dhs 15

The Middle East’s interiors, design & property magazine
Dubai Technology and Media Free Zone Authority
Have it your way: Bouroullec’s apps for baths
Culture’s new format: Saadiyat goes techie
Florence today: ethical dreams come true
Property portals: to surf or not to surf
identity
IssUE EIghTyfoUr
yEar sEvEn
sEpTEMbEr 2010
a MoTIvaTE pUbLICaTIon
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Veris 48-32 6/18/10 1:27 PM Page 1
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N E W S E A S O N ’ S C O L L E C T I O N S
N E W S E A S O N ’ S C O L L E C T I O N S
purity.indd 1 6/21/10 2:21:30 PM
purity.indd 1 6/21/10 2:21:30 PM
Ovens I Mi crowaves I Hobs I Cooker Hoods I Ref r i gerator s I Di shwasher s I Washi ng Machi nes I Si nks and Mi xer s
Our Built-in Kitchen Appliances & Sinks are produced to meet the highest quality standards found in
Europe and are seamlessly designed to complement the best kitchens in the world!
Purchasing our products means establishing a relationship direct with Teka, as there is no middle
man, allowing high quality at better prices. After sales service is exclusively handled by our certified
Teka Küchentechnik Technicians, ensuring the perfect experience from the beginning and beyond.
Our appliances can be found through our exclusive network of authorized dealers throughout UAE.
Teka Küchentechnik Built-in Kitchen Appliances and Sinks - the complete kitchen solution.
Teka Küchentechnik, Bin Khedia Center, Al Garhoud, P. O. Box 35142, Dubai, UAE. Office: Tel.: +9714-2833047, Fax: +9714-2833048. Showroom: Tel.: +9714-2822884, Fax: +9714-2833048
Kitchen appliances
made with German precision
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17 September 2010
Cover: Bouroullec Brothers.
Photography: Morgane Le Gall.
SEPTEMBER 2010
®
identity identity
FEATURES
22 On/Site inspection
Designs far outside the conventional made political and social
statements at the Basel edition of Design Miami’s Design
On/Site exhibition.
28 French connection
From cars to construction, France is joining the eco movement and
is also bringing the world mobile phones charged up by bicycle or
solar power.
36 Heroic pursuits
For his own home, architect and futurist Simone Micheli weaves a
colourful tapestry of his dreams and passions, whether bubble gum
pink or shocking yellow.
60 Freestyle compositions
Representing the new generation in the Axor Hansgrohe stable
of celebrity designers, the Brothers Bouroullec humbly credit
hard work for their success.
88 What’s in a name?
Developing brand name recognition and respectability are
becoming even more important as companies cross sector
lines into new ventures.
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ID Contents.indd 17 8/26/10 3:22:06 PM
Ovens I Mi crowaves I Hobs I Cooker Hoods I Ref r i gerator s I Di shwasher s I Washi ng Machi nes I Si nks and Mi xer s
Our Built-in Kitchen Appliances & Sinks are produced to meet the highest quality standards found in
Europe and are seamlessly designed to complement the best kitchens in the world!
Purchasing our products means establishing a relationship direct with Teka, as there is no middle
man, allowing high quality at better prices. After sales service is exclusively handled by our certified
Teka Küchentechnik Technicians, ensuring the perfect experience from the beginning and beyond.
Our appliances can be found through our exclusive network of authorized dealers throughout UAE.
Teka Küchentechnik Built-in Kitchen Appliances and Sinks - the complete kitchen solution.
Teka Küchentechnik, Bin Khedia Center, Al Garhoud, P. O. Box 35142, Dubai, UAE. Office: Tel.: +9714-2833047, Fax: +9714-2833048. Showroom: Tel.: +9714-2822884, Fax: +9714-2833048
Kitchen appliances
made with German precision
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INSI DE
CMYK
19 September 2010
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Obaid Humaid Al Tayer
GROUP EDITOR & MANAGING PARTNER
Ian Fairservice
GROUP SENIOR EDITOR
Gina Johnson | gina@motivate.ae
GROUP EDITOR
Catherine Belbin | catherine@motivate.ae
FEATURES EDITOR
Dorothy Waldman | dorothy@motivate.ae
CHIEF SUB-EDITOR
Iain Smith | iains@motivate.ae
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Belinda Igaya | belinda@motivate.ae
ART DIRECTOR
Karen Evans | karene@motivate.ae
GENERAL MANAGER – PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION
S Sasidharan | sasidharan@motivate.ae
MANAGER – PRODUCTION
C Sudhakar | sudhakar@motivate.ae
GENERAL MANAGER – GROUP SALES
Anthony Milne | anthony@motivate.ae
SENIOR ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER
Seema Kausar | seema@motivate.ae
DEPUTY ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER
Shweta Praful | shwetap@motivate.ae
SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVE
Atiya Naseer | atiya@motivate.ae
GENERAL MANAGER – ABU DHABI
Joe Marritt | Joe@motivate.ae
ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER – ABU DHABI
Darryl Wiley | Darryl@motivate.ae
CONTRIBUTORS:
Ashlee Beard | Steve Hill |Ruby Rogers | Richard Warren
REGULARS
21 Editorial
35 Subscription
80 Antennae
83 Forum
96 Books
98 Icon
PROPERTY
All prices quoted in identity are correct at the time of going to press.
IDENTITY NEXT ISSUE OCTOBER 2010
Motivate Publishing FZ LLC
Office 508, 5th Floor, Building 8
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identity
®
ISSUE #84
+ Interactive enlightenment
+ Net profits
+ Antennae
+ Portfolio
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+ Lighting on track
+ Exhibitions on show
+ Conscientious design
+ Steering to INDEX 2010
+ Haute property politics
+ And much, much, more…
DESIGN FORMULA
Printed by Emirates Printing Press, Dubai
Member of
4,741 copies
Dec 2009
67 id Property
43 Awash with invention


With ostentation a thing of the past, the WOW-factor
in bathrooms is being created from sleek shapes,
open spaces, free-standing fittings, splashes of colour
and even the return of corners, but in a new,
softer format.
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Nakkash_Sofa Ad_Emirates Homes Magazine FP.ai 1 6/13/10 3:30 PM
21 September 2010
Future forward
EDITORIAL
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Group Editor Catherine Belbin.
After a long, hot summer the coming season’s design agenda is overflowing
with exciting new prospects as the sector enters the last leg of this critical year.
Optimism is high and the creative juices are flowing with dynamic, eco-efficient
and, most of all, practical design solutions, which are expected to be seen when
the new collections are unveiled at some of the year’s most important events as
Maison & Object, MACEF and Abitare Il Tempo.
The King of Shoes, Parisian Christian Louboutin, is expected to click his heels
soon at the Dubai Mall following the inauguration of his sleek new 100-square
metre shoe emporium.
The interior by Household of London was influenced by the aesthetics of
Louboutin who has a keen eye for interior, as well as shoe design, and who
spends much of his time at his luxurious, much-photographed holiday home
in Egypt. He has succeeded in creating the ultimate shoe haven for women.
Louboutin’s patented, red-soled high-heeled shoes, the must-have accessory for
Sheikha’s and film divas, and has opened a number of stand-alone boutiques in
the Gulf recently, all of which boast striking interiors.
The high quality of US hardwood and its importance in design is to be
highlighted at a seminar for architects and furniture manufacturers at the Park
Hyatt on September 26, organised by the American Hardwood Export Council
(AHEC). The seminar will be led by sustainable hardwood design consultant
Criswell Davis and Bob Sabestina, a hardwood technical consultant who will
provide info on the environmental credentials of the American hardwood
forests and their growing use in sustainable design practices in the Middle East.
Exports of hardwoods to the UAE have increased by over 80 per cent during
the first six months of this year, with the greatest demand being for red oak.
Roderick Wiles AHEC Director said: “There are numerous opportunities in
domestic interiors, furniture, flooring, kitchen cabinets, doers and the internal
joinery markets.”
Iconic photographs and fashion are the focus of a stunning photographic
exhibition that opens at The Empty Quarter Gallery in mid-September. The
exhibition, The Story of a Lifetime, curated by Elie Domit, presents a selection
of photographs, many being exhibited here for the first time, and were shot
in the region by some of the world’s leading photographers including Norman
Parkinson, Lillian Bassman, F.C. Gundlach, William Klein and Albert Watson.
The exhibition also features a rare collection of haute couture dresses from
Saudi Arabian-born fashionista, Parveen Shaath.
Ramadan Kareem!
In Memorandum
Noor Ali Rashid, 80, the award-winning UAE royal photographer who has
captured the region’s growth and development on film passed away during the
Holy Month of Ramadan. Born in Gwadar, Noor spent over 50 years in Dubai.
He was working on a commerative book with Motivate Publishing to mark
UAE-British relations to coincide with the state visit of Queen Elizabeth ll to
Abu Dhabi in November.
Clockwise from top left: Noor Ali Rashid; Christian
Louboutin; Kate Moss; Roderick Wiles.
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Nakkash_Sofa Ad_Emirates Homes Magazine FP.ai 1 6/13/10 3:30 PM
21 September 2010
Future forward
EDITORIAL
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V
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G
A
W
D
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Group Editor Catherine Belbin.
After a long, hot summer the coming season’s design agenda is overflowing
with exciting new prospects as the sector enters the last leg of this critical year.
Optimism is high and the creative juices are flowing with dynamic, eco-efficient
and, most of all, practical design solutions, which are expected to be seen when
the new collections are unveiled at some of the year’s most important events as
Maison & Object, MACEF and Abitare Il Tempo.
The King of Shoes, Parisian Christian Louboutin, is expected to click his heels
soon at the Dubai Mall following the inauguration of his sleek new 100-square
metre shoe emporium.
The interior by Household of London was influenced by the aesthetics of
Louboutin who has a keen eye for interior, as well as shoe design, and who
spends much of his time at his luxurious, much-photographed holiday home
in Egypt. He has succeeded in creating the ultimate shoe haven for women.
Louboutin’s patented, red-soled high-heeled shoes, the must-have accessory for
Sheikha’s and film divas, and has opened a number of stand-alone boutiques in
the Gulf recently, all of which boast striking interiors.
The high quality of US hardwood and its importance in design is to be
highlighted at a seminar for architects and furniture manufacturers at the Park
Hyatt on September 26, organised by the American Hardwood Export Council
(AHEC). The seminar will be led by sustainable hardwood design consultant
Criswell Davis and Bob Sabestina, a hardwood technical consultant who will
provide info on the environmental credentials of the American hardwood
forests and their growing use in sustainable design practices in the Middle East.
Exports of hardwoods to the UAE have increased by over 80 per cent during
the first six months of this year, with the greatest demand being for red oak.
Roderick Wiles AHEC Director said: “There are numerous opportunities in
domestic interiors, furniture, flooring, kitchen cabinets, doers and the internal
joinery markets.”
Iconic photographs and fashion are the focus of a stunning photographic
exhibition that opens at The Empty Quarter Gallery in mid-September. The
exhibition, The Story of a Lifetime, curated by Elie Domit, presents a selection
of photographs, many being exhibited here for the first time, and were shot
in the region by some of the world’s leading photographers including Norman
Parkinson, Lillian Bassman, F.C. Gundlach, William Klein and Albert Watson.
The exhibition also features a rare collection of haute couture dresses from
Saudi Arabian-born fashionista, Parveen Shaath.
Ramadan Kareem!
In Memorandum
Noor Ali Rashid, 80, the award-winning UAE royal photographer who has
captured the region’s growth and development on film passed away during the
Holy Month of Ramadan. Born in Gwadar, Noor spent over 50 years in Dubai.
He was working on a commerative book with Motivate Publishing to mark
UAE-British relations to coincide with the state visit of Queen Elizabeth ll to
Abu Dhabi in November.
Clockwise from top left: Noor Ali Rashid; Christian
Louboutin; Kate Moss; Roderick Wiles.
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22 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
On/Site inspection
From customs charges to super-sized lamps, the exhibits at
Design Miami/Basel 2010 included a number of thought-provoking
surprises. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
The fifth edition of Design Miami/Basel 2010 attracted a record
16,600 visitors this summer. New collectors from Asia, Europe,
the United States and South America came to the Basel design fair
between June 14 - 19 with British architect Lord Norman Foster,
Russian tycoon Roman Abramovich and Indian royal Arvind Singh
Mewar among them.
Sponsored by HSBC Bank, Design Miami/Basel combines
commerce with art, bringing together collectors, gallerists, patrons,
designers, artists and journalists. In addition to some multi-million
dollar deals between collectors and galleries, the fair featured
talks on developments in design and exhibitions of specially
commissioned work.
The Swiss fair is the European offshoot of Design Miami/, which is
held in Florida each December. Design that crosses boundaries into
art, fashion, science, music and architecture, dating from the 18th
century to the present day, is exhibited at both fairs.
In addition to standard gallery displays of designers’ works, specially
commissioned pieces were also on display at the Basel fair. Running
for its second year, the Design On/Site programme featured eight
installations by “maverick” designers who are considered to be pushing
the boundaries of art, craft and technology. Their designs ranged from
furniture to lighting design to custom software programming.
“Design On/Site has quickly developed into a space where
progressive galleries can launch new work, install experimental
commissions and bring a focused eye onto what is being made in the
design world right now,” says Alexandra Cunningham, Design Miami/
exhibitor and special projects manager.
The work of new and emerging designers was celebrated at the
fair through its Designers of the Future award, which was sponsored
by W Hotels. The award is given to designers whose new materials
and processes are most innovative. This year’s four award winners,
Beta Tank, Graham Hudson, rAndom International and Zigelbaum &
Coelho, exhibited at the show.
“The common thread shared by the four diverse (Designers of the
Future) award-winners consists of experiential and cross-disciplinary
approaches that prompt visitors to participate and re-think the
definitions of design practice,” says Wava Carpenter, Design Miami/’s
associate director.
Trends2.indd 22 8/26/10 12:34:21 PM
22 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
On/Site inspection
From customs charges to super-sized lamps, the exhibits at
Design Miami/Basel 2010 included a number of thought-provoking
surprises. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
The fifth edition of Design Miami/Basel 2010 attracted a record
16,600 visitors this summer. New collectors from Asia, Europe,
the United States and South America came to the Basel design fair
between June 14 - 19 with British architect Lord Norman Foster,
Russian tycoon Roman Abramovich and Indian royal Arvind Singh
Mewar among them.
Sponsored by HSBC Bank, Design Miami/Basel combines
commerce with art, bringing together collectors, gallerists, patrons,
designers, artists and journalists. In addition to some multi-million
dollar deals between collectors and galleries, the fair featured
talks on developments in design and exhibitions of specially
commissioned work.
The Swiss fair is the European offshoot of Design Miami/, which is
held in Florida each December. Design that crosses boundaries into
art, fashion, science, music and architecture, dating from the 18th
century to the present day, is exhibited at both fairs.
In addition to standard gallery displays of designers’ works, specially
commissioned pieces were also on display at the Basel fair. Running
for its second year, the Design On/Site programme featured eight
installations by “maverick” designers who are considered to be pushing
the boundaries of art, craft and technology. Their designs ranged from
furniture to lighting design to custom software programming.
“Design On/Site has quickly developed into a space where
progressive galleries can launch new work, install experimental
commissions and bring a focused eye onto what is being made in the
design world right now,” says Alexandra Cunningham, Design Miami/
exhibitor and special projects manager.
The work of new and emerging designers was celebrated at the
fair through its Designers of the Future award, which was sponsored
by W Hotels. The award is given to designers whose new materials
and processes are most innovative. This year’s four award winners,
Beta Tank, Graham Hudson, rAndom International and Zigelbaum &
Coelho, exhibited at the show.
“The common thread shared by the four diverse (Designers of the
Future) award-winners consists of experiential and cross-disciplinary
approaches that prompt visitors to participate and re-think the
definitions of design practice,” says Wava Carpenter, Design Miami/’s
associate director.
Trends2.indd 22 8/26/10 12:34:21 PM
23
CMYK
September 2010
TRENDS
The business of art
Berlin and London studio Beta Tank was one of four
winners of the Designers of the Future Award. Its
founders, Michele Gauler and Eyal Burstein, seek to
translate complex social and technological issues into easily
understood objects and services. For the award, they
created part hand-made, part machine-made objects. To
question bureaucratic processes, these were delivered to
the fair in separate shipments, incurring different customs
charges along the way. This project will appear in their
book on business models for creative businesses.
Making the virtual real
American “post-industrial” design studio Zigelbaum
& Coelho, founded by Jamie Zigelbaum and Marcelo
Coelho, is at the “intersection of design, technology, science
and art.” The Designers of the Future Award-winner’s
installation, Six-Forty by Four-Eighty, features thousands of
luminescent pixels controlled by remote “light brushes”, an
example of its new controllable, ambient lighting for interiors.
“By transposing the pixel from the confines of the screen and
into the physical world, focus is drawn to the materiality of
computation itself,” Coelho says.
Man v machine
Opened in 2004 by collectors Virginia Damtsa and Tot Taylor,
Riflemaker exhibits work by young and emerging artists at a
former gun-maker’s shop that dates from 1712. For On/Site,
the gallery presented two videos by John Maeda, an artist,
graphic designer and computer scientist whose work centres on
humanising technology. His videos, Handsome and Grey, address
the issue of man’s interaction with computers and the computer
as substitute for human action. Museums bought both videos on
the first night of the fair.
Trends2.indd 23 8/26/10 12:34:41 PM
24 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
TRENDS
Concept curios
Italian architect, Claudia Pignatale, opened design gallery and
concept store Secondome in Rome in 2006. For On Site, the
gallery presented Cut and Paste, a series of hand-made curiosities by
Dutch designer Kiki van Eijk, several of which were multi-functional,
including a jewellery box with hidden compartment. In making these
experiential pieces van Ejik questions conventional design approaches,
including size, complexity and techniques. The resulting diversity of
designs is made from a wide range of materials, including wood,
brass, copper, ceramic, glass and steel.
Tree-mendous
Launched by the former London Design Museum curator, Gallery Libby
Sellers supports post-industrial design. Her artists’ creations are so
individual they cannot be manufactured. For On/Site the gallery presented
an immersive installation by London designer Simon Heijdens – Branches
is a digital tree canopy projection that spreads over the ceiling of its
exhibition booth. Its branches and leaves moved like the real thing in
response to internal movement monitors and external wind speed sensors
feeding information into the artist’s computers.
Light years ahead
Milan-based gallery, Dilmos, asked two design studios that
operate in Italy and the Netherlands, Studio Job and Pieke
Bergmans, to combine their skills as bronze-smiths and
light-bulb-makers, respectively, to create Wonderlamps.
Their creations, some more than a metre tall, transform
an everyday object, the humble lamp, into a piece of
sculpture, challenging the way many products are designed
as disposable objects. The lamps’ design combines
Bergman’s interest in creating pieces that correlate with
reality with Studio Job’s love of fantasy and surrealism.
Molten magic
For the first time the Basel fair featured a jewellery
gallery. Brussels-based dealer Caroline van Hoek
showed Ruudt Peters’ Platina collection of limited edition
platinum pieces for On/Site. A special technique involves
drawing with wax underwater, catching the fluid line in
coagulated form, before casting the forms with a layer
of platinum that the Dutch jeweller describes as “playing
a game of hard and soft; a symbiosis between male
and female”. A video showing the “melting” pieces was
shown in the exhibition booth.
Trends2.indd 24 8/26/10 12:34:57 PM
24 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
TRENDS
Concept curios
Italian architect, Claudia Pignatale, opened design gallery and
concept store Secondome in Rome in 2006. For On Site, the
gallery presented Cut and Paste, a series of hand-made curiosities by
Dutch designer Kiki van Eijk, several of which were multi-functional,
including a jewellery box with hidden compartment. In making these
experiential pieces van Ejik questions conventional design approaches,
including size, complexity and techniques. The resulting diversity of
designs is made from a wide range of materials, including wood,
brass, copper, ceramic, glass and steel.
Tree-mendous
Launched by the former London Design Museum curator, Gallery Libby
Sellers supports post-industrial design. Her artists’ creations are so
individual they cannot be manufactured. For On/Site the gallery presented
an immersive installation by London designer Simon Heijdens – Branches
is a digital tree canopy projection that spreads over the ceiling of its
exhibition booth. Its branches and leaves moved like the real thing in
response to internal movement monitors and external wind speed sensors
feeding information into the artist’s computers.
Light years ahead
Milan-based gallery, Dilmos, asked two design studios that
operate in Italy and the Netherlands, Studio Job and Pieke
Bergmans, to combine their skills as bronze-smiths and
light-bulb-makers, respectively, to create Wonderlamps.
Their creations, some more than a metre tall, transform
an everyday object, the humble lamp, into a piece of
sculpture, challenging the way many products are designed
as disposable objects. The lamps’ design combines
Bergman’s interest in creating pieces that correlate with
reality with Studio Job’s love of fantasy and surrealism.
Molten magic
For the first time the Basel fair featured a jewellery
gallery. Brussels-based dealer Caroline van Hoek
showed Ruudt Peters’ Platina collection of limited edition
platinum pieces for On/Site. A special technique involves
drawing with wax underwater, catching the fluid line in
coagulated form, before casting the forms with a layer
of platinum that the Dutch jeweller describes as “playing
a game of hard and soft; a symbiosis between male
and female”. A video showing the “melting” pieces was
shown in the exhibition booth.
Trends2.indd 24 8/26/10 12:34:57 PM
26 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
TRENDS
Slow furniture
Brand new Amsterdam gallery Particles presented
Aldo Bakker’s Urushi Series for On/Site. The Dutch
designer’s curvaceous furniture pieces have 30 layers
of Japanese Urushi lacquer applied to them by Mariko
Nishide. Echoing the Slow Movement’s desire for
people to lead more relaxed, reflective lives, the
designer says this lengthy lacquering process is his
response to the fleeting nature of mass production
and consumerism. Bakker wants his objects to have a
meditative quality that will help slow us down when
we gaze upon them.
Steely determination
The Karena Schuessler Gallery is the first in Berlin devoted to
commissioning design and all works are one-offs or limited
editions. For On Site, the gallery presented metal furniture made
by award-winning Polish designer and inventor Oskar Zieta,
who developed a process for inflating steel while a post-graduate
student at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.
This enables him to make steel stools, chairs and other pieces
with the “lightness of a balloon”, admirers say.
Brought to book
Gallery D&A Lab (Design and Art
Laboratory) has no permanent space, but
holds “guerilla events” where artists, using
new techniques, present functional, everyday
objects that appear to be art pieces. The
gallery invited British designer Jonathan
Monk to reinterpret US artist Donald Judd’s
bookcase, Bookshelf 1984, for On/Site.
Berlin-based Monk rearranged the shelf ’s
original elements into a low table, using
white for its base and some of the colours
used for the original bookshelf for its top.
