You are on page 1of 231

 

 
 

City of Easthampton, 
Massachusetts 
 Fiscal Year 2019 Budget 
 

 
 
Mayor Nicole LaChapelle 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 

Table of Contents 
 

Mayor’s Message ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…5 
Part I  ‐ Community  
City Organizational Chart………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……7  
Citizens Guide to the Budget…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……8  
Community Profile……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………………..9  
Part II  ‐ Overview and Summary  
Balance Budget Overview…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……….11  
Revenue Summary…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………….12 
Expenditure Summaries……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……….18  
Part III  ‐ Budget Detail  
Section 1 – General Government   
City Council ................................................................................................................................................. 34 
Mayor and City Attorney ............................................................................................................................ 35 
Auditor ........................................................................................................................................................ 40 
Assessor ...................................................................................................................................................... 44 
Finance ........................................................................................................................................................ 46 
Technology .................................................................................................................................................. 50 
Human Resources ....................................................................................................................................... 53 
City Clerk ..................................................................................................................................................... 58 
Elections ...................................................................................................................................................... 61 
Planning ...................................................................................................................................................... 63 
Section 2 ‐ Public Safety  
Police Department ...................................................................................................................................... 71 
Dispatch ...................................................................................................................................................... 83 
Fire and Ambulance .................................................................................................................................... 86 
Building Inspection Services ....................................................................................................................... 90 
Section 3 ‐ Education  
Education .................................................................................................................................................... 93 
Section 4 ‐ Public Works  
Public Works ............................................................................................................................................... 97 
Cemetery ................................................................................................................................................... 109 


 
 

Tree Warden ............................................................................................................................................. 112 
Section 5 ‐ Human Services  
Board of Health ......................................................................................................................................... 115 
Council on Aging ....................................................................................................................................... 118 
Veterans Services ...................................................................................................................................... 122 
Section 6 ‐ Culture and Recreation   
Emily Wilson Library ................................................................................................................................. 125 
Parks and Recreation ................................................................................................................................ 129 
Section 7 ‐ Debt  
Debt and Interest ...................................................................................................................................... 135 
Section 8 ‐ Unclassified  
Retirement ................................................................................................................................................ 139 
Workers Compensation ............................................................................................................................ 140 
Medicare Expense ..................................................................................................................................... 141 
Employee Benefits .................................................................................................................................... 142 
Liability Insurance ..................................................................................................................................... 143 
Reserve Fund ............................................................................................................................................ 144 
Unemployment ......................................................................................................................................... 145 
Section 9 ‐ Community Presvation Act  
Community Preservation Act .................................................................................................................... 147 
Section 10 ‐ Enterprise  
Enterprise .................................................................................................................................................. 150 
Part IV  ‐ Appendicies  
A. Glossary of Term  
B. Fund Descriptions and Balances  
C. Enterprise Indirect Charges 
D. Net School Spending Estimates 
E. School Budget Document  
F. CPA Priority Project List  
 

   

 
 

MAYOR’S MESSAGE 
 

April 18, 2018 

Dear President McCoy and Members of the City Council: 

As your mayor, I have worked tirelessly to craft a budget that reflects our city’s promise, 
vibrancy, and potential. I am pleased to submit the City of Easthampton’s proposed budget 
for fiscal year 2019. The proposed budget includes funds for the general operation and 
maintenance of the municipal government, education, and debt service. 

In this proposed budget, I am eager to premiere a new budget format. Based on the 
Government Financial Officials Association (GFOA) model, the new format presents critical 
city information in a transparent and accessible way for municipal leadership and to the 
people of Easthampton. The GFOA model incorporates guidelines established by the 
National Advisory Council on State and Local Budgeting and the GFOA's best practices on 
budgeting. The FY2019 budget represents a new beginning and the concentrated efforts of 
my administration to uphold transparency and efficiency at City Hall. 

Because of each resident’s belief in Easthampton, we secure our city’s progress. The 
proposed fiscal 2019 budget includes expenditures of $41,485,530 balanced by non‐tax levy 
revenues totaling $16,998,435 and estimated tax levy of $24,487,095. Of the tax levy, 
$1,443,950 funds the voted debt exclusions for the school building design, and new school 
building (Easthampton High School).  Results of the tax levy reflect dedicated revenue that 
offset expenditures, which are recognized Excluded Debt Service. The FY2019 operating 
budget represents $1,178,169 or a 2.92% increase over last year’s budget. 

We began the development of the FY2019 budget as we learned that Easthampton’s net 
state aid decrease by 1.4% in the Governor’s budget proposal. Undoubtedly, this budget 
year was challenging for my administration. Nevertheless, our city’s municipal leaders came 
together to carefully review all spending requests. We have identified those that are most 
critical to delivering the services for our community. 

The intention of Easthampton is all around us – as we walk along the reservoir, as we share 
meals and drive to work, as our children grow and graduate, as we grieve, and as we 
celebrate. These daily commitments to Easthampton capture our collective and individual 
identities and reaffirm our city’s vibrancy and vitality. The energy in Easthampton is 

 
 

CITY ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
City Clerk

City Council Auditor

Assessor

Parks
Culture and 
Recreation 
Cemetery

Highway

Highway Garage

Engineering 
Board of  Public 
Works
Water

Sewer
Citizen Voters

Waste Water 

Zoning 
Planning 
CPA

Mayor
Veterans Services
Human Services
Council on Aging 

Board of Public 
Health Agent
Health

Fire

Building
Public Saftey 
Police

Dispatch 

Finance Treasurer/Collector

Human Resourses

Information 
School Committee Education 
Technology

 

 
 

CITIZENS GUIDE TO THE BUDGET 
 
This document is intended to assist the reader in better understanding one of the most important documents 
produced by our community. The annual budget document is much more than just numbers; it is a reflection of 
our community’s values, priorities, and goals. The budget document serves as a policy document, a financial 
guide and a communications device to our residents. To this end, it is designed to be as user‐friendly as possible. 
This guide was created to help orient interested readers by providing a brief overview of the budget process, as 
well as, an explanation of the organization of the budget document itself. We hope you find this introductory 
guide a useful tool providing the latest financial and planning information for the City of Easthampton. 

 
THE BUDGET PROCESS  BUDGET CALENDAR 
   
The City of Easthampton operates under state statutes  July  
and the Home Rule Charter as amended to establish  Fiscal Year begins July 1st 
the Mayor‐Council form of government. The legislative   
body of the city is a nine‐member City Council, with   
five members representing each of the city’s wards  October/November  
and four members elected at‐large.   Free Cash / Retained Earnings Certification 
   
The City Charter provides for the Division of Powers  January 
such that the administration of the fiscal, prudential   Budget packets sent out to Department Heads 
and municipal affairs Easthampton, with the   
government thereof, shall be vested in an   February 
executive/administrative branch headed by a Mayor,   Department Budget Requests due to Mayor  
and a legislative branch to consist of a City Council.   
The legislative branch shall never exercise any  March 
executive/administrative power and the   Mayor meets with Department Heads to review 
executive/administrative branch shall never exercise  budgetary needs before April 1st  
any legislative power.   
  April 
The annual budget planning process starts with a joint   School Committee approves School budget  
meeting in January of the Mayor, City Council, and  Mayor’s Proposed Budget submitted to City Council by 
School Committee to review relevant financial  April 18th  
information and forecasts. Under the Charter, the   
Mayor must submit the proposed annual budget to  May 
council by May 15. The School budget is submitted to  City Council public hearings 
the Mayor at least 10 days beforehand. The Council   
will hold a public hearing on the budget and must act  June  
within 45 days of its submission. The Council may  City Council budget approval  
reduce or delete any line items, but it cannot add to  Fiscal Year ends June 30th 
any line item. The budget takes effect at the start of   
the next fiscal year on July 1.    
   
 


 
 

COMMUNITY PROFILE 
   
 
Name: City of Easthampton  Easthampton, Massachusetts 
   
   
Settled: 1664 
 
 
Incorporated as a Town: 1785 
 
 
Incorporated as a City: 1996 
 
 
Land Area: 13.4 square miles 
 
 
 
 
Easthampton, a city with a little over 16,000 residents, is located in the 
Public Roads: 92 miles  fertile Connecticut River Valley of Western Massachusetts and is rich in 
  the flavor of an industrial New England village. 
  Easthampton has evolved from a rural farming village to a flourishing 
County: Hampshire  mill town and now to a vibrant and diverse community with a wealth of 
  artists, retail shops, award‐winning restaurants and numerous 
  recreational opportunities. Our old mill buildings, once bustling with 
Population: 16,059  manufacturing enterprises, now buzz with the excitement of creative 
  and cultural activities.  
 
 
Form of Government: 
Mayor‐ City Council  
The new boardwalk, surrounding the Nashawannuck Pond in the center 
  of the city, serves as a gathering place for many and affords our 
FY2018 Tax Rate per Thousand:  residents and guests with an array of opportunities for leisure activity. 
$16.00   Our six‐mile‐long bike path, which runs from the Southampton border 
  all the way to the Oxbow section of the Connecticut River, provides 
2018 Average Single Family Home  opportunities for many segments of the population to enjoy such 
Value: $239,362  activities as a leisurely walk, a fast‐paced run, roller‐blade, and, of 
  course, bicycling for all ages. Our monthly Art Walk affords arts and 
  entertainment and has been increasing in popularity since its inception 
FY2018 Municipal Operating 
in 2006. 
Budget: 40,307,360  
 
 
  The City of Easthampton provides a broad range of general government 
Address:  services including police and fire protection; water and sewer; public 
City of Easthampton   works; parks and recreation; a senior center; and a library. 
Municipal Offices  Easthampton’s Public School Department consists of grades  
50 Payson Ave  Pre‐kindergarten through twelfth grade. Easthampton has three 
Easthampton, MA 01027  elementary schools, Maple, Center, and Pepin, a middle school, White 
www.easthampton.org  Brook. In 2013, Easthampton constructed a new state of the art high 
  school. 
 


 
 

Budget Summaries 

   

10 
 
 

BALANCED BUDGET 
 

Revenues    BUDGET    % of  % 


FY2018   RECOMMEND  Total  Change  
FY2019  
            
 Tax Levy (Property Tax)   23,664,122  24,487,095   59.03%  3.48% 
                
 Local receipts    3,171,000   3,488,909   8.41%  10.03% 
                
 Cherry Sheet (Net)    8,970,888   8,843,026   21.32%  ‐1.43% 
                
 Enterprise Revenue   3,994,540   4,184,094   10.09%  4.75% 
                        
 CPA Revenue    486,000   461,596   1.11%  ‐5.02% 
                            
 Other Financing Source   20,810   20,810   0.05%  0.00% 
            
 Total Revenue   40,307,360  41,485,530      2.92% 
                                                
1.00           
                
 1‐ General Government    1,647,816   1,778,351   4.29%  7.92% 
                
 2‐ Public Safety    5,323,941   5,409,304   13.04%  1.60% 
            
 3‐ Education    16,929,214  17,232,798   41.54%  1.79% 
                
 4‐ Public Works    1,680,503   1,740,663   4.20%  3.58% 
                        
 5‐ Human Services   635,967   633,203   1.53%  ‐0.43% 
                        
 6‐ Culture & Recreation   543,171   561,650   1.35%  3.40% 
                
 7‐ Debt & Interest   2,182,080   2,332,671   5.62%  6.90% 
                
 8‐ Unclassified   8,503,421   8,905,772   21.47%  4.73% 
                        
 9‐ CPA    486,000   461,596   1.11%  ‐5.02% 
                
 10‐ Enterprise   2,375,248   2,429,522   5.86%  2.29% 
            
 Expense Total   40,307,360  41,485,530      2.92% 
 

11 
 
 

Easthampton Revnue History 
30,000,000

25,000,000

20,000,000

15,000,000

10,000,000

5,000,000

0
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019

Cherry Sheet Taxes Local Reciepts CPA Enterprise


 

12 
 
 

REVENUE SUMMARY  

The city’s General Fund revenue (excluding the Water & Sewer Enterprise and CPA Funds) is divided 
into four main categories: property taxes, state aid, departmental receipts and available funds.  

Property Taxes  

Property taxes are the single largest revenue source for the city and historically provide 
approximately 66.5% of the General Fund budget.  Typically, a year to year variation of 1% or 2% is 
the result of external factors beyond the city’s control, such as the level of State Aid, building activity, 
or fluctuations in interest rates.  

Property taxes are levied on real property (land & buildings) and personal property used by 
Easthampton’s non‐manufacturing business firms.  In accordance with State law, the Board of Assessors 
determines the fair market value of all property every three years. Easthampton’s next revaluation will 
be performed during FY2020; however, interim adjustments are performed each year when a full 
revaluation is not required.  

Under the provisions of Proposition 2½, property taxes may not exceed 2½ percent of their “full and fair 
cash value.”  This limit is known as the “levy ceiling.”  Additionally, annual levy increases may not exceed 
2½ percent more than the previous year’s levy plus the taxes from any new growth value.  Any 
Proposition 2½ override or debt exclusion amounts approved on the Annual Election Ballot are also 
added to the levy limit.      

As the city’s primary revenue source, property taxes are expected to increase in FY2019 by 
approximately $822,972 to 24.5 million.  This increase includes the 2.5% increase of $562,109, a slight 
increase of $150,000 in estimated taxes from projected new growth. The value of new growth is 
budgeted conservatively at $9,375,000 million.  A conservative approach is necessary because new 
growth revenue is derived from the value of new development and other growth in the tax base. The 
rate of this development is greatly influenced and ultimately determined by economic factors in the 
private sector.  

   

13 
 
 

Tax Rate Recapitulation Sheet (RECAP) 
 

LEVY LIMIT  % 
CALCULATION  FY2018  FY2019  Change 
Prior Year Levy Limit  21,702,528  22,484,346 
Add 2.5%  542,563  562,109 
Add New Growth  239,255  150,000 
Add Overrides  0  0 
True LEVY LIMIT  22,484,346  23,196,455 
Add Debt Exclusions  1,408,500  1,443,950 
Amortization   (3,310)  (3,310) 
Adjusted LEVY LIMIT  23,889,536  24,637,095 
Overlay   (204,521.45)  (150,000.00)
Excess Levy Capacity  (20,892.26) 
Revenue  23,664,122  24,487,095  3.48% 
 
 

State Aid  

State aid is Easthampton’s second largest revenue source and represents approximately 24% of the 
General Fund budget.  Together, state aid and local property taxes account for approximately 90.5% of 
the General Fund budget.  The current budget model assumes State Aid will increase ½ % to 
$11,332,286 million.  The estimate is based upon the Governor’s FY2019 Budget which was released on 
January 24, 2018.   

Assessments  

Assessments are charges to the municipality from the State of Massachusetts, and these are 
subtracted in advance from the amount of state aid provided to the city.  The result of this operation 
is the net amount of money Easthampton receives in state funding, and it is the best comparative 
measure of Easthampton’s state assistance in relation to the prior year. Given the total value of 
assessments unknown at the time the city’s budget is created, the city has chosen to proceed with 
the Governor’s Budget figures for the FY2019 budget. The increase in assessments used in this 
budget model shows a net decrease in State Aid of 1.4% for fiscal 2019. 

It is important to note that state aid as a percentage of the budget has decreased over the past ten 
years, shifting the cost of operations to the local taxpayer.  Easthampton is only now receiving State Aid 
at levels comparable to FY2008; however, this amount is in nominal dollars and does not take into 
consideration the effect of inflation over the past 10 years. Additionally, during the same period of time, 
Easthampton’s state assessments for School Choice and Charter Sending Tuition has increased by 50% to 
over $2 million in assessments, now representing 5% of the city’s budget. 

14 
 
 

Departmental Receipts  

The third largest source of revenue for the General Fund in the budget is Departmental Receipts, which 
includes a variety of fees, permits, fines and licensing‐related monies that the city receives, as well as 
interest that is earned on investments or on overdue tax bills.  The total budgeted Departmental 
Receipts for FY2019 are estimated at $3,488,909 million.  

The single largest source of revenue within the Departmental Receipts category is the approximately 
$1.728 million received for motor vehicle excise taxes, which is a State tax collected by the 
municipality for its own use.    

15 
 
 

Other Available Funds   

The last category of city revenue are monies in various Special Revenue funds available for 
appropriation from prior years. Other sources of Available Funds to be used in FY2019 are projected 
to include special revenue offsets in departmental budgets, such as $2,500 in Cemetery Sale of Lots 
income, $2,500 in the Parking Fund, and $10,000 from the Williston Gift Fund. 

In addition, there will be a transfer of $3,310 from amortizable bond premiums. Amortizable bond 
premiums are funds that were received when bonds or notes were issued for debt excluded projects.  
The total net premiums are allocated over the term of the obligation, held in reserve and then 
transferred to offset the amount of the debt exclusion added to the tax rate. 

Community Preservation Act (CPA) Funds  

Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 44B (CPA) allows communities to create a local Community 
Preservation fund for open space protection, historic preservation, affordable housing and outdoor 
recreation. Easthampton adopted the Community Preservation in 2001. CPA monies are raised 
locally through the imposition of a surcharge of 3% of the tax levy against real property and receive a 
match from the state’s Community Preservation Trust Fund.   

The CPA state matching funds, generated by fees collected from the Registry of Deeds, has declined 
significantly over the years, from as high as $331,694 in FY2014 to $126,467 in FY2018 and this figure 
is projected to decrease further in 2019.

   

16 
 
 

Enterprise Funds  

Water and Sewer services are operated as enterprise funds. Briefly, an enterprise fund as authorized 
under Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 44 §53F½ is a separate accounting and financial 
reporting mechanism for municipal services for which a fee is charged in exchange for goods or 
services. It allows a community to demonstrate to the public the portion of total costs of a service 
that is recovered through user charges and the portion that is subsidized by the tax levy, if any. With 
an enterprise fund, all costs of service delivery—direct, indirect, and capital costs—are identified. 
This allows the community to recover total service costs through user fees if it chooses. In 
Easthampton, the Water and Sewer departments are fully independent, meaning they do not require 
a subsidy from the tax levy. 

