You are on page 1of 17

Know Thy Enemy: The Money

Motivated Hacker
October 13, 2017 By The Editor

Next up on our hacker profiles series, the cyber criminal.

You’re probably most familiar with the cyber criminal hacker profile, since
they’ve been around longer than the rest. This group’s motive is pretty obvious;
to make money using any means necessary.

Cyber criminal groups can range from a few lone actors who are just out for
themselves, to big cyber crime organizations, often financed and headed by
traditional criminal organizations. This hacker profile is responsible for stealing
billions of dollars from consumers and businesses each year.

These criminal attackers participate in a rich underground economy, where they


buy, sell, and trade attack toolkits, zero day exploit code, botnet services, and
intellectual property they steal from victims. Recently, their focus has been on
web exploit kits, such as Blackhole, Phoenix, and Nuclear Pack, which they use
to automate and simplify drive-by download attacks.

Their targets vary from small businesses and consumers, whom they attack
opportunistically, to large enterprises and industry verticals, who they target with
specific goals in mind. In an attack on the banking and credit card industry, a
very organized group of cyber criminals was able to steal 45 million dollars
globally from ATMs, in a highly synchronized fashion. The attack was made
possible due to an initial, targeted network breach against a few banks and a
payment processor company.

Now that you know a little about this enemy, you should focus on getting to
know your current defenses. Subscribe to Secplicity to stay current on the most
recent threats.

Cyber Criminal

Leadership: Usually works alone.

Motives: Identity theft, extortion, click-jacking, pirating software.

Known Associates: Other cybercriminals on the dark web.

Claims to fame: Petya, Licky, Cryptowall, CryptoLocker.

Methods: Web-based drive-by downloads, spamming, click-jacking,


ransomware, trojans.
Conoce a tu enemigo: el hacker
motivado por el dinero
13 de octubre de 2017Por el editor

A continuación, en nuestra serie de perfiles de hackers, el cibercriminal.

Probablemente estés más familiarizado con el perfil de piratas informáticos


cibernéticos, ya que han existido más tiempo que el resto. El motivo de este
grupo es bastante obvio; para ganar dinero usando cualquier medio necesario.

Los grupos delictivos cibernéticos pueden abarcar desde unos pocos actores
solitarios que se dedican solo a ellos mismos, hasta grandes organizaciones
del crimen cibernético, a menudo financiadas y encabezadas por
organizaciones delictivas tradicionales. Este perfil de hacker es responsable de
robar miles de millones de dólares de consumidores y empresas cada año.

Estos atacantes criminales participan en una economía subterránea rica, donde


compran, venden y venden kits de herramientas de ataque, código de
explotación de día cero, servicios de botnet y propiedad intelectual que roban a
las víctimas. Recientemente, se han centrado en kits de exploits web, como
Blackhole, Phoenix y Nuclear Pack, que utilizan para automatizar y simplificar
los ataques de descarga drive-by.

Sus objetivos varían desde pequeñas empresas y consumidores, a quienes


atacan de manera oportunista, a grandes empresas y sectores verticales de la
industria, a quienes apuntan con objetivos específicos en mente. En
un ataque a la industria de las tarjetas bancarias y de crédito, un grupo muy
organizado de ciberdelincuentes fue capaz de robar 45 millones de dólares en
todo el mundo de cajeros automáticos, de una manera altamente
sincronizada. El ataque fue posible debido a una violación inicial de la red
dirigida contra unos pocos bancos y una empresa procesadora de pagos.

Ahora que sabes un poco sobre este enemigo, debes enfocarte en conocer tus
defensas actuales. Suscríbase a Secplicity para mantenerse al día con las
amenazas más recientes.

Cyber Criminal
Liderazgo: generalmente funciona solo.
Motivos: robo de identidad, extorsión, clic-jacking, software de piratería.
Asociados conocidos: otros ciberdelincuentes en la web oscura.
Reclamaciones a la fama: Petya, Licky, Cryptowall, CryptoLocker.
Métodos: descargas drive-by basadas en la web, spamming, clics-jacking, ransomware, troyanos.
Profiling Modern Hackers:
Hacktivists, Criminals, and Cyber
Spies. Oh My!
May 30, 2013 By Corey Nachreiner

Sun Tzu, the renowned military strategist and author of The Art of War, was
known for the saying, “Know thy enemy and known thyself, and you will not be
imperiled in a hundred battles.” While the true intention of this quote is likely to
remind us that knowing our own strengths and weaknesses is equally important
to knowing those of your enemy, I can’t help but simplify it to the
rudimentary, “know thy enemy.”

