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A single knoll rises out of the plain in Oklahoma, north and west of the Wichita Commented [z1]: a small

a small round hill

Range. For my people, the Kiowas, it is an old landmark, and they gave it the Commented [z2]: an object (such as a stone or tree) that marks
the boundary of land
name Rainy Mountain. The hardest weather in the world is there. Winter brings
blizzards, hot tornadic winds arise in the spring, and in summer the prairie is an
anvil's edge. The grass turns brittle and brown, and it cracks beneath your feet. Commented [z3]: an iron block on which pieces of metal are
hammered into shape
There are green belts along the rivers and creeks, linear groves of hickory and Commented [AR4]: METAPHOR

pecan, willow and witch hazel. At a distance in July or August the steaming foliage Commented [z5]: hard but easily broken
Commented [z6]: An often extended region having distinctive p
seems almost to writhe in fire. Great green and yellow grasshoppers are roperties or characteristics

everywhere in the tall grass, popping up like corn to sting the flesh, and tortoises Commented [z7]: Arroyo
Commented [z8]: arboledas de varios tipos de nogales
crawl about on the red earth, going nowhere in the plenty of time. Loneliness is an
aspect of the land. All things in the plain are isolate; there is no confusion of Commented [z9]: To twist and turn // Personification
Commented [AR10]: NEITHER METAPHOR OR SIMILE
objects in the eye, but one hill or one tree or one man. To look upon that landscape
Commented [z11]: Graphic description // Simile
in the early morning, with the sun at your back, is to lose the sense of proportion. Commented [AR12]: Tactile imagery

Your imagination comes to life, and this, you think, is where Creation was begun. Commented [AR13]: THESE CONCRETE DETAILS BRING
VEROSIMILITUDE
Commented [AR14]: Simile and metaphor
I returned to Rainy Mountain in July. My grandmother had died in the spring, and I
Commented [z15]: Like looking at the sea // Visual image
wanted to be at her grave. She had lived to be very old and at last infirm. Her only Commented [AR16]: One of the most powerful aspects of
this landscape is that people, too, disappear within it by losing
living daughter was with her when she died, and I was told that in death her face “the sense of proportion.”Suggests a spiritual element to this
landscape. // The Kiowas’ idea of themselves (their culture, in
was that of a child. other words) is centered in their relationship to nature.

Commented [z17]: Instability, unsoundness, and insecurity due


Now that I can have her only in memory, I see my grandmother in the several to old age or crippling illness

postures that were peculiar to her: standing at the wood stove on a winter morning Commented [AR18]: THE RESEMBLANCE BETWEEN ELDERS
AND CHILDREN. THIS IMAGE SUGGEST A CIRCULARITY IN TIME IN
and turning meat in a great iron skillet; sitting at the south window, bent above her WHICH DEATH LOOPS RIGHT BACK INTO BIRTH.
Commented [z19]: Br for frying pan
beadwork, and afterwards, when her vision failed, looking down for a long time into
Commented [z20]: Adornos de cuentas
the fold of her hands; going out upon a cane, very slowly as she did when the
weight of age came upon her; praying. I remember her most often at prayer. She
made long, rambling prayers out of suffering and hope, having seen many things. I Commented [z21]: Tending to depart from the main point or
cover a wide range of subjects;
was never sure that I had the right to hear, so exclusive were they of all mere
custom and company. The last time I saw her she prayed standing by the side of
her bed at night, naked to the waist, the light of a kerosene lamp moving upon her
dark skin. Her long, black hair, always drawn and braided in the day, lay upon her
shoulders and against her breasts like a shawl. I do not speak Kiowa, and I never
understood her prayers, but there was something inherently sad in the sound,
some merest hesitation upon the syllables of sorrow. She began in a high and Commented [z22]: Small; slight
Commented [AR23]: He describes a sadness in them that
descending pitch, exhausting her breath to silence; then again and again--and transcended language.

always the same intensity of effort, of something that is, and is not, like urgency in Commented [z24]: Auditory image

the human voice. Transported so in the dancing light among the shadows of her Commented [AR25]: personification

room, she seemed beyond the reach of time. But that was illusion; I think I knew
then that I should not see her again.

First paragraph describes the Oklahoma plains accurately, the second paragraph, although
short, is a brief recall of his actions following his grandmother’s death and the third
paragraph depicts his grandmother. The chain of events and the verbs used to describe it are
simple, but by such thorough description and the use of images, he achieves to create a
vivid effect of remembrance (the reader can imagine him remembering his grandmother).

In the first paragraph after mentioning the ‘HARDERST WEATHER’ he supports the idea
by contrasting how different is the weather in winter and summer. Later he adds to the
‘ANVIL’S EDGE’ metaphor by describing the harsh summer weather. Also, the word
ILLUSION at the end is a great choice because when describing the image of the ‘dancing
light’ we imagine the scene somewhat illusive.

Semantic field: landmark; imagination; Creation; memory; remember; transported; time;


illusion // all these words and the use of the past tense gives us the sense of remembrance,
of the passing of time.