Enterprise
5,000,000
4,500,000
4,000,000
3,500,000
3,000,000
2,500,000
2,000,000
1,500,000
1,000,000
500,000
0
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
 

17 
 
 

The following is a summary of the city’s budget, which details the 2.92% increase allowable under the 
current revenue projections. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 
 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 
 1‐ General Government   
 1110‐ City Council               31,350         31,914          36,695          41,320                40,970 
 1210‐ Mayor             117,128        120,918        126,594         162,700              128,200 
 1220‐ License Board                    334                857             1,800            1,700                           ‐ 
 1350‐ Auditor             140,052        128,039        131,343        134,015             134,015 
 1410‐ Assessor             103,745           92,361           92,175         101,917               97,721 
 1450‐ Finance              322,941        320,199        321,179        378,151              368,751 
 1451‐ Technology             180,478        187,040         194,374         219,571             212,168 
 1510‐ City Attorney                27,129          19,231           25,700           25,820          50,000 
 1520‐ Human Resources             119,328        117,947        128,075       192,685            152,935 
 1610‐ City Clerk             110,087       110,158       113,648       115,221             114,921 
 1620‐ Elections               29,066   30,090    26,100   33,475         33,475 
 1720‐ Planning             129,389  137,073  156,263  161,481       161,481 
 1920‐ Building Operations             274,365  266,319   291,370  283,714       283,714 
 1980‐ Manhan Rail Trail                 2,500      2,500       2,500     2,500  
 1‐ General Government  Total          1,587,891  1,564,646  1,647,816  1,854,270   1,778,351 
 2‐ Public Safety   
 2100‐ Police          2,437,165  2,452,328  2,555,044  2,771,133   2,597,058 
 2103‐ Crossing Guards               35,398     35,235    39,600     44,600         39,800 
 2150‐ Detention               15,250   15,350     15,350     15,350          15,350 
 2170‐ Dispatch              237,784   279,787  287,602   275,556      275,556 
 2200‐ Fire          2,135,599  2,028,516  2,000,340  2,145,022   2,039,876 
 2310‐ Ambulance             336,041   312,784   314,025  358,005       330,294 
 2410‐ Inspection Services             102,023    90,555    94,480     94,084        93,869 
 2920‐ Animal Control               11,961     14,074    17,500   17,500         17,500 
 2‐ Public Safety  Total          5,311,220  5,228,629  5,323,941  5,721,250    5,409,304 
 3‐ Education   
 3000‐ Education        16,154,575  16,437,191  6,929,214  17,267,798   17,232,798 
 3‐ Education  Total        16,154,575  16,437,191  16,929,214  17,267,798   17,232,798 
 4‐ Public Works   
 4010‐ DPW Admin             206,502  207,412        208,963        171,938             171,938 
 4100‐ Fuel             106,574           96,787         138,043         137,000        137,000 
 4110‐ Engineering               61,289           73,911    75,012         143,892        143,892 
 4210‐ Highway             520,452  910,118         603,015         817,382              632,382 
 4230‐ Snow Emergency              267,332         519,495        200,000         200,000       200,000 
 4240‐ Street Lights               93,477           77,115        105,000        105,000        105,000 
 4250‐ Motor Repair             145,432        106,184         105,291        109,458             109,458 
 4260‐ Traffic             104,386          86,567           95,000         100,000         100,000 
 4300‐ Recycling & Hazardous              23,168          21,556           27,100           27,350          27,100 
Waste  
 4380‐ Landfill               30,321          40,174          40,000          33,000         33,000 
 4910‐ Brookside Cemetery               55,001          55,832          58,380          53,193          53,193 
 4920‐ Main Street Cemetery                 5,270            3,455              5,500             5,500           1,000 
 4951‐ Tree Warden               23,150          19,832           19,200          26,700          26,700 
 4‐ Public Works  Total          1,642,354      2,218,437    1,680,503     1,930,413   1,740,663 

18 
 
 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY (CONTINUED) 
 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
   
5‐ Human Services           
 5120‐ Board of Health               79,010  80,387   85,843   90,881       82,744 
 5410‐ Council on Aging             161,390  158,971   169,778     157,774       166,391 
 5430‐ Veterans Services               33,216  34,529  35,346  35,346   34,068 
 5440‐ Veterans Benefits             340,810  363,123  345,000  350,000   350,000 
 5‐ Human Services Total             614,426  637,010  635,967  634,001   633,203 
 6‐ Culture & Recreation  
 6100‐ Library             203,122   205,699  208,247       317,146            210,831 
 6310‐ Recreation              108,662       111,493        114,358        119,583     119,583 
 6500‐ Park             247,435  247,797  220,216  228,736    231,236 
 6920‐ Memorial & Veterans Day                     343        341       350                ‐ 
 6‐ Culture & Recreation Total             559,562  565,331  543,171  665,465   561,650 
 7‐ Debt & Interest  
 7100‐ Debt Principal          1,773,716  1,840,788  1,655,251  1,841,675   1,841,675 
 7500‐ Debt Interest             543,735    517,239  526,829  490,996       490,996 
 7‐ Debt & Interest Total          2,317,450  2,358,026  2,182,080  2,332,671   2,332,671 
 8‐ Unclassified  
 9111‐ Contributory Retirement          2,577,998  2,719,728  2,840,817  2,982,646   2,982,646 
 9120‐ Workers Compensation             144,999  180,520  187,675  194,461     194,461 
 9121 ‐ Employer Share            258,372  276,353  270,000  290,000    290,000 
Medicare  
 9140‐ Employee Benefits          3,797,827  4,155,925  4,674,729  5,527,427   4,908,466 
 9450‐ Liability Insurance             242,173  245,951  280,199  280,199    280,199 
 9510‐ Reserve Fund                       ‐                        ‐    200,000  200,000      200,000 
 9511‐ Unemployment                70,000         70,000           50,000         50,000        50,000 
 8‐ Unclassified Total          7,091,369  7,648,477  8,503,421  9,524,734   8,905,772 
 9‐ CPA   
 CPA          1,140,216  622,525  486,000  461,596   461,596 
 9‐ CPA  Total          1,140,216  622,525  486,000  461,596    461,596 
 10‐ Enterprise  
 4410‐ Sewer             421,665  416,578  438,076  802,787    442,787 
 4460‐ Waste Water          1,211,945  1,088,786  1,134,809  1,154,509   1,154,509 
 4462‐ Sewer/WWTP Reserve                       ‐                        ‐     15,000    15,000         15,000 
 4500‐ Water          1,088,257  821,917  772,363  802,227     802,227 
 4506‐ Water Reserve                       ‐                        ‐     15,000    15,000        15,000 
 10‐ Enterprise Total          2,721,868  2,327,281  2,375,248  2,789,522   2,429,522 
 Grand Total        39,140,931  39,607,554  40,307,360  43,181,720   41,485,530 
 

  

   

19 
 
 

General Government  

The first budget category is General Government. This category includes the offices and departments 
that support the direct service departments of the city through overall management, legal services, 
financial management (including collecting of revenues and the maintenance of financial records), 
and the administration of elections, management information systems, personnel administration and 
related ancillary services. General Government also includes planning and conservation services. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 1‐ General Government   
 1110‐ City Council               31,350         31,914          36,695          41,320                40,970 
 1210‐ Mayor             117,128        120,918        126,594         162,700              128,200 
 1220‐ License Board                    334                857             1,800            1,700                           ‐ 
 1350‐ Auditor             140,052        128,039        131,343        134,015             134,015 
 1410‐ Assessor             103,745           92,361           92,175         101,917               97,721 
 1450‐ Finance              322,941        320,199        321,179        378,151              368,751 
 1451‐ Technology             180,478        187,040         194,374         219,571             212,168 
 1510‐ City Attorney                27,129          19,231           25,700           25,820          50,000 
 1520‐ Human Resources             119,328        117,947        128,075       192,685            152,935 
 1610‐ City Clerk             110,087       110,158       113,648       115,221             114,921 
 1620‐ Elections               29,066   30,090    26,100   33,475         33,475 
 1720‐ Planning             129,389  137,073  156,263  161,481       161,481 
 1920‐ Building Operations             274,365  266,319   291,370  283,714       283,714 
 1980‐ Manhan Rail Trail                 2,500      2,500       2,500     2,500  
 1‐ General Government  Total          1,587,891  1,564,646  1,647,816  1,854,270   1,778,351 
 

In FY2019 General Government is budgeted at 1.778 million, which is an overall increase of 7.92%. In 
late FY2018, the Mayor’s Office implemented a revision to many city departments as part of a good 
government initiative to streamline government operations in the interest of simplicity for city 
residents, clarity for city employees, and a long‐term reduction in cost through the elimination of 
redundancy. As a result, some costs that formerly resided under different sections of the budget are 
now centralized in General Government, including personnel, legal services, and information 
technology. 

The following represent significant changes for General Government Departments: 

City Council:  

The increase in of $4,275 is primarily due to a salary increase for City Council members. 

20 
 
 

Executive Office: (Mayor’s Office, License Board, City Attorney)   

There are no significant changes contained in the Executive Office budget. Overall, the budget is 
increasing $24,106 in FY2019, which reflects an increase in the City Attorney budget, while 
decreasing the legal expense lines in other departments such as personnel and education. 

Finance and Personnel:  

Increases on this line are $72,432.  Again this increase is due to the reorganization and centralization 
of services to provide more compressive services to city employees as well as increase services to the 
public.  There are three major changes:  

 Centralization of collection: In March of 2018, the city moved the collection of water and sewer 
payments from the Public Works Department to the Collector’s Office. While this is an increase 
to the General Government expense line (in this case that of the Finance Department), this 
actually represents a reduction of half a full‐time city employee (FTE) along with further savings 
from the consolidation of services. Correspondingly there are decreases in the DPW 
Administration budget. Citizens of Easthampton benefit from this move by having a single point 
of contact for all bill collections, and the Collector’s Office now has better employee coverage to 
ensure the efficiency of residents’ experience 
 Centralization of Human Resources: Over the past few years, the city has been working to 
consolidate all payroll services in the Finance Department through the Treasurer’s Office in order 
simplify systems, eliminate redundancy, and increase accountability.  In FY2018, separate payroll 
services were eliminated from the School Department and the Public Works Department, 
reducing the total number of payroll systems from the original six separate systems to the 
current three systems.  The remaining Public Safety payroll systems in the Police and Fire 
Departments will likely consolidate within the next two years. City employees benefit from 
having a single point of contact for payroll concerns, and while a half‐time FTE equivalent was 
added to the Finance Department, the relieved individual departments reduce the redundant 
labor costs associated with this activity.  In addition, personnel services and legal services are 
now centralized in General Government managed by the Mayor’s Office for similar reasons  
 Implementation of new payroll system: This past December, the city retired its antiquated payroll 
software in favor of hiring an external payroll service.  This has resulted in greater efficiency, 
improved state and federal reporting, and a more user‐friendly self‐service system for city 
employees 

Technology:  

The FY2019 Technology budget represents an increase of $17,795. Factors contributing to the 
increase include centralization of services as the School Department and the city’s Technology 
Department are merging, the costs of software that were previously paid by the Enterprise Fund are 
now part of Technology budget, and are assessed to the Enterprise Fund through the indirect charge 
agreement (see appendix C for the detailed agreement). Additionally, telephone services, formerly 
managed by the Personnel Department, were moved to the Technology Department with the 
upgrade of the telephone system. 

21 
 
 

Elections:  

The budget for Elections represents an increase of $7,375, due to the two scheduled elections in 
FY2019 ‐ the Massachusetts State Primary Election scheduled on Sept. 4, 2018 and the 
Massachusetts State General Election scheduled on Nov. 6, 2018. 

Planning: 

The Planning budget has increased $5,218, or 3.34%. The FY2019 budget increase reflects a 
reorganization and changes to office staff during 2018: 

•    A new planner was hired in February 2018 
•    The Grants Coordinator position remains vacant after a retirement in the department 
•    A part‐time Conservation Agent was hired in November 2017 
•    The part‐time Assistant Planner position was increased to in December 2017 
 
 
Manhan Rail Tail  
 
 This budget has moved to the Culture and Recreation section of the budget, under the Parks 
department  
 

   

22 
 
 

Public Safety  

Public Safety consists of Police, Fire, Dispatch, Inspections & Enforcement, Public Health, and Animal 
Control Services. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 
 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 2‐ Public Safety   
 2100‐ Police          2,437,165  2,452,328  2,555,044  2,771,133   2,597,058 
 2103‐ Crossing Guards               35,398     35,235    39,600     44,600         39,800 
 2150‐ Detention               15,250   15,350     15,350     15,350          15,350 
 2170‐ Dispatch              237,784   279,787  287,602   275,556      275,556 
 2200‐ Fire          2,135,599  2,028,516  2,000,340  2,145,022   2,039,876 
 2310‐ Ambulance             336,041   312,784   314,025  358,005       330,294 
 2410‐ Inspection Services             102,023    90,555    94,480     94,084        93,869 
 2920‐ Animal Control               11,961     14,074    17,500   17,500         17,500 
 2‐ Public Safety  Total          5,311,220  5,228,629  5,323,941  5,721,250   5,409,304 
 

Police Department 

Overall, the FY2019 Police Department budget is increasing $42,014. The budget maintains the 
current level of services but anticipates some cost savings due to continued efforts by the Police 
department to manage overtime, through efficient shift scheduling and use of Special Police Officers 

  

Fire and Ambulance Department  

As presented, the FY2019 Fire Department budget reflects an increase of $55,805. The budget 
maintains the current level of services but anticipates some overtime cost savings due to additional 
full‐time staff added in FY2018 

Building Department  

There are no significant budget changes for the FY2019 Building Department. However, there is an 
anticipated change in the Weights and Measures inspector’s positions, as the current inspector has 
indicated he will retire after 55 years of service to the city. 

   

23 
 
 

Education  

Easthampton Public Schools consists of five schools, Maple, Center, Pepin, White Brook Middle 
School, and Easthampton High School serving 1562 students from pre‐kindergarten to twelfth. The 
school department and its budget are operated under the authority of the School Committee.  

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 
   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 3‐ Education   
 3000‐ Education        16,154,575  16,437,191  6,929,214  17,267,798   17,232,798 
 3‐ Education  Total        16,154,575  16,437,191  16,929,214  17,267,798   17,232,798 
 

Public Education  

Based on the city’s revenue forecast, it is projected that the Easthampton Public Schools may increase 
by 1.79% in FY2019. Therefore, the FY2016 amount available for the Easthampton Public School 
Department is $17,232,798. This represents an increase of $303,584 from the $16,437,191 appropriated 
last year. As of October 1, 2017, a total of 1,562 students attend the Easthampton schools, with 654 
students in grades PreK‐4 at the three city elementary schools, 430 students in grades 5‐8 at the Middle 
School, and 478 students in grades 9‐12 at the High School.  

Although the increase in the School Department budget is modest and represents an essential services 
budget in support of programs and services already in place in the department, the School Department 
shares in the increases of employee benefits and other operating cost of the city, and these costs are 
outlined in the Net School Spending report found in Appendix D.  The city continues the practice of using 
two‐thirds of all tax dollars to support education in Easthampton, when all costs are considered. 

Total General Fund Tax Dollars Spent in support of the School Department 

City General Fund 
Spending 
35%

School Spending 
65%

24 
 
 

Public Works  

The Department of Public Works (DPW) consists of multiple Divisions collectively responsible for 
maintaining and improving the city’s public spaces and infrastructure. This includes the maintenance 
and development of city roads, sidewalks, public trees, cemeteries, public grounds & buildings, as 
well as the city water supply system and wastewater/sewerage system. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 
 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 4‐ Public Works   
 4010‐ DPW Admin             206,502  207,412        208,963        171,938             171,938 
 4100‐ Fuel             106,574           96,787         138,043         137,000        137,000 
 4110‐ Engineering               61,289           73,911    75,012         143,892        143,892 
 4210‐ Highway             520,452  910,118         603,015         817,382              632,382 
 4230‐ Snow Emergency              267,332         519,495        200,000         200,000       200,000 
 4240‐ Street Lights               93,477           77,115        105,000        105,000        105,000 
 4250‐ Motor Repair             145,432        106,184         105,291        109,458             109,458 
 4260‐ Traffic             104,386          86,567           95,000         100,000         100,000 
   4300‐ Recycling & Hazardous Waste               23,168          21,556           27,100           27,350          27,100 
 4380‐ Landfill               30,321          40,174          40,000          33,000         33,000 
 4910‐ Brookside Cemetery               55,001          55,832          58,380          53,193          53,193 
 4920‐ Main Street Cemetery                 5,270            3,455              5,500             5,500           1,000 
 4951‐ Tree Warden               23,150          19,832           19,200          26,700          26,700 
 4‐ Public Works  Total          1,642,354      2,218,437    1,680,503     1,930,413   1,740,663 
 

Public Works 

In FY2019 Public Works is budgeted at 1.740 million, which is an overall increase of 3.58%. The major 
initiative reflected in this budget increase include the addition of a second engineer.   The salary for 
the Engineering department is split 33% to 67% between the General Fund budget and the 
Water/Sewer Enterprise Funds (respectively).  

   

25 
 
 

Human Services 

The Human Services section of the budget includes the Board of Health, the Senior Center/Council on 
Aging, as well as Veterans’ Services & Benefits.   

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
   
5‐ Human Services           
 5120‐ Board of Health               79,010  80,387   85,843   90,881       82,744 
 5410‐ Council on Aging             161,390  158,971   169,778     157,774       166,391 
 5430‐ Veterans Services               33,216  34,529  35,346  35,346   34,068 
 5440‐ Veterans Benefits             340,810  363,123  345,000  350,000   350,000 
 5‐ Human Services Total             614,426  637,010  635,967  634,001   633,203 
 

Health Department  

The Health Department budget as presented is a decrease of $3,099. The majority of the decrease is 
due to the anticipated vacancy of the Board of Health Agent in FY2019. A small decrease in 
administrative hours can be attributed to the creation of the Municipal Clerk position created in the 
Mayor’s office, the position will serve as clerk/minute taker for multiple city boards, eliminating 
additional hours evening for the board health staff. 

Senior Center/Council on Aging  

Overall, the FY2016 Senior Center budget represents a decrease of $3,387. This is a result of the 
hiring of a new Council on Aging Director. The budget also reflects increases in the transportation 
budget, with the plan to reorganize the department with several new part‐time driver positions, to 
create more transportation opportunities for the community. 