I suspect most security professionals, me included, spend much more time


analyzing the technical and mechanical aspects of cyber crime than the social
and psychological ones. We dissect attacker’s malware and exploit tools,
analyze their code and exploit techniques, but don’t always study who they are
and why they do what they do. According to General Tzu, this is a good way to
lose many battles.

In order to better understand the nature of the cyber threat, security


professionals need to act more like criminal investigators, and consider means,
motive, and opportunity. We’ve got the means down (tools and techniques), but
some of us may need to work a bit on motive. One of the ways to do that is to
understand the different hacker profiles.

Over the last few years, the general hacker profiles and motives have changed
quite a bit. We no longer live in a world of fame seeking hackers, script kiddies,
and cyber criminals—there are some new kids on the block. It’s important for
you to understand these motive and profile changes, since they dictate what
different types of hackers are ultimately after, whom they target, and how they
tend to do business. Knowing these things can be the key to helping your
understand which of your resources and assets need the most protection, and
how you might protect them.

With that in mind, I’d like to share some quick highlights about the three main
type of attackers I think plague us today:

1. The Hacktivist

Simply put, hacktivists are politically motivated cyber attackers. We’re all
familiar with traditional activists, including the more extreme ones. Over the past
five years, activist have realized the power of the Internet, and have started
using cyber attacks to get their political message across. A few examples of
hacktivist groups include the infamous Anonymous, and the more recent Syrian
Electronic Army. Most hacktivist groups tend to be decentralized and often not
extremely organized. For instance, there can be cases where one factor of
Anonymous may do things another factor doesn’t even agree with.

As disorganized as they may sound, these activist groups can cause significant
problems for governments and businesses. They tend to rely on fairly basic,
freely available “Skript Kiddie” tools. For instance, their most common weapon
is a DDoS attack, using tools like HOIC or LOIC. However, the more advanced
hacktivists also rely on web application attacks (like SQLi) to steal data from
certain targets, with the goal of embarrassing them—something they like to
call Doxing.

While hacktivists are arguably the least worrisome of today’s attackers, they still
have succeeded in causing havoc for many big companies and governments.
Since these hacktivist’s political agendas vary widely, even small businesses
can find themselves a target depending on the business they are in or
partnerships they have.

2. Cyber Criminals

You’re probably most familiar with the cyber criminal hacker profile, since
they’ve been around longer than the other two. This group’s motive is pretty
obvious; to make money using any means necessary.

Cyber criminal groups can range from a few lone actors who are just out for
themselves, to big cyber crime organizations, often financed and headed by
traditional criminal organizations. They are the group of hackers responsible for
stealing billions of dollars from consumers and businesses each year.

These criminal attackers participate in a rich underground economy, where they


buy, sell and trade attack toolkits, zero day exploit code, botnet services, and
much more. They also buy and sell the private information and intellectual
property they steal from victims. Lately, they’re focusing on web exploit kits,
such as Blackhole, Phoenix, and Nuclear Pack, which they use to automate and
simplify drive-by download attacks.

Their targets vary from small businesses and consumers, whom they attack
opportunistically, to large enterprises and industry verticals, who they target with
specific goals in mind. In a recent attack on the banking and credit card
industry, a very organized group of cyber criminals was able to steal 45 million
dollars globally from ATMs, in a highly synchronized fashion. The attack was
made possible due to an initial, targeted network breach against a few banks
and a payment processor company.

3. Nation States (or State-Sponsored Attackers)

The newest, and most concerning new threat actors are the state-sponsored
cyber attackers. These are government-funded and guided attackers, ordered
to launch operations from cyber espionage to intellectual property theft. These
attackers have the biggest bankroll, and thus can afford to hire the best talent to
create the most advanced, nefarious, and stealthy threats.
Nation state actors first appeared in the public eye during a few key cyber
security incidents around 2010, including:

 The Operation Aurora attack, where allegedly Chinese attackers


gained access to Google and many other big companies, and
supposedly stole intellectual property, as well as sensitive US
government surveillance information.
 The Stuxnet incident, where a nation state (likely the US) launched
an extremely advanced, sneaky, and targeted piece of malware that
not only hid on traditional computers for years, but also infected
programmable logic controllers (PLCs) used in centrifuges. The
attack was designed to damage Iran’s nuclear enrichment
capabilities.