Trends2.indd 26 8/26/10 12:35:12 PM
26 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
TRENDS
Slow furniture
Brand new Amsterdam gallery Particles presented
Aldo Bakker’s Urushi Series for On/Site. The Dutch
designer’s curvaceous furniture pieces have 30 layers
of Japanese Urushi lacquer applied to them by Mariko
Nishide. Echoing the Slow Movement’s desire for
people to lead more relaxed, reflective lives, the
designer says this lengthy lacquering process is his
response to the fleeting nature of mass production
and consumerism. Bakker wants his objects to have a
meditative quality that will help slow us down when
we gaze upon them.
Steely determination
The Karena Schuessler Gallery is the first in Berlin devoted to
commissioning design and all works are one-offs or limited
editions. For On Site, the gallery presented metal furniture made
by award-winning Polish designer and inventor Oskar Zieta,
who developed a process for inflating steel while a post-graduate
student at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.
This enables him to make steel stools, chairs and other pieces
with the “lightness of a balloon”, admirers say.
Brought to book
Gallery D&A Lab (Design and Art
Laboratory) has no permanent space, but
holds “guerilla events” where artists, using
new techniques, present functional, everyday
objects that appear to be art pieces. The
gallery invited British designer Jonathan
Monk to reinterpret US artist Donald Judd’s
bookcase, Bookshelf 1984, for On/Site.
Berlin-based Monk rearranged the shelf ’s
original elements into a low table, using
white for its base and some of the colours
used for the original bookshelf for its top.
Trends2.indd 26 8/26/10 12:35:12 PM
www.trevifurniture.com | www.wardedubai.com
For more information, contact:
Tel: +971 4 3284294
Fax: +971 4 3284293
Visit our showroom on:
Sheikh Zayed Rd. Opposite Times Square
and next to Reem Al Bawadi
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trevi furniture.pdf 8/26/10 12:57:12 PM
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Lace Hill.
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Construction work on one of France’s first low energy
buildings, plans for Madinat Zayed in Abu Dhabi to
become home to the world’s largest concentrated solar
power plant and a mobile phone that can be charged
by the sun capture the imagination. TEXT: STEVE HILL
ID Eco.indd 28 8/26/10 12:42:05 PM
28 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property] 28
Lace Hill.
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Construction work on one of France’s first low energy
buildings, plans for Madinat Zayed in Abu Dhabi to
become home to the world’s largest concentrated solar
power plant and a mobile phone that can be charged
by the sun capture the imagination. TEXT: STEVE HILL
ID Eco.indd 28 8/26/10 12:42:05 PM
March 2009 September 2010 29
ECO
NO QUARTER GIVEN
Construction work is due to begin next year on one of the first low energy buildings to be realised in France at what is being billed as
the first eco-quarter in Paris. The 19,000 square metre Pushed Slab office will cost Dhs164 million, and has been designed by Dutch
architectural company MVRDV and commissioned by French project developer ICADE Promotion.
The project combines proven energy efficiency technologies with individual office floors and outside spaces such as patios, balconies and
a garden. The building is highly flexible, offering three cores and a central lobby, and can be rented out to one or various tenants without
structural changes.
The building has two faces: a calm side in dialogue with the urban fabric of the north side of Paris, and a more dynamic side facing south,
rectangular to the boulevard. It is wrapped in a skin of certified wood and windows form a rhythmic ribbon, offering optimal sunning and
light control of the inner spaces. The climate is controlled by natural ventilation; 1,500 square metres of solar panels on
the roof provide renewable energy and a grey water circuit will be applied. Blinds will be integrated in
the south facade and in the cuts while the building will be insulated from the outside in
order to reduce thermal bridges. The accumulation of these proven
reliable techniques results in a highly efficient low
energy structure.
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30 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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30 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
PEDAL POWERED
Nokia has unveiled a bicycle charger kit to power its mobile phones, enabling
users to generate free “clean” electricity.
It consists of a bottle dynamo, a charger and phone holder. The dynamo fits
on the front of the bike while the charger and phone holder attach securely to
the handle bars, so they can be easily removed whenever the user parks.
The kit starts charging at walking speed (6km/h) and stops when the cyclist’s
speed reaches 50 km/h. Nokia estimates that 20 minutes of cycling at 10 km/h
will power up a Nokia 1202 for an hour of talk time or 74 hours of standby time.
The rubberised phone holder mounts a phone securely to a bike and
protects it from the vibrations of bumpy roads while the charger has been
designed to withstand dirt, humidity and weather, with an ultrasonically welded
case and clear coating on the electronics.
The dynamo is also very robust, while the phone holder comes with a
transparent bag to protect phones.
POWERFUL STATEMENT
Abu Dhabi future energy company, Masdar, has appointed the bidding
consortium of Total and Abengoa Solar as a partner to own, build and operate
Shams 1, the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant and the first of its
kind in the Middle East.
This flagship project will directly contribute towards Abu Dhabi’s target of
achieving seven per cent renewable energy power generation capacity by the
year 2020.
The joint venture between Masdar (60 per cent), Total (20 per cent) and
Abengoa Solar (20 per cent) will develop, build, operate and maintain the plant,
which will be located in Madinat Zayed, approximately 120km south-west of
the capital of the UAE.
It will be the largest concentrated solar power plant in the world, extending
over an area of 2.5 square kilometres with a capacity of approximately 100MW
and a solar field consisting of 768 parabolic trough collectors to be supplied by
Abengoa Solar.
Shams 1 is registered as a project under the United Nations’ Clean
Development Mechanism and is eligible for carbon credits. The plant will
displace approximately 175,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, equivalent to planting
1.5 million trees or removing 15,000 cars from Abu Dhabi’s roads.
HIMALAYAN HEMP
Earth Divas has launched its Modern Eco handbag collection, incorporating
Eastern hand-loom fabrics and stitching with contemporary Western designs. It
has taken five years to develop this collection, which is based on a tightly woven
hemp fabric that is durable, contoured and structured.
This hemp grows wild in the lower Himalayan mountain region and is not
cultivated or farmed. It is cut by hand and softened in water – no chemicals are
used – before the stalk of the plant is brushed into a wool-like material and spun
by hand into a strand twine.
The twine is then woven by hand on a pit loom into a piece of fabric, typically
one metre by three metres, before it is taken down the mountain on foot to
Kathmandu where craftswomen buy the fabric and create handbags and accessories.
All Earth Divas handbags are hand-crafted by cottage industry producers and
working women’s co-operatives in Kathmandu, Nepal. Each artisan is paid a
minimum of 30 per cent more than the local wage rate and 100 per cent of
company profits are returned to these workers.
Clockwise from left: Nokia’s bicycle charger;
Modern Eco handbag by Earth Divas; Shams 1,
the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant.
ECO
ID Eco.indd 30 8/26/10 12:42:26 PM
30 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
30 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
PEDAL POWERED
Nokia has unveiled a bicycle charger kit to power its mobile phones, enabling
users to generate free “clean” electricity.
It consists of a bottle dynamo, a charger and phone holder. The dynamo fits
on the front of the bike while the charger and phone holder attach securely to
the handle bars, so they can be easily removed whenever the user parks.
The kit starts charging at walking speed (6km/h) and stops when the cyclist’s
speed reaches 50 km/h. Nokia estimates that 20 minutes of cycling at 10 km/h
will power up a Nokia 1202 for an hour of talk time or 74 hours of standby time.
The rubberised phone holder mounts a phone securely to a bike and
protects it from the vibrations of bumpy roads while the charger has been
designed to withstand dirt, humidity and weather, with an ultrasonically welded
case and clear coating on the electronics.
The dynamo is also very robust, while the phone holder comes with a
transparent bag to protect phones.
POWERFUL STATEMENT
Abu Dhabi future energy company, Masdar, has appointed the bidding
consortium of Total and Abengoa Solar as a partner to own, build and operate
Shams 1, the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant and the first of its
kind in the Middle East.
This flagship project will directly contribute towards Abu Dhabi’s target of
achieving seven per cent renewable energy power generation capacity by the
year 2020.
The joint venture between Masdar (60 per cent), Total (20 per cent) and
Abengoa Solar (20 per cent) will develop, build, operate and maintain the plant,
which will be located in Madinat Zayed, approximately 120km south-west of
the capital of the UAE.
It will be the largest concentrated solar power plant in the world, extending
over an area of 2.5 square kilometres with a capacity of approximately 100MW
and a solar field consisting of 768 parabolic trough collectors to be supplied by
Abengoa Solar.
Shams 1 is registered as a project under the United Nations’ Clean
Development Mechanism and is eligible for carbon credits. The plant will
displace approximately 175,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, equivalent to planting
1.5 million trees or removing 15,000 cars from Abu Dhabi’s roads.
HIMALAYAN HEMP
Earth Divas has launched its Modern Eco handbag collection, incorporating
Eastern hand-loom fabrics and stitching with contemporary Western designs. It
has taken five years to develop this collection, which is based on a tightly woven
hemp fabric that is durable, contoured and structured.
This hemp grows wild in the lower Himalayan mountain region and is not
cultivated or farmed. It is cut by hand and softened in water – no chemicals are
used – before the stalk of the plant is brushed into a wool-like material and spun
by hand into a strand twine.
The twine is then woven by hand on a pit loom into a piece of fabric, typically
one metre by three metres, before it is taken down the mountain on foot to
Kathmandu where craftswomen buy the fabric and create handbags and accessories.
All Earth Divas handbags are hand-crafted by cottage industry producers and
working women’s co-operatives in Kathmandu, Nepal. Each artisan is paid a
minimum of 30 per cent more than the local wage rate and 100 per cent of
company profits are returned to these workers.
Clockwise from left: Nokia’s bicycle charger;
Modern Eco handbag by Earth Divas; Shams 1,
the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant.
ECO
ID Eco.indd 30 8/26/10 12:42:26 PM
SUSTAINABLE CALLS
The Puma Phone, produced by the sports designer in partnership with Sagem,
features a solar cell that allows users to charge the device simply by sitting it in
the sun. A single charge, according to Puma, will provide five hours of talk time
and 140 minutes of video calling.
Now available in a select number of European and African countries, this
video chat-capable device also comes complete with a pedometer – allowing
users to see how far they have run – and a yachting compass.
It is further preloaded with applications that assist users to tap into news and
sport information as well as maps of Europe with pedestrian navigation.
And its sustainability credentials are further underlined by Puma’s eco-friendly
and innovative packaging.

TOP GEAR
Renault is due to unveil its new concept car, the two-seat coupe DeZir, at
next month’s Paris Motor Show.
It is powered by an electric motor mounted in a mid-rear position to
optimise weight distribution over the front and rear wheels. The vertically-
mounted 24kW/h lithium-ion battery is located behind the bench seat and
provides the car with a range of 160 kilometres.
Three battery-charging methods can be employed: a standard charge using
a conventional household plug, which powers the batting in eight hours; a fast
charge using a 400V three-phase current, charging the battery to 80 per cent of
its capacity in 20 minutes; and a fast battery exchange utilising Renault’s Quick
Drop technology.
The vehicle’s energy efficiency package also includes the recovery of
deceleration energy. This technology is based on the same principles as the
KERS (Kinetic Energy Recovery System) seen in Formula One, where, when a
car decelerates, kinetic energy is recovered and stored in the battery.
In the case of DeZir, this energy can then be employed by the driver to
provide a temporary power boost at the moment he or she chooses, using a
button located on the steering wheel.
SITTING PRETTY
Chishen Chiu takes recycled paper and recycled wood waste, and transforms
them into his FlexibleLove sustainable furniture.
Experiments by the Taiwanese designer produced an accordion-like,
honeycomb structure from this reconstituted cardboard, which has proved
to be exceptionally strong and durable. Established manufacturing techniques
minimise the overall impact on the environment.
Chiu originally designed a flexible love seat that can seat from one to 16
people, easily changing length and shape with a simple “pull” at each end.
This unique ability to extend and collapse means there are endless
permutations, but one home truth remains the same – don’t leave the love seat
out in the rain.
ID
Clockwise from left: Puma’s cell phone, Renault’s
two-seat DeZir; FlexibleLove from Chishen Chiu.
32 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
ECO
ID Eco.indd 32 8/26/10 12:42:40 PM
SUSTAINABLE CALLS
The Puma Phone, produced by the sports designer in partnership with Sagem,
features a solar cell that allows users to charge the device simply by sitting it in
the sun. A single charge, according to Puma, will provide five hours of talk time
and 140 minutes of video calling.
Now available in a select number of European and African countries, this
video chat-capable device also comes complete with a pedometer – allowing
users to see how far they have run – and a yachting compass.
It is further preloaded with applications that assist users to tap into news and
sport information as well as maps of Europe with pedestrian navigation.
And its sustainability credentials are further underlined by Puma’s eco-friendly
and innovative packaging.

TOP GEAR
Renault is due to unveil its new concept car, the two-seat coupe DeZir, at
next month’s Paris Motor Show.
It is powered by an electric motor mounted in a mid-rear position to
optimise weight distribution over the front and rear wheels. The vertically-
mounted 24kW/h lithium-ion battery is located behind the bench seat and
provides the car with a range of 160 kilometres.
Three battery-charging methods can be employed: a standard charge using
a conventional household plug, which powers the batting in eight hours; a fast
charge using a 400V three-phase current, charging the battery to 80 per cent of
its capacity in 20 minutes; and a fast battery exchange utilising Renault’s Quick
Drop technology.
The vehicle’s energy efficiency package also includes the recovery of
deceleration energy. This technology is based on the same principles as the
KERS (Kinetic Energy Recovery System) seen in Formula One, where, when a
car decelerates, kinetic energy is recovered and stored in the battery.
In the case of DeZir, this energy can then be employed by the driver to
provide a temporary power boost at the moment he or she chooses, using a
button located on the steering wheel.
SITTING PRETTY
Chishen Chiu takes recycled paper and recycled wood waste, and transforms
them into his FlexibleLove sustainable furniture.
Experiments by the Taiwanese designer produced an accordion-like,
honeycomb structure from this reconstituted cardboard, which has proved
to be exceptionally strong and durable. Established manufacturing techniques
minimise the overall impact on the environment.
Chiu originally designed a flexible love seat that can seat from one to 16
people, easily changing length and shape with a simple “pull” at each end.
This unique ability to extend and collapse means there are endless
permutations, but one home truth remains the same – don’t leave the love seat
out in the rain.
ID
Clockwise from left: Puma’s cell phone, Renault’s
two-seat DeZir; FlexibleLove from Chishen Chiu.
32 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
ECO
ID Eco.indd 32 8/26/10 12:42:40 PM
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36 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Heroic pursuits
Italian designer Simone Micheli champions a brand of
futurism where the main protagonists break from tradition,
embodying simplicity and ethics in search of ‘ethical luxury.’
TEXT: LISA VINCENTI PHOTOGRAPHY: JUERGEN EHEIM
A cobweb-like, dream-catcher woven
of rope serves as an ethereal, elegant
crown atop the main living space.
Simone.indd 36 8/26/10 12:47:17 PM
36 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Heroic pursuits
Italian designer Simone Micheli champions a brand of
futurism where the main protagonists break from tradition,
embodying simplicity and ethics in search of ‘ethical luxury.’
TEXT: LISA VINCENTI PHOTOGRAPHY: JUERGEN EHEIM
A cobweb-like, dream-catcher woven
of rope serves as an ethereal, elegant
crown atop the main living space.
Simone.indd 36 8/26/10 12:47:17 PM
37
CMYK
September 2010
CMYK
INTERIORS
CMYK CMYK
Simone.indd 37 8/26/10 12:47:29 PM
38 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
INTERIORS
Simone Micheli, aka Simone Micheli Architectural Hero, has dreams
of a world in which design transports man into another, brighter, sensorial
realm. From his studio in Florence, the Italian visionary, designer, architect and
daydreamer has become the leading proponent of what he has come to call
“ethical luxury” – a daily battle to imbue everyday life with beauty and magic,
while protecting the surrounding world.
Not far from the city’s centre, in a sliver of green, Micheli recently conceived
his 200 square metre private residence in a 19
th
-century weaving shop.
Though an avowed futurist, Micheli doesn’t avoid the past altogether, instead
his loft space pays homage to history, while connecting it to the unstoppable
metropolitan life all around. A hyper-realist portrait of ethical luxury, the
design, where 90 per cent of the materials were culled from eco-conscious
sources, illustrates his current adoration of white, cleverly layered with vivid
strokes of yellow, green and pink; soft edges and rounded forms; and sensorial
experimentation.
Streamlined and flowing, the futurism Micheli’s work evokes strives to break
free of traditional conventions. Nonetheless, the primary goal of his oeuvre
is to repossess everyday beauty and truth, and to revive one’s emotional
involvement in and connection to inhabited space.
“I am a city fighter that struggles with never-ending battles to not give up the
dream,” Micheli says of the name chosen for his design studio, which began in
2003 and has offices in Florence and Milan. “Simone Micheli is a sort of ancient
fighter, like the Orlando Furioso, that fights against stereotypes, that is against
the tide, that doesn’t accept banality and platitude, and wants to create new
dimensions, able to make people live magical moments that will remain in their
hearts like memories.”
The poetry of his prose is no wonder. Micheli grew up amid the drama of
Italy and its rich artistic legacy, exposed early on to the world of painting in
the studio of his father and later steeped in the nation’s history of avant-garde,
contemporary design. His DNA positively oozes romance, idealism and poetic
meanderings. “Design is without doubt a kind of art, a means to generate
emotions, to challenge the senses of all who make use of it, to define new
possible answers to the always more fitting and anomalous needs and necessity
of the human visitor,” he says.
From the beginning of his architectural career in 1990, Micheli has been
called on to create cosmic, serotonin-spiking environments. His recently
completed i-Suite Hotel in Rimini takes guest on a wild journey where they
will discover a sensorial delight as the natural/artificial, known/unknown turn
convention on its head.
For his wellness centre at the Milan Exedra Hotel, he takes guests on a
bleeding-edge, space-age voyage into another 3D, surreal dimension. The
Atomic Spa Suisse is a dizzying, fantastic world inspired by Italian mid-1960s pop
singer Mina, who in Le mille bolle blu, (the thousand blue bubbles) crooned: “I
can see a thousand blue bubbles and they wander weightless, they chase each
other, they climb up and down the sky… dancing over clusters of clouds while
harps are playing music inside my soul.”
In this Micheli dreamscape, silvery-blue bubbles cling like dew to the ceiling
and walls amid an environment composed of irregular, flowing shapes and
spaces painted in soothing or energetic strokes of pinks, blues and whites.
Likewise, his conception of the recently completed interior of Town@House
Street hotel in Milan proves equally as evocative; a wondrous marriage of the
practical and the intriguing.
“My architecture is anti-mimetic, strong, raging, deep-rooted, deep,
unpredictable,” he notes. “The main goal that guides my every planning thought
is linked with the desire to qualify human life, to favour its emotional revival.
Left to right: Soft shapes and spotless finish create formally clean patterns and
house the few essential elements, including the OH! bidet and WC designed
by Micheli and made by Simas; Simone Micheli.
Simone.indd 38 8/26/10 12:47:42 PM
38 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
INTERIORS
Simone Micheli, aka Simone Micheli Architectural Hero, has dreams
of a world in which design transports man into another, brighter, sensorial
realm. From his studio in Florence, the Italian visionary, designer, architect and
daydreamer has become the leading proponent of what he has come to call
“ethical luxury” – a daily battle to imbue everyday life with beauty and magic,
while protecting the surrounding world.
Not far from the city’s centre, in a sliver of green, Micheli recently conceived
his 200 square metre private residence in a 19
th
-century weaving shop.
Though an avowed futurist, Micheli doesn’t avoid the past altogether, instead
his loft space pays homage to history, while connecting it to the unstoppable
metropolitan life all around. A hyper-realist portrait of ethical luxury, the
design, where 90 per cent of the materials were culled from eco-conscious
sources, illustrates his current adoration of white, cleverly layered with vivid
strokes of yellow, green and pink; soft edges and rounded forms; and sensorial
experimentation.
Streamlined and flowing, the futurism Micheli’s work evokes strives to break
free of traditional conventions. Nonetheless, the primary goal of his oeuvre
is to repossess everyday beauty and truth, and to revive one’s emotional
involvement in and connection to inhabited space.
“I am a city fighter that struggles with never-ending battles to not give up the
dream,” Micheli says of the name chosen for his design studio, which began in
2003 and has offices in Florence and Milan. “Simone Micheli is a sort of ancient
fighter, like the Orlando Furioso, that fights against stereotypes, that is against
the tide, that doesn’t accept banality and platitude, and wants to create new
dimensions, able to make people live magical moments that will remain in their
hearts like memories.”
The poetry of his prose is no wonder. Micheli grew up amid the drama of
Italy and its rich artistic legacy, exposed early on to the world of painting in
the studio of his father and later steeped in the nation’s history of avant-garde,
contemporary design. His DNA positively oozes romance, idealism and poetic
meanderings. “Design is without doubt a kind of art, a means to generate
emotions, to challenge the senses of all who make use of it, to define new
possible answers to the always more fitting and anomalous needs and necessity
of the human visitor,” he says.
From the beginning of his architectural career in 1990, Micheli has been
called on to create cosmic, serotonin-spiking environments. His recently
completed i-Suite Hotel in Rimini takes guest on a wild journey where they
will discover a sensorial delight as the natural/artificial, known/unknown turn
convention on its head.
For his wellness centre at the Milan Exedra Hotel, he takes guests on a
bleeding-edge, space-age voyage into another 3D, surreal dimension. The
Atomic Spa Suisse is a dizzying, fantastic world inspired by Italian mid-1960s pop
singer Mina, who in Le mille bolle blu, (the thousand blue bubbles) crooned: “I
can see a thousand blue bubbles and they wander weightless, they chase each
other, they climb up and down the sky… dancing over clusters of clouds while
harps are playing music inside my soul.”
In this Micheli dreamscape, silvery-blue bubbles cling like dew to the ceiling
and walls amid an environment composed of irregular, flowing shapes and
spaces painted in soothing or energetic strokes of pinks, blues and whites.
Likewise, his conception of the recently completed interior of Town@House
Street hotel in Milan proves equally as evocative; a wondrous marriage of the
practical and the intriguing.
“My architecture is anti-mimetic, strong, raging, deep-rooted, deep,
unpredictable,” he notes. “The main goal that guides my every planning thought
is linked with the desire to qualify human life, to favour its emotional revival.
Left to right: Soft shapes and spotless finish create formally clean patterns and
house the few essential elements, including the OH! bidet and WC designed
by Micheli and made by Simas; Simone Micheli.