Veterans Services 

The Veterans’ Services budget remains relatively level from FY2018 to FY2019. The city is in the process 
of hiring a new Veterans Agent for FY2019 that will be shared with the Town of South Hadley. Although 
any approved benefits paid to Easthampton’s veterans will eventually be subject to a 75% 
reimbursement from the Commonwealth’s Department of Veterans’ Services, it is still the responsibility 
of the city to budget adequate benefits on the front end to cover those expenses 

26 
 
 

Culture and Recreation  

The Culture and Recreation section of the budget includes Library, Parks, and Recreation. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
   
 6‐ Culture & Recreation  
 6100‐ Library             203,122   205,699  208,247       317,146            210,831 
 6310‐ Recreation              108,662       111,493        114,358        119,583     119,583 
 6500‐ Park             247,435  247,797  220,216  228,736    231,236 
 6920‐ Memorial & Veterans Day                     343        341       350                ‐ 
 6‐ Culture & Recreation Total             559,562  565,331  543,171  665,465   561,650 
 

Library  

The city’s Library budget has increased $2,584 compared to FY2018. This amount follows the 
guidance of the Municipal Appropriation Requirement (MAR) for each award year and is computed 
using figures for the three prior fiscal years. For each of those three years that a municipality 
received State Aid to Public Libraries award, the figure used will be either the MAR or Total 
Appropriated Municipal Income (TAMI), whichever is higher. 

Parks and Recreation Department  

The Parks and Recreation Department has increased by $16,245. A portion of this increase is 
explained by the reorganization of the Manhan Rail Trail budget as funding for this public 
recreational area has been moved into the Parks and Recreation budget. There are planned salary 
increases along with increased utility costs associated with supporting the pool at Nonotuck Park.  It 
is important to note that a number of programs within the parks and recreation department are self‐
supporting. Payroll for part‐time and seasonal staff and all programmatic expenses are paid for 
directly from recreation revolving funds.  

Memorial & Veterans Day  

This budget has been moved to the Veterans Services budget in Section 5. 

   

27 
 
 

Debt and Interest  

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
   
 7‐ Debt & Interest  
 7100‐ Debt Principal          1,773,716  1,840,788  1,655,251  1,841,675   1,841,675 
 7500‐ Debt Interest             543,735    517,239  526,829  490,996       490,996 
 7‐ Debt & Interest Total          2,317,450  2,358,026  2,182,080  2,332,671   2,332,671 
 

Debt Service  

The proposed FY2019 debt service budget provides for the payment of principal and interest costs 
for long and short‐term bonds issued by the city for General Fund purposes. For FY2019, the total 
Debt Service budget for the General Fund is $2.3 million, an increase of $150,591. The increase is due 
to the anticipated BAN of $1.25 million of the municipal equipment and the scheduled pay down of 
municipal BAN’s issued for the Pre‐K‐8 School Building design as well as the design of the complete 
street project.  

One key factor in limiting the increase in new FY2019 debt service is the city’s Free Cash policy, 
whereby smaller capital items are now being purchased using available funds, such as Free Cash, 
instead of financing with debt. 

   

28 
 
 

Unclassified  

The city’s practice is to budget certain overhead costs in the aggregate rather than distributing costs 
by department or program. These overhead costs include employee benefits of health insurance, life 
insurance, Easthampton contributor retirement contributions, unemployment compensation and 
workers’ compensation insurance; comprehensive building and liability insurance, and a reserve fund 
for extraordinary and unforeseen expenses. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
8‐ Unclassified  
 9111‐ Contributory Retirement          2,577,998  2,719,728  2,840,817  2,982,646   2,982,646 
 9120‐ Workers Compensation             144,999  180,520  187,675  194,461     194,461 
9121 ‐ Employer Share Medicare             258,372  276,353  270,000  290,000    290,000 
 9140‐ Employee Benefits          3,797,827  4,155,925  4,674,729  5,527,427   4,908,466 
 9450‐ Liability Insurance             242,173  245,951  280,199  280,199    280,199 
 9510‐ Reserve Fund                       ‐                        ‐    200,000  200,000      200,000 
 9511‐ Unemployment                70,000         70,000           50,000         50,000        50,000 
 8‐ Unclassified Total          7,091,369  7,648,477  8,503,421  9,524,734   8,905,772 
 

Employee Benefits & Insurance  

Employee Benefits and Insurance represents the budgetary requirements for health and life 
insurance coverage for both city and School Department employees and retirees as well as other 
benefits such as FICA expense, Easthampton contributory retirement contributions, unemployment 
compensation, and workers’ compensation insurance. The FY2019 health insurance budget request 
of $4.9 million represents a total increase of 5.00% from the amount budgeted last year. We are 
anticipating that this expense will continue to rise and expect that the Hampshire County Group 
Insurance Trust will look to make plan design changes as it attempts to curb rising costs. 

The second largest category of employee benefit costs after health insurance is Easthampton 
Contributory Retirement. The total FY2019 Easthampton Contributory Retirement Assessment is 
$2,982,646, which is an increase of 5.00%. While the city is responsible for the Easthampton 
contributory retirement assessment, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is assessed annually by 
the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement System. 

29 
 
 

Building & Liability Insurance  

Building and Liability insurance includes property and liability coverage for all city‐owned property as 
well as all city officials, elected and appointed. The city’s building and liability insurance is level 
funded in FY2019.  

Workers Compensation  

Workers Compensation and Injured on Duty Compensation budget reflects a 3.62% increase for 
FY2019. The Personnel Department is continuing to enroll in and sponsor programs to improve safety 
in the workplace. These programs not only reduce our worker’s compensation costs but also improve 
working conditions for all employees.  

Reserve Fund  

Authorized by Massachusetts statute, the Reserve Fund provides city operations with an option for the 
funding of extraordinary or unforeseen expenditures during the year. Transfers from this account 
require approval by the City Council. The Reserve Fund amount is being level funded at $200,000. 

   

30 
 
 

Community Preservation Act  

Easthampton adopted the Community Preservation Act in 2001. The Act creates a 3% tax surcharge 
which generates revenue for projects addressing open space, affordable housing, historic preservation, 
and recreation. The Committee makes recommendations to the City Council on the expenditure of the 
funds. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
   
 9‐ CPA   
 CPA          1,140,216  622,525  486,000  461,596   461,596 
 9‐ CPA  Total          1,140,216  622,525  486,000  461,596    461,596 
 

The Community Preservation Act (CPA) budget reflects a $24,404 decrease for FY2019. This decrease is 
due to a trend of decreasing state matching funds. The committee takes a conservative approach to 
forecasting revenue and has adjusted to the decreasing state match accordingly.  

The Community Preservation Act requires that at least 10% of each year’s Community Preservation Fund 
revenues be spent or set aside for spending on each of the three Community Preservation core 
categories ‐ open space, affordable housing and historic preservation. The remaining 70% of the 
Community Preservation Fund may be allocated among those three categories, recreation, and up to 5% 
on administration cost as the Community Preservation Committee and City Council see fit.  

In FY2019 the CPA Committee continues to fund a portion of the administrative cost of the Assistant City 
Planner, this year the CPA committee has elected to increase the historic preservation set‐aside 
significantly, funding an additional $200,000 in anticipation of a large renovation project at the “Old 
Town Hall.”  

   

31 
 
 

Enterprise Funds  

The Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds have been established as Enterprise Funds separate from the 
General Fund. The expenditures for both the Water and Sewer Funds are financed by water and 
sewer rate revenues. 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 10‐ Enterprise  
 4410‐ Sewer             421,665  416,578  438,076  802,787    442,787 
 4460‐ Waste Water          1,211,945  1,088,786  1,134,809  1,154,509   1,154,509 
 4462‐ Sewer/WWTP Reserve                       ‐                        ‐     15,000    15,000         15,000 
 4500‐ Water          1,088,257  821,917  772,363  802,227     802,227 
 4506‐ Water Reserve                       ‐                        ‐     15,000    15,000        15,000 
 10‐ Enterprise Total          2,721,868  2,327,281  2,375,248  2,789,522   2,429,522 
 

Sewer  

The FY2019 Water Enterprise Fund is budgeted at $442,787 which is an increase of $4711. This 
increase is due to additional cost of trench shoring equipment rental. 

Waste Water  

The FY2016 Water Enterprise Fund is budgeted at $1,154,509 which is an increase of $19,700. This 
increase is due to a number of factors including a planned increase in employee salaries in addition 
to the rising cost of chemicals needed in the operation of the treatment plant.   

Water  

The FY2016 Water Enterprise Fund is budgeted at $802,227 which is an increase of $29,864. This 
increase is due to a number of factors including planned increases in employee salaries in addition to 
professional service and well as equipment rentals of an aerial platform lift needed annual 
inspections of Easthampton’s water storage tanks. 

Indirect Cost  

The Indirect cost associated with the Enterprise Fund is not included in the Enterprise section of the 
budget included but rather included in the general fund section of the budgets for General 
Government, Public Works, Unclassified, and Debt and Interest. This represents $1,754,572 of the 
Enterprise Total budget and is an increase of 8.35%. This increase results from a number of factors, 
primarily due to the rising cost of employee benefits, and secondarily related to the reorganization of 
the Water and Sewer billing and collections. These costs, which were formerly charged directly to the 
Enterprise Fund, are now in General Government departments and now assessed to the enterprise 
via the indirect charge assessment. 

32 
 
 

 
Section 1  
     General Government 

33 
 
 

City Council  
Mission Statement 
The City Council serves as the city’s elected legislative branch in accordance with the Home Rule 
Charter.   

Organizational Overview 

City Councilors ‐ 9

Clerk of the City 
Council

City Clerk &  City Auditor & Asst. City 
Asst.City Clerk  Principal Assessor
Auditor
 

Budget  
Department    1110‐ City Council  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 1‐ General Government   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 COUNCIL SALARIES               27,000  27,000  31,500  36,000    36,000 
 PERMANENT, CLERICAL               2,565     3,090   3,045   3,240   3,090 
 1‐Personnel Services Total               29,565  30,090  34,545  39,240      39,090 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 CITY COUNCIL ADVERTISING               1,204   1,581  2,000  2,000   1,800 
 CITY COUNCIL IN STATE TRAVEL                    100                    ‐           ‐            ‐   
 CITY COUNCIL OFFICE SUPPLIES                        80        32        50        80            80 
 FOOD & FOOD SERVICE SUPPLIES                     47           ‐     100            ‐   
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                1,431  1,613  2,150  2,080    1,880 
 3‐Holdover  
 ADVERTISING ENC                            ‐      211         ‐                ‐   
 CITY COUNCIL ADVERTISING FY 2015                    353         ‐                  ‐                            ‐   
3‐Holdover Total                    353             211          ‐             ‐   
 Grand Total              31,350      31,914  36,695  41,320   40,970 

34 
 
 

Mayor and City Attorney  
Mission Statement 
The Easthampton Mayor is the city's highest‐ranking official who performs administrative, political, and 
ceremonial municipal functions. The mayor also serves on School Committee and the School Building 
Committee. 
 
The Mayor feels strongly that good government is one that values and cultivates resident trust and is 
guided by high professional standards, policy and practice. This commitment always looks to enhance 
local government and its accessibility to the community. The Office of the Mayor oversees, coordinates 
and administers the operations of Easthampton City Government to ensure residents, businesses, and 
visitors are provided with excellent services in an atmosphere of transparency and accountability.  The 
Mayor works alongside the City Council, city committees, city boards, and city Department Heads to 
increase economic development, forecast fiscal patterns, identify resources to solve foreseen and 
unforeseen challenges facing the city.  

The Mayor participates in a number of regional, statewide and national municipal and educational policy 
boards, such as the Mass. Mayor's Association, the Economic Development Council of Western Mass., 
and the Mass. Municipal Association. The Mayor's Planning Director, Finance Director, Auditor and 
Personnel Director also participate in regional and local professional organizations geared toward 
finance issues, economic development, internal controls and other effective tools on best practices in 
their respective municipal department.  

Organizational Overview 
 

Mayor

Staff

Board Clerk 

 
 
35 
 
 

Accomplishments  
Since taking office on January 2, 2018, Mayor Nicole LaChapelle has worked hard to deliver on her 
promise of transparency, and accessibility to core government services for all residents. She seeks to 
employ central concepts of good government throughout all departments ‐ responsiveness, 
accountability and prudent fiscal management of city dollars and services.  In evaluating potential 
initiatives and opportunities, the Office of the Mayor asks the question, “Is this best for the people of 
Easthampton?”  Toward that end, the Mayor has worked to continue and augment many excellent 
initiatives started by her predecessors, and to provide solutions for issues facing the city that result in 
positive outcomes for all.  These include: 

 Successfully negotiating a new three‐year contract with the DPW Union 
 Reopening and clarifying important points in the Firefighter’s Union contract  
 Securing two grants of $25,000 each from the “Community Compact” fund of the Executive Office of 
Administrative Finance to support greater transparency and efficiency in city budgeting, forecasting 
for the future, and the planned creation of Easthampton’s first ever formal capital planning process 
 Working to upgrade the efficiency and responsiveness of city government by consolidating 
departmental resources such as legal representation, personnel, and information technology to 
ensure best practices and eliminate duplication of services 
 Consolidating payroll systems with a review of the city’s pay plan as well as city job classifications to 
enact common‐sense improvements to flow of city service delivery and clarify roles and reporting 
structures 
 Upgrading phone and email systems to improve internal and external communications with city 
employees 
 Applied for Opportunity Zone designation to reduce barriers private investment in the city 
 Concentrating all city collections and payments in the Collector’s office by moving water and sewer 
payments to the Collector’s office from the DPW to enable city residents to pay their bills in a single 
stop at City Hall 
 Worked to negotiate contracts and host city agreements with potential partners in the cannabis 
industry in the best interest for the safety and financial interest of the people of Easthampton in a 
rapidly changing regulatory environment 
 Alongside the School Department and School Building Department, worked to plan and promote the 
proposed new K‐8 consolidated school 
 Assisted with the search for a new city Superintendent of Schools 
 Continue to work with the Department of Justice and Massachusetts Attorney General Maura 
Healey to ensure that Easthampton remains a welcoming and just city for all of its residents by 
broadening this work to include more of the city’s stakeholders in FY2019 
 Actively seeking an experienced and professional clerk to manage the city’s licensing department 
 Hired a special investigator to transparently address citizen concerns about city government 
operations 
 Initiated the Mayor‐in‐training program 

36 
 
 

Goals and Objectives 

 Work with local, regional, state and federal agencies to build out an ongoing, interactive platform 
for community stakeholders to provide input, direction and share concerns that ultimately drive a 
city re‐visioning process  
 Develop a communications plan for public participation focused on explaining capital needs, 
options, and strategies. Facilitate feedback in advance of any major capital program. 
 Align fiscal and personnel policy and practice to conform with the city home rule Charter, state and 
federal statutes 
 Fully align the city’s Master Plan to a Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) that formally adopts 
comprehensive multi‐year capital plans to ensure effective management of capital assets 
 Create a financial forecasting model that allows for improved decision‐making in maintaining fiscal 
discipline and delivering essential community services that evaluate current and future fiscal 
conditions to guide policy and programmatic decisions 

Programs and Services  
Responsibilities of the Mayor’s Office include: 

 The enforcement of all city laws and ordinances 
 Implementing economic development and community development initiatives 
 Preparing a balanced annual city budget for the City Council 
 Working closely with the Fire and Police Departments to ensure public safety 
 Working with the School Committee and the Superintendent to advance student achievement and 
to support a better future for Easthampton’s growing student population 
 Coordinating all city departments to deliver responsive and effective services to the citizens of 
Easthampton 
 Serving as a hub of organization for community groups and agencies working to improve the city 
 Representing the interests of Easthampton to other levels of government 

   

37 
 
 

Budget  
Department    1210‐ Mayor  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 


1‐ General Government  
1‐Personnel Services 
CLERICAL SALARY       38,563      41,067      44,744        79,500            45,000 
SALARY       72,500      73,655      75,000        75,000            75,000 
1‐Personnel Services Total    111,063    114,722    119,744      154,500          120,000 
2‐Purchase of Services 
 ADVERTISING            485           975           600             600                 600 
 DUES AND MEMBERSHIP         2,875        2,947        3,000          3,000              3,000 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING              ‐             100           200          2,000              2,000 
 EQUIP REPAIR & MAINT                5              ‐                ‐                  ‐                    ‐   
 FOOD SERVICE SUPPLIES              47              ‐               50                ‐                    ‐   
 IN STATE TRAVEL         1,399           709        1,800          2,000              2,000 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES            286           506           400             400                 400 
 POSTAGE            200           173           200             200                 200 
 PRINTING & REPRODUCING            133              ‐                ‐                  ‐                    ‐   
           400           600           600                ‐                    ‐   
RADIOS,TELEPHONES,OTHERCOMM  
 VET'S DAY SUPPLIES            236           136              ‐                  ‐                    ‐   
2‐Purchase of Services Total        6,065        6,147        6,850          8,200              8,200 
3‐Holdover 
 GEN OFFICE SUPPLIEs.              ‐                ‐                ‐                    ‐   
 RADIOS, TELEPHONES, OTHER             ‐               50              ‐                    ‐   
COMM. ENCUMB.  
3‐Holdover Total             ‐               50              ‐                       ‐   
Grand Total    117,128    120,918    126,594      162,700          128,200 
 

   

38 
 
 

Budget (continued) 
Department    1510‐ City 
Attorney   

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

1‐ General Government   
2‐Purchase of Services  
CITY ATTY‐PERODICALS & BOOK               2,192      2,346        2,700            2,820                2,820 
 CITY ATTY‐PROF SERVICES         21,460    16,681      23,000          23,000              47,180 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total    23,653    19,027      25,700          25,820              50,000 
 3‐Holdover  
BOOKS, PERIDICALS   ‐           204              ‐                       ‐   
BOOKS,PERIDICALS   191           ‐                ‐                       ‐   
MISC PROF & TECH SERV FY 2015   3,285           ‐                ‐                       ‐   
3‐Holdover Total   3,476         204              ‐                          ‐   
 Grand Total   27,129    19,231      25,700          25,820              50,000 
 

   

39 
 
 

Auditor 
Mission Statement 
The mission of the City Auditor’s Office is to ensure that financial transactions and activities are carried 
out in accordance with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, ordinances, and regulations.  In 
addition, the City Auditor’s Office works to implement professional accounting and financial 
management standards established by the Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) and in 
accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).  These standards help to ensure the 
accurate and timely reporting of financial and accounting information.  