Unlike the other hackers’ tools, state-sponsored attackers create very


customized and advanced attack code. Their attacks often incorporate
previously undiscovered software vulnerabilities, called zero day, which have no
fix or patch. They often leverage the most advanced attack and evasion
techniques into their attack, using kernel level rootkits, stenography, and
encryption to make it very difficult for you to discover their malware. They have
even been known to carry out multiple attacks to reach their ultimate target. For
instance, they might attack a software company to steal a legitimate digital
certificate, and then use that certificate to sign the code for their malware,
making it seem like it comes from a sanctioned provider. These advanced
attacks are what coined the new industry term, advanced persistent threat
(APT).

While you’d expect nation state attackers to have very specific targets, such as
government entities, critical infrastructure, and Fortune 500 enterprises, they
still pose some threat to average organizations as well. For instance,
sometimes these military attackers target smaller organizations as a stepping-
stone for a bigger attack. Furthermore, now that these advanced attacks and
malware samples have started to leak to the public, normal criminal hackers
have begun to adopt the advanced techniques, upping the level of traditional
malware as well.

Understanding the motives, capabilities, and tools of these three hacker profiles
gives you a better idea of what types of targets, resources, and data each one
is after. This knowledge should help cater your defenses to the types of attacker
you think are most relevant to the business or organization you protect.

Now that you know a little about your enemy, you can focus on getting to know
yourself, and match your defenses to your most likely enemy. Once you’ve
done that, you will not be imperiled in a hundred cyber battles. — Corey
Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

To spread the knowledge about today’s three main cyber threat actors,
WatchGuard has created a fun and fact-filled info-graphic. Check it out
below, and be sure to share it with your friends and co-workers to spread
the word.
WatchGuard profiles the three main classes of cyber attackers.
hacker profiles: the bad guys behind the latest cybersecurity attacks.

Get up close and personal with these hacker personalities. Learn to recognize them and
protect your cybernetic data!

Hacktivist

My motives: alter the state, look for virtual pranks and chaos to highlight the government and
large corporations, freeing terrorists, vigilantism, "Doxing", cyber protests, anarchy, fun.

My boss: myself and what I believe, totally decentralized.

My tools: Attack to web applications using freely available tools.

My methods: I use free kiddie skript tools to launch DDOS attacks or web application attacks to
try to hijack a legitimate website or steal data.

My hero: Guy Fawkes, the face of Anonymous.

My comrades: 4chan, Anonymous, LulzSec, Antisec.

My favorite drink: energy drinks.

My credibility on the street: I was responsible for 58% of all the data theft in 2011, but in 2012
my fellow hackers got a bigger piece of the pie.

my claims to fame: chanology of the project, recovery of the operation, activities of the Arab
spring, operation HBGary, Operation Ouraborus, Operation Megaupload, just to name a few.

Cyber Criminal

My reasons: identify the theft, credit card information, extortion (through ransonware or
DDOS), click on the account, pirate software, monetize the computer data in any way possible.

My boss: my financier, a traditional criminal organization that has decided to recruit children
who are experts in technology.

My tools: exploit kits sold in markets and underground Internet forums (or dark net) ... I also
buy and sell pre-packaged botnets and botnet modules.

My methods: I prefer web-based downloads, spam, clicking, installing rasonware and fake
software, and I can even use my victims to attack others.

My hero: Albert Gonzales, who stole more than 170 million credit and debit cards in two years.

My colleagues: other cybercriminals in the clandestine market, where we exchange piracy kits.

My favorite drink: Vodka.

My street credit: last year I received $ 20.7 billion of consumers.

My claims to fame: I recently completed a global bank robbery, stealing around $ 45 million in
ATMs.

National state
My motives: obtain intelligence from my enemies, cyber espionage, steal secrets from my
adversaries, disarm or destroy an enemy's military infrastructure, propaganda, distract an
enemy during a real attack.

My boss: my government

My tools: customized and advanced malware and toolkits designed for a very specific objective
(ie, Stuxnet, Flame, Gauss).

My methods: advanced persistent threats, zero-day exploits, rootkit technology, strong


encryption and many evasion techniques. I use customized malware for non-traditional
computer systems.

My hero: ugly gorilla (real name: Jack Wang).

My comrades: I only trust a few people within my government organization.

My favorite drink: a martini shake, not stirred.

My street cred: in the Aurora attacks of 2009, I introduced the watering hole attack and have
targeted over 30 large companies inclifing Google.