Simone.indd 38 8/26/10 12:47:42 PM
40 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Brushed in strokes of yellow, Micheli’s son’s room, where the
architect’s adoration of soft edges and flowing lines are apparent,
was designed to evoke brightness, vitality and happiness.
Simone.indd 40 8/26/10 12:47:48 PM
40 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Brushed in strokes of yellow, Micheli’s son’s room, where the
architect’s adoration of soft edges and flowing lines are apparent,
was designed to evoke brightness, vitality and happiness.
Simone.indd 40 8/26/10 12:47:48 PM
41
CMYK
September 2010
CMYK
INTERIORS
“The leitmotif that links all my works is sensorial: all my realisations wrap and
involve man bringing him to a oneiric dimension of wonder and surprise. For
my home, the architecture tells my story, that of my child, Cesar, and of my
wife, Roberta – of love, transparency and truth.”
In Florence, his family’s just-completed home was conceived to be dynamic,
über-fresh and vivid, where the past glissades through the present and into the
unknown future. With all the furnishings designed by the Tuscan architect, the
overall spirit of Micheli’s private quarters erases the extraneous, creating instead
an emptiness for the soul to fill.
“[The interior design] comes from my conception of luxury,” he says. “The
new luxury in architecture is connected with the basic will to repossess little
everyday beauties and truths, and sensations’ privacy; it is linked more to
emptiness than fullness; it is more mental than physical; it is not opulence but
clearness. I wanted to build a new story connected with the wonderland, free
from traditional bonds, aimed at simplifying and appreciating my life and my
family’s life in a space where everything is lacking in undesired un-essential.”
The cavernous, echoing living area breaks traditional design rules. Divided
by a sweeping brick arch, it features an unconventional distribution pattern on
the ceiling and large openings which reveal the opposite garden. The main
great room was designed to hosts the episodes of daily life while a low-height
diagonal wedge contains the kitchen, which can be screened off from view. The
entire vista is crowned by a cobweb-like thread of ropes – a highly imaginative
dream-catcher and microcosm, lending lightness and elegance to the space
below, while providing a safe play area for Micheli’s son, Cesar.
Luxury to Micheli is irrespective of financial wealth, opulence and bling. It is
merely the splendour, delight and well-being of the soul, fed and nourished by
architecture and design. For his own residence, he created a dimension that
is unconventional and visionary, candid in its clarity. “Living in a luxury sphere
nowadays means succeeding in loving and being loved in a truly complete
and full way; it means being absorbed in simplicity, like making a blade of grass
fluttering in the wind. It means repossessing of the truth of life, living the beauty
of the everyday life,” he says.
For Micheli, colour, or the lack thereof, in his work comes from the
“chromatic heritage that flows in my body.” Inspiration comes from 15
th
and
16
th
century Italian paintings, from studying its use around the world, and his
work has the ability to create a “new magic moment of great physical and
emotional transport.”
The Florence home is bathed in white, nonetheless strokes of pink were
employed in the great room, through bubblegum pink upholstery and a
fragment on a painted wall. Micheli considers pink the new cult colour, borne
of the fusion of the purity of white and the passion of red. In Cesar’s room,
sunshine yellow was chosen for the glossy, soft-edged shelving and desk; a
pattern of yellow bubbles on a wall; and an L-shaped platform that provides a
sleep area and plenty of storage.
“Luxury means reconsidering, dreaming, starting to love again without asking
anything back, giving without having anything back,” Micheli says. “It means
building without destroying, having a strong ethical sense and being capable of
generating healthy beauty. Luxury does not mean opulence and redundancy, but
rather the essentials, ethical gestures, free spaces with scattered basic elements. I
wish to create new stories connected with the world of the wonders and having
no bonds with tradition… To simplify and improve the life of man by eliminating
all the unessential and undesired elements in the space he lives in.”
ID
The soaring great room hosts the episodes of daily life in succession while a wedge, a low height diagonal splinter houses an all-white kitchen.
Simone.indd 41 8/26/10 12:47:56 PM
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Bahrain: A.|.M. Kooheji Croup B.S.C. (c) -o· i··o ooo· kooheji|md·ajmkooheji.com
Kuvait: Arte Casa lrading Co. -o6s ¡·¡· ooo inío·artecasa.|z
Oman: Ahmed Mohsin lrading L.L.C. -o6· z¡· i· oio svare·amtoman.com
Oatar: M.S.K Bui¦ding Materia¦ -o· ¡¡ ¡¡o osi inío·mskqatar.com
Saudi Ara|ia: Articasa -o6 6 zzsz ¡¡oz (|eddah). -o6 6 i¡·o o·zo (livadh) inío·articasa.|iz
United Ara| Lmirates: Cerman Home íor Bathrooms c Kitchens -o·i ¡ z6· ooo inío·germanhome.net
2_InteriorDesign_dOtTamTam_225x300:InteriorDesign_dOtTamTam_225x300 8~04~20l0 l4:52 Pagina l
43 September 2010
BATHROOMS | DESI GN FORMULA
D
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S
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F
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R
M
U
L
A
CONTENTS:
44 Simple yet special
50 Simplex solutions
51 Discreet decorations
55 Magical metallics
56 Powder room plans
Awash with invention
Trends that gained momentum in early 2010 in other parts of the
home have become de rigueur for the bathroom as the year has
progressed, so that splashes of subtle sophistication and texture,
coupled with ample room for individuality, are spicing up the
room’s interior design needs. TEXT: LISA VINCENTI
From Dornbracht comes Tara.Logic, a
supremely simple design, which adds
instant personality to any bath.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 43 8/26/10 12:50:41 PM
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dOt, design Wiel Arets Bathroom Cu¦ture since i·oz vvv.¦auíen.com/midd¦eeast
Bahrain: A.|.M. Kooheji Croup B.S.C. (c) -o· i··o ooo· kooheji|md·ajmkooheji.com
Kuvait: Arte Casa lrading Co. -o6s ¡·¡· ooo inío·artecasa.|z
Oman: Ahmed Mohsin lrading L.L.C. -o6· z¡· i· oio svare·amtoman.com
Oatar: M.S.K Bui¦ding Materia¦ -o· ¡¡ ¡¡o osi inío·mskqatar.com
Saudi Ara|ia: Articasa -o6 6 zzsz ¡¡oz (|eddah). -o6 6 i¡·o o·zo (livadh) inío·articasa.|iz
United Ara| Lmirates: Cerman Home íor Bathrooms c Kitchens -o·i ¡ z6· ooo inío·germanhome.net
2_InteriorDesign_dOtTamTam_225x300:InteriorDesign_dOtTamTam_225x300 8~04~20l0 l4:52 Pagina l
44 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESIGN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
As we enter the final quarter of 2010 and summer’s heat begins to wane,
the interior design world is already well into 2011. In the bathroom, where the
home spa experience has been the major development of the past few years,
another layer of intrigue and intelligence can now be found.
So while the major themes of rejuvenation, serenity and purity continue to
play a starring role, a renewed inventiveness and new interpretations are also
proving a major factor in the latest designs, where the use of intricate textures,
smart technologies and a more complex interplay of shapes, pattern, lighting,
and colour are injecting a revitalising splash.
With a renewed focus on home life, spurred by the shift in consumer
attitudes towards more modest living, calming minimalist interiors and an
ever-growing environmental awareness have provided the impetus for interior
design over the past few months. Yet by mid-2010, the back-to-basics attitude,
where excessive ornamentation and ostentation was stripped from furnishings
and rooms, began to give way to a new sense of optimism. Designs again
witnessed a more exuberant and bolder attitude – albeit still more tempered
and restrained than in earlier epochs.
“People around the world are slowing down and re-evaluating their lifestyles,”
says trend forecaster Milou Ket of Milou Ket Style & Design in the Netherlands.
“They’re rediscovering traditional values like honesty and trustworthiness,
placing more worth on the environment and natural resources, and finding
greater appreciation for family, friends and community. As a result, interiors
will become even more individual and personal in upcoming years, with an
emphasis on quality, performance and innovation.”
Consumers are ready to turn the page, having tired of the economic gloom
hanging over the world. Trend forecasters anticipate that while the new lifestyle
attitudes that shun excess and ostentation are here to stay, they do expect
consumers to take on added risks in the designs of their homes, where extra
layers of complexity and colour can create a sense of boldness that has been
missing in recent months.
“The post-crisis time is characterised by the appearance of new and
spontaneous creativity,” says Mayouri Sengchanh from Paris-based trend agency
Carlin International, who earlier this year, alongside a team of other industry
experts at German design exposition Heimtextile, predicted an explosion of
good humour and bright colours would infuse future design with a sense of
impulsive creativity.
Patterns from different cultures, wonderful forms and colours, prints and
surface coverings play with form to introduce a more capricious tone into
creative home design. The lavatory proves no exception: strong and bold
monolithic shapes, fantastic tile and surface treatments, washroom features
that glow at night, and the judicious interjection of colour and pattern form the
backdrop to sophisticated, contemporary installations.
SIMPLE YET SPECIAL
“There is much talk about there being a return to minimalist design
post-recession, but most trend forecasters, including me, believe that
revisiting any earlier design style would be just too simple a solution,”
comments Victoria Redshaw, director of trend-spotter Scarlet Opus.
“The global economic crisis has changed everything; consumer attitudes,
spending patterns, decision-making processes, priorities and taste. Therefore,
to the same degree that ostentatious ‘bling’ styling is no longer appropriate,
The Zucchetti Kos Faraway Bathroom Collection, designed by Ludovica and Roberto Palomba and available at Sanipex, won the Elle Decoration Award 2010.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 44 8/26/10 12:50:46 PM
44 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESI GN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
As we enter the final quarter of 2010 and summer’s heat begins to wane,
the interior design world is already well into 2011. In the bathroom, where the
home spa experience has been the major development of the past few years,
another layer of intrigue and intelligence can now be found.
So while the major themes of rejuvenation, serenity and purity continue to
play a starring role, a renewed inventiveness and new interpretations are also
proving a major factor in the latest designs, where the use of intricate textures,
smart technologies and a more complex interplay of shapes, pattern, lighting,
and colour are injecting a revitalising splash.
With a renewed focus on home life, spurred by the shift in consumer
attitudes towards more modest living, calming minimalist interiors and an
ever-growing environmental awareness have provided the impetus for interior
design over the past few months. Yet by mid-2010, the back-to-basics attitude,
where excessive ornamentation and ostentation was stripped from furnishings
and rooms, began to give way to a new sense of optimism. Designs again
witnessed a more exuberant and bolder attitude – albeit still more tempered
and restrained than in earlier epochs.
“People around the world are slowing down and re-evaluating their lifestyles,”
says trend forecaster Milou Ket of Milou Ket Style & Design in the Netherlands.
“They’re rediscovering traditional values like honesty and trustworthiness,
placing more worth on the environment and natural resources, and finding
greater appreciation for family, friends and community. As a result, interiors
will become even more individual and personal in upcoming years, with an
emphasis on quality, performance and innovation.”
Consumers are ready to turn the page, having tired of the economic gloom
hanging over the world. Trend forecasters anticipate that while the new lifestyle
attitudes that shun excess and ostentation are here to stay, they do expect
consumers to take on added risks in the designs of their homes, where extra
layers of complexity and colour can create a sense of boldness that has been
missing in recent months.
“The post-crisis time is characterised by the appearance of new and
spontaneous creativity,” says Mayouri Sengchanh from Paris-based trend agency
Carlin International, who earlier this year, alongside a team of other industry
experts at German design exposition Heimtextile, predicted an explosion of
good humour and bright colours would infuse future design with a sense of
impulsive creativity.
Patterns from different cultures, wonderful forms and colours, prints and
surface coverings play with form to introduce a more capricious tone into
creative home design. The lavatory proves no exception: strong and bold
monolithic shapes, fantastic tile and surface treatments, washroom features
that glow at night, and the judicious interjection of colour and pattern form the
backdrop to sophisticated, contemporary installations.
SIMPLE YET SPECIAL
“There is much talk about there being a return to minimalist design
post-recession, but most trend forecasters, including me, believe that
revisiting any earlier design style would be just too simple a solution,”
comments Victoria Redshaw, director of trend-spotter Scarlet Opus.
“The global economic crisis has changed everything; consumer attitudes,
spending patterns, decision-making processes, priorities and taste. Therefore,
to the same degree that ostentatious ‘bling’ styling is no longer appropriate,
The Zucchetti Kos Faraway Bathroom Collection, designed by Ludovica and Roberto Palomba and available at Sanipex, won the Elle Decoration Award 2010.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 44 8/26/10 12:50:46 PM
C
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
IdentityCookerFd.pdf 8/24/10 3:23:40 PM
46 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
The Forma freestanding bathroom suite designed
by Andrea Andretta for Toscoquattro offers striking
silhouettes of pure white and asymmetrical ovals.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 46 8/26/10 12:50:50 PM
47 September 2010
BATHROOMS | DESI GN FORMULA
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 47 8/26/10 12:50:53 PM
48 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESIGN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
minimalism per se is not relevant either. Yes consumers will desire greater
simplicity, with a focus on restraint and sophistication, but this does not mean a
desire to dwell in plain, sparse, masculine, hard-edged living environments.”
Redshaw says that by autumn 2010, increased optimism will be reflected
in a yearning for a greater use of colours and patterns throughout the home.
Consumers are ready to be more adventurous and open to the idea of creating
bolder interior statements, she notes.
“The key issue for product designers and interior designers alike is to satisfy
the need for new and interesting design experiences [emotional and physical/
sensorial] and to answer the growing need for a sense of escapism within the
home and hotel environment,” Redshaw continues. “The challenge is to create
WOW-factors without being excessive and ostentatious. Consumers will desire
interior schemes that intrigue, enchant, delight and surprise them. And they will
also be looking for bathroom schemes that tick these boxes, too.”
Subtle patterns on tiles are one way to set the tone by creating a chic canvas
on which to layer fresh textures. In fact, the judicious use of tiles is one of the
simplest ways of injecting individual style and complexity into any bathroom.
In the world of tiles, a preview of prominent Italian bathroom show Cersaie
2010 clearly illustrates a fascination with texture and shape. Hard surfaces will
be transformed into masculine stripes, delicate fabrics and muted metallics.
The 2011 style forecasts call for everything from renaissance-inspired looks to
patchwork patterns, but advances in technology ensure these archetypes are
given a modern twist.
In fact, what’s old is new is proving the rallying cry of many upcoming
introductions. Popular TV shows, such as HBO’s smash hit Mad Men, illustrate
that the swinging 60s are making a comeback. “Often when we think of patterned
tiles we have in our minds a picture of old-fashioned styling or loud retro
designs,” Redshaw says. “But by incorporating pattern into tiles you can create a
beautiful balance between the worlds of contemporary and classic design.”
From Milanese designer Paolo Zani, who was born in 1960, comes a range
of ceramic tiles for Ceramiche Ascot called Murmansk. Available in a neutral
palette of white, black, beige, brown, sage, and grey, Murmansk’s strongest
impression comes from its pattern of what looks like tiny, irregular pebbles
or bumps.
The Studies series by Diego Grandi for Lea Ceramiche, reworks geometry
and shape. With names such as Grid, Outline, Plan and Seed, the grès porcelain,
in some cases incised and sanded, becomes an intriguing background for new
designs. Also from Lea Ceramiche, come Lines and Waves, a new collection
by Patrick Norguet that explores a whole new sensory concept of surfaces. In
Lines, a three-dimensional effect produces a virtual, visual landscape evocative of
a city skyline; while the repetition of dots that characterise the Waves collection
create an optical effect reminiscent of waves and movement.
Romance and tradition are also expected to make a strong showing at
Cersaie. However, in their current incarnations, they are neither saccharine
sweet nor buttoned up. Collections such as Cathay 4 Fine by La Fabbrica or
Jardin by Maison Sichenia introduce a more feminine aspect to the bathroom,
but neither is overwrought. In the Cathay series, which can be used to recover
existing surfaces without demolishing them, contemporary floral patterns and
arabesque scrolls add a softer dimension; while Jardin is characterised by a
dusted and delicate “Barelythere” flower.
Clockwise from left: Crystalline, a new basin design from Alape, features crisp,
beveled edges; Colombo Design’s Lulù collection is comprised of 22 pieces.
Alessi’s updates Ilbagnoaless include a new touchless faucet that favors
generous curves.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 48 8/26/10 12:50:57 PM
48 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESI GN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
minimalism per se is not relevant either. Yes consumers will desire greater
simplicity, with a focus on restraint and sophistication, but this does not mean a
desire to dwell in plain, sparse, masculine, hard-edged living environments.”
Redshaw says that by autumn 2010, increased optimism will be reflected
in a yearning for a greater use of colours and patterns throughout the home.
Consumers are ready to be more adventurous and open to the idea of creating
bolder interior statements, she notes.
“The key issue for product designers and interior designers alike is to satisfy
the need for new and interesting design experiences [emotional and physical/
sensorial] and to answer the growing need for a sense of escapism within the
home and hotel environment,” Redshaw continues. “The challenge is to create
WOW-factors without being excessive and ostentatious. Consumers will desire
interior schemes that intrigue, enchant, delight and surprise them. And they will
also be looking for bathroom schemes that tick these boxes, too.”
Subtle patterns on tiles are one way to set the tone by creating a chic canvas
on which to layer fresh textures. In fact, the judicious use of tiles is one of the
simplest ways of injecting individual style and complexity into any bathroom.
In the world of tiles, a preview of prominent Italian bathroom show Cersaie
2010 clearly illustrates a fascination with texture and shape. Hard surfaces will
be transformed into masculine stripes, delicate fabrics and muted metallics.
The 2011 style forecasts call for everything from renaissance-inspired looks to
patchwork patterns, but advances in technology ensure these archetypes are
given a modern twist.
In fact, what’s old is new is proving the rallying cry of many upcoming
introductions. Popular TV shows, such as HBO’s smash hit Mad Men, illustrate
that the swinging 60s are making a comeback. “Often when we think of patterned
tiles we have in our minds a picture of old-fashioned styling or loud retro
designs,” Redshaw says. “But by incorporating pattern into tiles you can create a
beautiful balance between the worlds of contemporary and classic design.”
From Milanese designer Paolo Zani, who was born in 1960, comes a range
of ceramic tiles for Ceramiche Ascot called Murmansk. Available in a neutral
palette of white, black, beige, brown, sage, and grey, Murmansk’s strongest
impression comes from its pattern of what looks like tiny, irregular pebbles
or bumps.
The Studies series by Diego Grandi for Lea Ceramiche, reworks geometry
and shape. With names such as Grid, Outline, Plan and Seed, the grès porcelain,
in some cases incised and sanded, becomes an intriguing background for new
designs. Also from Lea Ceramiche, come Lines and Waves, a new collection
by Patrick Norguet that explores a whole new sensory concept of surfaces. In
Lines, a three-dimensional effect produces a virtual, visual landscape evocative of
a city skyline; while the repetition of dots that characterise the Waves collection
create an optical effect reminiscent of waves and movement.
Romance and tradition are also expected to make a strong showing at
Cersaie. However, in their current incarnations, they are neither saccharine
sweet nor buttoned up. Collections such as Cathay 4 Fine by La Fabbrica or
Jardin by Maison Sichenia introduce a more feminine aspect to the bathroom,
but neither is overwrought. In the Cathay series, which can be used to recover
existing surfaces without demolishing them, contemporary floral patterns and
arabesque scrolls add a softer dimension; while Jardin is characterised by a
dusted and delicate “Barelythere” flower.
Clockwise from left: Crystalline, a new basin design from Alape, features crisp,
beveled edges; Colombo Design’s Lulù collection is comprised of 22 pieces.
Alessi’s updates Ilbagnoaless include a new touchless faucet that favors
generous curves.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 48 8/26/10 12:50:57 PM
50 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
In installations to be presented by tile makers, patterns are used sparingly
along a single wall, or as the backdrop to a freestanding tub, striking the perfect
balance between minimalism and decorative flourish.
SIMPLEX SOLUTIONS
Two prominent designers who have long understood the transformative power
of pattern are Patricia Urquiola and Marcel Wanders.
When Urquiola conceived her line of bath products for Axor, the forms
proved simple and pure, but the space she envisioned proved richly layered.
With her knack of transforming traditional elements into a contemporary look
in the bathroom setting, where the lines between bath and living area are
increasingly blurred, Urquiola Axor blends form, function, and imagination: the
classic shapes of the vessel sinks and tubs are a modern interpretation of an
old-fashioned washtub; faucets combine shining surfaces with soft contours;
handles are cut out rectangles with soft, rounded, super-thin edges and the top
of the faucet features a subtle wave; while the generously-shaped levers offer a
pleasant feel for the hand.
In the setting in which she chose to showcase her Axor line, Urquiola
blended various elements, culled from tradition, nature and travels, to create
a deceptively simple outlook, which was full of charm, emotion, differing styles
and objet trouvé.
For the Verona-based fair for stone design and technology Marmomacc, the
Spaniard dreamed up a collection that clearly illustrates the significance of surface
pattern in interiors. The graphic series she created for Budri, an installation called
Micrasterias, represents the differing use of marbles and stones of different origins.
The project arose from her observation of vegetal micro-organisms – micrasterias
– and she mixed these minute forms, blown-up to magnified proportions, with
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 50 8/26/10 12:50:59 PM
50 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
In installations to be presented by tile makers, patterns are used sparingly
along a single wall, or as the backdrop to a freestanding tub, striking the perfect
balance between minimalism and decorative flourish.
SIMPLEX SOLUTIONS
Two prominent designers who have long understood the transformative power
of pattern are Patricia Urquiola and Marcel Wanders.
When Urquiola conceived her line of bath products for Axor, the forms
proved simple and pure, but the space she envisioned proved richly layered.
With her knack of transforming traditional elements into a contemporary look
in the bathroom setting, where the lines between bath and living area are
increasingly blurred, Urquiola Axor blends form, function, and imagination: the
classic shapes of the vessel sinks and tubs are a modern interpretation of an
old-fashioned washtub; faucets combine shining surfaces with soft contours;
handles are cut out rectangles with soft, rounded, super-thin edges and the top
of the faucet features a subtle wave; while the generously-shaped levers offer a
pleasant feel for the hand.
In the setting in which she chose to showcase her Axor line, Urquiola
blended various elements, culled from tradition, nature and travels, to create
a deceptively simple outlook, which was full of charm, emotion, differing styles
and objet trouvé.
For the Verona-based fair for stone design and technology Marmomacc, the
Spaniard dreamed up a collection that clearly illustrates the significance of surface
pattern in interiors. The graphic series she created for Budri, an installation called
Micrasterias, represents the differing use of marbles and stones of different origins.
The project arose from her observation of vegetal micro-organisms – micrasterias
– and she mixed these minute forms, blown-up to magnified proportions, with
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 50 8/26/10 12:50:59 PM
51 September 2010
CMYK
BATHROOMS | DESI GN FORMULA
graphic symbols to create a new digitally-enhanced biological vision.