The Auditor’s Office prepares financial reports, maintains records, and provides accurate and timely 
reporting to the Massachusetts Department of Revenue on the city’s financials. 

The City Auditor’s Office provides financial assistance to city departments and personnel covering a wide 
range of financial activities including: budget to actual revenue and expenditures, accounts payable 
procedures, monthly reconciliations, KVS financial software applications, Net school spending 
calculations, Enterprise indirect cost calculations, assists the Finance Director, School Management, and 
Mayor in the budget process and other matters as needed.  The Auditor’s Office also provides guidance 
on sound financial practices. 

The City Auditor also serves as ex‐officio Auditor to the Easthampton Retirement Board.  The Auditor 
approves bills for payment, reviews payrolls, financials and balance sheets and serves as a member of 
the Board.  The Board is responsible for managing over $52.9 million in investments, employees, and 
policies of the Easthampton Retirement System. 

Organizational Overview 

City Auditor

Assistant City Auditor

40 
 
 

Accomplishments  
In FY 2017 the Auditor’s Office processed 6,797 vouchers for payment totaling $24,610,209, and 2,434 
purchase orders for the city departments/Enterprise and 1,676 vouchers totaling $3,304,513 for the 
school department.   

In FY 18 the City Auditor certified free cash with the Massachusetts Department of Revenue at 
$1,669,820 and Retained Earnings at $1,705,764 in a timely and accurate manner.  The end‐of‐year 
deficit on the balance sheet was $5,980, a record low. 

The Auditor’s office worked with the Assessors, City Clerk and Finance Director to get the tax rate set on 
November 9, 2017, with the total amount to be raised $184,638.91 less than on the 2017 tax recap with 
excess levy capacity of $20,892.26.  The Auditor compiled all miscellaneous reports to the state, 
including snow and ice, Community Preservation, Cash and Receivable Reconciliations, the Statement of 
Indebtedness, and Schedule A with zero variances. 

The Auditor’s office worked with the external auditors, Scanlon and Associates, CPA, to accomplish the 
majority of the audit of the city’s financials within a month of the close of the year, with completion of 
the single audit by December.  We also worked with the school business manager to complete the End 
of Year School Report. 

As a member of the Easthampton Retirement Board, we hired a new Administrator in FY17 and we are 
currently in the process of compiling a new Personnel Policy Manual.  The Easthampton Retirement 
System has achieved a Post‐Employment Benefits (OPEB) funded ratio of 65.5% which is funded until 
2033 with our current actuarial assumptions. Our retiree COLA increases are on the first $14,000 per 
year of retirement income.  All investments are with the state PRIT Fund and as of November 30, 2017, 
we have a 9.97% rate of return over a 5 year period. 

Trends 
In 2018 the city migrated to an external payroll processing company.  The Auditor’s office participated in 
the initial set up of the new payroll system, and continues to check all payroll entries, and creates and 
posts to the ledgers for both city and school payrolls.     

In 2018 many changes in personnel due to retirements and position changes have led to the Auditor’s 
Office working closely with new employees in the school department and other departments on 
financial policies and reconciliations. 

In 2018 the total amount to be raised on the tax levy decreased by .41%, in 2017 it had increased by 
1.6% and in 2016 it increased by 5.4%.  Net state estimates increased 3% from 2017 but estimated local 
receipts did not increase, and new growth did not increase from 2017.  A contributing factor to the 
decreased total levy was a decrease in the debt exclusion of 11.9%, and the city continued the recent 
practice of not adding to the levy by raising deficits on the recap.  

41 
 
 

Actual 2017 general fund revenue increased 3.5% over 2016 actual revenue from all sources, local 
receipts increased by 1%.  

General Fund expenditures increased 3.6% from $35,367,806.61 in 2016 to $36,657,747.89 in 2017.  
Actual enterprise revenue increased .2% in FY17 over 2016, and expenditures decreased by 14% from 
$2,721,867.53 in 2016 to $2,327,281.08 in 2017.  

Goals and Objectives 
 Continue to maintain and work to improve the city’s AA bond rating with the Finance Director 
through recommendations for sound financial practices, and continue to work with the departments 
to reduce the amount of outstanding grant and agency revenue at year‐end 
 Continue to work toward excellence in reporting accuracy and timeliness internally and to the state 
and federal government 
 Mentor and teach the Assistant Auditor in all phases of Auditor’s duties and in the process of 
obtaining certification 
 Work with the School Department on monthly reconciliations and end of the year closing and 
reporting 
 Revise the Net School Spending agreement and Enterprise Indirect agreement to meet the changing 
environment.  Help the Finance Director and Mayor as needed with budget preparation 
 Prepare the balance sheet and other supporting documents required to obtain free cash 
certification as close to September 30th as possible from the Mass Department of Revenue 
 Work with the Assessor, the City Clerk, and the Finance Director to get the tax rate set in an 
accurate and timely manner.  Set a goal for completing the Schedule A in October 

Programs and Services 
Accounting & Financial Management: 

Maintenance of electronic accounting records 

Processing of purchase orders, accounts payable and receivables into the proper classifications, checking 
for availability of funds. 

Working with City Treasurer to reconcile and monitor cash receipts. 

Working with the Collector and DPW to reconcile collections of taxes and user fees. 

Reviewing of city contracts and leases to ensure that adequate funding is available 

Working as a member of the Easthampton Retirement Board to set policies, manage investments and 
oversee Retirement Office Management. 

42 
 
 

Financial Reporting & Analysis:   

Preparing monthly revenue/expenditure budget to actual reports for the City Council, the Mayor, the 
Finance Director, and the City Planner.  Providing monthly expenditure and special revenue reports to 
departments, monthly reconciliations of all receivables to the Collector, the Finance Director, the DPW 
and the Assessor.  Analyzing and reporting annual actual Net School Spending to the Superintendent of 
Schools, the Mayor, and the Finance Director for end‐of‐year Report to Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education. 

Preparing mandatory city, state and federal reports covering a wide range of financial activities.   

Conducting internal audits of departments to ensure laws and policies are being followed. 

Budget  
 

Department    1350‐ Auditor  

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  
1‐ General Government  
1‐Personnel Services 
 ASST. SALARY       46,028       34,739         36,377            38,048              38,048  
LONGEVITY            533               ‐                  ‐                        ‐    
 SALARY       65,034       65,384         65,866            66,867              66,867  
1‐Personnel Services Total    111,595     100,122       102,243          104,915            104,915  
2‐Purchase of Services 
 AUDIT ‐ GASB 68         3,000         4,500           4,500            4,500                4,500  
 DUES & MEMBERSHIP            150            195              195                  195                   195  
 EDUCATION & TRAINING            390            830              980                  980                   980  
 FINANCIAL AUDIT       22,500       21,000         22,500          22,500              22,500  
 IN STATE TRAVEL                5            147                75                    75                     75  
 OFFICE SUPPLIES         2,412         1,189              850                  850                   850  
2‐Purchase of Services Total      28,457       27,860         29,100          29,100              29,100  
3‐Holdover 
 AUDITOR OFFICE ENCUMBRANCE               ‐                56                ‐                        ‐    
3‐Holdover Total              ‐                56                ‐                           ‐    
Grand Total    140,052     128,039       131,343         134,015            134,015  
 

43 
 
 

Assessor 
Mission Statement 
The Easthampton Assessor’s Department is tasked with listing and valuing all real and personal property 
in the city, ensuring equitable taxation, according to Massachusetts Law.  

Organizational Overview 

Board of Assessors

Principal Assessor

Adminstraive 
Assessor
 

Accomplishments  
 Successfully completed Interim Year Valuation and timely setting of Tax Rate 
 Completed inspections required as part of our Cyclical Re‐inspection Program 

Goals and Objectives 
 Continue with cyclical and permit inspections for data quality and new growth 
 Continue with value analysis for successful Certification 

Programs and Services  
 Tax Exemptions for Qualified Taxpayers 
 Real Estate, Personal Property and Motor Vehicle Abatements 
 Online Access to maps, property cards and valuations, along with information on abatements and 
exemptions 

44 
 
 

Budget  
Department    1410‐ Assessor  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 1‐ General Government   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 ADMIN  ASST SALARIES         21,618    21,074        19,000           26,196               22,000 
 ASSESSORS STIPENDS           2,250      2,700          2,700             2,700                  2,700 
 PART‐TIME, CLERICAL         11,976            ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
 PRINCIPAL ASSESSOR FULL TIME         49,893    54,166        56,275           58,821               58,821 
 1‐Personnel Services Total         85,737    77,940        77,975           87,717               83,521 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 DEEDS & TRANSFERS                25      9,000               ‐                        ‐   
 DUES & MEMBERSHIP              360         340             400                 400                    400 
 EDUC. & TRAINING           1,039      1,082          1,500         1,500                 1,500 
 IN STATE TRAVEL              286           69             100                 400                    400 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES              582         230             500                 500                    500 
 POSTAGE           1,100      1,000          1,200            1,200                 1,200 
 PROF & TECH SERVICES         14,115      2,700        10,000           10,000               10,000 
 VEHICLE SUPPLIES                 ‐              ‐               500                 200                    200 
2‐Purchase of Services Total         17,507    14,421        14,200           14,200               14,200 
 3‐Holdover  
 ASSESSORS MISC PROF & TECH             500            ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
SERFY 2015  
 3‐Holdover Total              500            ‐                 ‐                           ‐   
Grand Total       103,745    92,361        92,175         101,917               97,721 
 

   

45 
 
 

Finance 
Mission Statement 
The mission of the Treasurer/Collector’s Office is to receive, manage and distribute all funds of the city 
in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws and the city’s financial policies. The Finance Director 
serves as the Treasurer/Collector in addition to the position’s other responsibilities. The Easthampton 
Treasurer/Collectors Office is responsible for the billing and collection of real estate taxes, motor vehicle 
excise taxes, utilities (water & sewer) and the receipt of various permits and licenses. The office 
reconciles bank accounts and manages warrants, long and short‐term investments, long and short‐term 
borrowing, payroll processing, and income tax reporting.  

The Treasurer/Collector’s Office provides financial management assistance to city departments and 
personnel covering a wide range of financial activities including budget administration, revenue 
forecasts, procurement, and contracts administration. 

The Office partners with the Personnel Department (Human Resources) to manage employee payroll 
and benefits administration. 

Organizational Overview 

Finance Director

Procurement 
Assistant Tax  Payroll Manager/ 
Adminstrative 
Collector Assistant  Treasurer
Assistant 

Principal Clerk Payroll Clerk

 
 

Accomplishments  
 Maintained the city’s AA Bond Rating 
 Partnered with Auditor’s office to ensure monthly accounting of cash is verified and timely to 
improve end of year completion and provide refined audit trails with clearer reporting in the general 
ledger 
 Completed the merger of the Treasurer and Collector offices and crossed trained staff. 
 Created a new Procurement Officer position and updated the procurement policies to include 
updates from the 201x Municipal Relief Act 
 Increased use of statewide contracts for procurement 

46 
 
 

 Led a transition from an antiquated in‐house payroll processing system to Harpers Payroll Services, 
allowing for improved reporting and employee self‐service functionality 
 Transitioned to a bi‐annual tax billing schedule to reduce printing and postage costs 
 Expanded online payment options for tax collections and other applicable departments 
 Consolidated the collections process transitioning utility billing and collections from the Department 
of Public Works into the Treasurer/Collectors office 

Goals and Objectives 
 Continue consolidation process to maximize efficiency and improve customer service  
 Implement programs to improve bond rating and overall financial management of the city 
o Partner with the Auditor’s office to forecast revenue and create modeling programs  
o Maintain 10% of the budget in reserves   
o Create a Capital Planning document  
 Continue to evolve the new budget document started in Fiscal 2019 to a robust version in Fiscal year 
2020 or 2021 

 
Programs and Services 
Treasury Management 

 Cash reconciliation  
 Cash receipts processing from all city departments 
 Management of city investments  
 Borrowing and debt service for city projects  
 Land court filings and redemption  
 Warrant funding  
 Vendor & Payroll  check  distribution  
 8ACH/wire payments to vendors 

Collections 

 Collection and posting of payments for real estate, personal property, motor vehicles and boat 
excise tax bills  
 Special assessment and liens payments  
 Online payment services  
 Refund processing for overpayments and abatements  
 Municipal lien certificates  
 Tax title process for delinquent taxpayers  

47 
 
 

 Utility bill collections  
 Bank deposits 

Procurement  

 The city moved to a centralized procurement model in Fiscal Year 2018.  
 All Contracts and Purchase Orders are reviewed by the procurement officer as part of the 
treasurer/collector’s office.  
 Maintains the city’s compliance with all Massachusetts Procurement laws 
 M.G.L. c. 149 – BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS 
 M.G.L. c. 30, § 39M, or M.G.L. c. 30B – PUBLIC WORKS (NON‐BUILDING) CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS 
(WITH LABOR) 
 M.G.L. c. 30, § 39M, or M.G.L. c. 30B – CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS PROCUREMENTS (WITHOUT 
LABOR) 
 M.G.L. c. 7C, §§ 44‐57 – DESIGN SERVICES FOR PUBLIC BUILDING PROJECTS: Cities,  
 M.G.L. c. 30B – PROCUREMENT OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES 

Financial Reporting & Analysis 

 Prepares budget using the GFOA award‐winning budget process 
 Prepares budget revenue estimates, tracks expenditures and collections 
 Updates and ensures compliance with financial policies and procedures 

   

48 
 
 

Budget  
Department    1450‐ Finance   

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
1‐ General Government  
1‐Personnel Services 
 ASST SALARY          87,976      88,453        89,107         139,878             139,878 
 LONGEVITY               700           492             300                 500                    500 
 
 PART‐TIME ‐ CLERICAL          20,333      21,058               ‐                        ‐   
 SALARY          76,830      46,826        84,136           85,405               85,405 
 TAX COLL SALARY          60,712      48,811               ‐                        ‐   
 TREAS_ ADMIN & CLERKS          28,847      35,393      101,971           69,703               69,703 
1‐Personnel Services Total       275,399    241,032      275,514         295,486             295,486 
2‐Purchase of Services 
 ADVERTISING               132        4,127          1,000             1,000                 1,000 
 DUES & MEMBERSHIPS               210           210             250                 250                    250 
 EDUC. & TRAINING                 95           820          2,500             2,500                 2,500 
EQUIP R & M SUPPLIES                 ‐             296          1,355             1,355                 1,355 
 EQUIP RENTAL            1,293        1,354               ‐                        ‐   
 IN STATE TRAVEL                 61           540          1,000             1,000                 1,000 
 INSURANCE            2,151        2,303          2,300             2,300                 2,300 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES            1,587        3,277          1,500             3,500                 3,500 
 POSTAGE          19,276      22,432        20,000           25,000               20,000 
 PROF SERVICES            9,582      23,904        10,400           40,400               36,000 
 RECORDING DEEDS                 ‐          2,475          1,000             1,000                 1,000 
 
 SAFETY DEP BONDS               716           320               ‐                        ‐   
 TAX TITLE‐TAKING          11,628      12,049          4,000             4,000                 4,000 
 TELEPHONE                 ‐             360             360                 360                    360 
2‐Purchase of Services Total         46,730      74,466        45,665           82,665               73,265 
3‐Holdover 
 MISC PROF & TECH    87              ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
 MISC. PROF & TECH                 ‐                ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
 TAX TITLE               725              ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
 TAX TITLE‐ENC.                 ‐          4,701               ‐                        ‐   
3‐Holdover Total              812        4,701               ‐                           ‐   
Grand Total       322,941    320,199      321,179         378,151             368,751 
 

49 
 
 

Technology 
Mission Statement 
The Technology Department provides technological services to the City of Easthampton through 
thoughtful planning, fiscal responsibility, and problem‐solving, resulting in an organization which 
continuously improves its technology tools to better serve the departments who can in turn, better 
serve the City of Easthampton. 
 

Organizational Overview 

Mayor

Systems Administrator

Accomplishments  
 Initial steps in formally merging the city and school technology departments 
 Assist in the planning and implementation for the merging of the Tax Department and the 
Treasurer’s Office 
 The implementation of bar codes and scanning equipment for the tax bills 
 Virtualization of Windows 2016 servers, which saves thousands of dollars for the city 

Trends 
The City Technology Department will move forward integrating new technologies, for the purpose of 
transparency, data security, online services and inter‐departmental communications. 

   

50 
 
 

Goals and Objectives  

The City Technology Department will move forward with plans to merge with the School Technology 
Department. This has been an ongoing process, but will now become formalized. The merger will bring 
methods and procedures in line with one goal, in addition to cost savings through economies of scale. 

Through the department merger, the following goals are to be achieved: 

 The update and expansion of the city’s Unitrends backup system. Our current system is stable but 
needs to be expanded. This will include a software upgrade and off‐site archiving 
 In‐house mail system. The current vendor supplied system is inadequate, as the city’s needs have 
expanded 
 Upgrade of workstation computers, which includes hardware and software, for the Police, Fire and 
Council on Aging 
 Integrated phone system for the Municipal Building and the Council on Aging 
 Hiring of a new part‐time employee.  
 