My Claims to Fame: Google Aurora attacks, New York Times hack, and other classified security
breaches.
Perfilando hackers modernos:
hacktivistas, delincuentes y espías
cibernéticos. ¡Oh mi!
30 de mayo de 2013Por Corey Nachreiner

Sun Tzu, el famoso estratega militar y autor de El arte de la guerra, era


conocido por el dicho: "Conoce a tu enemigo y conócete a ti mismo, y no
estarás en peligro en cien batallas". Si bien la verdadera intención de esta cita
es probable para recordarnos que conocer nuestras propias fortalezas y
debilidades es igualmente importante para conocer las de tu enemigo, no
puedo evitar simplificarlo a lo rudimentario, "conoce a tu enemigo".

Sospecho que la mayoría de los profesionales de la seguridad, incluido yo,


pasan mucho más tiempo analizando los aspectos técnicos y mecánicos del
delito cibernético que los aspectos sociales y psicológicos. Analizamos las
herramientas de malware y de ataque de los atacantes, analizamos su código y
exploramos las técnicas, pero no siempre estudiamos quiénes son y por qué
hacen lo que hacen. Según el general Tzu, esta es una buena forma de perder
muchas batallas.

Para comprender mejor la naturaleza de la amenaza cibernética, los


profesionales de seguridad deben actuar más como investigadores criminales y
considerar los medios, el motivo y la oportunidad . Tenemos los medios bajos
(herramientas y técnicas), pero algunos de nosotros debemos trabajar un poco
por motivos. Una de las formas de hacerlo es comprender los diferentes
perfiles de hackers.

En los últimos años, los perfiles y motivos de los piratas informáticos generales
han cambiado bastante. Ya no vivimos en un mundo de hackers en busca de
fama, delincuentes y delincuentes cibernéticos; hay algunos niños nuevos en la
cuadra. Es importante que comprenda estos cambios de motivo y perfil, ya que
dictan qué tipo de hackers persiguen, a quién apuntan y cómo tienden a hacer
negocios. Conocer estas cosas puede ser la clave para ayudarlo a comprender
cuáles de sus recursos y activos necesitan la mayor protección y cómo puede
protegerlos.

Con esto en mente, me gustaría compartir algunos momentos destacados


sobre los tres principales tipos de atacantes que creo que nos aquejan hoy en
día:

1. El Hacktivista

En pocas palabras, los hacktivistas son atacantes cibernéticos con


motivaciones políticas. Todos estamos familiarizados con los activistas
tradicionales, incluidos los más extremistas. En los últimos cinco años, los
activistas se han dado cuenta del poder de Internet y han comenzado a usar
ataques cibernéticos para transmitir su mensaje político. Algunos ejemplos de
grupos de hacktivistas incluyen el infame Anonymous y el ejército electrónico
sirio más reciente . La mayoría de los grupos de hacktivistas tienden a ser
descentralizados y, a menudo, no extremadamente organizados. Por ejemplo,
puede haber casos en que un factor de Anonymous pueda hacer cosas con las
que otro factor ni siquiera concuerda.

Por desorganizados que puedan parecer, estos grupos activistas pueden


causar problemas importantes para los gobiernos y las empresas. Tienden a
confiar en herramientas "Skript Kiddie" bastante básicas y de libre acceso. Por
ejemplo, su arma más común es un ataque DDoS, usando herramientas
como HOIC o LOIC . Sin embargo, los hacktivistas más avanzados también
confían en los ataques de aplicaciones web (como SQLi ) para robar datos de
ciertos objetivos, con el objetivo de avergonzarlos, algo que les gusta
llamar Doxing .

Mientras que los hacktivistas son posiblemente los menos preocupantes de los
atacantes de hoy, todavía han tenido éxito en causar estragos en muchas
grandes empresas y gobiernos. Dado que las agendas políticas de este
hacktivista varían ampliamente, incluso las pequeñas empresas pueden llegar
a ser un objetivo según el negocio en el que se encuentren o las asociaciones
que tengan.

2. Delincuentes cibernéticos

Probablemente estés más familiarizado con el perfil del pirata informático


cibernético, ya que han existido por más tiempo que los otros dos. El motivo de
este grupo es bastante obvio; para ganar dinero usando cualquier medio
necesario.