For a less esoteric interpretation of pattern, Redshaw suggests a study of
Wanders’s recently opened neo-baroque Mondrian Hotel in South Beach,
Miami. “He shows how successful relationships between contemporary shapes
and classic patterns can be forged to create new, beautiful and powerful interior
design statements,” she explains.
“The fabulous patterned tile floor of the carport illustrates how even dense
pattern can be applied across large areas and still achieve a visually harmonious
balance and a successful integration into the interior scheme. In this way
Wanders’ interior design style creates whispered wow-factors. It is theatrical,
sculptural, luxurious, weighted and dramatic.
“He makes the complex look simple and this is the essence of the design
philosophy of ‘Simplexity’ – simplicity layered with complexity. The focus of
Simplexity is to make the complex look simple and allow what appears to be
simple to also have an underlying layer of complexity. Nothing is superfluous,
everything is significant.
“This is a design philosophy which results in elegant innovation. It is a way
of introducing subtle, sophisticated twists of intelligently applied decoration.
Beautifully detailed surface finishes and dense decoration pull us in and attract
our attention and appreciation.”
Concentrated layers of pattern can be applied in a modest way to achieve
such affect, even in the bathroom, a direction that is anticipated to be evident
at Cersaie. From bath and kitchen fittings maker Kohler comes an artful,
exceptionally executed series of basins and toilets. The Empress Bouquet pattern
offers a modern interpretation of 18
th
-century Chinese print work, with
an elegant floral motif detailed with brilliant golds and metallics. Each fixture
showcases a slightly different variation of the pattern, creating a one-of-a-kind
piece that pairs simple forms with the quiet whisper of florals, geometrics and
rarely spotted birds in flight.
For those who desire a less ornate approach, from Italian Neutra by
Arnaboldi Angelo comes a supremely sophisticated and inventive solution. In
its Augmented Texture LED series, designed by Elia Nedkov, a highly textured,
multi-dimensional stone wall throws off evocative bands of light to create a new
perspective on the surfaces, making soft, subtle luminous effects that gently
graze the texture and material. Stone tiles of variable thicknesses produce
tactile, light and voluminous effects, or a smooth finish. It also drenches the bath
in a natural element, playing off earlier trends to bring a more natural, organic
element into home design.
“This trend [Simplexity] promotes a new design ethos, which respects old
craftsmanship and the beauty that old products and patterns can bring to new
introductions. So search the archives and respectfully innovate the classics
as history leads us to the future by introducing layers of beautiful patterns,”
Redshaw says.
DISCREET DECORATIONS
If the master bathroom remains predominately white or ultra-clean, free of any
excess, that doesn’t necessarily mean sterility. In fact, as it continues to morph
Left to right: Karim Rashid’s Kelvin radiator for Caleido, proves a colourful
canvas; Antrax IT’s Serie T radiator pulls double duty as a towel bar.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 51 8/26/10 12:51:02 PM
52 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESIGN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
Top to bottom: Dornbracht presents two introductions: it’s Performing Shower
rain-head and Supernova, a suite of angular, geometric forms; Inda’s Divos
offers a complete system, replete with storage solutions; bold statements, such
as Aquamass’ Dip tub in fuchsia, add a playful dimension.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 52 8/26/10 12:51:11 PM
52 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESI GN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
Top to bottom: Dornbracht presents two introductions: it’s Performing Shower
rain-head and Supernova, a suite of angular, geometric forms; Inda’s Divos
offers a complete system, replete with storage solutions; bold statements, such
as Aquamass’ Dip tub in fuchsia, add a playful dimension.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 52 8/26/10 12:51:11 PM
54 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
into an extension of the master suite, the walls are coming down, in some
cases literally, and bathroom elements are taking on the role of sculpture and
furnishings.
Many current designs play with the tendency to expand the bath out into
the master suite by viewing it not as a bathroom fitting, but a decorative object
that is subject to different styles, materials and shapes. On one hand, some in
the industry (such as Inda and Duravit’s 2nd Floor collection) are introducing
furniture-like systems to outfit an entire bathroom, much like what we’d find
in the kitchen or home office, while other others are taking an even more
flamboyant approach.
Even if the overall design effect remains minimalist and pure, more discreet
flourishes can be achieved in a fresh manner. Monolithic and freestanding
tubs prove the dernier cri in the bath. From Domovari comes the swooping,
crescent-shaped freestanding Vela by Karim Rashid and, as part of its new
Duo collection by Matteo Thun, Neutra has introduced a pair of freestanding,
counter-height his and her sinks carved from a single block of stone. Likewise,
Toscoquattro offers a similar monolithic interpretation in its Forma collection.
Brussels-based Aquamass has several roomy tubs that embrace today’s design
mood. While the oval-shaped Stone One tub (available in a variety of colours
and patterns) has been updated to include a bi-coloured version that features
a matt white interior swathed in a pastel grey, anthracite or vibrant orange
exterior; it is the Dip, now available in fuchsia, that was specifically developed to
offer a brighter mood.
“Today, still sensitive to the changes at work in society, Aquamass wishes to
show its willingness to lead from the front and launches the fuchsia Dip bathtub,
in association with the League of Optimists of the Kingdom of Belgium,” states
the company’s Jean-Pol Piron.
“The League of Optimists of the Kingdom of Belgium is a non-profit making
organisation, part of the International Association of Optimists Without Borders,
a non-profit making body set up in 2008 with the aim of promoting beyond all
boundaries the evolution of mentalities towards more optimism, strengthening
enthusiasm, good humour, positive thinking, audacity, enterprising spirit and
tolerance, as well as harmony between people and communities.”
Interestingly, the goals of the group clearly parallel the shift in thinking not only
among designers, but consumers as well. All are more than ready for the next
chapter, in which hard edges and sharp turns are replaced with flowing curves
and feminine principals, only now infused with a touch more drama.
Early this year, the crisp and tailored lines of the first part of the decade were
superseded by more sumptuous and voluptuous profiles throughout the major
European fairs and the closing chapters of this year will see a touch more drama
to interior settings.
The likes of Duravit with its Pura Vida collection or Alessi’s update of its
existing Ilbagnoalessi One line, designed by Stefano Giovannoni, lead the way.
A complete scenario for the bathroom, Ilbagnoalessi includes sanitaryware,
bathtub, shower cabins and furniture, and the expanded range, to be presented
at Cersaie this autumn, was prefaced by the new touchless wash basin faucet,
produced by Oras, which eschews sharp lines in favour of generous curves.
While the colour palette remains predominantly based upon 2010’s
interpretation of neutrals, where shades of grey have proved the new beige,
more vibrant and lively hues are making a comeback to imbue spaces with a
more dynamic atmosphere.
“From the moment you enter a space, you are inundated with the sense
of the colours surrounding you,” says international colour guru Leatrice “Lee”
Eiseman, a prime consultant to Pantone.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 54 8/26/10 12:51:17 PM
54 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
into an extension of the master suite, the walls are coming down, in some
cases literally, and bathroom elements are taking on the role of sculpture and
furnishings.
Many current designs play with the tendency to expand the bath out into
the master suite by viewing it not as a bathroom fitting, but a decorative object
that is subject to different styles, materials and shapes. On one hand, some in
the industry (such as Inda and Duravit’s 2nd Floor collection) are introducing
furniture-like systems to outfit an entire bathroom, much like what we’d find
in the kitchen or home office, while other others are taking an even more
flamboyant approach.
Even if the overall design effect remains minimalist and pure, more discreet
flourishes can be achieved in a fresh manner. Monolithic and freestanding
tubs prove the dernier cri in the bath. From Domovari comes the swooping,
crescent-shaped freestanding Vela by Karim Rashid and, as part of its new
Duo collection by Matteo Thun, Neutra has introduced a pair of freestanding,
counter-height his and her sinks carved from a single block of stone. Likewise,
Toscoquattro offers a similar monolithic interpretation in its Forma collection.
Brussels-based Aquamass has several roomy tubs that embrace today’s design
mood. While the oval-shaped Stone One tub (available in a variety of colours
and patterns) has been updated to include a bi-coloured version that features
a matt white interior swathed in a pastel grey, anthracite or vibrant orange
exterior; it is the Dip, now available in fuchsia, that was specifically developed to
offer a brighter mood.
“Today, still sensitive to the changes at work in society, Aquamass wishes to
show its willingness to lead from the front and launches the fuchsia Dip bathtub,
in association with the League of Optimists of the Kingdom of Belgium,” states
the company’s Jean-Pol Piron.
“The League of Optimists of the Kingdom of Belgium is a non-profit making
organisation, part of the International Association of Optimists Without Borders,
a non-profit making body set up in 2008 with the aim of promoting beyond all
boundaries the evolution of mentalities towards more optimism, strengthening
enthusiasm, good humour, positive thinking, audacity, enterprising spirit and
tolerance, as well as harmony between people and communities.”
Interestingly, the goals of the group clearly parallel the shift in thinking not only
among designers, but consumers as well. All are more than ready for the next
chapter, in which hard edges and sharp turns are replaced with flowing curves
and feminine principals, only now infused with a touch more drama.
Early this year, the crisp and tailored lines of the first part of the decade were
superseded by more sumptuous and voluptuous profiles throughout the major
European fairs and the closing chapters of this year will see a touch more drama
to interior settings.
The likes of Duravit with its Pura Vida collection or Alessi’s update of its
existing Ilbagnoalessi One line, designed by Stefano Giovannoni, lead the way.
A complete scenario for the bathroom, Ilbagnoalessi includes sanitaryware,
bathtub, shower cabins and furniture, and the expanded range, to be presented
at Cersaie this autumn, was prefaced by the new touchless wash basin faucet,
produced by Oras, which eschews sharp lines in favour of generous curves.
While the colour palette remains predominantly based upon 2010’s
interpretation of neutrals, where shades of grey have proved the new beige,
more vibrant and lively hues are making a comeback to imbue spaces with a
more dynamic atmosphere.
“From the moment you enter a space, you are inundated with the sense
of the colours surrounding you,” says international colour guru Leatrice “Lee”
Eiseman, a prime consultant to Pantone.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 54 8/26/10 12:51:17 PM
55 September 2010
CMYK
BATHROOMS | DESI GN FORMULA
“It is the first thing you notice when you enter and the final message that you
take away when you leave. People are being more practical, but they still want
excitement. You can bring in yellow, orange or red, which gives energy to a
more neutral shade.”
She has dubbed this palette “Focus”, where deep graphite blues and greys
are the neutrals, but where hotter hues are added to infuse space with energy.
Dornbracht presented its gorgeous Supernova collection in what it dubbed
its “Lemon Suite”. In that presentation, a mellow yellow wall paint bathed a
predominantly white bath in a soft sunny glow.
MAGICAL METALLICS
The range of colours available today is not as simple as in earlier decades. It is
complex, multi-dimensional and multi-faceted, nothing is ever black-and-white
but is instead painted in varying shades of grey. Whether pale nudes, intimate
pinks, warm-tinged greys and purple nocturnes or a peppery liquorice and
smokey black (used to deliver dark moody shadows), late 2010 and beyond
offers a quieter palette completed by pale brushed gold, blackened gold, rose-
tinted gold and tarnished pewter, Victoria Redshaw notes.
“Even though the days of ‘bling’ being seen as cool and fashionable are
decidedly over, consumers still have a desire for a little metallic magic in their
lives,” she continues. “Fashion has shifted away from ‘full-on’ gold, and now
softer and lighter tones of gold are in vogue with glamorous glistening effects.
There is also a developing interest in other metallics and moving forward the
focus is on warm copper tones, antiqued bronzes, lightly tarnished silvers, dark
pewter, platinum and super-iridescent finishes.
“Subtlety is key to new metallic tile styles. The application of metallics
now needs to be elegant and intriguing rather than bold and over the top but
it must still deliver a WOW-factor. It can be a difficult balance to strike but
over-application will look excessive, which is not good, particularly at a time
when excess is seen as vulgar. Metallics should be used to add a tasteful touch
of luxe.”
Without doubt the home has now fallen victim to fashion’s fickle whims, but
keeping interiors feeling fresh without falling victim to fleeting trends can prove
quite simple.
“Another way to think about it is that trends tend to swing in a pendulum
motion – a trend only swings so far in one direction before it reaches its peak
and naturally swings back in the opposite direction. This theory can be seen to
apply to metallics in fashion and interiors because after several seasons of ‘bold
gold’ there is now a desire for more of a ‘subtle shimmer’,” Redshaw says.
“Originally our new love of metallics filtered down from the catwalks and red
carpet glamour. Now the trend is also being reinforced by exotic North African
and Moorish influences in interior design. Coppers and bronzes are key to the
trend. There is a sophisticated bohemian spirit apparent in this trend’s styling
and an exotic glamour. There are hints of a harem atmosphere, of languid
relaxation and escapism.”
Left to right: Highly textural tiles and rounded shapes add another layer of interest in Grohe’s Veris bath;
a barely-there shower enclosure, such as Tecnodoor from Cesana, adds simple flair.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 55 8/26/10 12:51:28 PM
56 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
She points to ever-inventive Sydney-based ALLOY as an example. The
company’s line of locally made stainless steel, raw steel, titanium plated, brass
and copper mosaic tiles are sleek, stylish, sophisticated and ideal for adding a
dose of glamour to the bath.
“Subtle but alluring flecks and flakes of metallics can also deliver a luxurious
statement,” Redshaw says. “The artistic shimmer of glitter looks particularly
striking when used with dark colours such as aubergine and black.”
POWDER ROOM PLANS
While the master bathroom dominates the attention of most when it comes
to designing their interiors, the powder room has fallen by the wayside in
many minimalist homes. But for decades traditional residential designs used the
powder room as a way of injecting a bit of whimsy and drama, especially via
wallpapers – think chinoiserie or jungle prints.
For centuries, the powder room has allowed visitors to use amenities
without encroaching too much into the more private areas of the house,
generally garnering the smallest interior space in the house. However, it
was also a world of its own, employing completely different colour schemes
and design features. It was a place of experimentation and the room where,
historically, residents were most willing to take design risks, often via bold and
whimsical wallpaper featuring quirky patterns and vivid hues.
“In small spaces like powder rooms, you’re free to indulge a fantasy,” notes
Patrick Frey of renowned Parisian textile maker Pierre Frey, whose wallpapers
often serve as the backdrop to these tiny chambers.
Mike Brummel, from fabric maker Kirk Brummel, adds: “If powder rooms
are small, brief moments of checking oneself over before stepping out into the
world again, you want something exciting and flattering on their walls.”
But such devices needn’t be limited to more traditional settings. There are a
slew of contemporary wallpapers (including LED versions) and bath fittings that
push the envelope as well as futuristic tiles and innovative lighting that make a
dramatic bathroom a distinct and viable possibility. In fact, designers note that
more homeowners are becoming interested in creating a more melodramatic
powder room.
Designers Darren Genner and Simona Castagna, from Minosa Design in
Sydney, took such an approach to a powder room they dreamed up for a
contemporary house. “We wanted something dramatic, hence the feature wall
of Bisazza glass mosaics in varying shades of black and grey,” says Genner, who
notes the powder room is next to the wine cellar and home theatre, which
features a dark grey floor and near-black walls and ceiling. “The grouting was
colour mixed to match the individual tiles and provide a more seamless image.”
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 56 8/26/10 12:51:31 PM
56 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
She points to ever-inventive Sydney-based ALLOY as an example. The
company’s line of locally made stainless steel, raw steel, titanium plated, brass
and copper mosaic tiles are sleek, stylish, sophisticated and ideal for adding a
dose of glamour to the bath.
“Subtle but alluring flecks and flakes of metallics can also deliver a luxurious
statement,” Redshaw says. “The artistic shimmer of glitter looks particularly
striking when used with dark colours such as aubergine and black.”
POWDER ROOM PLANS
While the master bathroom dominates the attention of most when it comes
to designing their interiors, the powder room has fallen by the wayside in
many minimalist homes. But for decades traditional residential designs used the
powder room as a way of injecting a bit of whimsy and drama, especially via
wallpapers – think chinoiserie or jungle prints.
For centuries, the powder room has allowed visitors to use amenities
without encroaching too much into the more private areas of the house,
generally garnering the smallest interior space in the house. However, it
was also a world of its own, employing completely different colour schemes
and design features. It was a place of experimentation and the room where,
historically, residents were most willing to take design risks, often via bold and
whimsical wallpaper featuring quirky patterns and vivid hues.
“In small spaces like powder rooms, you’re free to indulge a fantasy,” notes
Patrick Frey of renowned Parisian textile maker Pierre Frey, whose wallpapers
often serve as the backdrop to these tiny chambers.
Mike Brummel, from fabric maker Kirk Brummel, adds: “If powder rooms
are small, brief moments of checking oneself over before stepping out into the
world again, you want something exciting and flattering on their walls.”
But such devices needn’t be limited to more traditional settings. There are a
slew of contemporary wallpapers (including LED versions) and bath fittings that
push the envelope as well as futuristic tiles and innovative lighting that make a
dramatic bathroom a distinct and viable possibility. In fact, designers note that
more homeowners are becoming interested in creating a more melodramatic
powder room.
Designers Darren Genner and Simona Castagna, from Minosa Design in
Sydney, took such an approach to a powder room they dreamed up for a
contemporary house. “We wanted something dramatic, hence the feature wall
of Bisazza glass mosaics in varying shades of black and grey,” says Genner, who
notes the powder room is next to the wine cellar and home theatre, which
features a dark grey floor and near-black walls and ceiling. “The grouting was
colour mixed to match the individual tiles and provide a more seamless image.”
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 56 8/26/10 12:51:31 PM
57 September 2010
BATHROOMS | DESI GN FORMULA
The sense of theatrics is enhanced by the contrast between the classical
profile created by the Bisazza mosaic, and the contemporary fixtures and fittings.
A sleek Ovale Gessi faucet spouts water directly out of the face on the wall into
a suspended Minosa Puddle basin and the lighting was designed to provide a
soft, relaxing ambiance for guests. Ceiling lights illuminate the walls, accentuating
the face and basin, while two pendants heighten the drama and throw light onto
a black shelf.
Genner adds that a lot of homeowners are looking for innovative design
solutions for powder rooms and often seek to replicate the extravagant
bathrooms seen in expensive restaurants. “For many years, a powder room
was simply a toilet and a pedestal basin. Today, we are seeing a move towards
darker, more dramatic environments, and a lot of mood and special effects
lighting,” he says.
For those looking to create a more sensual and sensational bathroom,
whether as part of the master suite or merely in the water closet, the future is
brimming with products that provide just the right splash of drama.
“As the future unfolds, people are eternally full of hope,” Milou Ket says.
“Society is built on the hope that one day things will be better, and dreams can
be fulfilled.”
Here’s to happier times and braver escapes, even if it lasts for just the few
fleeting moments required to powder one’s nose.
ID
Left to right: Zucchetti reworks the traditional footed tub into a modern
statement in Morphing; Patricia Urquiola’s showerhead for Axor.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 57 8/26/10 12:51:38 PM
58 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESIGN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
alape.co.za; tel: (04) 330 7771
alessi.com; tel: (04) 344 5624
antrax.it
ascot.it
aquamass.com
axor-design.com; tel: 332 6565
bisazza.it; tel: (04) 347 3347
budri.com
burgbad.com
caleido.bs.it
ceramichelea.it; tel: (04) 262 9100
cesana.it; tel: (04) 339 5660
colombodesign.it
duravit.com; tel: (04) 556 2232
dornbracht.com; tel: (04) 335 0731
gessi.com; tel: (04) 339 0760
grohe.com; tel: (04) 331 8070
hansgrohe.com; tel: (04) 332 6565
inda.net
kohler.com; tel: (04) 321 1330
maison.sichenia.it
toscoquattro.it
totousa.com; tel: (04)265 0999
zucchettidesign.it; tel: (04) 339 5660
Design sources
Bath by Toto.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 58 8/26/10 12:51:42 PM
58 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESI GN FORMULA | BATHROOMS
alape.co.za; tel: (04) 330 7771
alessi.com; tel: (04) 344 5624
antrax.it
ascot.it
aquamass.com
axor-design.com; tel: 332 6565
bisazza.it; tel: (04) 347 3347
budri.com
burgbad.com
caleido.bs.it
ceramichelea.it; tel: (04) 262 9100
cesana.it; tel: (04) 339 5660
colombodesign.it
duravit.com; tel: (04) 556 2232
dornbracht.com; tel: (04) 335 0731
gessi.com; tel: (04) 339 0760
grohe.com; tel: (04) 331 8070
hansgrohe.com; tel: (04) 332 6565
inda.net
kohler.com; tel: (04) 321 1330
maison.sichenia.it
toscoquattro.it
totousa.com; tel: (04)265 0999
zucchettidesign.it; tel: (04) 339 5660
Design sources
Bath by Toto.
ID DF Bathrooms.indd 58 8/26/10 12:51:42 PM
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60 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Freestyle compositions
Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, the reigning EIDA Designers of the Year, work tirelessly with an endless flow
of creativity, inspiration and precision, as seen in their latest designs for Axor Hansgrohe. TEXT: CATHERINE BELBIN
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Variations on a theme, bathroom apps from Axor Bouroullec.
Bouroullec.indd 60 8/26/10 3:37:35 PM
60 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Freestyle compositions
Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, the reigning EIDA Designers of the Year, work tirelessly with an endless flow
of creativity, inspiration and precision, as seen in their latest designs for Axor Hansgrohe. TEXT: CATHERINE BELBIN
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Variations on a theme, bathroom apps from Axor Bouroullec.
Bouroullec.indd 60 8/26/10 3:37:35 PM
61
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September 2010
CMYK
PROFILE
Bouroullec.indd 61 8/26/10 3:37:47 PM
62 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
PROFILE
Fresh, young and dynamic, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec represent a new
generation of industrial designers. They have grown up in the age of celebrity
designers – a time when the world’s leading manufacturers have realised the
potential value that the signature of a well-known name can add to a product,
especially if it wins an international design award such as the red dot or iF.
The Bouroullecs ascended into the limelight with designs for office systems,
lamps, fragmented filaments of fibres that create almost invisible room dividers
and their now classic Clouds, which is housed in some of the world’s leading
design museums. They have since received their share of accolades with their
latest being the award EIDA (Elle Decoration International Design Awards)
Designers of the Year 2010.
With an enviable track record, it is not surprising that Philippe Grohe
commissioned them to create a designer line for his Axor range, following in
the footsteps of Citterio, Starck, Massaud and Urquiola, among others, whose
collaboration with the German company has propelled the Axor brand to the
upper echelons.