Programs and Services 
 Software maintenance and support for the following:   
Financial, Assessing, Permitting, Tax and Utility Billing, Public Safety, CJIS, Windows OS,  
city website. 
 Phone system and cell phone management 
 Hardware support for municipal, public safety and senior center. 
 Wireless communication, internal and external 
 E‐mail maintenance and support 
 Disk to Disk Unitrends data backup and recovery 
   

51 
 
 

Budget  
Department    1451‐ Technology  

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  
 
1‐ General Government     
 1‐Personnel Services  
 LONGEVITY                 200               ‐                200                  200                    200  
 SALARY FULL TIME            64,979       65,490         65,866            66,867               62,000  
1‐Personnel Services Total            65,179  
      65,490         66,066            67,067               62,200  
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 COMPUTERS & PERIPHERALS                   ‐           1,513           2,500              6,500                 3,964  
 EDUC & TRAINING                   ‐                 ‐                500                  500                    500  
 EQUIPMENT            10,807         3,507           8,180            12,223               12,223  
 FORMS & SUPPLIES              7,254       11,950         15,500            10,500               10,500  
 MISC PROF & TECH SERV                 125            188                ‐                         ‐    
 SOFTWARE LICENSES            82,763       85,084         87,188         122,741             122,741  
 TELEPHONE EXPENSE            13,218       12,626         14,400                       ‐    
 TRAVEL                   ‐                 ‐                  40                    40                      40  
 2‐Purchase of Services Total          114,167     114,867       128,308          152,504             149,968  
 3‐Holdover  
 COMPUTER FORMS                   ‐           5,540                       ‐    
TELEPHONE ENC                   ‐           1,143                ‐                         ‐    
 TELEPHONE FY 2015              1,131               ‐                  ‐                         ‐    
 3‐Holdover Total              1,131         6,683                ‐                            ‐    
 Grand Total          180,478     187,040       194,374          219,571             212,168  
   
 

   

52 
 
 

Human Resources 
Mission Statement 
Through strategic partnerships and collaboration, the Human Resources Department provides a broad 
range of efficient and effective Human Resources services consistent with community expectations to 
enhance the quality of life for the workforce of Easthampton and to ensure that the city continues to be 
a desirable place to live, work, and transact business. 

The Human Resources Department is committed to attracting and retaining a knowledgeable and 
diverse workforce by promoting a harmonious work environment and assisting employees in personal 
and professional development that will contribute to Easthampton being perceived by the public as an 
employer of choice. 

Organizational Overview 

HR Director

Assistant Director

Clerk

Accomplishments  
 Partnered with the City Treasurer Department to transition from an antiquated payroll system to a 
Payroll/HR Management system 
 Began a phased implementation process for time and attendance system to ensure time keeping 
accuracy and limit leakage 
 Began a phased process of employee self‐service functionality in the new Payroll/HR system 
reducing dependency on paper employee transactions 
 Began phased process of building employee website to access policies, procedures, and notifications 
 Updated and implemented new policies for paid time off for Pay Plan employees 
 Successfully negotiated and executed Fire Department of Public Works contracts 
 Introduced a vision plan (new employee benefit) with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts 
 Switched Injured on Duty carrier to reduce cost while significantly increasing benefits for safety 
personnel 

53 
 
 

 Acquired an Executive Committee position on the Hampshire County Insurance Trust to represent 
the interests of Easthampton employees 
 Worked proactively with the Department of Public Works Union to update Department of Public 
Works job descriptions to implement safer lifting requirements to reduce injuries 
 Received the Safety Practices Award from the Massachusetts Municipal Association for DPW safe 
lifting reforms 
 Worked with Fire personnel to create a yoga program for Fire Personnel in connection with Blue 
Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts 
 Held first Employee Open Enrollment/Health Fair for active city and school employees to learn more 
about available benefit offerings and Medicare requirements at age 65 
 Held the first Retiree Open Enrollment/Health fair for retired city and school employees 

Trends 
HealthCare costs continue to be a major focal point for all Human Resource departments with the 
continued State and Federal debates on medical coverage for Americans. Easthampton remains 
competitive with its plan as part of the Hampshire County Group Insurance Trust and non‐participation 
in the Massachusetts GIC. However, rising costs in diagnostic services and soaring pharmacy costs have 
necessitated Easthampton to actively participate in decisions facing the Hampshire County Group 
Insurance Trust.  

Easthampton reclaimed a position on the Executive Committee to ensure representation of all 
employees, union and non‐union. In fiscal year 2019, Easthampton’s Human Resources Department will 
continue to work collectively with employee groups participating in the city 32B Committee to advocate 
to keep medical plan design changes minimal while looking at strategies to contain costs. 

2018 revealed a deficit in employee engagement. Employees articulated their desire for a more inclusive 
environment. The city will continue in 2019 to build upon employee‐management relationships and 
encourage participation at all levels through the development of performance management tools to 
encourage a healthy dialogue. 

As the cost of living increases and other communities make pay changes to attract talent, Easthampton 
will explore external resources that can assist in examining pay levels. Easthampton is committed to 
being an employer of choice and will work to assess our position related to market conditions.  

   

54 
 
 

Goals and Objectives 
GOAL 1: HUMAN RESOURCE CONSOLIDATION/STANDARDIZATION 

City and school human resource functions are predominately separate. New‐Hire paperwork, benefits 
administration, and payroll are currently conducted by city human resources. All other Human Resource 
functions are delegated amongst various school personnel causing confusion among employees about 
where to find support. The centralization of services not only allows for streamlined functionality but a 
reduction in risk associated with non‐compliance with both State and Federal laws. 

 Establish and implement centralized HR programs and practices 
 Standardize administration of Leaves of Absences (FMLA) 
 Ensure Legal Compliance 
 Enhance employee experience 
 Audit employee files 
 Complete time and attendance rollout 
 Expand toolkit available on the self‐service portal 

GOAL 2: INCREASE EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT 

The Human Resources Department will continue to build an environment of employee engagement, 
empowerment, and involvement where people can offer their best. The Human Resources Department 
will work to equip managers with tools, resources, and a comprehensive policy framework that 
facilitates an effective operating environment. 

 Increase interface with non‐union represented employees 
 Build a healthier culture based on self‐reliance and accountability 
 Review and update job descriptions to match current functionality 
 Create yearly performance management assessment tool to assess individual performance 
 Assist managers in creating an active dialogue with employees that is more frequent, open, honest, 
and supportive 
 Provide training and development opportunities 
 Foster a culture that creates trust, respect, and inclusion of diverse ideas 

GOAL 3: ENHANCE BENEFIT OFFERINGS 

The Human Resources Department will continue to assess the employee benefit package and make 
adjustments as necessary in response to ever changing‐state and federal programs. The Human 
Resources Department is committed to advising on benefits offered to ensure that Easthampton 
remains an employer of choice providing benefits that exceed offerings of surrounding communities. 

 Lobby to keep the medical benefits plan design intact  

55 
 
 

 Increase Flexible Spending account limits to the federal maximum to assist with the medical plan’s 
out‐of‐pocket expenses 
 Explore dental plans that offer orthodontia benefits 
 Increase worksite wellness in conjunction with Blue Cross Blue Shield 
 Educate employees approaching age 65 on Medicare requirements 
 Increase education on services and benefits provided at no cost by benefit carriers 

Programs and Services 
Personnel Management 

 Development and maintenance of personnel files  
 Recruitment and Hiring  
 Employee Orientation 
 Benefit Administration 
 32B Committee Meetings with city Union Representation 
 COBRA 
 Legal Compliance  
o Civil Rights Act (Title VII)  
o Pregnancy Discrimination Act (MA)  
o American Disabilities Act 
o Genetic Information Non‐Discrimination Act 
o Fair Labor Standards Act 
o Family Medical Leave Act 
o Small Necessities Leave Act 
o Health Insurance Portability And Accountability Act 
 Employee Relations  
 MCAD Claims 
 Prohibited Practice Claims 
 Labor Relations /Collective Bargaining 
 Workforce Performance Management 
 Workers Compensation  
 Injured on Duty‐ 111F Management 
 MA Unemployment 

   

56 
 
 

Budget  
Department   1520‐ Human 
Resources  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
1‐ General Government  
1‐Personnel Services 
 DIRECTOR SALARY               63,641      67,928        65,660           85,398               79,435 
 FULL‐TIME, PERM CLERICAL               39,629      34,312        32,265           63,787                65,000 
 LONGEVITY                    200           167               ‐                        ‐   
1‐Personnel Services Total            103,470    102,406        97,925         149,185             144,435 
2‐Purchase of Services 
 ACTUARIAL STUDY                       ‐                ‐            7,350             2,000                 2,000 
 ADVERTISING                    858        1,764          1,100             2,000                 2,000 
 DUES                    250           250             250                 500                    500 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                    100           245             250             2,000                 2,000 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                    158           171             200                 500                    500 
 NEGOTIATOR                       ‐                ‐            5,000            5,000  
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                    496           615             500             1,000                 1,000 
 POSTAGE                    525           475             500                 500                    500 
 PROF SERVICES               13,286      12,020        15,000           30,000  
2‐Purchase of Services Total              15,674      15,540        30,150           43,500                 8,500 
3‐Holdover 
 PERSONNEL ADVERTISING FY 2015                    184              ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
3‐Holdover Total                   184              ‐                 ‐                           ‐   
Grand Total            119,328    117,947      128,075         192,685             152,935 

 
   

57 
 
 

City Clerk  
Mission Statement 
The City Clerk’s Office is the official record keeper for the City of Easthampton.  The clerk’s office issues, 
records, maintains and ensures the safekeeping and preservation of the city’s vital records (birth, death, 
and marriage), town meeting and City Council records, business certificates and other licenses and permits 
as  outlined  by  state  law.    The  office  also  serves  as  the  city’s  burial  agent  which  allows  for  the  timely 
issuance  of  death  certificates.    In  addition,  the  office  also  issues  dog  license,  tag  sale  permits,  raffle 
licenses, and business certificates.  Our office continues to issue hunting and fishing licenses through an 
online  portal.    This  is  a  service  which  benefits  many  people  from  surrounding  communities  as  well  as 
Easthampton.   In general, the office strives to provide professional customer service to the citizens of 
Easthampton in an accurate, timely, and courteous manner.  

The City Clerk also serves as the Public Records Access officer and coordinates public records requests 
through referrals to city departments.   

In accordance with the Open Meeting Law, the office posts agendas and minutes of public meetings for 
the city’s boards and committees, both on‐site and on the city website.  In addition, the City Clerk assists 
the city’s IT Director with updating of the city’s website.    

The City Clerk’s office oversees the annual city census and the related printing of the annual street listing.   

The City Clerk serves as clerk to the City Council with all of its related responsibilities, including – but not 
limited  to  ‐  creating  and  posting  of  the  council  agendas  (full  council  and  subcommittees),  recording 
minutes of the City Council, maintaining the City Council’s budget and processing its bills, and maintaining 
the city’s ordinances and database of board and committee members.   

The office also administers all local and state elections, including primaries.  Included with this duty is also 
the registration of voters and maintenance of the city’s voter’s list.  Please see the Election & Registration 
Department budget for more information on elections.       

Organizational Overview 

City Clerk

Asst City Clerk

 
   

58 
 
 

Accomplishments  
 Began accepting on‐line payments for vital records & burial permits. 
 Will soon begin accepting credit/debit card payments over the counter. 
 Continuing work to maintain information on the city’s website ‐ agendas, minutes, events, meeting 
calendar, departmental information, etc. 
 

Trends 
During calendar year 2017, the office took in $57,289.07 in payments (including fish and game license 
payments).  That amount was very close to calendar year 2016, when $59,414.07 was taken in.   

Trends for births, marriages and deaths are remarkably consistent from year to year:   

BIRTHS:                 2015:  121      2016:  130      2017:   123 

MARRIAGES:        2015:    87      2016:    87      2017:     90 

DEATHS:                2015:  184      2016:  154      2017:   175 

BURIAL PERMITS (issued for at‐home deaths):      2015:    58       2016:    71     2017:  58 

Dog license sales are also consistent from year to year: 

2014:  1,843     2015:  1,847      2016:  1,886    2017:  1,869  

Business certificates (most for small home‐based businesses) seem to be increasing; many financial 
institutions and state licenses require them.   

Tag sale permits are required by city ordinance.  The city‐wide tag sale in May has increased the number 
of permits issued: 

2014:  226       2015:  354      2016:  286        2017:   282 

Goals and Objectives 
 Continue to offer a variety of services to citizens.  The City Clerk will continue to add more 
information to the city’s website 

59 
 
 

 During FY 2019 the City Clerk will be working with the Planning Department on the Census 2020 
Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA).  This is a necessary step to insure that Easthampton’s 
address list is accurate for the 2020 Federal Census 
 Open Meeting Law & Public Records: The City Clerk’s office is responsible for the posting of all 
committee agendas and minutes and also monitors and refers all Public Records requests.   We will 
continue to streamline this process so that all boards and committees are submitting their agendas 
and minutes in a timely manner.   

Budget  
Department    1610‐ City Clerk  

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED   RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  
1‐ General Government  
1‐Personnel Services 
 ASST CLERK SALARY                 43,988         44,227          44,554            45,225                  45,225 
 CLERK SALARY                 60,712         61,005          63,300            64,246                 64,246  
 LONGEVITY                      800              800                800                  800                      800  
1‐Personnel Services Total              105,501       106,032       108,653           110,271               110,271  
2‐Purchase of Services 
 ADVERTISING                         97                  ‐                      ‐                            ‐   
 BINDING RECORDS                      118                  ‐                  120                          ‐   
 CITY CLK‐DOG LICENSES                      181              186                200                  200                       200  
 CITY CLK‐DUES & MEMBERSHIP                      280              290                300                  300                      300  
 CITY CLK‐IN STATE TRAVEL                   1,114           1,106           1,150               1,200                    1,000 
 CITY CLK‐SAFE DEPOSIT BONDS                      291              325                325                  250                      250  
 EDUC & TRAINING                      150                  ‐                      ‐                            ‐   
 MISC PROF & TECH SERV                      430              238                300                  300                      300  
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                      813              816           1,100              1,100                   1,000  
 POSTAGE                   1,008           1,165           1,300              1,400                   1,400  
 PRINTING                      105                  ‐                  200                  200                       200  
2‐Purchase of Services Total                  4,586           4,126           4,995               4,950                   4,650  
Grand Total              110,087       110,158        113,648          115,221              114,921  
 

   

60 
 
 

Elections 
Mission Statement 
The mission of the Elections Department is to administer all elections in accordance with the laws of the 
Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts.    This  includes  voter  registration,  absentee  voting,  early  voting  and 
Election Day voting.  During FY 2019 there are two scheduled elections – the State Primary on September 
4, 2018, and the State Election on November 6, 2018.  The state election will include 10 days of early 
voting.  It is possible there may be early voting for the State Primary. 

Organizational Overview 

Board of Registars 

Clerk to the Board 
of Registrars

Election Workers Asst. City Clerk

Accomplishments  

 Administered the 2017 city Election.  Will administer a special election on May 22, 2018  
 Replaced the 23‐year old AccuVote Optical Scan Vote Tabulators with Imagecast Precinct Tabulators 
 Prior to May 22nd special election, there will be training of election workers on use of the new voting 
equipment 

Trends 
 Despite being an “off” state election year, local interest in the city election during FY 2018 was very 
evident 
 Voter registration has been increasing due to the ability to register to vote in many ways – in person, 
by mail, at the Registry of Motor Vehicles, at some state agencies and on‐line. As of Feb. 20, 2018 the 
total number of registered voters was 11,970.  That number is slightly lower than in 2016, which is 
typical – the number always increases in a presidential election year, then goes back down:   
 Oct., 2016:  12,228 total voters         Oct., 2017:  11,913 total voters 

61 
 
 

Goals and Objectives 
 Administer the state primary and state election as efficiently as possible 
 Run the Early Voting period (s) so that it’s a good experience for all  
 Investigate central tabulation for processing the ballots to see if it might work for the city 
 Continue to utilize the city website to promote voter registration and absentee/early voting 
opportunities 
 Investigate the purchase of Poll Pads at the polling places (note – they are not yet certified by the 
state for use at the polls for check‐in) 
 Continue gradual replacement of voting booths 
 

Programs and Services 
 In accordance with state law, conduct the annual census so that Easthampton’s voter’s list is as 
accurate as possible 
 Administer and coordinate all primaries and elections in accordance with state law 
 

Budget 
Department    1620‐ Elections  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

1‐ General Government  
1‐Personnel Services 
 ELEC & REG‐CLERICAL                  500           500              500                 600                    600 
 ELEC & REG‐OTHER POSITIONS            10,875      11,199          7,000           15,000              15,000 
 ELEC & REG‐REGULAR                  525           525             525                 525                    525 
1‐Personnel Services Total           11,900      12,224         8,025          16,125               16,125 
2‐Purchase of Services 
ELEC & REG‐COMPUTER SERV             2,976        1,522          2,000             2,000                 2,000 
ELEC & REG‐MISC MACH                    ‐             410             400             1,750                  1,750 
ELEC & REG‐MISC PROF & TECH              7,384        5,493          8,125             5,500                  5,500 
ELEC & REG‐OFFICE SUPPLIES                  456           515             800                 800                    800 
ELEC & REG‐POSTAGE              5,911        6,436           6,000            6,500                  6,500 
 ELEC & REG‐PRINTING SUPPLIES                  438           364             750                800                    800 
2‐Purchase of Services Total           17,166       14,741          18,075           17,350               17,350  
3‐Holdover 
 MISC. MACHINES & EQUIPMENT                     ‐           3,125                    ‐                           ‐   
3‐Holdover Total                    ‐           3,125                    ‐                              ‐   
 4‐Capital  
 FY18 VOTING MACHINES                     ‐                  ‐                      ‐                           ‐   
 4‐Capital Total                     ‐                  ‐                      ‐                              ‐   
Grand Total           29,066       30,090          26,100          33,475               33,475  

62 
 
 

Planning 
Mission Statement 
The primary function of the Planning Department is to manage the regulatory process for development 
proposals submitted to the Planning Board and Zoning Board of Appeals under the Easthampton Zoning 
Ordinance and the Subdivision Control Law. As part of that process, the Planning Department evaluates 
development proposals for their contribution towards community planning goals as documented in the 
current Easthampton Master Plan, and to assess their impacts on the community. 
 