Los grupos delictivos cibernéticos pueden abarcar desde unos pocos actores
solitarios que se dedican solo a ellos mismos, hasta grandes organizaciones
del crimen cibernético, a menudo financiadas y encabezadas por
organizaciones delictivas tradicionales. Son el grupo de piratas informáticos
responsable de robar miles de millones de dólares a consumidores y empresas
cada año.

Estos atacantes criminales participan en una rica economía clandestina, donde


compran, venden y comercializan kits de herramientas de ataque, código de
explotación de día cero, servicios de botnet y mucho más. También compran y
venden la información privada y la propiedad intelectual que roban a las
víctimas. Últimamente, se están centrando en kits de exploits web, como
Blackhole, Phoenix y Nuclear Pack, que utilizan para automatizar y simplificar
los ataques de descarga drive-by.

Sus objetivos varían desde pequeñas empresas y consumidores, a quienes


atacan de manera oportunista, a grandes empresas y sectores verticales de la
industria, a quienes apuntan con objetivos específicos en mente. En un reciente
ataque a la industria de tarjetas bancarias y de crédito, un grupo muy
organizado de ciberdelincuentes fue capaz de robar 45 millones de dólares en
todo el mundo de los cajeros automáticos, de una manera altamente
sincronizada. El ataque fue posible debido a una violación inicial de la red
dirigida contra unos pocos bancos y una empresa procesadora de pagos.

3. Estados Nacionales (o Atacantes Patrocinados por el Estado)

Los nuevos y más preocupantes nuevos actores de amenazas son los


atacantes cibernéticos patrocinados por el estado. Estos son atacantes guiados
y financiados por el gobierno, ordenados a lanzar operaciones desde el
ciberespionaje hasta el robo de propiedad intelectual. Estos atacantes tienen el
bankroll más grande y, por lo tanto, pueden darse el lujo de contratar al mejor
talento para crear las amenazas más avanzadas, nefastas y furtivas.

Los actores del estado nacional aparecieron por primera vez en el ojo público
durante algunos incidentes de seguridad cibernética clave alrededor de 2010,
que incluyen:

 El ataque de la Operación Aurora , donde atacantes


supuestamente chinos obtuvieron acceso a Google y a
muchas otras grandes compañías, y supuestamente se
robaron la propiedad intelectual, así como información
sensible de vigilancia del gobierno de los EE . UU .
 El incidente de Stuxnet , donde un estado nación
(probablemente los EE. UU.) Lanzó una pieza de malware
extremadamente avanzada, furtiva y dirigida que no solo se
ocultó en las computadoras tradicionales durante años, sino
que también infectó los controladores lógicos programables
(PLC) utilizados en las centrífugas. El ataque fue diseñado
para dañar las capacidades de enriquecimiento nuclear de
Irán.

A diferencia de las otras herramientas de los hackers, los atacantes


patrocinados por el estado crean un código de ataque muy personalizado y
avanzado. Sus ataques a menudo incorporan vulnerabilidades de software
previamente desconocidas, llamadas cero días, que no tienen solución o
parche. A menudo aprovechan las técnicas más avanzadas de ataque y
evasión en su ataque, utilizando rootkits de nivel kernel, estenografía y
encriptación para que sea muy difícil para usted descubrir su malware. Incluso
se sabe que realizan múltiples ataques para alcanzar su objetivo final. Por
ejemplo, podrían atacar a una compañía de software para robar un certificado
digital legítimo, y luego usar ese certificado para firmar el código de su
malware, haciendo que parezca que proviene de un proveedor
sancionado. Estos ataques avanzados son los que acuñaron el nuevo término
de la industria,amenaza persistente avanzada (APT) .

Si bien se espera que los atacantes del estado nación tengan objetivos muy
específicos, como las entidades gubernamentales, la infraestructura crítica y
las empresas Fortune 500, también representan una amenaza para las
organizaciones promedio. Por ejemplo, a veces estos atacantes militares
apuntan a organizaciones más pequeñas como un trampolín para un ataque
más grande. Además, ahora que estos ataques avanzados y muestras de
malware han comenzado a filtrarse al público, los hackers criminales normales
han comenzado a adoptar las técnicas avanzadas, aumentando también el
nivel del malware tradicional.

Comprender los motivos, las capacidades y las herramientas de estos tres


perfiles de piratas informáticos le ofrece una mejor idea de los tipos de
objetivos, recursos y datos que cada uno busca. Este conocimiento debería
ayudarlo a proteger sus defensas de los tipos de atacante que considere más
relevantes para la empresa u organización que protege.