The brothers’ new concept encourages users to create a personalised
bathroom from their collection of basins, tubs, shelves and taps. Allowing
them to determine exactly where to place the taps – nothing is preconceived
– consumers can create their own dream bathroom made from the finest
materials and incorporating the latest water-saving technology developed by Axor
engineers, which is exactly what is being demanded in the upscale market today.
“It is a very contemporary approach as consumers like to add their own
images to screensavers and to select the apps that they need on their iPhones
depending on how that are going to use that device. Today we can interact
personally with technology,” says Erwan, who takes on the role as spokesperson.
“The Bouroullec Axor collection that we have worked on for the past six
years reflects this trend. You can mix and match the different elements to create
a bathroom that is unique and custom-designed for you, depending on your
height, habits, whether you want the tap levers on the left or right, on the wall
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Clockwise from left: Lighthouse lamp; Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec;
Axor Bouroullec collection 2010.
Bouroullec.indd 62 8/26/10 3:37:59 PM
62 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
PROFILE
Fresh, young and dynamic, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec represent a new
generation of industrial designers. They have grown up in the age of celebrity
designers – a time when the world’s leading manufacturers have realised the
potential value that the signature of a well-known name can add to a product,
especially if it wins an international design award such as the red dot or iF.
The Bouroullecs ascended into the limelight with designs for office systems,
lamps, fragmented filaments of fibres that create almost invisible room dividers
and their now classic Clouds, which is housed in some of the world’s leading
design museums. They have since received their share of accolades with their
latest being the award EIDA (Elle Decoration International Design Awards)
Designers of the Year 2010.
With an enviable track record, it is not surprising that Philippe Grohe
commissioned them to create a designer line for his Axor range, following in
the footsteps of Citterio, Starck, Massaud and Urquiola, among others, whose
collaboration with the German company has propelled the Axor brand to the
upper echelons.
The brothers’ new concept encourages users to create a personalised
bathroom from their collection of basins, tubs, shelves and taps. Allowing
them to determine exactly where to place the taps – nothing is preconceived
– consumers can create their own dream bathroom made from the finest
materials and incorporating the latest water-saving technology developed by Axor
engineers, which is exactly what is being demanded in the upscale market today.
“It is a very contemporary approach as consumers like to add their own
images to screensavers and to select the apps that they need on their iPhones
depending on how that are going to use that device. Today we can interact
personally with technology,” says Erwan, who takes on the role as spokesperson.
“The Bouroullec Axor collection that we have worked on for the past six
years reflects this trend. You can mix and match the different elements to create
a bathroom that is unique and custom-designed for you, depending on your
height, habits, whether you want the tap levers on the left or right, on the wall
P
H
O
T
O
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R
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P
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Clockwise from left: Lighthouse lamp; Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec;
Axor Bouroullec collection 2010.
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64 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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PROFILE
or basin. The installer drills all the holes for taps in the sinks, bathtubs in situ,
confirming Axor Hansgrohe’s belief that the user is in total control as to where
the fixtures are placed.”
However, the brothers gained their reputation with products other than
those for the bathroom. Designing a table is much different from designing
a bathroom. Their new table, Baguette for Magis is, ”meant for life with just
enough shininess of the chrome, but at the same time, not interfering with
the space. It is a really good table with attention to detail. This bathroom has
more function involved so there is a meeting of many elements. Naturally there
is a certain disorganisation that we need to organise, dimension that we can
provoke. A table is much more condensed and this is reflected in the design
for our new Baguette table for Magis. It is completely different to the Axor
collection,” Erwan says.
“We are designing a tableware collection for Alessi. To me it’s an art to
construct something that is totally different using the modern materials that we
have available to us today and as much as possible we avoid circles and squares.”
Their design philosophy is illustrated by the Slow chair, a product that makes
you want to sit comfortably and not just perch on. “We always try to make our
designs functional and inviting. Our designs are meant to be used and not just
looked at. Our designs are not minimalist,” Erwan says.
The relatively young duo – they are still in their 30s – have worked together
since Erwan was at art school and Ronan got his first break with the Italian
Capellini group, and have been riding the wave of success for almost a decade.
“We both have different skills and we thrive on each other’s creative energies.
Of course we could work independently, but together we are stronger,”
Erwan says.
“We are simple, hard working people, passionate about what we do
and revel in having time to experiment with new materials, shapes and
forms, and to generate new ideas as to how we can better organise work
and living environments.”
Today, manufacturers are lining up with project proposals for the cerebral pair
yet, despite their success, they remain unpretentious and almost oblivious to
the trappings of success. “We actually still have a core niche of companies that
we have been working with over the years. We are comfortable with them and
they with us. We share the same philosophies and we work well together, so
we are hesitant about working with others,” Erwan says.
“We love to maintain long relationship with eight main companies, as well as
with a few smaller collections. Our strategy is based on our belief that the better
you know the client, the better the product will be.”
He goes on to explain that their success is not an accident. “The only thing
that I know is that it’s work, work and work: I am a workaholic. It’s mental. It’s
tiring. From the moment I wake up my mind is already buzzing with creativity.
I spend a lot of time observing, people, things, life and it is always nice to stop
and look at the details especially if its done in a special or unusual way. My
thoughts are not always focused. It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact inspiration or
reasoning as to why I did something when I did something,” Erwan says.
“Yes we have a lot of pressure, but we self-generate this pressure [because]
we are incredibly afraid of making a mistake. Axor was a major project that
stretched over six years. It was challenging, completely new for us. Now we
want to realise other projects that are realistic, but are as strong conceptually.
We are so afraid of not being at the top, we have to keep pushing ourselves.”
So what is next for the Bouroullec brothers? “My dream is to design a
summer house for myself. I’d love to build in front of a lake, but my wife hates
lakes, so we will compromise for a site on a riverside. I would never build on
the coast as there are too many people and much of the French coastline has,
architecturally speaking, been spoilt,” Erwan says.
However, with the brothers’ current frenetic pace, it may be a while before
this dream is realised, but it is far more likely that the pair will succeed at their
passionate quest to create a truly iconic piece of work, like an Eames chair or
Sarrien’s Tulip chair.
“It doesn’t take time. I think it just happens. I think we tried to force it, but it is
just something that will happen one day,” Erwan concludes.
ID
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Clockwise from above: Baguette table; Slowchair 2007; Kreo Exhibition.
Bouroullec.indd 64 8/26/10 3:38:19 PM
64 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
PROFILE
or basin. The installer drills all the holes for taps in the sinks, bathtubs in situ,
confirming Axor Hansgrohe’s belief that the user is in total control as to where
the fixtures are placed.”
However, the brothers gained their reputation with products other than
those for the bathroom. Designing a table is much different from designing
a bathroom. Their new table, Baguette for Magis is, ”meant for life with just
enough shininess of the chrome, but at the same time, not interfering with
the space. It is a really good table with attention to detail. This bathroom has
more function involved so there is a meeting of many elements. Naturally there
is a certain disorganisation that we need to organise, dimension that we can
provoke. A table is much more condensed and this is reflected in the design
for our new Baguette table for Magis. It is completely different to the Axor
collection,” Erwan says.
“We are designing a tableware collection for Alessi. To me it’s an art to
construct something that is totally different using the modern materials that we
have available to us today and as much as possible we avoid circles and squares.”
Their design philosophy is illustrated by the Slow chair, a product that makes
you want to sit comfortably and not just perch on. “We always try to make our
designs functional and inviting. Our designs are meant to be used and not just
looked at. Our designs are not minimalist,” Erwan says.
The relatively young duo – they are still in their 30s – have worked together
since Erwan was at art school and Ronan got his first break with the Italian
Capellini group, and have been riding the wave of success for almost a decade.
“We both have different skills and we thrive on each other’s creative energies.
Of course we could work independently, but together we are stronger,”
Erwan says.
“We are simple, hard working people, passionate about what we do
and revel in having time to experiment with new materials, shapes and
forms, and to generate new ideas as to how we can better organise work
and living environments.”
Today, manufacturers are lining up with project proposals for the cerebral pair
yet, despite their success, they remain unpretentious and almost oblivious to
the trappings of success. “We actually still have a core niche of companies that
we have been working with over the years. We are comfortable with them and
they with us. We share the same philosophies and we work well together, so
we are hesitant about working with others,” Erwan says.
“We love to maintain long relationship with eight main companies, as well as
with a few smaller collections. Our strategy is based on our belief that the better
you know the client, the better the product will be.”
He goes on to explain that their success is not an accident. “The only thing
that I know is that it’s work, work and work: I am a workaholic. It’s mental. It’s
tiring. From the moment I wake up my mind is already buzzing with creativity.
I spend a lot of time observing, people, things, life and it is always nice to stop
and look at the details especially if its done in a special or unusual way. My
thoughts are not always focused. It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact inspiration or
reasoning as to why I did something when I did something,” Erwan says.
“Yes we have a lot of pressure, but we self-generate this pressure [because]
we are incredibly afraid of making a mistake. Axor was a major project that
stretched over six years. It was challenging, completely new for us. Now we
want to realise other projects that are realistic, but are as strong conceptually.
We are so afraid of not being at the top, we have to keep pushing ourselves.”
So what is next for the Bouroullec brothers? “My dream is to design a
summer house for myself. I’d love to build in front of a lake, but my wife hates
lakes, so we will compromise for a site on a riverside. I would never build on
the coast as there are too many people and much of the French coastline has,
architecturally speaking, been spoilt,” Erwan says.
However, with the brothers’ current frenetic pace, it may be a while before
this dream is realised, but it is far more likely that the pair will succeed at their
passionate quest to create a truly iconic piece of work, like an Eames chair or
Sarrien’s Tulip chair.
“It doesn’t take time. I think it just happens. I think we tried to force it, but it is
just something that will happen one day,” Erwan concludes.
ID
P
H
O
T
O
G
R
A
P
H
Y
:

S
T
U
D
IO

B
O
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R
O
U
L
L
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C
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O
T
O
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H
Y
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T
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B
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U
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U
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C
P
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O
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O
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T
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Clockwise from above: Baguette table; Slowchair 2007; Kreo Exhibition.
Bouroullec.indd 64 8/26/10 3:38:19 PM
67 September 2010
idProperty
CONTENTS:
68 Interactive enlightenment
72 Portfolio
76 Net profits
80 Antennae
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IDP Cover.indd 67 8/26/10 12:58:31 PM
68 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK CMYK CMYK
Interactive
enlightenment
The challenge in designing Manarat Al Saadiyat, the
exhibition centre for Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi, was to
make it as phenomenal as the development it represents.
TEXT: DOROTHY WALDMAN PHOTOGRAPHY: DUNCAN CHARD
Action Impact designed interactive technology that permits live
updates from the various developments on Saadiyat island.
Manarat.indd 68 8/26/10 12:56:08 PM
68 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK CMYK CMYK
Interactive
enlightenment
The challenge in designing Manarat Al Saadiyat, the
exhibition centre for Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi, was to
make it as phenomenal as the development it represents.
TEXT: DOROTHY WALDMAN PHOTOGRAPHY: DUNCAN CHARD
Action Impact designed interactive technology that permits live
updates from the various developments on Saadiyat island.
Manarat.indd 68 8/26/10 12:56:08 PM
69
CMYK
September 2010
CMYK
NATI ONAL | idProperty
Manarat.indd 69 8/26/10 12:56:14 PM
70 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
New developments often have exhibition centres that convey the
project’s message with a few doll-sized architectural models, enormous
computer-generated imagery and perhaps a video display.
However, when the development is Saadiyat Island, with a collection
of major buildings by five Pritzker prize-winning architects and a Gary
Player-designed golf course, the exhibition centre itself, Manarat Al Saadiyat,
needs to be as exceptional and innovative as the project it represents. Never
before have there been buildings by such renowned architects as Frank Gehry
(Guggenheim Museum), Jean Nouvel (Louvre Museum) Lord Norman Foster
(Zayed National Museum), Zaha Hadid (Performing Arts Centre) and Tadao
Ando (Maritime Musum) in close proximity to each other.
And there is much more than just this collection of stunning buildings, which
comprise the core of the Cultural District to the 27 square kilometre of Saadiyat
Island, being developed by Abu Dhabi’s Tourism Development and Investment
Corporation (TDIC). The large natural island, whose name means Island of
Happiness in Arabic, is 500 metres off the coast of the mainland and is projected
to become home to 150,000 residents along with the full complement of
services and facilities to meet their needs, as well as hotels, beaches, marinas
and other amenities associated with a premier tourist destination.
As an integral segment of Abu Dhabi’s 2020 vision, Manarat’s goal is to
capture and communicate the excitement and magnitude of the Dhs100 billion
project, as well as the innovative spirit of Saadiyat Island and its role as a model
of sustainable development.
Rising to TDIC’s challenge to design a new format for exhibition centres, one
that imbues the historical and cultural significance of the island as well as the
vibrant vision for its future, the live communications and design agency Action
Impact created a multi-dimensional, interactive experience at Manarat Al Saadiyat,
which translates from the Arabic to mean place of enlightenment for Saadiyat.
Like stepping into the pages of a captivating book, the nine chapters of The
Saadiyat Story flow seamlessly through an open, clean space. Information is
etched onto glass boards, while black light boxes and a simple palette of colours
entice visitors to further delve into the experience, drawing them in, captivating
their imaginations and gently guiding them from one area to the next. Each space,
distinguished by low lighting, presents a different dialogue, a different format.
Architecture, technology and design interact to convey the lofty vision
of Saadiyat Island. While architectural models provide three-dimensional
representations of everything that will be created on the island, technology
builds the excitement. For example, in the second chapter, The Vision for
Visitors explore the roots and history of Abu Dhabi through literature
and images.
Manarat.indd 70 8/26/10 12:56:26 PM
70 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
New developments often have exhibition centres that convey the
project’s message with a few doll-sized architectural models, enormous
computer-generated imagery and perhaps a video display.
However, when the development is Saadiyat Island, with a collection
of major buildings by five Pritzker prize-winning architects and a Gary
Player-designed golf course, the exhibition centre itself, Manarat Al Saadiyat,
needs to be as exceptional and innovative as the project it represents. Never
before have there been buildings by such renowned architects as Frank Gehry
(Guggenheim Museum), Jean Nouvel (Louvre Museum) Lord Norman Foster
(Zayed National Museum), Zaha Hadid (Performing Arts Centre) and Tadao
Ando (Maritime Musum) in close proximity to each other.
And there is much more than just this collection of stunning buildings, which
comprise the core of the Cultural District to the 27 square kilometre of Saadiyat
Island, being developed by Abu Dhabi’s Tourism Development and Investment
Corporation (TDIC). The large natural island, whose name means Island of
Happiness in Arabic, is 500 metres off the coast of the mainland and is projected
to become home to 150,000 residents along with the full complement of
services and facilities to meet their needs, as well as hotels, beaches, marinas
and other amenities associated with a premier tourist destination.
As an integral segment of Abu Dhabi’s 2020 vision, Manarat’s goal is to
capture and communicate the excitement and magnitude of the Dhs100 billion
project, as well as the innovative spirit of Saadiyat Island and its role as a model
of sustainable development.
Rising to TDIC’s challenge to design a new format for exhibition centres, one
that imbues the historical and cultural significance of the island as well as the
vibrant vision for its future, the live communications and design agency Action
Impact created a multi-dimensional, interactive experience at Manarat Al Saadiyat,
which translates from the Arabic to mean place of enlightenment for Saadiyat.
Like stepping into the pages of a captivating book, the nine chapters of The
Saadiyat Story flow seamlessly through an open, clean space. Information is
etched onto glass boards, while black light boxes and a simple palette of colours
entice visitors to further delve into the experience, drawing them in, captivating
their imaginations and gently guiding them from one area to the next. Each space,
distinguished by low lighting, presents a different dialogue, a different format.
Architecture, technology and design interact to convey the lofty vision
of Saadiyat Island. While architectural models provide three-dimensional
representations of everything that will be created on the island, technology
builds the excitement. For example, in the second chapter, The Vision for
Visitors explore the roots and history of Abu Dhabi through literature
and images.
Manarat.indd 70 8/26/10 12:56:26 PM
71
CMYK
September 2010
CMYK
NATI ONAL | idProperty
Saadiyat, an audio-visual presentation is revealed in an open-plan auditorium
on an elevated 20 metre by 3.6 metre curved screen that encapsulates the
viewers’ entire field of vision, creating an understanding of the huge magnitude
of the project. At the conclusion of the film, each person walks beneath the
screen in their own manner and direction, without the restrictions of walls and
doors, and out into the rest of the exhibition.
Sound was also given great importance in this free-flowing environment.
Without walls to act as sound barriers between the theatre and the spaces
elsewhere, the soundtrack can be heard throughout. But to prevent a cacophony
of duelling fugues, the various soundtracks associated with the different exhibition
areas were composed to provide harmony with each other, a subtle, yet
challenging task that conveys the many layers of planning that went into the
creation, not only of the centre, but also of the development as a whole.
Videos, easily updateable LED message displays and interactive touch screens
that catalogue real-time activities to keep pace with the island’s rapid changes
are only a few of the uses of the latest technological innovations harnessed to
express the excitement engendered by the project. A specially designed X-Desk
allows multiple users to simultaneously navigate the unique digital content of the
multi-touch table top surface and the LCD screens of the virtual books allow
visitors to flip pages without touching.
The free flowing spaces of the open environment and the innovative
technology not only provide spatial flexibility and current content, it also permits
the customisation of the exhibition to accommodate the requirements of
different audiences, whether that be a class of school children on an educational
field trip or a small group of visiting VIPs. Different programmes have been
developed that allow for the transformation of the experience from a constant
flow, high-throughput cued progression, to a slower, more intimate presentation.
The end result, as the thousands of visitors who have already experienced
the exhibition will attest, is that Saadiyat Island is well represented by the
creativity and innovation that lead to enlightenment at Manarat Al Saadiyat.
ID
Left to right: Visitors are enveloped by an immersive AV experience in The Vision
for Saadiyat that prepares them for what is to come; even the architecture of
utilitarian spaces evoke the forward thinking of the project.
Manarat.indd 71 8/26/10 12:56:40 PM
72 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Beneath the surface
Much of what goes into making a building green cannot be
seen as these examples of sustainable building practices
illustrate. TEXT: LYNN DAVIS
Eco-friendly grouting by Mapei, Terminal 3, Dubai International Airport.
ID Portfolio.indd 72 8/26/10 2:13:19 PM
72 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Beneath the surface
Much of what goes into making a building green cannot be
seen as these examples of sustainable building practices
illustrate. TEXT: LYNN DAVIS
Eco-friendly grouting by Mapei, Terminal 3, Dubai International Airport.
ID Portfolio.indd 72 8/26/10 2:13:19 PM
73 September 2010
PORTFOLI O | idProperty
HIDDEN GREEN
Natural, locally sourced materials, energy-efficient LED lighting and passive
cooling are all ecological steps that have become de rigueur in today’s
architecture. However, as some of Dubai’s newer buildings illustrate, a few of
the more significant efforts to lower our carbon footprint remain unseen.
Terminal 3, the newest at Dubai International Airport, was designed with
soaring ceilings and natural light to create a sustainable structure. However,
beneath it all, the vast expanses of flooring contribute ecological benefits of
the airport.
Throughout the airport, products by Italian manufacturer Mapei, which
produces adhesives, sealants and other unseen and often underrated products,
were used to ensure optimum quality in the floors and finishes.
Known for its commitment to sustainability, the company has developed
energy and water-efficient concrete, antimicrobial agents, low-emissions
compounds and construction processes that make buildings healthier, as well as
reducing their carbon footprint.
“Our commitment to environmental sustainability is very clear, as we believe
that industry needs to play a greater role in promoting sustainable practices. For
our part, we will continue to develop and introduce eco-friendly products that
aim to address the challenges of the construction industry throughout the Middle
East,” says Laith Haboubi, Mapei’s business development director for the UAE.
The company was also instrumental in the creation of the Armani Hotel
at Burj Khalifa, which reflects the understated design philosophies of Giorgio
Armani and his exacting demands for perfection. Consistent with the use of
rounded organic shapes, warm woods, stone and other natural materials
are other eco-friendly components in many locations throughout the hotel,
including Armani/Hashi.
“The Armani Hotel was easily the most challenging part of our scope of
supply to the Burj Khalifa because Mapei was making sure not only to supply
quality materials, but to ensure that the style and aesthetic requirements of the
contractors were achieved,” Haboubi says.
The company has also committed Dhs387.3 million, which is 70 per cent of
its annual budget, to the research and development of eco-friendly construction
products and materials in an effort to stem the huge levels of waste from this
sector of the economy. In the GCC alone, 55 per cent of the 120 million tonnes
of waste (about 66 million tonnes) is generated each year from construction.
Mapei green materials have also been used in the recently opened Matalan
store in Lamcy Plaza; Qasr El Sarab; Atlantis Hotel on Palm Jumeirah, the
Emirates Palace Hotel; Burj Al Arab and Dubai International Airports Terminal 1,
2 and 3, among other projects.
DUBAI ROCKS
After 11 years in its Sheikh Zayed Road location and a year-and-a-half hiatus,
the Hard Rock Cafe is set to once again open its doors in Dubai.
The 2,452 square metre location in Festival City will seat more than 300
guests and will feature a convertible live music venue that will showcase
Top to bottom: Armani/Hashi, the Japanese restaurant at the new Armani Hotel
in Burj Khalifa, and the hotel’s entrance utilise green adhesives by Mapei.
ID Portfolio.indd 73 8/26/10 2:13:31 PM
74 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
idProperty | PORTFOLI O
Top to bottom: Exterior and interior of the new Hard Rock Cafe; Hilton Riyadh
King Saud University.
performers, both famous and emerging, with an as yet unannounced group
anticipated to be at the official launch at the end of this month.
In the classic Hard Rock style, it will be marked by a huge 35.9 metre guitar,
which is thought to be the world’s largest and will be submitted to the Guinness
Book of World Records.
Known throughout its 39-year history for its rock music memorabilia décor,
with items from the world’s largest collection on display at all of its 152 venues
in 52 countries around the world, the Dubai restaurant will follow the same
pop music theme.
The new location, above the Marks & Spencer store in the mall, also
boasts a 232 square metre Rock Shop featuring Hard Rock’s limited-edition
merchandise, as well as original rock ’n’ roll memorabilia from the group’s
legendary collection that began with an Eric Clapton guitar.
A LEED certified building, as defined by the Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System, in Seattle, United
States, the birth place of Jimi Hendrix and where he performed his first gig, is
the home of a 1,300 square metre Hard Rock Cafe, illustrating the company’s
concern for the environment.
EDUCATE AND INNOVATE
Hilton Worldwide will be opening a 241-room Hilton Riyadh King Saud University
and a 155-room Hilton Riyadh King Saud University Residence in 2012.
“Saudi Arabia is our number one development market in the Middle East.