The other responsibilities of the Planning Department include:  
 Administering several grant and funding programs including the Community Development Block 
Grants (CDBG) and Community Preservation Act (CPA) funds 
 Providing staff support to various permitting and advisory committees, including but not limited to 
the Conservation Commission, Community Preservation Act Committee, Affordable and Fair Housing 
Partnership, Easthampton Development and Industrial Commission, Easthampton City Arts, and 
the Commission on Disability 
 Meeting with neighbors and developers, coordinates the departmental review and administration of 
the proposals, schedules public hearings, drafts decisions, and manages performance guarantees for 
the completion of approved projects  
 Promoting sustainable growth initiatives to reduce burdens on the city’s financial capacity, 
infrastructure, wildlife and natural resources. 
 Conducting long‐term community land use planning efforts including visioning, master planning, 
strategic planning and resource‐based planning 
 

Organizational Overview 

City Planner

Conservation 
Assistant Planner Arts Coordinator
Agent
 
 

Accomplishments  
Planning Department (general operations) 

The Planning Department staff initiated, oversaw, and managed many complex and long duration projects 
as part of general operations.  The following is a summary of several of those projects: 
 
 Assisted in the adoption of a comprehensive and progressive Cannabis Zoning Ordinance. 

63 
 
 

 Assisted  the  Mayor’s  Office  in  coordinating  cannabis  establishment  applicant  processes  and  Host 
Community Agreements 
 Assisted  in  the  adoption  of  a  progressive  set  of  revisions  associated  with  the  keeping  of  chickens 
Zoning Ordinance 
 Completed the approximately $1 million‐dollar purchase of 25 acres of farmland and forest land over 
the Barnes Aquifer as part of the Cook‐County Road Conservation Project.  Substantial CPA dollars 
from both Easthampton ($343,000) and Southampton ($386,862) along with a $400,000 LAND grant 
from the state were used 
 Assisted in the consideration of a Seasonal Cottage Ordinance (although it was not sent forward as an 
Ordinance revision) 
 Hired a shared Conservation Agent with the Town of Southampton to provide 11 hours per week (8 
hours per week in Southampton) from November 2017 until June 30, 2018 
 Transferred  and  contracted  with  the  Pioneer  Valley  Planning  Commission  to  apply  for  the  city’s 
FY2019 CDBG application; including the full administration and coordinated by PVPC if awarded 
 Submitted  an  area  of  Easthampton  as  a  federally  recognized  Opportunity  Zone  under  an  EOEA 
application process 
 Awarded an  approximately $17,000 grant from the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs for a 
comprehensive update to the city’s 1990 Subdivision Regulations 
 
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)  
The Planning Department managed the FY2016 CDBG award of $800,000.  In December 2017 the Admiral 
Street Neighborhood Infrastructure Project was completed.  It was an approximately $445,000 project 
which  included  improvements  to  streets,  sidewalks,  drainage  and  sewer  lines  on  Church  and  George 
Streets, and a portion of Briggs and Admiral Street.  An additional component of the CDBG award will 
result  in  approximately  eight  (8)  Housing  Rehabilitation  Projects  will  also  be  completed  by  September 
2018.  The Housing Rehabilitation project is approximately $211,000.   
 
Community Preservation Act 
The  Planning  Department  administered  the  FY2018  CPA  budget  of  approximately  $830,000  under  the 
direction  of  the  Community  Preservation  Act  Committee.    Easthampton  adopted  the  Community 
Preservation  Act  in  2001.  The  Act  creates  a  3%  tax  surcharge  which  generates  revenue  for  projects 
addressing open space, affordable housing, historic preservation and recreation. The Committee makes 
recommendations to the City Council on the expenditure of the funds. The following is a list of CPA funds 
allocated in FY2017:  
 
 CPA Funds       $834,006 
 Matching Funds    $988,363 
 Total Funds      $1,822,368 
 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts ‐ Community Compact Program 
In  June  2016,  the  city  in  partnership  with  PVPC  completed  a  “Review  of  Permitting  Requirements  for 
Industrial/Manufacturing  Uses”  under  the  Community  Compact  Cabinet’s  Housing  and  Economic 
Development/Competitive best practices grant.  In May 2017, the City of Easthampton and the Town of 
Southampton  executed  an  Inter  municipal  Agreement  to  share  a  Conservation  Agent.    Under  the 
Community Compact Cabinet’s Regionalization and Efficiency Grant, the city was awarded $25,000 to fund 

64 
 
 

a part time Conservation Agent.  The City of Easthampton was provided with 11 hours per week and the 
Town of Southampton 8 hours per week.   
 
Complete Streets 
During FY2018, the Planning Department coordinated with the Department of Public Works and others to 
continue  participation  in  the  State’s  Complete  Streets  Funding  Program.    The  city,  in  partnership  with 
MassDOT, completed a Phase II Project Prioritization Plan which resulted in a Tier 3 Construction Funding 
Award of $217,445 for crosswalk and other improvement projects. 
 
The projects identified include: 

 Cottage Street crossing improvements 
 Sidewalk and crossing improvements near 15 Cottage Street 
 Pleasant Street wayfinding 
 Access to transit Cottage Street 
 Crosswalk enhancements at Main/Glendale 
 Sidewalk and crosswalk improvements at Pulaski Park 

 
Easthampton City Arts 
Easthampton City Arts (ECA) is a city organization based in the Planning Department that creates positive, 
innovative, and accessible arts programming and cultural events to generate and increase opportunities 
for artists and the local economy.  ECA operates with the direction of a coordinating committee and events 
are funded primarily through donations and State cultural grant funding.  E‐City Arts seeks to offer a wide 
range of arts programming and cultural events, which serve as platforms for community engagement and 
economic development.  
 
The following is a summary of the 2018 programs and events:  

 Easthampton  Art  Walk  is  an  established  and  growing  monthly  event,  activating  downtown 
Easthampton with visual and performing arts, and drawing attendees from throughout the region into 
local galleries, restaurants, and businesses 
 The 4th annual Easthampton Book Fest will take place on Saturday, April 14, 2018, and will feature a 
full day of original, creative content that highlights the literary accomplishments of local and national 
writers, poets, essayists, and publishers 
 The 5th annual Cultural Chaos street festival will take place on Saturday, June 9, 2018, in the Cottage Street 
Cultural District and will feature a full day of music, performance, and art 
 ECA will launch its first‐ever Youth Arts Initiative in Spring 2018 

   

65 
 
 

Goals and Objectives 
Planning Department (General Operation) 
Goal ‐ Continue efforts to increase the amount of Planning Department staff funded by the general fund 
rather than grant funded positions; articulate a three‐year plan for Department staffing needs.  
 
Objectives: 

 A concerted effort during FY2019 will focus on raising the awareness of and elevate the work of the 
Planning Department 
 Better highlight and publicize the work of the Planning Department 
 Conduct  increased  public  outreach,  engagement,  and  coordination  with  city  departments,  civic 
groups and community organizations 
 Better integrate City Arts into the Planning Department through refinement of the yearly work plan, 
public outreach, engagement, coordination, and online presence 
 Post  additional  information  regarding  projects,  hearings  (such  as  application  materials)  and  other 
information on the Department website 
 Partner with the Mayor’s office on frequent video updates or other interactive engagement 
 Coordinate with the Mayor’s office on pay scale restructuring to better reflect Department needs. 
 Formally catalogue and track full range of Department activity during Fiscal Years 
 Seek an unpaid intern to review, catalogue, and prepare a summary report outlining significant grant‐
initiated projects since completion of the 2008 Master Plan 

Goal ‐ Continue to take steps to streamline permitting for a wide range of projects. 
 
Objectives:  

 Identify  at  least  one  recommendation  of  the  Pioneer  Valley  Planning  Commission’s  “Review  of 
Permitting Requirements for Industrial/Manufacturing Uses” to streamline the permitting process for 
these types of land use permits 
 Formalize the process, timeline and consistence of the “pre‐development” meeting with departments 
to streamline the permitting process for larger, unique, or complex projects. 
 Update the 2015 Small Business Permitting Guide 
 Consider  ways  to  reduce  permitting  requirements  for  smaller,  homeowner  related  projects 
(supplemental apartments, additions, etc.) 
 Assess  need,  timeline,  process,  and  costs  associated  with  conducting  a  comprehensive  zoning 
ordinance re‐write 

Goal – Continue to and/or begin to catalogue and outline future master plan or visioning related projects 
and initiatives  
 
Objectives: 

 Work with the Chamber of Commerce, the City Engineer, and others on outreach and information 
related to the 2021 TIP Union Street reconstruction 
 Assess the general status of parking supply, demand, and infrastructure in the “downtown area” 

66 
 
 

 Work  with  the  City  Engineer  and  others  on  the  design  and  implementation  of  complete  street 
improvements in 2019 
 Assess previous efforts related to the implementation of the 2008 Master Plan (such as Open Space)  
 Assess and consider options or scenarios for a master plan “update” 
 Assess and consider city‐owned parcels for existing and potential future uses 

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)  
In February 2018, the city in partnership with PVPC submitted an FY2019 CDBG request for is $798,000 
project.  The announcement of the grant award is expected in June 2018.  

 During  FY2017,  the  Planning  Department  coordinated  and  completed  the  2018  Community 
Development Strategy which outlines the following long‐term goals and objectives (2018‐2023): 
 Create  and  retain  housing  available  to  residents  with  a  broad  range  of  incomes.  The  increase  and 
maintenance of the supply of both rental and ownership units are necessary 
 Enhance the local climate for sustainable economic development in the commercial downtown, the 
industrial manufacturing base, green energy, and the growing arts cluster 
 The Open Space and Recreation priorities focus on the preservation of land over the Barnes Aquifer, 
along  Mt.  Tom,  along  the  Manhan  River  Greenway,  and  land  for  agricultural  use.  Recreation 
improvements are focused on existing parks and access to local ponds 
 Bring  public  services  and  technological  resources  to  and  expand  those  currently  in  the  city  that 
compliment  population  needs  and  community  development  priorities.  5.  Protect  key  Historic  and 
Cultural  resources  through  the  re‐use  of  Old  Town  Hall  and  the  recognition  and  protection  of  key 
historic districts and sites (including but not limited to the Emily Williston Library, Maple School, and 
Center School) will contribute to the long‐term maintenance of Easthampton’s community character.  
 Create  connections  through  planning,  growth,  and  activities  based  on  links  between  people, 
infrastructure, resources, and services 

A total of 37 projects are identified on the Prioritization of Projects list. 
 
Community Preservation Act (CPA) 
The  final  Community  Preservation  Plan  for  FY2019  is  nearing  completion.    As  in  past  years,  the 
Preservation Plan identifies possibilities for future projects and expenditures through an assessment of 
current  resources  and  needs  in  the  community  and  helps  potential  project  applicants  understand  the 
Committee’s priorities and the approval process by outlining the possibilities for Community Preservation 
and the criteria for project approval.  
 
The  CPA  Committee  continues  to  respond  to  less  state  matching  funds  through  the  CPA  program  by 
soliciting longer term plans from interested organizations.  The  Committee continues  to evaluate high 
demand for projects with reductions in available funding.  The renovation of the second floor of Old Town 
Hall is one of the more significant expected requests in either FY2019 or FY2020 and the Committee has 
begun to reserve some funding for that project. 
 
Easthampton City Arts 
The formation of specific goals will occur between the Art’s Coordinator, City Planner, and others over the 
course of FY2019.   Generally, the program will include: 

 Continued implementation of and planning for existing programs and events 

67 
 
 

 Exploration  of  expanded  funding  options  to  support  programs  and  events  and  a  new  approach  to 
fundraising 
 Launching of a new website and production of “Easthampton cultural district map” 
 Consideration of expanding the cultural district 
 Expanding ECA Coordinating Committee membership 
 Better integration of ECA into the Planning Department, including assistance in branding, outreach, 
and expanded initiatives (such as bike share) 

 
Planning Department Staffing Goals 

 City Planner – As the Department Head, the goal for FY2019 will be to begin to prepare for the position 
to be primarily responsible for longer range planning efforts or those efforts that more broadly guide 
the city.  This may require a multiple year strategy to implement 
 Assistant  Planner  –  The  FY2019  budget  moves  incrementally  closer  to  fully  funding  this  Planning 
Department position through the General Fund.  The retirement of the Grants Coordinator creates 
the need to create a plan to re‐organize and shift responsibility of this position over the next year 
 Arts Coordinator – The FY2019 moves incrementally closer to fully funding this Planning Department 
position through the General Fund.  During FY2019 significant effort will be made to ensure that the 
position and the City Arts program become integrated and part of the Planning Department’s work 
program and to clarify the same to the general public 
 Conservation Agent ‐ Part of the goal of the Community Compact Shared Agent program was for each 
community to allocate funds to pay for the part time position after the grant funds are expended.  The 
Planning Department finds great value in having a professional staff member to aid applicants and the 
Conservation Commission.  While funding the entire 19‐hour per week part‐time position from the 
general fund was not an option, the FY2019 budget request begins to provide some general funds 
along  with  drawing  from  a  series  of  other  funding  sources,  such  as  the  Conservation  Commission 
permit fees  
 Administrative Assistance – The FY2019 budget eliminates the nominal $3,300 dollars to pay for the 
Planning Board Clerk/minute taker position.  This decision to remove funding is based solely on the 
potential to create a Clerk position who will cover minutes for multiple boards and committees 

 
Programs and Services 
 

 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Administration 
 Community Preservation Act (CPA) Administration 
 Zoning Ordinance Amendments 
 Inter‐Departmental Coordination for larger projects 
 Long‐term and Community Planning initiatives 
 Grant applications and administration (MassWorks, PARC, LAND)  
 Exploration  of  other  grants  and  funding  sources  as  applicable  (Housing  Choice,  other  new  State 
initiatives) 

   

68 
 
 

Budget  
Department    1720‐ Planning  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

1‐ General Government  
1‐Personnel Services 
 ECA ARTS COORDINATOR                                  ‐                 ‐          38,276           35,074                35,074 
 
 E'TON CITY ARTS                         26,671       26,528                 ‐                           ‐   
PART TIME ‐ OTHER                         16,025       16,125        16,245             9,950                  9,950 
 PART‐TIME,CLERICAL                                  ‐                 ‐             3,254 
 PART‐TIME,REG                         21,434       21,985        23,211           40,997                40,997 
 PLANNER SALARY                         60,067       66,146        69,465           69,506                69,506 
 PLANNING BD, PERM. CLERICAL                            1,090            790                 ‐                           ‐   
 ZONING BD,PERM CLERICAL                               365            272                 ‐                           ‐   
1‐Personnel Services Total                      125,652    131,846      150,451         155,526              155,526 
2‐Purchase of Services 
 ADVERTISING                                  ‐                 ‐                600                 600                     600 
 CONS COMM‐DUES & MEMBERSHIP                               393            401                 ‐                           ‐   
 CONS COMM‐EDUCATION                                  ‐              100                 ‐                           ‐   
 CONS COMM‐POSTAGE                                  ‐              200                 ‐                           ‐   
 CONSERVATION MISC. EXP.                                  ‐                 ‐                500                 500                     5 
 DUES & MEMBERSHIPS                               380            405              834                 835                     835 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                               100            160              100                 100                     100 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                                  ‐                 ‐                200                 200                     200 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                                 46            109              400                 400                     400 
 
 PLANNING BD,ADVERTISING                               111            225                 ‐                           ‐   
 POSTAGE                                  ‐                75              650                 650                     650 
 PRINTING                                 72              37                 ‐                       ‐   
 PVPC                            2,408         2,468           2,527             2,670                  2,670 
 ZONING BD, ADVERTISING                               180               ‐                   ‐                           ‐   
 ZONING BD, POSTAGE                                  ‐              250                 ‐                           ‐   
2‐Purchase of Services Total                           3,689         4,429           5,811             5,955                  5,955 
3‐Holdover 
 CITY PLANNER OFFICE SUPPLIES                                49               ‐                   ‐   
 FULL TIME, PERMANENT, REGULAR                                  ‐              643                 ‐   
GENERAL OFFICE SUPPLIES ENC.                                  ‐              105                 ‐   
 PRINTING, REPRODUCING ENCUMB                                  ‐                50                 ‐                           ‐   
3‐Holdover Total                                49            798                 ‐                           ‐   
Grand Total                      129,389    137,073      156,263         161,481             161,481 

69 
 
 

   

Section 2  

 Public Safety 
 

70 
 
 

Police Department  
Mission Statement 
The  mission  of  the  Easthampton  Police  Department  is  to  provide  excellence  in  police  service  through 
aggressive pursuit of violators of the law and prevention of crime and disorder. This is accomplished by a 
partnership of the police and the public to enhance the quality of life, reduce the fear of crime, preserve 
the peace and impartially enforce the law. 

The Easthampton Police will maintain the highest standard of integrity and respect the dignity of each 
individual. Our services will be rendered with courtesy, civility and in adherence to the constitutions of 
the United States of America and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

OUR MISSION is to be the model of excellence in policing by working in partnership with the community 
and others to: 
•    FIGHT crime and the fear of crime, including terrorism 

•    ENFORCE laws while safeguarding the constitutional rights of all people 

•    PROVIDE quality service to all of our residents and visitors 

•    CREATE a work environment in which we recruit, train, and develop an exceptional team of 
employees 

CORE VALUES  
Our core values form the framework for all of our work. These values are a part of the finest traditions 
of the Easthampton Police Department and make up who we are. The core values on which we stand, 
and that are emblazoned on the uniform of every officer of the Easthampton Police Department are: 

1. Honor 
It is a privilege to serve as a member of the law enforcement community and especially as a member of 
the Easthampton Police Department. Each day when we pin on our badge, we remember those who 
went before us and the sacrifices made in the name of this badge.  We treat our badge with honor, 
respect, and pride. We do nothing that will tarnish our badge, for one day we will pass it to another 
Easthampton Police officer to honor and respect.  

2. Integrity  
Integrity is the bedrock of policing and the foundation for building a successful relationship with our 

71 
 
 

partners. Integrity means reflecting our values through our actions. It is not enough to espouse honor, 
service, and integrity. Each of us must live these values in our professional and personal lives. We do this 
by being honest in our dealings, and abiding by the laws and respecting the civil rights of all. Serving 
with integrity builds trust between the community and the police.  

3. Service  
Service with honor means providing police service respectfully and recognizing the dignity of every 
person. We can demand that others respect and honor our work only when we respect them and their 
rights. We are in the business of providing police service with the highest degree of professionalism. 
Every day we come into contact with crime victims, residents afraid to enjoy their neighborhoods, and 
young people scared to stand up and do the right thing. Our job is to help them and to do so with 
courtesy and compassion. 

