traits they could splice in. This leaves plenty of options for students to try and see what
the limits are both ethically and feasible. This lab goes exceptionally well with our essential
questions because this lab shows both the risks (ethically) and challenges (whether it is feasible
or not) that are associated with DNA modification.