Riyadh is drawing both domestic and international visitors from strong business
and corporate markets, and we are delighted to meet this demand with
two additional Hilton-branded properties,” says Andrew Clough, senior vice
president of development for Hilton Middle East and Asia-Pacific.
King Saud University, Saudi Arabia’s oldest, largest and most prestigious
higher education centre with a student population of 70,000, is establishing a
sustainable energy technology programme, which will initially focus on solar,
wind, hydrogen and nuclear energy.
BLU GREEN
The Radisson Blu, Dubai Deira Creek, is the area’s first five-star hotel to
be awarded the international Green Globe Certification after undergoing a
Dhs1.25million investment in sustainability.
Green policies, in accordance with the Rezidor Groups Responsible Business
Programme, have been instituted since the company began managing the
35-year-old, 276-room property in 2006, proving that even older properties
can be environmentally friendly.
“The Green Globe Certification Audit is based on a number of environmental
factors, in all we had 250 points to address. Some of the inefficient old and high-
power consuming air-conditioning equipment was replaced, coupled with the
energy-saving wheel, which cools hot air drawn from outside, before passing it
through the hotel chillers,” says Arthur Rodrigues, the chief engineer.
“It is always more challenging for an older property to attain such rigorous
standards, but, considering that, it is so much more rewarding to be recognised
for our achievements.”
The Rezidor Hotel Group has also recently announced the 2013 opening
of a Radisson Blu Resort, Andematt, at the foot of the Gotthard Massif in the
Swiss Alps. “Rezidor is expanding its young, contemporary and successful resort
portfolio which now features 45 properties with more than 10,700 rooms in
operation and under development across Europe, the Middle East and Africa,”
says Kurt Ritter, president and CEO of Rezidor.
“Andermatt, as a well-established winter sports destination, is a perfect fit for us
– we are looking forward to also building up the summer business together with
our partners.”
ID
ID Portfolio.indd 74 8/26/10 2:13:34 PM
74 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
idProperty | PORTFOLI O
Top to bottom: Exterior and interior of the new Hard Rock Cafe; Hilton Riyadh
King Saud University.
performers, both famous and emerging, with an as yet unannounced group
anticipated to be at the official launch at the end of this month.
In the classic Hard Rock style, it will be marked by a huge 35.9 metre guitar,
which is thought to be the world’s largest and will be submitted to the Guinness
Book of World Records.
Known throughout its 39-year history for its rock music memorabilia décor,
with items from the world’s largest collection on display at all of its 152 venues
in 52 countries around the world, the Dubai restaurant will follow the same
pop music theme.
The new location, above the Marks & Spencer store in the mall, also
boasts a 232 square metre Rock Shop featuring Hard Rock’s limited-edition
merchandise, as well as original rock ’n’ roll memorabilia from the group’s
legendary collection that began with an Eric Clapton guitar.
A LEED certified building, as defined by the Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System, in Seattle, United
States, the birth place of Jimi Hendrix and where he performed his first gig, is
the home of a 1,300 square metre Hard Rock Cafe, illustrating the company’s
concern for the environment.
EDUCATE AND INNOVATE
Hilton Worldwide will be opening a 241-room Hilton Riyadh King Saud University
and a 155-room Hilton Riyadh King Saud University Residence in 2012.
“Saudi Arabia is our number one development market in the Middle East.
Riyadh is drawing both domestic and international visitors from strong business
and corporate markets, and we are delighted to meet this demand with
two additional Hilton-branded properties,” says Andrew Clough, senior vice
president of development for Hilton Middle East and Asia-Pacific.
King Saud University, Saudi Arabia’s oldest, largest and most prestigious
higher education centre with a student population of 70,000, is establishing a
sustainable energy technology programme, which will initially focus on solar,
wind, hydrogen and nuclear energy.
BLU GREEN
The Radisson Blu, Dubai Deira Creek, is the area’s first five-star hotel to
be awarded the international Green Globe Certification after undergoing a
Dhs1.25million investment in sustainability.
Green policies, in accordance with the Rezidor Groups Responsible Business
Programme, have been instituted since the company began managing the
35-year-old, 276-room property in 2006, proving that even older properties
can be environmentally friendly.
“The Green Globe Certification Audit is based on a number of environmental
factors, in all we had 250 points to address. Some of the inefficient old and high-
power consuming air-conditioning equipment was replaced, coupled with the
energy-saving wheel, which cools hot air drawn from outside, before passing it
through the hotel chillers,” says Arthur Rodrigues, the chief engineer.
“It is always more challenging for an older property to attain such rigorous
standards, but, considering that, it is so much more rewarding to be recognised
for our achievements.”
The Rezidor Hotel Group has also recently announced the 2013 opening
of a Radisson Blu Resort, Andematt, at the foot of the Gotthard Massif in the
Swiss Alps. “Rezidor is expanding its young, contemporary and successful resort
portfolio which now features 45 properties with more than 10,700 rooms in
operation and under development across Europe, the Middle East and Africa,”
says Kurt Ritter, president and CEO of Rezidor.
“Andermatt, as a well-established winter sports destination, is a perfect fit for us
– we are looking forward to also building up the summer business together with
our partners.”
ID
ID Portfolio.indd 74 8/26/10 2:13:34 PM
76 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK CMYK CMYK
Net profits
Never before have homebuyers had access
to so much useful information. The question is,
how can you fully utilise it? TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
Central London apartment designed
by Gregory Philips Architects.
Internet.indd 76 8/26/10 1:32:35 PM
76 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK CMYK CMYK
Net profits
Never before have homebuyers had access
to so much useful information. The question is,
how can you fully utilise it? TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
Central London apartment designed
by Gregory Philips Architects.
Internet.indd 76 8/26/10 1:32:35 PM
77 September 2010
INTERNATI ONAL | idProperty
“Video killed the radio star,” sang pop group The Buggles in 1979. Back
then, video recorders had just come into the shops and we marvelled at how
you could record your favourite TV programme and watch it again and again
and again. Since then, video has become an everyday feature of our lives and,
if hi-tech gurus like Michael Dell and John Chambers are correct, it will grow
even more important in years ahead.
Video and other technological improvements allow us to take a virtual walk
along a street in New York, London and myriad other destinations, courtesy of
Google Street View, and discover with the click of a mouse the values of the
homes we pass. If we stop at a property for sale along the way most estate
agents will allow you to take a 360-degree tour of it from their website, which
will also display floor plans, as well as local schools and transport info.
These are golden times for homebuyers because the flood of property data
pouring into our home computers coincides with a proliferation in the number
of buyers’ agents around the world.
Widely used in Australia, South Africa and the United States, and becoming
more numerous in Europe, buyers’ agents (aka property finders) promise to
help homebuyers choose the right property at the right price. However, do we
really need a buyers’ agent when we can access so much data on the web with
our increasingly powerful and portable tools?
With a mobile phone we can take photos of the home we may want to buy,
connect to the internet to compare its price with similar properties and phone
the sales agent. Some of us even feel confident enough to bid for property
on auction sites such as eBay. Will video, Google, the iPad and their like kill
the careers of buyers’ agents stone dead? Or do we need these property
professionals now more than ever, to help us navigate our way through an
ocean of increasingly complex data?
Internet.indd 77 8/26/10 1:32:45 PM
78 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
We certainly have a big appetite for what’s available on the web. Zoopla.co.uk
is the second most-visited property website in Britain and it allows homebuyers
to find out what homes are for sale, compare property values and chart price
movements. It has received 50 million visitors since launching in 2008.
“We average over two property searches per second and serve more than
40 million page views per month,” says Alex Chesterman, founder and CEO
of Zoopla. “We help our users make sense of the residential property market
by combining property listings with market value data, local information and
community tools.”
The pace of technological development, and the release of commercial
applications to exploit it, like Zoopla, is rapid, a seemingly endless stream of
new opportunities for homebuyers and sellers. Over the space of a few weeks
this year, Chesterman’s company teamed up with United States website REDC,
which auctions 1,000 properties online each month, to start auctioning British
properties through both portals. In the same month, Spanish auctioneer, Direct
Auctions, added Portuguese properties to its online listings for the first time.
Shortly after that, Apple launched the iPad, a hand-held computer that provides
more comprehensive internet access than a mobile phone and is more portable
than a laptop, a useful piece of hardware for people on the move, including
those bidding at online property auctions.
Within a couple of weeks of the launch, property portal Primelocation.com,
created an app for it that allows users to browse through images of properties
for sale. Other companies across the world launched property apps tailored
to the computer’s touchscreen technology. These are just a few of the techie
gadgets and giszmos for homebuyers to appear in recent months.
They add to a growing plethora of websites that help you get a mortgage,
find a conveyancing lawyer, check for nuisance neighbours, track which homes
have had sales prices reduced, calculate your mortgage payments, describe a
locale’s facilities, give house price statistics, advise on how to refurbish a home
and much, much more.
Chesterman says buyers can look forward to more technological advances.
“Mobile access is likely to have an ever increasing impact in the property space
over the coming months,” he says. ‘Whoopee!’ many homebuyers might reply,
especially since most data is free.
However, Tim Hammond, chief executive of the Association of Property
Finders and Buyers Agents, says new technology’s usefulness is limited. “There
has been a proliferation of property portals, but they only fulfil the very first part
of the homebuying process,” he says. “What is time consuming and stressful
is everything that has to be done after finding the property you want to buy.
A buying agent can substantiate an offer based on in-depth evaluation of data.
Estate agents are well versed in the art of trying to push prices higher on behalf
of the seller. Typically for most people, you buy a house as often as you have a
tooth pulled, but you wouldn’t pull your own teeth. Buying Agents are trained
negotiators and buy scores of properties every year.”
Some property experts say technology confuses buyers, including investors
who could be deemed professional property purchasers. Robert Hadfield,
Clockwise from above: Central London apartment designed by Gregory
Philips Architects; interior of apartment designed by Zook Interiors, at Charters,
Berkshire; interior of house on Chester Square, Belgravia, London, designed
by minimalist architect, John Pawson.
Internet.indd 78 8/26/10 1:33:03 PM
78 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
We certainly have a big appetite for what’s available on the web. Zoopla.co.uk
is the second most-visited property website in Britain and it allows homebuyers
to find out what homes are for sale, compare property values and chart price
movements. It has received 50 million visitors since launching in 2008.
“We average over two property searches per second and serve more than
40 million page views per month,” says Alex Chesterman, founder and CEO
of Zoopla. “We help our users make sense of the residential property market
by combining property listings with market value data, local information and
community tools.”
The pace of technological development, and the release of commercial
applications to exploit it, like Zoopla, is rapid, a seemingly endless stream of
new opportunities for homebuyers and sellers. Over the space of a few weeks
this year, Chesterman’s company teamed up with United States website REDC,
which auctions 1,000 properties online each month, to start auctioning British
properties through both portals. In the same month, Spanish auctioneer, Direct
Auctions, added Portuguese properties to its online listings for the first time.
Shortly after that, Apple launched the iPad, a hand-held computer that provides
more comprehensive internet access than a mobile phone and is more portable
than a laptop, a useful piece of hardware for people on the move, including
those bidding at online property auctions.
Within a couple of weeks of the launch, property portal Primelocation.com,
created an app for it that allows users to browse through images of properties
for sale. Other companies across the world launched property apps tailored
to the computer’s touchscreen technology. These are just a few of the techie
gadgets and giszmos for homebuyers to appear in recent months.
They add to a growing plethora of websites that help you get a mortgage,
find a conveyancing lawyer, check for nuisance neighbours, track which homes
have had sales prices reduced, calculate your mortgage payments, describe a
locale’s facilities, give house price statistics, advise on how to refurbish a home
and much, much more.
Chesterman says buyers can look forward to more technological advances.
“Mobile access is likely to have an ever increasing impact in the property space
over the coming months,” he says. ‘Whoopee!’ many homebuyers might reply,
especially since most data is free.
However, Tim Hammond, chief executive of the Association of Property
Finders and Buyers Agents, says new technology’s usefulness is limited. “There
has been a proliferation of property portals, but they only fulfil the very first part
of the homebuying process,” he says. “What is time consuming and stressful
is everything that has to be done after finding the property you want to buy.
A buying agent can substantiate an offer based on in-depth evaluation of data.
Estate agents are well versed in the art of trying to push prices higher on behalf
of the seller. Typically for most people, you buy a house as often as you have a
tooth pulled, but you wouldn’t pull your own teeth. Buying Agents are trained
negotiators and buy scores of properties every year.”
Some property experts say technology confuses buyers, including investors
who could be deemed professional property purchasers. Robert Hadfield,
Clockwise from above: Central London apartment designed by Gregory
Philips Architects; interior of apartment designed by Zook Interiors, at Charters,
Berkshire; interior of house on Chester Square, Belgravia, London, designed
by minimalist architect, John Pawson.
Internet.indd 78 8/26/10 1:33:03 PM
79 September 2010
CMYK
INTERNATI ONAL | idProperty
whose London-based company, Pineflat, manages investors’ properties and
invests in its own property portfolio, says buyers’ agents may be needed even
more in future.
“On the letting side of our business we can see that people are spoiled
for choice,” he says. “In some cases they will create a short-list from online
listings, but often they seem to just arrange multiple viewings, miss half
the appointments and then end up staying put because the choice is too
bewildering. New devices and services will make this harder.”
Hadfield says circumstances vary between countries depending on access to
technology and data. For example, in the US, the online Multiple Listings Service
(MLS) is useful to buyers. “As an investor in the US we use the MLS system for
pre-screening possible purchases and then our local people visit the properties
with ‘our’ realtor,” he says.
“On the whole it is easier to get the relevant supporting information than
in Britain or by simply using Google Street View, but it’s still a bit hit and miss.
So, all in all, I think that far from making buyers’ agents redundant the new
technology will create new job opportunities for them.”
So the websites most sought-after by homebuyers in the future may belong
to buyers’ agents. Indeed, rather than killing off property finders, video has
made some of them stars – quite a few of them front TV property shows and
have high profiles on the web.
ID
Net guide
Whether hiring a buyers’ agent or not, here are some useful property websites
for homebuyers to look at: for US property online listings, mortgage information
and property market news, try mls.com; in Spain look at amlaspain.com, and
in Britain consult Globrix.com and zoopla.co.uk.
For the most accurate property price data, try a country’s relevant government
department which, in Britain, is landregistry.gov.uk.
For free advice, you can always twitter for it on twitter.com, where property
experts from around the world can be found answering questions.
Google has several features useful to property buyers. By typing in a property’s
address, Google Street View and Google Earth give useful street level and bird’s
eye views of it and the surrounding area respectively. Google Maps shows where
a property is located.
If you do opt for a buyers’ agent, the London-based Association of Property
Finders and Buying Agents (APFBA) has 50 members listed on its website,
apfba.org, who operate in a number of countries.
Clockwise from above: 49 Bishops Avenue, Kenwood, London; The Mansion, Kenwood, London. House built by developer, Harrison Varma; interior of villa at Zil
Pasyon estate, Seychelles.
Internet.indd 79 8/26/10 1:33:12 PM
SEVERN HEAVEN
Hong Kong has the most expensive street on the
planet. A Financial News survey has found that
Severn Road in Hong Kong’s most salubrious
district, The Peak, has the world’s most expensive
homes, averaging Dhs257,000 per square metre,
a whopping 74 per cent rise on this time last year.
It has knocked last year’s top location, Monaco’s
Avenue Princess Grace, down into fourth place.
Homes cost Dhs235,000 per square metre on
the Monaco street, just half what they were 12
months ago. The principality is one of the biggest
victims of a downturn in the international market
for billionaire homes – values have dropped 15
per cent globally. Exceptions to the rule have been
London and New York where prices have risen
15 per cent. This has helped London’s Kensington
Gardens and New York’s Fifth Avenue move into
joint second place with sales prices on both streets
averaging Dhs238,000 per square metre.
A castle in Tuscany, an eco-friendly bungalow in France and a house with its own golf course in England
– the world’s housing market is always and exciting and varied place. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
OVERSEAS INVASION
Seven out of 10 buyers of central London homes
priced at Dhs28 million or more come from
overseas, estate agency Knight Frank reveals.
UAE purchasers are prominent among them,
making up six per cent of all international buyers,
the sixth biggest group. Russians, Americans and
Italians are the three most prevalent nationalities.
UAE buyers dominate overseas demand on the
Hyde Park Estate and are high-profile in Belgravia.
With the pound down by 28 per cent against
US dollar-pegged currencies since March 2008,
London property prices are still relatively cheap
for UAE buyers, despite a revival in the British
capital’s housing market over the past year. Buyers
from 51 countries have piled into central London
this year, but it is not just in the city centre where
they have been busy – in suburban districts like
Richmond, 40 per cent of buyers of homes valued
Dhs11.5 million or more come from overseas.
GROWING APPLE
The United States housing market has taken a
tumble since tax credits on home purchases were
withdrawn in April, but Manhattan’s luxury homes
market is buoyant. Prices for homes valued at
Dhs7.3 million or more on the island are edging
up, because Wall Street bonuses and earnings
are on the rise again, Miller Samuel Real Estate
Appraisers reveals. However, problems still dog
the luxury sector – overpricing of new build
homes means there is enough stock to meet
seven years of expected take up, the agency says,
and that is acting as a drag on the market. Another
negative is that mortgages remain hard to come
by. Meanwhile, the rest of the US housing market
remains on course for a double dip in prices
now that transactions have dropped following
the withdrawal of tax credits. Prices will drop five
per cent nationally in 2010, forecasts consultancy
Capital Economics.
80 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
idProperty | ANTENNAE
ID PR Antennae.indd 80 8/26/10 1:34:22 PM
SEVERN HEAVEN
Hong Kong has the most expensive street on the
planet. A Financial News survey has found that
Severn Road in Hong Kong’s most salubrious
district, The Peak, has the world’s most expensive
homes, averaging Dhs257,000 per square metre,
a whopping 74 per cent rise on this time last year.
It has knocked last year’s top location, Monaco’s
Avenue Princess Grace, down into fourth place.
Homes cost Dhs235,000 per square metre on
the Monaco street, just half what they were 12
months ago. The principality is one of the biggest
victims of a downturn in the international market
for billionaire homes – values have dropped 15
per cent globally. Exceptions to the rule have been
London and New York where prices have risen
15 per cent. This has helped London’s Kensington
Gardens and New York’s Fifth Avenue move into
joint second place with sales prices on both streets
averaging Dhs238,000 per square metre.
A castle in Tuscany, an eco-friendly bungalow in France and a house with its own golf course in England
– the world’s housing market is always and exciting and varied place. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
OVERSEAS INVASION
Seven out of 10 buyers of central London homes
priced at Dhs28 million or more come from
overseas, estate agency Knight Frank reveals.
UAE purchasers are prominent among them,
making up six per cent of all international buyers,
the sixth biggest group. Russians, Americans and
Italians are the three most prevalent nationalities.
UAE buyers dominate overseas demand on the
Hyde Park Estate and are high-profile in Belgravia.
With the pound down by 28 per cent against
US dollar-pegged currencies since March 2008,
London property prices are still relatively cheap
for UAE buyers, despite a revival in the British
capital’s housing market over the past year. Buyers
from 51 countries have piled into central London
this year, but it is not just in the city centre where
they have been busy – in suburban districts like
Richmond, 40 per cent of buyers of homes valued
Dhs11.5 million or more come from overseas.
GROWING APPLE
The United States housing market has taken a
tumble since tax credits on home purchases were
withdrawn in April, but Manhattan’s luxury homes
market is buoyant. Prices for homes valued at
Dhs7.3 million or more on the island are edging
up, because Wall Street bonuses and earnings
are on the rise again, Miller Samuel Real Estate
Appraisers reveals. However, problems still dog
the luxury sector – overpricing of new build
homes means there is enough stock to meet
seven years of expected take up, the agency says,
and that is acting as a drag on the market. Another
negative is that mortgages remain hard to come
by. Meanwhile, the rest of the US housing market
remains on course for a double dip in prices
now that transactions have dropped following
the withdrawal of tax credits. Prices will drop five
per cent nationally in 2010, forecasts consultancy
Capital Economics.
80 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
idProperty | ANTENNAE
ID PR Antennae.indd 80 8/26/10 1:34:22 PM
TALKING TURKEY
Turkey is winning the Balkans property war.
Property prices have crashed in Greece, Bulgaria
and Romania and taxes are up; Romania is levying
a Solidarity Tax on foreign property owners so
they can share the pain. But, in Turkey, GDP is
forecast to grow seven per cent this year and
Istanbul has become a favourite with overseas
investors – 1,400 foreigners started businesses
in the city in the first half of 2010 and property
investors are pouring in. At condo scheme No
1 Knightsbridge, 60 foreigners from Britain, the
United States, Pakistan, the Middle East, Nigeria
and Canada have bought apartments, and only
about six apartments remain available for sale
to foreigners at this suburban project on the
European side of the city, at prices starting from
Dhs132,000. German and French opposition to
Turkish EU membership does cast a small shadow,
but many Turks may wonder if they need to join
when they are doing so well.
A WINE TIME
A castle in Tuscany is for sale. The 1,000
-year-old Castle of Montauto and eight acres
of surrounding land is on the market for
Dhs95 million through Aylesford estate agents.
With a floor area of 1400 square metres, the
building is filled with a multitude of frescoes,
giant, stone fireplaces and other centuries-old
features. Tuscany remains a popular destination
for holiday homebuyers, according to Knight
Frank. The weak pound may mean there are
fewer Britons than a couple of years ago and the
Russians remain elusive, but the Dutch, Belgians,
Scandinavians and French have been migrating
south. They have been taking an interest in the
wine estates, where they can benefit from sales
of produce to help pay for the costs of upkeep of
their holiday homes. Apartments in Florence are
also catching their eye, especially those within
earshot of the Duomo’s bells. Many of the city’s
older apartment buildings are being refurbished.
WHEREVER YOU MAY RHONE
Eco-friendly holiday homes for nature lovers are on sale in the south of France. Located within the La
Camargue national park, Domaine des Flamants Roses, a holiday community of 93 bungalows, is being built
by developer Terresens using wood from sustainable forests. Photovoltaic panels will power the lights and
solar power will heat water in homes and the estate’s spa. Rainwater will be collected for the swimming
pool and plant watering, and grey water will be recycled in a reed pool. Covering 930 square kilometres,
La Camargue is where the River Rhone meets the Mediterranean Sea and 400 species of bird, including
the pink flamingo, call it home. The homes are offered as leaseback properties by marketers Experience
International – owners receive a guaranteed rental return of four per cent per year for 18 years on the
properties, which are let out when the owners are not there. Prices start at Dhs887,000 and completion is
scheduled for 2012.
GOLF HOMES ON PAR
The market for homes in golf communities
survived the global property downturn pretty
well estate agency Chesterton Humberts reports.