Organizational Overview 

Police Chief

Operations
Police Captain

Principal Clerk

Investigations
Detective 
Sergeant 
Administration
Lieutenant
(2) Detectives
(1) SRO

Day Shift Relief  Eve Shift  Eve Shift Relief  Mid Shift 


Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant

(5) Day Shift  (5) Eve Shift  Court Officer K9 Officer and  (5) Mid Shift 


Patrols Patrols K9  Patrols

(5) Special 
Officers 

72 
 
 

Accomplishments 
 An overall reduction in crime 
 Liaison Officer Appointments: Elder Affairs, Diversity/Bias, Domestic Violence, Victim Witness, 
Veterans Affairs, Hampshire Hope ‐ opioid addiction and a new SRO 
 EPD Social Media program 
 Interactive EPD Website 
 Annual Cook Out with a Cop program 
 Monthly Coffee with a Cop program 
 Public Information Officer (PIO) Appointments 
 Department restructuring to save overtime: Midnight Shift Relief Sergeant to add supervision on 
every shift, Administrative/Training/Patrol Lieutenant’s position  
 Appointment of a part‐time Task Force Officer to DA’s Anti‐Crime Task Force 
 The DA’s Office Child Advocacy Center partnership 
 Domestic Violence assessment and follow‐up program 
 Equipped all cruisers with biohazard bags and a supply of Tyvek overalls, shoe coverings, respirators, 
gloves and eye protection in an effort to prevent opioid exposure 
 Equipped all cruisers with CO detectors due to recent CO officer exposures 
 IACP Net program 
 Traffic Enforcement program 
 Narcan program 
 New Radio Repeater on Mt. Tom saved approximately $300,000 in city wide repeater coverage 
proposal 
 Instituted a new overtime savings training philosophy  
 Instituted a new Marine Search and Rescue program with newly acquired vessel. Water rescue 
training and enforcement with Environmental Police/Coast Guard (The Rt. 5 boat ramp in the 
busiest public boat ramp in the Commonwealth) 
 Partnered with Mt. Tom Ice Cream for our Youth Ice Cream Citation program 
 Partnered with Boston based “Home Base” for Veteran and Family Care outreach through MA 
General Hospital 
 Partnered with Holyoke Police Department for “22 Until None” program, suicide prevention for 
Veterans 
 Acquired Grants: Radio interoperability, Active Shooter, Ballistic Vests, Highway Safety – Traffic, OUI 
Enforcement, Distracted Driving Enforcement and K9 
 Conducted traffic studies on most major roadways in the city along with directed traffic patrols. This 
information is shared on our social media pages 
 Officer Andrew Beaulieu completed 14 weeks of canine training (Patrol and Narcotics certification) 
with his dog Gino, and is now on regular patrol as our new K9 Team 
 Participated in the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) National Drug Take Back Initiative resulting in 
collection of unused, unwanted medications 

73 
 
 

 Continued success with our new School Resource Officer who spends time in the Elementary 
Schools, the Middle School and the High School 
 Hired new Dispatchers and Dispatch Supervisor, each of whom is certified in Emergency Medical 
Dispatch (EMD) allowing them to provide medical aid over the phone to 911 callers 
 Completed ECW (Taser) training for officers, instituted Executive Office of Public Safety Taser policy 
and deployed Tasers to trained, authorized officers 
 Managed public safety for major events including several road races, parades, Mill Side concert 
events and numerous weekend festivals 
 Purchased 2 Harley Davidson Motorcycles and anticipate the participation in a number of 
community activities in addition to traffic enforcement 
 Participated and hosted the 2017 Easthampton Toy Program to provide more than $10,000 worth of 
toys to those less fortunate families in Easthampton 
 Lids for Kids program 
 Assisted with the Special Olympics games held at Nonotuck Park  
 Special Olympics Convoy where officers from the department met with officers from area 
departments and drove in police cruiser convoy to Cambridge, MA to participate in the awards 
ceremony by presenting the athletes with medals 
 Annual Big Rig Day event where children can explore big rigs and public safety vehicles.  
 Continued partnership with the Easthampton CERT Program 
 EHS Student Internship program 
 Partnership with Easthampton’s Community Coalition and Youth Coalition 
 

Trends 
2017 Comstats: 

The patrol force is the first responder to all public safety calls for service. The vast majority of calls are 
usually  patrol  related,  making  patrol  the  backbone  of  the  Department.  In  addition  to  our  community 
outreach  programs,  in  the  calendar  year  “2017”  the  Easthampton  Police  Department  served  the 
community as follows: 

16,413    Calls for service 

346     Arrests 

174     Summons arrests 

39     Juvenile arrests/summons 

69     Warrant Arrests 

804     Incidents were documented 

559     Criminal complaints were issued 

74 
 
 

1,363     Criminal incidents requiring investigation 

325     Automobile crashes that required reporting 

65     Restraining/Harassment Orders were issued 

429     Parking Tickets issued totaling $8,520.00 

1,167     Citations issued totaling $36,690.00 

281     Firearms Licenses issued totaling $23,425.00 

33     Calls for suicidal persons 

27     Unattended death investigations 

We  anticipate  that  crime  levels  will  rise  for  several  reasons,  to  include,  the  sophistication  of  criminal 
activity, the opioid crisis, and an uncertain economy. All of this will surely continue to make our jobs that 
much  more  difficult.  Criminal  activity  continues  to  evolve  with  Cybercrime  technology,  resulting  in 
internet scams, identity theft, child exploitation and other schemes. Policing and solving many of these 
crimes is difficult to keep up with, given rapidly changing technology and the global nature of such deceits.  
It has become a regular occurrence that someone has been robbed of his/her money or identity or been 
scammed by someone that may live in another country. The fewer resources we have, the more inhibited 
our ability is to effectively deal with anticipated problems and crime. 

Opioid Epidemic: The influx of drug overdoses and alcohol abuse that we have seen has devastating effects 
on not just the user, but the family and the community as a whole.  Many of the petty crimes, car breaks, 
shoplifting,  house  breaks,  home  invasions  and  like  offenses  are  due  to  desperation  for  quick  money. 
Addiction does not discriminate.  It has no race, age, gender, or income boundaries.  Heroin use in the 
United States has increased 135% from 2002 to 2016.   With this, the numbers of heroin overdoses and 
deaths have drastically risen. During this same time frame, heroin‐related overdose deaths have jumped 
533%.  

In Easthampton, we were called to 25 heroin‐opioid related overdoses and of those, 3 resulted in death 
in 2017. There certainly would have been more deaths, had we not started a Narcan program where our 
officers are all trained in its use and carry it as part of their duty gear. We have saved many lives here in 
Easthampton by deploying Narcan. The Easthampton Police Department is committed to continuing to 
work  with  the  regional  community  and  local  social  service  providers  to  deliver  assistance  to  those 
struggling with addiction.  

As a community, we can work together to stop and reverse the rising rates of opioid misuse and abuse 
in our region. Our goals are to: 

 Prevent heroin and prescription drug misuse and addiction 
 Prevent overdose from prescription drugs and heroin 

75 
 
 

 Help more people get treatment and recover from heroin and prescription drug addiction 

Crosswalk safety: In 2018, efforts will be made to work with stakeholders to improve pedestrian safety—
in  particular  crosswalk  safety—by  improving  design,  signage,  education,  and  enforcement.    Crosswalk 
safety  has  always  been  a  priority  concern,  but  with  increased  traffic  volume,  more  residents,  and  the 
aggressiveness  of  drivers,  the  safety  of  pedestrians  and  crosswalk  violations  has  to  be  a  dedicated 
education and enforcement focus to improve overall safety.   

School Safety: School safety and security will continue to be a priority for the department as it is nationally. 
We  will  continue  to  work  with  school  leaders  to  improve  the  school  safety  plan.  We  must  ensure  the 
safety of our children. The school resource officer visits all the schools daily and is heavily involved in the 
school culture, creating a safe environment for the students and faculty.      

There were 82 calls for service and 17 arrests at the Massachusetts Chapter 766 Approved Private Special 
Needs School here in Easthampton. We will continue our partnership with that school administration to 
work towards improving their school safety plan, the health & welfare of the student population and a 
reduction in enforcement action.     

The  legalization  of  Cannabis:  The  legalization  of  Cannabis  in  Massachusetts  has  created  numerous 
challenges for law enforcement in addressing public safety concerns. Some of the anticipated impacts on 
Easthampton Police practices and resources will be: 

 An increase of individuals operating motor vehicles under the influence of Cannabis. Field sobriety 
testing for Cannabis remains a major challenge in both the lack of technology for detection and recent 
case law 
 Cannabis industries are a significant cash storage and cash transport businesses due to federal banking 
restrictions, creating attractive targets for criminal activity such as burglaries, robberies and money 
laundering 
 Cannabis tourism will become a significant factor on our congested downtown area, no doubt creating 
traffic related issues 
 Law  enforcement  agencies  have  found  novice  users,  such  as  tourists,  pose  a  particular  problem 
because  they  often  do  not  understand  the  potency  of  today’s  Cannabis  and  Cannabis  infused 
products, often resulting in calls for service from First Responders 
 Residential  growing  operations  pose  safety  risks  for  first  responders.  They  can  contain  fire  risks, 
overloaded  electrical  circuits,  hash  oil  and/or  carbon  dioxide  cylinders  explosions  and  bypassed 
electrical meters 
 A  risk  of  significant  black/gray  market  Cannabis  transactions  arising  from  the  combination  of  a 
dramatic increase in production, loosened controls, and increased opportunities for diversion 
 An increase in the use of Cannabis by persons under 21 as a result of wider availability 

76 
 
 

Goals and Objectives  
GOAL 1:  HIRE PERSONNEL AND MOVE TOWARD FULL STAFFING  

Objectives:  

 Recruit and hire Special Police Officers to backfill our full‐time hiring pool 
 Continue to diversify our workforce 
 Enroll new Specials into our comprehensive departmental Field Training Program by July 
 Acquire mandated training for any departmental officers during FY2019 
 Reinstate our Community Services/Walking‐Bike Beat Officer 
 Review our Liaison Officer Program and appoint: 
o A Mental Health Liaison Officer 
o Expand  our  CISM  Liaison  Officers:  Critical  Incident  Stress  Management  (CISM)  is  a 
comprehensive, organized approach for the reduction and control of harmful aspects of stress 
in  the  emergency  service  field. Our  CISM  Officers  are  part  of  a  specially  trained  team  of 
volunteers from police, fire, EMS, mental health, clergy and other professions, who provide 
CISM services for those exposed to a critical incident 
o Reinstate our Triad (Senior Citizens and Law Enforcement Together) program 

GOAL 2:  SCHOOL SAFETY  

Objectives:  

 Work with the Easthampton School Department administration to update their school safety plan 
and handbook 
 Work on adding “tools” to their plan that allows for additional safety and security options 
 Additional training for our new SRO, including advanced SRO school 
 Work with neighboring communities to conduct ongoing drills and training at area schools 
 Continue to evaluate school safety protocols and implementation 
 Continue to work with our Massachusetts Chapter 766 Approved Private Special Needs School 

GOAL 3:  REPLACE AND UPGRADE EQUIPMENT  

Objectives: 

 Ensure that the department has standard, current equipment and tools necessary to perform our 
jobs 
 Acquire AED’s for all line cruisers 
 A new traffic signboard, with the latest technology, in order to provide the department with a 
detailed accounting of traffic speed, volume and trends 

77 
 
 

 Evaluate the cruiser fleet (average cruiser has 60,000 miles) and establish a program to efficiently 
rotate cruiser purchases 
 Replace our 20‐year‐old ballistic shields 
 Evaluate a replacement program for our 10‐year‐old portable radios 
 Trade‐in our current 4th generation Glock handguns and upgrade to 5th generation Glock handguns 
to better accommodate female and left‐handed shooters. Replace the 8‐year‐old 4th generation 
Glocks while they still hold a substantial trade‐in value 
 Evaluate a move from a .40 caliber duty firearm to a 9 mm caliber firearm allowing for ammunition 
cost savings 

GOAL 4:  ADMINISTER POLICIES TO ADDRESS ADDICTION  

Objectives: 

 Continue regional coalition efforts among law enforcement, social and medical service agencies to 
help those in need 
 Provide training for community members in the use of Narcan 
 Continue active membership in the Hampshire HOPE Coalition addressing the rise in prescription 
opioid misuse, heroin use, addiction, and overdose death in Hampshire County 
 The Easthampton Police is partnering with Hampshire HOPE to create our own Drug Addiction 
Response Team (DART) and recruit our city’s first “recovery coach.” The DART approach does not 
treat addicts as criminals, but as people in need of help. Officers identify individuals who have 
overdosed on narcotics or engaged in high‐risk behavior related to their addiction and follow up 
with them within 48 hours of the initial call. Addicts in recovery will have a long‐term connection to 
the resources they need to avoid relapse 
 Continue to work with the Easthampton Youth Coalition to train and educate our youth on addiction 
 Search out and apply for applicable grants

Programs and Services 
Patrol 

 Emergency Response   Foot Patrols 
 Accident Investigation   K‐9 Officer 
 Traffic Enforcement   Social Media 
 Juvenile Services   Veteran Affairs Officer 
 School Resource Officer   Animal Control 
 Bike patrols   Addiction Officer 
 Motor Unit patrols   Drug Recognition Experts 
 Diversity/Bias Officer   Arson Investigators 
 Accident Reconstruction   Academy Training 
 Motor pool   Coffee with a Cop 

78 
 
 

 Elder Services   Cook‐Out with a Cop 
 Domestic Violence Team   Ice Cream citation program 
 Firearms Licensing    Neighborhood Policing 
Criminal Investigation  

 Felony Investigations   Crime Prevention 
 Cyber Crime   Crime Scene Services 
 Child Exploitation   Sexual Assault Investigators 
 Background Investigations   Photography 
 Special Investigations   Finger Printing 
 Identity Theft   Anti‐Crime Task Force 
 Drug Awareness   Evidence collection, processing and 
 Narcotics Investigations   storage 
 

Administration and Communications 

 Grants   Human Recourses 
 Budgeting   Clerical Duties 
 Personnel Services   Detail Processing 
 Expenses   Special Events 
 Policies and Procedures   9‐1‐1 
 General Orders   Emergency Communications 
 City Officials and Departments Liaison   Code Red Notification 
 Internal Affairs   Prisoner Monitoring 
 Keeper of the Records   24 Hour Contact Point 
 Taxi Permitting & Inspections   Walk In Service 
 Soliciting and Raffle Permitting  
 

   

79 
 
 

Budgets 
 

Department    2100‐ Police  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
2‐ Public Safety   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 CLERICAL FULL TIME                     39,673         39,868         40,169   40,770               40,770 
 COURT TIME                     11,600         10,345         30,000        30,000               20,000 
 FULL TIME REGULAR                1,382,219    1,472,355    1,499,328    1,750,824          1,742,224 
 FULL‐TIME, PERM., SUPERVISORY                   163,890       202,325       178,810                      ‐   
 HOLIDAYS PAY                     71,211         73,537         77,132           80,104               80,104 
 INCENTIVE                   287,985       193,981       300,000         343,385             328,500 
 LONGEVITY                          300              300              300                 300                    300 
 OFFICER IN CHARGE                       6,117           5,025           6,000             6,000                 6,000 
 OVERTIME PAY                   183,990       182,406       190,000         190,000             150,000 
 OVERTIME TRAINING                     54,033         49,626         42,000           45,000               32,000 
 OVERTIME‐INVESTIGATIVE                     31,631         28,053         39,775           40,000               40,000 
 POLICE SPECIALS                     24,518         38,565         30,000           35,000               35,000 
 UNIFORM ALLOWANCE                            ‐                   ‐           25,570           21,000               21,000 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                2,257,167    2,296,386    2,459,085      2,582,383          2,495,898 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ADVERTISING                            ‐                   ‐                500                 500                    500 
 AUTO SUPPLIES                     15,927         20,353         15,000           25,000               15,000 
 BOOKS PERIDICALS                          531              329           2,000             2,000                 2,000 
 COMPUTER FORMS & SUPPL                          474              971           3,500                      ‐   
 COMPUTER SERVICES                       9,121           3,850         12,090                      ‐   
 DUES & MEMBERSHIPS                       3,124           3,279           4,759             5,000                 5,000 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                       4,311           9,137           9,000           13,500                 9,000 
 EQUIPMENT                            ‐                   ‐                750                 750                    750 
 FURNITURE & FIXTURES                          375              227              500                 500                    500 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                       2,190           1,856           2,450             2,500                 2,500 
 MAINT. SERVICEAGREEMENTS                          128              379              500                 500                    500 
MEDICAL EXP                       3,965           6,901           5,000             5,000                 5,000 
 MISC MACHINES & EQUIP                          678           1,308           3,500             3,500                 3,500 
 MISC PROF SERVICES                          497              469           1,410             1,500                 1,410 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                       3,781           3,258           5,500           10,500                 9,500 
 PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPL                          153           1,041           1,000                      ‐   
 POSTAGE                          730              728           1,500                      ‐   
 PUB SAFTEY SUPPLIES                     11,116         33,616         12,000          35,000               13,000 

80 
 
 

     

Budgets (continued)  
 

Department    2100‐ Police   (continued) 


 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
           
           
RADIOS,TELEPHONE,OTHER                       5,024         19,123         15,000         28,000               28,000 
 UNIFORM ALLOWANCE                     22,037         28,123                 ‐              5,000                 5,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                     84,161       134,950         95,959         138,750             101,160 
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                     13,443         10,427                 ‐         
 4‐Capital  
 FY18 FORD UTILITY CRUISER                            ‐                   ‐                   ‐            50,000                       ‐   
MARKED LINE CRUISER FY16                     42,515                 ‐                   ‐   
 POLICE CRUISER                     39,680                 ‐                   ‐   
POLICE RADIOS,TEL,OTHER COMM                         199                 ‐                   ‐   
POLICE REPEATER FY17                            ‐           10,565                 ‐   
 4‐Capital Total                     82,394         10,565                 ‐                            ‐   
50,000  
 Grand Total                2,437,165    2,452,328    2,555,044    2,771,133          2,597,058 
 

Department    2103‐ Crossing 
Guards  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

                                                          1  
 2‐ Public Safety   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 CROSSING GUARDS               35,398    35,035        39,600    44,400               39,600 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                 35,398    35,035        39,600    44,400               39,600 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 POLICE EQUIPMENT                         ‐           200               ‐                   200                    200 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                         ‐           200               ‐                   200                    200 
 Grand Total                35,398    35,235        39,600       44,600               39,800 
           
 

81 
 
 

Budgets (continued)  
Department    2150‐ Detention  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

2‐ Public Safety   
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 LOCKUP OTHERWISE UNCLASS.                                    ‐           100             100                 100                    100 
 SPECIAL ASSESSMENT (NEMLEC)                       15,250    15,250        15,250           15,250               15,250 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                        15,250    15,350        15,350         15,350               15,350 
 Grand Total                         15,250    15,350        15,350         15,350               15,350 
 

Department   2920‐ Animal 
Control  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

2‐ Public Safety   
1‐Personnel Services  
 ANIMAL INSP PT PERM                              869      2,904          3,000          3,000                 3,000 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                      869      2,904          3,000          3,000                 3,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ANIMAL CONT PROF SERVICES                         10,642    10,251        14,500         14,500               14,500 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total             10,642    10,251        14,500       14,500               14,500 
 3‐Holdover  
 ANIMAL CONTROL MISC PROF/TECH                     451            ‐                 ‐   
MISCELLANEOUS PROF & TECH SERV                         ‐           919               ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                             451         919               ‐         
Grand Total             11,961    14,074        17,500  17,500               17,500 
 

82 
 
 

Dispatch  
Mission Statement 
The mission of the Easthampton Public Safety Dispatch is to contribute to the safety and quality of our 
community by assisting the citizens of our city, our neighboring cities and towns, and our associated 
public safety agencies with efficient, reliable, responsive and professional public communication 
services. 