Ahora que sabes un poco sobre tu enemigo, puedes centrarte en conocerte a ti


mismo y unir tus defensas con tu enemigo más probable. Una vez que hayas
hecho eso, no estarás en peligro en cien batallas cibernéticas. - Corey
Nachreiner, CISSP ( @SecAdept )

Para difundir el conocimiento sobre los tres principales actores


cibernéticos actuales, WatchGuard ha creado un gráfico de información
divertido y lleno de hechos. Compruébelo abajo, y asegúrese de
compartirlo con sus amigos y compañeros de trabajo para correr la voz.
WatchGuard perfila las tres clases principales de atacantes cibernéticos.

perfiles de hackers: los malos detrás de los últimos ataques de ciberseguridad.


Conozca de cerca y personal a estas personalidades de hackers. ¡Aprenda a
reconocerlos y proteger sus datos cibernéticos!

Hacktivist
Mis motivos: alterar el estado, buscar bromas y caos virtuales para destacar al
gobierno y las grandes corporaciones, liberar terroristas, vigilancia, "Doxing", protestas
cibernéticas, anarquía, diversión.
Mi jefe: yo mismo y lo que creo, totalmente descentralizado.
Mis herramientas: ataque a aplicaciones web utilizando herramientas disponibles
gratuitamente.
Mis métodos: uso herramientas skript kiddie gratuitas para lanzar ataques DDOS o
ataques de aplicaciones web para intentar secuestrar un sitio web legítimo o robar
datos.
Mi héroe: Guy Fawkes, el rostro de Anonymous.
Mis camaradas: 4chan, Anonymous, LulzSec, Antisec.
Mi bebida favorita: bebidas energéticas.
Mi credibilidad en la calle: fui responsable del 58% de todo el robo de datos en 2011,
pero en 2012 mis compañeros hackers obtuvieron un pedazo más grande del pastel.
mis reclamos a la fama: chanología del proyecto, recuperación de la operación,
actividades de la primavera árabe, operación HBGary, Operación Ouraborus,
Operación Megaupload, solo por nombrar algunos.

Cyber Criminal
Mis razones: identifique el robo, la información de la tarjeta de crédito, la extorsión (a
través de ransonware o DDOS), haga clic en la cuenta, software pirata, monetice los
datos de la computadora de cualquier manera posible.
Mi jefe: mi financista, una organización criminal tradicional que ha decidido reclutar
niños expertos en tecnología.
Mis herramientas: kits de exploits vendidos en mercados y foros subterráneos de
Internet (o redes oscuras) ... También compro y vendo botnets preempaquetados y
módulos de botnets.
Mis métodos: prefiero las descargas basadas en la web, el correo no deseado, hacer
clic, instalar el software rasonware y falso, e incluso puedo usar a mis víctimas para
atacar a los demás.
Mi héroe: Albert Gonzales, quien robó más de 170 millones de tarjetas de crédito y
débito en dos años.
Mis colegas: otros ciberdelincuentes en el mercado clandestino, donde
intercambiamos kits de piratería.
Mi bebida favorita: Vodka.
Mi crédito callejero: el año pasado recibí $ 20,7 mil millones de consumidores.
Mis reclamos a la fama: Recientemente completé un robo bancario global, robando
alrededor de $ 45 millones en cajeros automáticos.

Estado nacional
Mis motivos: obtener inteligencia de mis enemigos, espionaje cibernético, robar
secretos de mis adversarios, desarmar o destruir la infraestructura militar de un
enemigo, propaganda, distraer a un enemigo durante un ataque real.
Mi jefe: mi gobierno
Mis herramientas: malware y kits de herramientas personalizados y avanzados
diseñados para un objetivo muy específico (es decir, Stuxnet, Flame, Gauss).
Mis métodos: amenazas persistentes avanzadas, exploits de día cero, tecnología de
rootkit, encriptación fuerte y muchas técnicas de evasión. Utilizo malware
personalizado para sistemas informáticos no tradicionales.
Mi héroe: gorila feo (nombre real: Jack Wang).
Mis camaradas: solo confío en unas pocas personas dentro de mi organización
gubernamental.
Mi bebida favorita: un licuado de martini, sin agitar.
Mi credibilidad en la calle: en los atentados de Aurora de 2009, presenté el ataque al
abrevadero y apunté a más de 30 grandes compañías que incluyen a Google.
Mis reclamos a la fama: ataques de Google Aurora, pirateo del New York Times y
otras violaciones de seguridad clasificadas.