The strong letting potential of these properties
ensured demand from second home buyers
remained firm over the past couple of years, the
agency says, and the demand for golf homes may
grow stronger in future thanks to China’s rapid
economic expansion. China’s burgeoning middle
class loves golf and many are finding ways around
the country’s tight capital controls to buy homes
abroad. As these controls loosen, many more
will buy overseas homes, with golf communities
among their favourite destinations. Many Chinese
golfers might wish they could buy overseas
without restriction now, so they could buy a very
rare type of property currently on the market
in Suffolk, England. On offer is a home with its
own private 18-hole golf course in the garden in
Glevering Mill at Dhs5.7 million.
BRAZIL SCORES
One World Cup ends and the hype for the next
starts immediately. As the world recovers its sense
of hearing after being deafened by vuvuzelas during
the South Africa 2010 World Cup, we read that
Brazil will become an “economic winner” when it
hosts the next tournament in 2014. Estate agents
are especially keen for us to consider the cities
where World Cup matches will be played, such
as the north east coastal city of Fortaleza, where
many foreigners have already bought holiday
homes. Buying a brand new home in Brazil is a bit
tricky, because quite a few developments were left
unfinished during the global property slump and
some investors recommend buying land that can
be built upon when the market recovers. Some
resort schemes offer land plots to buyers, including
the Tambaba Country Club Resort, on the
northeast coast, where 450 square metre plots
of land are available for Dhs20,000 each through
marketers Experience International.
81 September 2010
ID PR Antennae.indd 81 8/26/10 1:34:26 PM
83
CMYK
83
CMYK
September 2010
CMYK
FORUM
CMYK
Liquid gold
Whimsy and practicality perform a sparkling pas
de deux as design dances to an innovative tune.
TEXT: DOROTHY WALDMAN
BRILLIANT BALLERINAS
Throughout her life, Anna has had many transformations; and her latest
reincarnation is as a prima ballerina crowned with a tiara and bedecked in
a diamond necklace. Her entourage includes six dancers, each with their
own shimmering personality. Created by a master jeweller from Valenza P
Ennamels, the face and body of each of these Anna G corkscrews from Alessi
is adorned with precious stones. The seven works of art are presented on
pedestals to emphasise their beauty but they are all fully functional. Anna G
will make her Middle East debut later this year.
Forum.indd 83 8/26/10 1:48:28 PM

4 Place Du Mal Juin, B.P. 24, 06141, VENCE, FRANCE
Tel +33 (0) 4 93 58 11 03 Fax +33 (0) 4 93 58 29 84
realimmo06@orange.fr
To view our full portfolio of exclusive residences
from Monaco to Cannes visit: realimmo06.com
Panoramic views of the sea, the old city and the
mountains can be enjoyed from the 2,500 square
metres of landscaped gardens of the villa located
on a hillside just 1.5 kilometres from the city centre.
A mirror swimming pool outside and approximately
300 square metres of exceptional quality living
space inside make this a truly spacious and luxurious
four bedroom, four-bathroom home.
1,650,000
Designed to harmonize with their environment, the
two bedroom penthouses feature large terraces
facing the south for viewing the sea and the
Cap d’Antibes. A lovely garden with swimming
pool and underground parking will complete the
new construction for a 2011 delivery date. It is
situated only 500 metres in a very quiet area from
the shops.
1,070,000
Invest in the French Riviera
Exclusive Holiday Homes
Perched on a hillside 300 metres above the sea, these holiday homes in Vence,
between Monaco and Cannes, offer breath-taking panoramic views of the
spectacular surroundings. Only 15 minutes from Nice Côte d’Azur Airport,
they are easily accessible while providing the ultimate in holiday pleasure.
Located in a peaceful residential area facing the
south with open views spanning from Cap Ferrat
to Lerins Islands, the villa was built in 1987 in the
Provençal style, offering the cosy warmth of solidarity.
With three bedrooms, three bathrooms and garage
for three cars, it also features magnificent views from
the landscaped grounds and the tiled 12 X 8 metre
swimming pool. (Needs some refurbishment)
1,650,000
The Provençal style villa is a private retreat featuring
gardens and terraces overlooking the sea with
spectacular views of Cap d’Antibes and mountains,
yet close to the city centre. Enjoy summer evenings
in the pool or dining in the summer dining room
complete with fitted kitchen. Perfect for entertaining
with four bedrooms, including a massive Master suite,
and brilliant lounge, dining room and more.
1,380,000
Real Immobilier Ad.indd 1 7/27/10 1:19:15 PM
83
CMYK
83
CMYK
September 2010
CMYK
FORUM
CMYK
Liquid gold
Whimsy and practicality perform a sparkling pas
de deux as design dances to an innovative tune.
TEXT: DOROTHY WALDMAN
BRILLIANT BALLERINAS
Throughout her life, Anna has had many transformations; and her latest
reincarnation is as a prima ballerina crowned with a tiara and bedecked in
a diamond necklace. Her entourage includes six dancers, each with their
own shimmering personality. Created by a master jeweller from Valenza P
Ennamels, the face and body of each of these Anna G corkscrews from Alessi
is adorned with precious stones. The seven works of art are presented on
pedestals to emphasise their beauty but they are all fully functional. Anna G
will make her Middle East debut later this year.
Forum.indd 83 8/26/10 1:48:28 PM

4 Place Du Mal Juin, B.P. 24, 06141, VENCE, FRANCE
Tel +33 (0) 4 93 58 11 03 Fax +33 (0) 4 93 58 29 84
realimmo06@orange.fr
To view our full portfolio of exclusive residences
from Monaco to Cannes visit: realimmo06.com
Panoramic views of the sea, the old city and the
mountains can be enjoyed from the 2,500 square
metres of landscaped gardens of the villa located
on a hillside just 1.5 kilometres from the city centre.
A mirror swimming pool outside and approximately
300 square metres of exceptional quality living
space inside make this a truly spacious and luxurious
four bedroom, four-bathroom home.
1,650,000
Designed to harmonize with their environment, the
two bedroom penthouses feature large terraces
facing the south for viewing the sea and the
Cap d’Antibes. A lovely garden with swimming
pool and underground parking will complete the
new construction for a 2011 delivery date. It is
situated only 500 metres in a very quiet area from
the shops.
1,070,000
Invest in the French Riviera
Exclusive Holiday Homes
Perched on a hillside 300 metres above the sea, these holiday homes in Vence,
between Monaco and Cannes, offer breath-taking panoramic views of the
spectacular surroundings. Only 15 minutes from Nice Côte d’Azur Airport,
they are easily accessible while providing the ultimate in holiday pleasure.
Located in a peaceful residential area facing the
south with open views spanning from Cap Ferrat
to Lerins Islands, the villa was built in 1987 in the
Provençal style, offering the cosy warmth of solidarity.
With three bedrooms, three bathrooms and garage
for three cars, it also features magnificent views from
the landscaped grounds and the tiled 12 X 8 metre
swimming pool. (Needs some refurbishment)
1,650,000
The Provençal style villa is a private retreat featuring
gardens and terraces overlooking the sea with
spectacular views of Cap d’Antibes and mountains,
yet close to the city centre. Enjoy summer evenings
in the pool or dining in the summer dining room
complete with fitted kitchen. Perfect for entertaining
with four bedrooms, including a massive Master suite,
and brilliant lounge, dining room and more.
1,380,000
Real Immobilier Ad.indd 1 7/27/10 1:19:15 PM
84 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
84 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
OUD GOLD
Iridescent Italian glass holders in a sophisticated champagne
hue decorated with the distinctive gold Amouage logo make a
fitting presentation for the company’s three new oud fragrances,
which combine with different blends of exotic spices and scents.
Developed over two years by Christopher Chong, the fragrances
are as beautifully complex, as the container is elegantly simple.
INNOVATION CELEBRATION
This year marks two creative anniversaries for Edra, which will be celebrated at October’s
Triennale di Milano, along with a major retrospective. Celebrating their 20
th
year are
Masanori Umeda’s Flower armchairs. “The flower is the biological representation of
concentrated beauty,” he says. “Getsuen is a giant lily with pointed petals: it’s a flower,
it’s a mainstay of heraldry, and it’s the shape of a minstrel’s hat. Rose Chair is, literally,
a rose shaped chair: it is plump and pouty, yet soft and sexy – as luxurious as a
couture gown. Soshun is a simple, uncomplicated daisy.”
Francesco Binfare’s innovative Flap sofa, a deeply slashed curved platform
with numerous reclining back rests, is as contemporary today as it was when
first introduced 10 years ago.
Fernando and Humberto Compana have amassed an impressive body
of designs during the past 20 years that are featured at Antibodies: works
1989/2009, originally hosted by Vitra in Rhein. It will be on display from
October 14 to January 16, 2011.
WINNING WELLNESS
Expanding the cardio session beyond the treadmill, Technogym’s Crossover is an innovative machine for a
total body workout that engages muscle groups not used with conventional exercise machines. The total
body workout is accomplished with the Italian company’s aesthetic sensibilities – smooth curves, tactile
surfaces and smooth movement – and completes the company’s Excite+ line. Technogym has been
selected as the official gym equipment provider for the 2012 London Olympics.
Forum.indd 84 8/26/10 1:48:42 PM
85
CMYK
September 2010
CMYK
FORUM
Design agenda
Ceranor Expo, Porto, Portugal, September 1-5
Habitare, Helsinki, September 1-5
Maison & Objet, Paris, September 3-7
Meuble Paris, Paris, September 3-7
Now! Design a Vivre, Paris, September 3-7
Macef, Milan, September 9-12
MoOD, Brussels, September 14-16
Zow 2010, Istanbul, September 16-19
Abitare Il Tempo, Verona, September 16-20
London Design Festival, London, September 18-26
100% Design, London, September 23-26
Decorex International, London, September 26-29
Salon de l’Habitat, Toulouse, September 25 - October 3
Casa Moderna, Udine, Italy, September 26 - October 5
SICI, Madrid, Spain, September 28 - October 1
Cersaie, Bologna, Italy, September 28-October 2
Cityscape, Dubai, October 4-7
InterCasa, Lisbon, Portugal, October 2-10
Saudi Build, Riyadh, October 18-21
SÉ HERE
The bold, confident Sé Collection by Spanish designer Jaime Hayon will
launch at The London Design Festival in September. Curved side tables
of solid bronze, lacy wood lounge chairs and fluid shapes give the series,
Hayon’s first complete furniture collection, a dynamic, new look. It
features bold colours, striking combinations and refined upholstery with
innovative touches combined with dynamic, yet light shapes. Produced
by a network of French craftsmen and artisans from fine woods, metals,
marbles and fabrics, each piece is an amalgamation of design, detail, wit
and artistry. British luxury brand Sé first launched at Maison et Objet in
Paris in 2008 with a collection by Damien Langlois-Meurinne.
SOMETHING FISHY
The Fishcondo fishbowl from The One is a geometric
confluence of metal and glass that makes it as intriguing
as the creatures living inside.
CHARMED
Elegantly simple, Fasem’s Charme Gold chair makes a
heavyweight impact, with its gracefully curved, yet lightweight,
aluminium structure. The soft capitone leather adds comfort with
a classic touch to this distinctly 21st century interpretation.
Forum.indd 85 8/26/10 1:48:52 PM
86 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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ANTENNAE
6
8
5
4
7
2
3
1
1. CHUNCHEON
TEE TIME
Currently under construction is a clubhouse
for the Whistling Rocks golf course some 75
kilometres north-west of Seoul. The mountain
landscape has inspired Mecanoo’s design,
which allows visitors to make the most of the
spectacular views. The 6,000 square metre
clubhouse features a ground floor entrance lobby
leading to changing rooms while the first storey
is dedicated to restaurants and eight banquet
rooms. In the basement, there will be a golf shop
and employee offices. The design also includes
three tea houses which are sculptural in form and
at night form a visual icon golfers can experience
from the clubhouse or while on the course.
2. CANTERBURY
AWARD HONOUR
The University of Kent’s new Dhs36.3 million
School of Arts Building recently won a Royal
Institute of British Architects award, celebrating its
high architectural standards and contribution to
the local environment. The 2,500 square metre
building, named after influential British artist
Derek Jarman and designed by London-based
architects Hawkins/Brown, has been short listed
for the prestigious RIBA Stirling Prize, which will
be announced next month. The building features
state-of-the-art facilities, including drama and film
studios, computing and editing suites, a large art
gallery, teaching rooms, postgraduate space and
staff offices. The steel-framed building features
a distinctive zinc wall tiled cladding system, plus
glazed walling.
3. FREDERIKSBERG
ON THE MOVE
This municipality to the west of Copenhagen is
to become home to the Dhs80 million House
of Culture and Movement. MVRDV and ADEPT
won a competition to design the 4,000 square
metre building, which will be set in 4,500
square metres of public gardens and is due to
be completed in 2015. Three buildings are
to be built on the site, including the House of
Culture and Movement, which is a rectangular
glass volume containing six stacked elements
accommodating a theatre, health zone, food
zone, Zen area, study centre and exhibition hall,
fitness and activity centre.
Competition-winning designs for an unusual shaped aquarium in the capital of Georgia, a new gallery due
to open in the Slovenian city of Maribor and Singapore’s spectacular Marina Bay Sands project grab this
month’s headlines. TEXT: STEVE HILL
P
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86 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
ANTENNAE
6
8
5
4
7
2
3
1
1. CHUNCHEON
TEE TIME
Currently under construction is a clubhouse
for the Whistling Rocks golf course some 75
kilometres north-west of Seoul. The mountain
landscape has inspired Mecanoo’s design,
which allows visitors to make the most of the
spectacular views. The 6,000 square metre
clubhouse features a ground floor entrance lobby
leading to changing rooms while the first storey
is dedicated to restaurants and eight banquet
rooms. In the basement, there will be a golf shop
and employee offices. The design also includes
three tea houses which are sculptural in form and
at night form a visual icon golfers can experience
from the clubhouse or while on the course.
2. CANTERBURY
AWARD HONOUR
The University of Kent’s new Dhs36.3 million
School of Arts Building recently won a Royal
Institute of British Architects award, celebrating its
high architectural standards and contribution to
the local environment. The 2,500 square metre
building, named after influential British artist
Derek Jarman and designed by London-based
architects Hawkins/Brown, has been short listed
for the prestigious RIBA Stirling Prize, which will
be announced next month. The building features
state-of-the-art facilities, including drama and film
studios, computing and editing suites, a large art
gallery, teaching rooms, postgraduate space and
staff offices. The steel-framed building features
a distinctive zinc wall tiled cladding system, plus
glazed walling.
3. FREDERIKSBERG
ON THE MOVE
This municipality to the west of Copenhagen is
to become home to the Dhs80 million House
of Culture and Movement. MVRDV and ADEPT
won a competition to design the 4,000 square
metre building, which will be set in 4,500
square metres of public gardens and is due to
be completed in 2015. Three buildings are
to be built on the site, including the House of
Culture and Movement, which is a rectangular
glass volume containing six stacked elements
accommodating a theatre, health zone, food
zone, Zen area, study centre and exhibition hall,
fitness and activity centre.
Competition-winning designs for an unusual shaped aquarium in the capital of Georgia, a new gallery due
to open in the Slovenian city of Maribor and Singapore’s spectacular Marina Bay Sands project grab this
month’s headlines. TEXT: STEVE HILL
P
H
O
T
O
G
R
A
P
H
Y
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CMYK
September 2010
5. MARIBOR
FOCAL POINT
Slovenia’s second city will soon have a new art
gallery. Hungarian architects Tamás Lévai and
Ágnes Jószai beat 200 rivals to win a competition
to design the new structure, which is due to
open in July 2012. The 14,000 square metre
facility will include 8,000 square metres of gallery
premises, a children’s museum, an architectural
centre and a creative industry centre, museum
library, and retail facilities. The gallery, complete
with its transparent lower areas and facade of
uniform, white resin-based plaster, will become a
focal point of Maribor as it prepares to become
European Capital of Culture in 2012.
4. MOSCOW
GOAL SCORER
The redevelopment of the Dynamo Moscow stadium and its surrounding park is to be undertaken by
Erick van Egeraat, which won a closed international design competition. The focal point of the successful
proposal is a 300,000 square metre multi-functional culture, health and sports centre to be developed
on a 116,000 square metre site and which will comprise a 45,000-seat football stadium, a 10,000-seat
arena hall, a retail and entertainment complex, restaurants, parking and other facilities. The stadium will
be FIFA compliant with the aim that it will play a key role in Russia’s bid to host the 2018 World Cup.
7. SINGAPORE
SKY’S THE LIMIT
The spectacular Dhs3.1 billion Marina Bay Sands
offers stunning views across this city-state. The
2,560-room resort was recently officially opened
with officials predicting that more than 70,000
visitors a day, and some 18 million a year, will be
attracted once all facilities are fully operational.
The 1.2-hectare Sands Sky Park sits on top of the
resort’s three hotel towers 200 metres above
ground, and features a 150 metre-long infinity
edge swimming pool and gardens that are home
to 250 trees. There are 18 different room types
and some 230 luxury suites as well as exclusive
restaurants, including The Sky on 57 helmed by
Singapore celebrity chef Justin Quek.
6. BATUMI
MAKING A SPLASH
Henning Larsen Architects has won a
competition to design a new aquarium in the
seaport capital of the Republic of Georgia. The
2,000 square metre proposal was inspired by
the shape of pebbles on Batumi beach, and
the main structure is easily visible from land
and sea. It accommodates four self-contained
exhibition areas representing the Aegean and
the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean, the Black
and Red Seas and an interactive display space.
A café and retail outlets are also planned, as
well as educational facilities, while it is hoped
that the aquarium will make a state-of-the-art
contribution to exploring life underneath the sea.
8. TORONTO
POWERFUL PROPOSAL
The mothballed Hearn Generating Station could
become home to a sports complex housing
three ice rinks, according to plans recently
unveiled by the Los Angeles office of German
company Behnisch Architekten. The Hearn,
which ceased power production in 1983, could
also have a second life as home to tennis courts,
indoor football pitches, a conference centre or
concerts, according to the company, which is
renowned for its environmentally sustainable
buildings. A 70-storey smokestack next to the
structure could be used as natural ventilation for
the station, which also features extremely strong
foundations and generous parking facilities.
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88 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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What’s in a name?
From New York’s Trump Tower to Dubai’s Palazzo
Versace, branding has spread far and wide in property,
but is it all just bling and blather? TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
Branding.indd 88 8/26/10 1:53:40 PM
88 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK CMYK CMYK
What’s in a name?
From New York’s Trump Tower to Dubai’s Palazzo
Versace, branding has spread far and wide in property,
but is it all just bling and blather? TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
Branding.indd 88 8/26/10 1:53:40 PM
89 September 2010
CMYK CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
The Baglioni Marrakech hotel created by Ajensa, international developer of
hotel and residential resorts. The Baglioni Marrakech incorporates the brands
of its collaborators, The Baglioni Hotel Group, Jade Jagger for yoo, Six Senses
Spa and Patrick Genard and Associates, as well as Ajensa.
Branding.indd 89 8/26/10 1:53:47 PM
90 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
DESIGN@LARGE
It has not quite got to the stage where we buy homes from McDonald’s
or Gordon Ramsay, but such scenes are definitely easier to imagine now than
10 years ago. After all, Cipriani has sold New York apartments to people who
reckon that if the eatery can knock up a tasty dish, then why not a des res
condominium.
Brands have become as powerful in property as they have in catering,
fashion, airlines and most other business sectors. Donald Trump led the way
with New York’s Trump Tower in 1983, but when British property developer
John Hitchcox and French designer Philippe Starck joined forces in 1999 to
create yoo, the first company to build homes and design the interiors – the
focus of its brand, branding, became all the rage in property.
In addition to a growing number of brand conscious and design conscious
developers appearing during the noughties, the property sector was invaded
by brand-savvy operators from other spheres who noticed an opportunity to
generate additional wealth from their good names. Restaurateurs, hoteliers,
furniture makers, fashion designers and even golfers have put their logos to
residential schemes across the world.
Buyers have lapped up brand-name homes because the familiar logo of
a company with a proven track record, albeit so often in a completely
different trade, implies good quality. Brands have been particularly important
to buyers of overseas property as they can be useful points of recognition in
little known locations.
As the global property market recovers from its biggest crash in modern times,
brands have taken on renewed importance, because many buyers, uncertain of
what might happen next to real estate, are homing in on them as guarantees of
intrinsic value that can weather economic storms. In brands we trust.
But not all brands are equal, some promise reassurance, some provide it.
The question is how to select the winners from the poseurs?
Lucy Russell, managing director of Lucy Russell Limited, a London-based
company that helps private clients buy and sell homes, says brands are most
important at the top end of the market.
“People these days expect a lot for their money. They are not just after space,
they are not just after location, they are after the actual brand names involved,”
she says. “If you take some of the best brands in London, like One Hyde Park, the
Candy and Candy development, which is all about the names involved, including
the Candys’ own name, which is a very strong name these days.”
One Hyde Park’s winning team of brands includes Rogers Stirk Harbour +
Partners, the architectural practice led by Lord Richard Rogers, which designed
the scheme, and the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, which will provide
services to its residents. Although the development is sandwiched between two
busy roads and its apartments are London’s most expensive, overseas buyers,
especially Russians, have bought heavily. Half of its 86 apartments are already
sold, with prices reaching Dhs156.7 million per unit. The developer, whose
reputation for creating smart homes in London, Moscow and Monaco has
spread worldwide, plans to complete construction this October.
Developments bearing the names of fashion designers were among the most
popular at the height of the noughties property boom. Following the success
of its first resort scheme on Australia’s Gold Coast, in 2005 Italian fashion
house Versace launched Palazzo Versace Dubai, a 130,000 square metre
hotel and condominium scheme in the emirate’s Culture Village. Built jointly
Icon Vallarta, Puerto Vallarta, Gold Coast, Mexico. A new development branded, marketed and interior designed by yoo.
Branding.indd 90 8/26/10 1:53:58 PM
90 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
It has not quite got to the stage where we buy homes from McDonald’s
or Gordon Ramsay, but such scenes are definitely easier to imagine now than
10 years ago. After all, Cipriani has sold New York apartments to people who
reckon that if the eatery can knock up a tasty dish, then why not a des res
condominium.
Brands have become as powerful in property as they have in catering,
fashion, airlines and most other business sectors. Donald Trump led the way
with New York’s Trump Tower in 1983, but when British property developer
John Hitchcox and French designer Philippe Starck joined forces in 1999 to
create yoo, the first company to build homes and design the interiors – the
focus of its brand, branding, became all the rage in property.
In addition to a growing number of brand conscious and design conscious
developers appearing during the noughties, the property sector was invaded
by brand-savvy operators from other spheres who noticed an opportunity to
generate additional wealth from their good names. Restaurateurs, hoteliers,
furniture makers, fashion designers and even golfers have put their logos to
residential schemes across the world.
Buyers have lapped up brand-name homes because the familiar logo of
a company with a proven track record, albeit so often in a completely
different trade, implies good quality. Brands have been particularly important
to buyers of overseas property as they can be useful points of recognition in
little known locations.
As the global property market recovers from its biggest crash in modern times,
brands have taken on renewed importance, because many buyers, uncertain of
what might happen next to real estate, are homing in on them as guarantees of
intrinsic value that can weather economic storms. In brands we trust.
But not all brands are equal, some promise reassurance, some provide it.
The question is how to select the winners from the poseurs?
Lucy Russell, managing director of Lucy Russell Limited, a London-based
company that helps private clients buy and sell homes, says brands are most
important at the top end of the market.
“People these days expect a lot for their money. They are not just after space,
they are not just after location, they are after the actual brand names involved,”
she says. “If you take some of the best brands in London, like One Hyde Park, the
Candy and Candy development, which is all about the names involved, including
the Candys’ own name, which is a very strong name these days.”
One Hyde Park’s winning team of brands includes Rogers Stirk Harbour +
Partners, the architectural practice led by Lord Richard Rogers, which designed
the scheme, and the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, which will provide
services to its residents. Although the development is sandwiched between two
busy roads and its apartments are London’s most expensive, overseas buyers,
especially Russians, have bought heavily. Half of its 86 apartments are already
sold, with prices reaching Dhs156.7 million per unit. The developer, whose
reputation for creating smart homes in London, Moscow and Monaco has
spread worldwide, plans to complete construction this October.
Developments bearing the names of fashion designers were among the most
popular at the height of the noughties property boom. Following the success
of its first resort scheme on Australia’s Gold Coast, in 2005 Italian fashion
house Versace launched Palazzo Versace Dubai, a 130,000 square metre
hotel and condominium scheme in the emirate’s Culture Village. Built jointly
Icon Vallarta, Puerto Vallarta, Gold Coast, Mexico. A new development branded, marketed and interior designed by yoo.
Branding.indd 90 8/26/10 1:53:58 PM
C
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Y
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MY
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messara.pdf 1/27/10 11:57:28 AM
92 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
DESIGN@LARGE
with UAE-Australian developer Emirates Sunland Group, half of the scheme’s
apartments were sold prior to its official marketing launch in 2007. Completion
is scheduled for early 2011.
“In Dubai they love the fashion brands,” Russell says. “It enables people to
say: ‘Oh, I have a Versace apartment,’ and people instantly know it is going to
be at the very, very high end.”
Versace is popular with Italians, too, as is another Italian brand that moved
into property, the jeweller and hotel operator Bulgari, which has also proved a
hit with Russians. “People, definitely international clients, associate themselves
with certain names and there are definite nationalities that they are attracted
to,” Russell says. “So, for example, Italians are very loyal to Italian brands,
Germans are very loyal to German brands, whereas the British and Americans
aren’t quite so loyal, but I think at all levels now, branding is very important and
it is very recognised globally.”
In the aftermath of the property market slump, buyers in some locations, like
London, now focus on brands associated with hotel operators and specialist
property developers.
“I think now people are looking for brands that are linked to longevity in
the property market,” Russell says, “People are more savvy than they were a
few years ago, so they are looking for brands not just for the sake of brands,
but for brands where there’s actually something behind it. For example, if
you are linked with the Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts you are going to get
exceptionally good service. Each name has its own connotation.”
With that thought about connotation in mind, London’s designer property
developers are keen to define their own brands. For example, Rigby & Rigby
designs and makes furniture bespoke for each property it works on, while
Blaze says its family friendly-homes have ample storage space, and can easily be
updated and adapted.
Buying into a brand can be costly, so choosing the correct label is important.
Depending on size and location, the premium on a brand name home can
touch 30 per cent, Russell estimates. “I think in 2007 everyone was whacking
on a brand everywhere and I don’t think it’s necessarily paid off,” she says. “The
hotel brands have done very well, like Six Senses, which has done its own villas.
People know the brands globally, because of the hotels, so it follows very well
through to the property side, whereas when you are talking about the more
fashion-related brands it is difficult to know how long that lasts for, because, like
fashion, it is of the moment. It is not necessarily fashionable later.”
The most successful brand, yoo, has now dropped property development
altogether to focus on lending its name to others. It goes into joint ventures
with less well-known property developers around the world who do the hard
graft of building while the London-based firm sets standards of construction,
designs interiors, helps with marketing and stamps its highly valued brand name
on the finished product. Starck and the company’s other designers, such as Jade
Jagger, are brands in themselves, so their involvement gives extra cache to the
corporate label.
Now, Starck and Hitchcox may lead the way once again, this time for
design-led property companies looking to expand into other business areas,
returning the compliment of fashion designers and others who moved into
their realm. Like the Versaces and Ciprianis of this world, yoo wants to offer
a complete lifestyle package linked to the home. Starck already designs a wide
range of domestic products, but more can be added, according to his business
partner Hitchcox.
“We’ve just designed a bicycle, because there is a property scheme where
we can’t have any car parking spaces, so we are looking at products that
complement our brand and styling,” yoo’s chairman says. “We are looking at
the furniture business, at creating everything for the home. I am intrigued by the
depth of the market, by how far it can go. Fashion has been in our discussions.”
Versace had better watch out.
ID
Clockwise from above left: A home in Parsons Green, London, renovated and
interior designed by developer Blaze; yoo Nordelta, Buenos Aires, Argentina,
a new development branded, marketed and interior designed by yoo; a home
in Central London renovated and interior designed by Rigby & Rigby, a
developer which also made all the furniture bespoke for these properties,
a key trait of their brand.
Branding.indd 92 8/26/10 1:54:15 PM
92 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
with UAE-Australian developer Emirates Sunland Group, half of the scheme’s
apartments were sold prior to its official marketing launch in 2007. Completion
is scheduled for early 2011.
“In Dubai they love the fashion brands,” Russell says. “It enables people to
say: ‘Oh, I have a Versace apartment,’ and people instantly know it is going to
be at the very, very high end.”
Versace is popular with Italians, too, as is another Italian brand that moved
into property, the jeweller and hotel operator Bulgari, which has also proved a
hit with Russians. “People, definitely international clients, associate themselves
with certain names and there are definite nationalities that they are attracted
to,” Russell says. “So, for example, Italians are very loyal to Italian brands,
Germans are very loyal to German brands, whereas the British and Americans
aren’t quite so loyal, but I think at all levels now, branding is very important and
it is very recognised globally.”
In the aftermath of the property market slump, buyers in some locations, like
London, now focus on brands associated with hotel operators and specialist
property developers.
“I think now people are looking for brands that are linked to longevity in
the property market,” Russell says, “People are more savvy than they were a
few years ago, so they are looking for brands not just for the sake of brands,
but for brands where there’s actually something behind it. For example, if
you are linked with the Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts you are going to get
exceptionally good service. Each name has its own connotation.”
With that thought about connotation in mind, London’s designer property
developers are keen to define their own brands. For example, Rigby & Rigby
designs and makes furniture bespoke for each property it works on, while
Blaze says its family friendly-homes have ample storage space, and can easily be
updated and adapted.
Buying into a brand can be costly, so choosing the correct label is important.
Depending on size and location, the premium on a brand name home can
touch 30 per cent, Russell estimates. “I think in 2007 everyone was whacking
on a brand everywhere and I don’t think it’s necessarily paid off,” she says. “The
hotel brands have done very well, like Six Senses, which has done its own villas.
People know the brands globally, because of the hotels, so it follows very well
through to the property side, whereas when you are talking about the more
fashion-related brands it is difficult to know how long that lasts for, because, like
fashion, it is of the moment. It is not necessarily fashionable later.”
The most successful brand, yoo, has now dropped property development
altogether to focus on lending its name to others. It goes into joint ventures
with less well-known property developers around the world who do the hard
graft of building while the London-based firm sets standards of construction,
designs interiors, helps with marketing and stamps its highly valued brand name
on the finished product. Starck and the company’s other designers, such as Jade
Jagger, are brands in themselves, so their involvement gives extra cache to the
corporate label.
Now, Starck and Hitchcox may lead the way once again, this time for
design-led property companies looking to expand into other business areas,
returning the compliment of fashion designers and others who moved into
their realm. Like the Versaces and Ciprianis of this world, yoo wants to offer
a complete lifestyle package linked to the home. Starck already designs a wide
range of domestic products, but more can be added, according to his business
partner Hitchcox.
“We’ve just designed a bicycle, because there is a property scheme where
we can’t have any car parking spaces, so we are looking at products that
complement our brand and styling,” yoo’s chairman says. “We are looking at
the furniture business, at creating everything for the home. I am intrigued by the
depth of the market, by how far it can go. Fashion has been in our discussions.”
Versace had better watch out.
ID
Clockwise from above left: A home in Parsons Green, London, renovated and
interior designed by developer Blaze; yoo Nordelta, Buenos Aires, Argentina,
a new development branded, marketed and interior designed by yoo; a home
in Central London renovated and interior designed by Rigby & Rigby, a
developer which also made all the furniture bespoke for these properties,
a key trait of their brand.
Branding.indd 92 8/26/10 1:54:15 PM
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id inspirations 2010 sep.indd 93 8/29/10 9:52:29 AM
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id inspirations 2010 sep.indd 95 8/29/10 11:10:52 AM
96 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
BOOKS
ARCHITECTURE NOW! 7
PHILIP JODIDIO
TASCHEN
DHS163
Like the previous books in this series,
this spans the globe examining some
of the best examples of architecture
completed in the past couple of
years and discussing some important
recent trends, such as temporary
and eco-friendly buildings. The
Burnham Pavilion, in Chicago, United
States, designed by Zaha Hadid and
completed in 2009, is constructed
of a fabric skin stretched over a frame
of bent aluminium to create the easily
dismantled or recycled exhibition
space featured on the cover. The
Mountain, in Copenhagen, features
apartments that each open directly
onto a grassy terrace, while the
Greenhouses of the Japanese
Pavilion of the 2008 Venice
Architecture Biennale are a series
of glasshouses set in a lush garden.
Meanwhile, Yoshioka Tokujin
incorporated a crystal forest in the
Swarovski Ginza, in Tokyo, and
surrounded by snow, the space
saucer-shaped Princess Elisabeth
building in Antarctica houses scientific
teams. Also highlighted are the Yas
Hotel, in Abu Dhabi, designed by
Asymptote, and Burj Khalifa by SOM.
TRANSFORMER
WANG SHAOQIANG, EDITOR
SANDU PUBLISHING
DHS234
Reworking a structure from another
era to fit contemporary needs is an
exciting challenge for architects, and a
way to preserve the authenticity and
originality of the past. Renovations by
some of the world’s best architects
are examined in this book, with
beautiful photographs of the original
buildings and the final makeovers.
For example, Steven Holl Architects
reorganised the interior of the
1890s warehouse where the NYU
Department of Philosophy is located,
pictured on the cover around a
spine of light to form bright, open
spaces that interact with the changing
positions of the sun. Across the
Atlantic, a grounded Boeing
747-200 has been transformed into
the Jumbo Hostel at the entrance
to the Stockholm Atlanda Airport.
In Mumbai, an industrial warehouse
was converted by Seie Architects
into the Blue Frog Lounge, a
complex of sound recording studios,
along with an acoustic lounge,
restaurant and other social areas
that features state-of-the-art
technology, elegant fluid curves and
ever-changing lighting.
DESIGN IN BLACK AND WHITE
JANELLE MCCULLOCH
IMAGES PUBLISHING
DHS260
Dramatic and sophisticated,
contemporary and classic, the
combination of black and white
perennially represents glamour and
luxury. Whether it is a well-tailored
tuxedo with a crisp white shirt, a
checked pattern floor or a page
of print, the combination is the
quintessential expression of style. For
this book, Janelle McCulloch travelled
the world documenting timeless
examples of black and white buildings
and interiors, including the Ubud
Hotel in Bali, where a freestanding
black bathtub with a white interior is
draped with flowing white netting. A
Manhattan pied-a-terre features wide
horizontal black and white stripes on
the lounge walls and curtains with
narrow stripes. A sun umbrella, club
chair in a hounds tooth upholstery
or even a French Metro sign can all
impart the essence of elegance. Even
the design of this strikingly stylish
book – black and white striped front
pages and white on black elements
– re-enforce the power of the
combination illustrated in the images
of coastal, classic, country and high
glamour spaces.
ISLANDS
MARK FLETCHER
H.F. ULLMANN
DHS246
The book’s subtitle, Contemporary
architecture on water, explains exactly
where the 47 projects featured
here are located. These beautifully
photographed buildings by some of
the greatest architects and designers
in the world, including IM Pei, Renzo
Piano and Zaha Hadid, are all on
islands, both natural and man-made.
Featured on the cover is the Wave
Tower, designed by A-cero Studio and
Joaquin Torres & Rafael Llamazares
architects, which is slated to be built
on its own island in Dubai and where
a double-skin silkscreen glass facade
was developed to reduce energy
consumption. One section highlights
island resorts, like the Bulgari Resort in
Bali, designed by Antonio Citterio and
featuring a cliff-side infinity pool that
reiterates the water theme. Other
sections concentrate on residences,
cultural islands that support museums,
buildings that are themselves islands
suspended above the water and
urban areas surrounded by water.
Floating island projects not yet realised
present another intriguing view of
living on water.
ID

BOOKS AVAILABLE FROM MAJOR UAE BOOKSTORES
Black and white is always effortlessly elegant, some faded classics have been given a modern update
and living on the water can be awe-inspiring, according to identity’s reading list this month.
ID Books.indd 96 8/26/10 1:45:28 PM
96 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
BOOKS
ARCHITECTURE NOW! 7
PHILIP JODIDIO
TASCHEN
DHS163
Like the previous books in this series,
this spans the globe examining some
of the best examples of architecture
completed in the past couple of
years and discussing some important
recent trends, such as temporary
and eco-friendly buildings. The
Burnham Pavilion, in Chicago, United
States, designed by Zaha Hadid and
completed in 2009, is constructed
of a fabric skin stretched over a frame
of bent aluminium to create the easily
dismantled or recycled exhibition
space featured on the cover. The
Mountain, in Copenhagen, features
apartments that each open directly
onto a grassy terrace, while the
Greenhouses of the Japanese
Pavilion of the 2008 Venice
Architecture Biennale are a series
of glasshouses set in a lush garden.
Meanwhile, Yoshioka Tokujin
incorporated a crystal forest in the
Swarovski Ginza, in Tokyo, and
surrounded by snow, the space
saucer-shaped Princess Elisabeth
building in Antarctica houses scientific
teams. Also highlighted are the Yas
Hotel, in Abu Dhabi, designed by
Asymptote, and Burj Khalifa by SOM.
TRANSFORMER
WANG SHAOQIANG, EDITOR
SANDU PUBLISHING
DHS234
Reworking a structure from another
era to fit contemporary needs is an
exciting challenge for architects, and a
way to preserve the authenticity and
originality of the past. Renovations by
some of the world’s best architects
are examined in this book, with
beautiful photographs of the original
buildings and the final makeovers.
For example, Steven Holl Architects
reorganised the interior of the
1890s warehouse where the NYU
Department of Philosophy is located,
pictured on the cover around a
spine of light to form bright, open
spaces that interact with the changing
positions of the sun. Across the
Atlantic, a grounded Boeing
747-200 has been transformed into
the Jumbo Hostel at the entrance
to the Stockholm Atlanda Airport.
In Mumbai, an industrial warehouse
was converted by Seie Architects
into the Blue Frog Lounge, a
complex of sound recording studios,
along with an acoustic lounge,
restaurant and other social areas
that features state-of-the-art
technology, elegant fluid curves and
ever-changing lighting.
DESIGN IN BLACK AND WHITE
JANELLE MCCULLOCH
IMAGES PUBLISHING
DHS260
Dramatic and sophisticated,
contemporary and classic, the
combination of black and white
perennially represents glamour and
luxury. Whether it is a well-tailored
tuxedo with a crisp white shirt, a
checked pattern floor or a page
of print, the combination is the
quintessential expression of style. For
this book, Janelle McCulloch travelled
the world documenting timeless
examples of black and white buildings
and interiors, including the Ubud
Hotel in Bali, where a freestanding
black bathtub with a white interior is
draped with flowing white netting. A
Manhattan pied-a-terre features wide
horizontal black and white stripes on
the lounge walls and curtains with
narrow stripes. A sun umbrella, club
chair in a hounds tooth upholstery
or even a French Metro sign can all
impart the essence of elegance. Even
the design of this strikingly stylish
book – black and white striped front
pages and white on black elements
– re-enforce the power of the
combination illustrated in the images
of coastal, classic, country and high
glamour spaces.
ISLANDS
MARK FLETCHER
H.F. ULLMANN
DHS246
The book’s subtitle, Contemporary
architecture on water, explains exactly
where the 47 projects featured
here are located. These beautifully
photographed buildings by some of
the greatest architects and designers
in the world, including IM Pei, Renzo
Piano and Zaha Hadid, are all on
islands, both natural and man-made.
Featured on the cover is the Wave
Tower, designed by A-cero Studio and
Joaquin Torres & Rafael Llamazares
architects, which is slated to be built
on its own island in Dubai and where
a double-skin silkscreen glass facade
was developed to reduce energy
consumption. One section highlights
island resorts, like the Bulgari Resort in
Bali, designed by Antonio Citterio and
featuring a cliff-side infinity pool that
reiterates the water theme. Other
sections concentrate on residences,
cultural islands that support museums,
buildings that are themselves islands
suspended above the water and
urban areas surrounded by water.
Floating island projects not yet realised
present another intriguing view of
living on water.
ID

BOOKS AVAILABLE FROM MAJOR UAE BOOKSTORES
Black and white is always effortlessly elegant, some faded classics have been given a modern update
and living on the water can be awe-inspiring, according to identity’s reading list this month.
ID Books.indd 96 8/26/10 1:45:28 PM
“COMI NG HOME”
HANDWOVEN OUTDOOR FURNI TURE CREATED WI TH WEATHER-RESI STANT DEDON FI BER
! ALL DEDON I MAGES ARE PROTECTED BY COPY-
RI GHT. DEDON GMBH RETAI NS THE RI GHTS OF
USE. ANY CHANGE OF THE DEDON AD LAYOUTS
AND/OR CREATI VE MATERI AL I S NOT PERMI TTED. !
Nakkash Gallery · Al Garhoud Street · P.O. Box 26767 · Dubai-UAE
Tel: 00971 4 2826767 · Fax: 00971 4 2827567
nakkashg@emirates.net.ae · www.nakkashgallery.com
www.dedon.de/treehouse
DEDON_Skater_Identity_240x320.indd 1 12.08.10 15:26
CMYK
98 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
ICON
TEXT: STEVE HILL
The Range Rover success story owes much to the post war-popularity
of the Land Rover – a rugged no-frills four-wheel drive workhorse itself
inspired by the Willys Jeep that was aimed squarely at the military and
agricultural markets.
The Rover Company first began developing ideas for a station wagon
version of the Land Rover in the late 1940s and these plans were given
further impetus by the firm’s desire to develop a model that would spark
sales in the vital American market.
Following a takeover by British Leyland, the first Range Rover was
launched to the world in June 1970. And although much has changed in
40 years, current models still honour the company’s evocative past while
also looking forward, as can be seen by the appointment of Victoria
Beckham as a design partner for the new Evoque model, which is due
to go on sale next summer.
ID
Range Rover

It’s easy to forget, but before 1970 a customer would have been
laughed out of a car showroom if they had had the temerity to ask to
test-drive a luxury off-road vehicle… for the simple reason that they did
not exist.The launch 40 years ago of the Range Rover changed everything,
creating an entirely new market niche and a concept that was embraced as
quickly by the motor-buying public as it was by manufacturers, who scrambled
to launch their own versions of this instant icon.
Virtually every major car maker is now represented in the Sports Utility
Vehicle market, testament to the tremendous impact that Range Rover
continues to have on the motor industry.
The fundamentals have changed little, with today’s owners still attracted to
a status symbol that offers a lofty driving position, space and prestige around
town and on major highways, as well as proven off-road capabilities for those
who enjoy the country lifestyle.
Icon.indd 98 8/26/10 2:00:07 PM
CMYK
98 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
ICON
TEXT: STEVE HILL
The Range Rover success story owes much to the post war-popularity
of the Land Rover – a rugged no-frills four-wheel drive workhorse itself
inspired by the Willys Jeep that was aimed squarely at the military and
agricultural markets.
The Rover Company first began developing ideas for a station wagon
version of the Land Rover in the late 1940s and these plans were given
further impetus by the firm’s desire to develop a model that would spark
sales in the vital American market.
Following a takeover by British Leyland, the first Range Rover was
launched to the world in June 1970. And although much has changed in
40 years, current models still honour the company’s evocative past while
also looking forward, as can be seen by the appointment of Victoria
Beckham as a design partner for the new Evoque model, which is due
to go on sale next summer.
ID
Range Rover

It’s easy to forget, but before 1970 a customer would have been
laughed out of a car showroom if they had had the temerity to ask to
test-drive a luxury off-road vehicle… for the simple reason that they did
not exist.The launch 40 years ago of the Range Rover changed everything,
creating an entirely new market niche and a concept that was embraced as
quickly by the motor-buying public as it was by manufacturers, who scrambled
to launch their own versions of this instant icon.
Virtually every major car maker is now represented in the Sports Utility
Vehicle market, testament to the tremendous impact that Range Rover
continues to have on the motor industry.
The fundamentals have changed little, with today’s owners still attracted to
a status symbol that offers a lofty driving position, space and prestige around
town and on major highways, as well as proven off-road capabilities for those
who enjoy the country lifestyle.
Icon.indd 98 8/26/10 2:00:07 PM
K
O
M
M
A
Scavolini S.p.A. 61025 Montelabbate (PU) - Italy Tel. +39 0721443333
Fax: +39 0721443413 contact@scavolini.com www.scavolini.com
Pls. download our general
catalog from www.scavolini.com
Kitchen Designs Llc
P.O.BOX 81553
Salahudeen Road
Deira - Dubai
Tel. 971 - 4 2691003
ayman@kitchendesigns.ae
Just for business use:
www.scavolini.biz
The “best seller” from Italy
System of Quality
Management
UNI EN ISO 9001
System of Environmental
Management
UNI EN ISO 14001
System of Health &
Safety Management
OHSAS 18001
For the carcase of the
kitchens Scavolini uses
only Idroleb: a water
repellent V100 panel with the
lowest formaldehyde emission,
lower than specified on the
Japanese standards F**** (4 stars).
Discover Scavolini’s commitment
for a cleaner world on
www.scavolinigreenmind.com
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