Organizational Overview 

Police Chief & 
Fire Chief

Dispatch 
Supervisor

2 Part time  5 Full time 
dispatchers dispatchers
 

Accomplishments  
This past year has seen some big changes for the dispatch center. We had 4 new full‐time dispatchers 
and 2 new part‐time dispatchers. This provided a big challenge as these employees needed to get their 
initial training in several areas before being cleared to work on their own. Our dispatchers also handled 
1862 Fire and ambulance calls for service as well as 16,413 police calls for service. 

Trends  
The trend for 2018 that will have the biggest impact on our dispatch operations is the recent upgrade of 
911 equipment known as Nextgen. This new equipment will allow all 911 calls placed via cellphone to go 
to the closest answering point instead of a state answering point. Currently, when someone calls 911 on 
a cell phone it is directed to the state, for us it is the Northampton State Police dispatch Center. They in 
turn, transfer the caller to Easthampton. Often times with motor vehicle accidents several 911 calls are 
received, and the state will only transfer the original or any follow up calls with pertinent information. 
With Nextgen, all cellphone based 911 class placed in Easthampton will come directly to us. This is going 
to increase the workload tremendously during the crucial early moments of an emergency.   

83 
 
 

Goals and Objectives  

The goals and objectives of the Easthampton Public Dispatch Center are as follows: 

GOAL: Ensure the safety of our officers and other public safety personnel by gathering all important 
information necessary to ensure a safe and efficient response. 

 Objective: Emphasize and encourage proper calls for service 
 Objective: Analyze officer safety issues 
 Objective: Emphasize and properly implement officer safety related procedure 

GOAL: Achieve organizational excellence through commitment, education and continuing education and 
technology. 

 Objective: Examine alternate methods of continuing training to reduce overtime costs associated 
with formal classroom training. 

GOAL: Enhance staffing and workplace development. 

 Objective: Develop personal evaluation system for monitoring and identifying areas of improvement 
 Objective: Develop a process to attract, hire and retain qualified employees 

GOAL: Promote job satisfaction through employee participation in decision making and improved 
working environments. 

 Objective: Conduct regular work circle sessions between management and telecommunicators 
 Objective: Emphasize and ensure a clean, safe and attractive physical environment 

Programs and Services  

The Easthampton Public Safety Dispatch Center is the primary point of contact for all emergencies in the 
city. All 911 calls are handled in the center and the appropriate public safety agency is dispatched. We 
also monitor the municipal fire alarm system that protects several buildings in the city including the 
majority of city‐owned buildings.  The center is the backup for the Town of Hadley and Hadley is the 
backup for Easthampton. The employees of the dispatch center are also the first point of contact the 
public has when they require non‐emergency services from our public safety departments. Dispatch not 
only provides the face to face contact but we also handle the countless administrative calls that come 
into the building every day. 

The main services provided are to our fire and police departments. During large‐scale fire incidents the 
dispatchers not only handle the initial 911 calls but they are responsible for calling back off‐duty 
firefighters and mutual aid assistance. This mutual aid also covers outside state and federal agencies 
that may be needed by the incident commander. Dispatch also handles the issuance of burning permits 

84 
 
 

during the spring.   Dispatch provides the same assistance to the police department along with the 
following: License and registration checks, criminal history checks, issuing of firearms cards that have 
been approved, filling of overtime and outside details, providing copies of accident reports, accepting 
records requests.  

Budget 
 Department    2170‐ Dispatch   

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

2‐ Public Safety   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 DISPACHERS HOLIDAY PAY                          12,538      12,157          9,815             9,671                 9,671 
 DISPATCH  PERS. SERVICES                        194,410    206,516      247,787         235,385             235,385 
 DISPATCH OVERTIME                          14,282      23,832        10,000           10,200               10,200 
 DISPATCH UNIFORM ALLOWANCE                                520           263               ‐                        ‐   
 LONGEVITY DIFFERNTIAL                                200           200             200                 200                    200 
 PART‐TIME, PERMANENT, REGULAR                          13,312      33,760        15,000           15,300               15,300 
 UNIFORM ALLOWANCE                                   ‐                ‐            1,200             1,200                 1,200 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                       235,263    276,728      284,002         271,956             271,956 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 DISPATCH EDUCATION & TRAINING                            1,751        2,498          1,500             1,500                 1,500 
 GENERAL OFFICE SUPPLIES                                371           481             900                 900                    900 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                                  38             80             200                 200                    200 
 RADIOS,TELEPHONES,OTHER COMM.                                360              ‐            1,000             1,000                 1,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                            2,521        3,059          3,600             3,600                 3,600 
 Grand Total                         237,784    279,787      287,602         275,556             275,556 
   
 

   

85 
 
 

Fire and Ambulance  
Mission Statement 
The mission of the Easthampton Fire Department is to protect the lives and property of the community 
from emergencies involving fire, medical, hazardous materials, and environmental causes. This mission 
will be achieved through public education, code management, and emergency response. 

Organizational Overview 
Fiscal year 2018 has been a great year for the Easthampton Fire Department so far. We have all previous 
firefighter vacancies filled and the long‐vacant Deputy Fire Chief position has been funded and filled. We 
are also fortunate to have funding approved to replace our 1995 Engine 2 and our 2006 Ambulance 3. 
Both of these vehicles will be delivered late FY2018 or early FY2019. Our call volume remains steady 
from previous years. We have responded to 1498 calls for service through January 1, 2018.  

A critical program was also reinstated in 2018 thanks to some additional funding, multi‐family housing 
unit inspections. This program is initiated through the building department and includes the fire and 
health departments. Due to the excessive length of time that has passed since the last inspections there 
are several life safety code violations that have been discovered slowing down the overall progress. The 
positive effect is the homes that have been inspected are now safer for the tenants to live in. 

Fire Chief

Principal Clerk Deputy Fire Chief

Call Force 5 
Firefighters

A Group B Group C Group D Group Fire Prevention 


1 Captain 1 Captain 1 Captain 1 Captain
1 Captain
5 Firefighters 5 Firefighters 5 Firefighters 5 Firefighters
 
 

86 
 
 

Accomplishments  
Fiscal year 2018 has been a great year for the Easthampton Fire Department so far. We have all previous 
firefighter vacancies filled and the long vacant Deputy Fire Chiefs position has been funded and filled. 
We are also fortunate to have funding approved to replace our 1995 Engine 2 and our 2006 Ambulance 
3. Both of these vehicles will be delivered late FY 18 or early FY 19. Our call volume remains steady with 
previous years as we have responded to 1498 calls for service through January 1, 2018.  

A critical program was also returned in 2018 thanks to some additional funding, multi‐family housing 
unit inspections. This program is initiated through the building department and includes the fire and 
health departments. Due to the excessive length of time that has passed since the last inspections there 
are several life safety code violations that have been discovered slowing down the overall progress. The 
positive effect is the homes that have been inspected are now safer for the tenants to live in. 

Trends 
The one trend having the biggest impact on our department is the housing market boon. So far this fiscal 
year we have completed 204 smoke detector inspections. By comparison, in all of calendar year 2017 we 
conducted 388 inspections.   

Goals and Objectives 
The first goal of the department for FY2019 is to restore our Public Education program. With the Deputy 
Fire Chiefs position restored this is a goal we can now accomplish. To accomplish this goal we will break 
it down into 3 objectives;  

 Send the Deputy to a training class which will make us eligible for state grants to partially fund the 
program  
 We will start with a program called Senior SAFE which focuses on fire safety for elderly members of 
our community 
 Offer blood pressure clinics at elderly housing complexes with on duty firefighters.  
 Next, we will expand the program to the elementary school grades  

Our second goal is to increase the number of hours of in house training completed by department 
members. By increasing the number of training hours there is a possibility to reduce our ISO (Insurance 
Services Office) rating thus potentially reducing some rates for homeowners insurance.  The objectives 
are as follows; 

 Establish an annual training plan  
 Identify department members who are subject matter experts for instructors 
 Create classes that will mirror those that provide credit towards cities insurance fees 

87 
 
 

Programs and Services 
The Easthampton Fire Department provides a variety of services to our residents that include: Fire 
Suppression, Paramedic level ambulance service, a robust Fire Prevention Program, Hazardous Materials 
Operations level response, and technical rescue. We are active in the statewide fire mobilization plan 
providing equipment and management staff for both fire and ambulance task forces.  

Budgets  
Department    2200‐ Fire  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 2‐ Public Safety   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 FIRE CAPTAINS GRADE                    7,474         10,778           4,000             4,000                 3,000 
 FULL TIME REGULAR             1,261,280    1,315,750    1,358,829      1,383,211          1,367,889 
 FULL TIME, SUPERVISORY                  81,574         83,433         83,758         159,161             159,161 
 HOLIDAY PAY                  77,310         80,313         83,189           88,666               80,000 
 INCENTIVE                139,206       140,782       155,000         198,028             180,000 
 LONGEVITY                       400              400              400                 400                    400 
 MEDICAL EXP                    9,499           2,366           3,800             3,800                 3,000 
 ON CALL COMPENSATION                  16,416         10,635         11,000           11,000                 9,000 
 OVERTIME PAY                280,897       209,820       188,700         191,531             150,000 
 OVERTIME PAY (EMERGENCY)                    1,848           6,071           5,000             5,000                 4,000 
 OVERTIME PAY (TRAINING)                       745           1,540         12,000             4,000                 2,000 
 PART TIME CLERICAL                  20,004         25,954         27,014           28,477               28,477 
 PRIOR YR VACATION PAYOUT                    9,790                 ‐                   ‐   
 SICK LEAVE BUYBACK                  18,718         44,370                 ‐   
 UNIFORM ALLOWANCE                  23,223         21,210         19,000           19,000               19,000 
 1‐Personnel Services Total             1,948,382    1,953,420    1,951,690     2,096,272          2,005,926 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ALARM REPAIRS                       153              163              200                 200                    200 
 BLDG,& EQUIP R&M SUPPLIES                    2,897           4,256           2,500             2,500                 2,500 
 CUSTODICAL SUPPLIES                          ‐                532              200                 200                    200 
 DUES & MEMBERSHIP                       555           1,730           1,800             1,800                 1,800 
 EDUCATION& TRAINING                    8,230           8,740           5,000             5,000                 3,000 
 EQUIPMENT                    9,522         11,439           9,000             9,000                 9,000 
 FIRE APPARATUS SUPPLIES                    1,202           1,434           1,200             1,200                 1,200 
 FIRE,GAS,OIL,LUBE                       280              599              200                 200                    200 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                    2,491           1,017              400                 500                    500 
 MISC PROF & TECH SERV                          ‐                813              850                 850                    850 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                    2,055           1,453           1,500             1,500                 1,500 
 RADIO,TEL.&OTHER                  11,435         12,355         11,300           11,300                 1,000 
 REPAIRS TO VEHICAL EQUIP                  23,229         17,645         10,000           10,000                 8,000 
 SCBA MAINTENANCE & REPAIR                    2,847           1,690           4,500             4,500                 4,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                  64,896         63,864         48,650           48,750               33,950 
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                122,321         11,233                 ‐         
 Grand Total             2,135,599    2,028,516    2,000,340    2,145,022          2,039,876 
 

88 
 
 

Budgets (continued)  
 

Department    2310‐ Ambulance  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

2‐ Public Safety   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 EMS INCENTIVE    211,824    224,556      225,000         259,130             257,419 
 OVERTIME PAY (ALS/EMS)                           ‐          6,765          4,000            4,000                 2,000 
 OVERTIME PAY(EMERG)                  19,178      22,427        30,000           35,000               20,000 
 PART‐TIME              8,398              ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
 1‐Personnel Services Total               239,400    253,747      259,000         298,130             279,419 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 AMBULANCE SUPPLIES                      731           323             450                 450                    450 
 CERTICATION FEES                    1,500        1,500          1,800             1,800                 1,800 
 DUES AND MEMBERSHIPS                       275           275             275                 275                    275 
 INTERCEPT FEE'S                       550              ‐            1,200             1,200                 1,200 
 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS                    4,153        7,576          4,000             8,850                 8,850 
 MEDICAL SUPPLIES                 16,800      17,502        17,000           17,000               13,000 
 MISC PROF & TECH SERV                  28,726      22,899        25,000        25,000               20,000 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                      102              ‐               300                 300                    300 
 VEHICLE EQUIPMENT REPAIR                5,963        7,797          5,000             5,000                 5,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                58,800      57,873        55,025   59,875               50,875 
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                37,840       1,164               ‐         
 Grand Total             336,041    312,784      314,025     358,005             330,294 
 

   

89 
 
 

Building Inspection Services 
Mission Statement 
The Building Department is responsible for administering and enforcing Massachusetts Codes regarding 
building, sheet metal, plumbing, gas, and electrical work; as well as the rules and regulations of the 
Massachusetts Architectural Access Board. In addition, the department administers and enforces all City 
of Easthampton Zoning By‐laws. It is the mission of the Building Department to strive to ensure public 
safety, health, and welfare through inspection activities and continuous enforcement of all codes, rules 
and regulations designed to detect and correct improper and/or unsafe building practices and land use 
within the city. 

Organizational Overview
Building Inspector

Part‐time Clerk

Part‐time  Part‐time Plumbing  Sealer of Weights 


Wiring Inspector Inspector and Measures
 
Accomplishments 
The Building Department completed the Hampden Care Medical Marijuana Facility. We permitted and 
began the new Williston Dormitory Facility. We worked closely with the Fire Prevention Officer to insure 
public safety in all facets. We began the process of consolidating building permit records and plan 
storage. 

Trends 
The City of Easthampton consistently issues approximately 1,000 building permits per calendar year. In 
recent years the trend has leaned toward Energy related permits, i.e.; solar, windows and insulation 
projects. 

Goals and Objectives 
 Continue the highest level of customer service to the homeowners, business owners, contractors, 
developers and design professionals.  
 Work closely with other departments as needed to increase permit turnover efficiency.  
 Continue to work with the Assistant City Planner on rewriting and streamlining 

90 
 
 

Programs and Services  
Permitting and inspection of all phases of building, wiring, plumbing, gas, sheet metal and related 
projects. The enforcement of all building codes, the city’s zoning ordinance and compliance with the 
Architectural Access Board Regulations 

Budget  
Department    2410‐ Inspection 
Services  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

2‐ Public Safety   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 BLDG F.T., PERMANENT, REGULAR                 60,125    43,813        59,125        61,769               61,769 
 BLDG INSP CAR ALLOWANCE                           ‐              ‐            1,705            1,705                 1,705 
 BLDG INSP,PART TIME                16,039    19,149        14,348           14,563               14,348 
 BLDG., P.T, PERMANENT, CLERICAL                 5,619      8,307        12,052           12,598               12,598 
 GAS INSP CAR ALLOWANCE                       320         320               ‐                        ‐   
 GAS INSP PART TIME REG                   2,142      2,185               ‐                        ‐   
 PART‐TIME, PERMANENT, CLERICAL                  1,640      1,093               ‐                        ‐   
 PLUMBING INSP CAR ALLOWANCE                        438         438               ‐                        ‐   
 PLUMBING INSP PART TIME SAL                  3,316      3,379               ‐                        ‐   
 SEALER CAR ALLOWANCE                      297         297               ‐                       ‐   
 SEALER OF WEIGHT PART TIME S                  3,000      3,000               ‐                        ‐   
 TEMPORARY POSITIONS, REGULAR                           ‐              ‐            3,000   
 WIRE INSP CAR ALLOW                      600         650               ‐                          ‐   
 WIRE INSP PART TIME SALARY                5,750      5,800               ‐                        ‐   
 1‐Personnel Services Total                 99,286    88,430        90,230        90,634               90,419 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 BLDG INSP DUES & MEMBERSHIPS                       215         215             500                 500                    500 
 BLDG INSP IN STATE TRAVEL                   1,084         532             700                 700                    700 
 BLDG INSP OFFICE SUPPLIES                      566         190             800                 800                    800 
 BOOKS, PERIDICALS AND PUBLICAT                        24         134          1,000                 200                    200 
 BUILDING SUPP & MATERIALS                           ‐           223               ‐                     ‐                        ‐   
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                       440         684             700                 700                    700 
 PLUMBING INSP OFFICE SUPPLIES                         16            ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
 POSTAGE                     292           94             550                 550                    550 
 WIRE INSP OFF. SUPPLIES                         ‐               4               ‐                        ‐   
 WIRE INSPECTOR PROF. SERVICES   100            ‐                 ‐                        ‐   
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                 2,736      2,075          4,250        3,450                 3,450 
 3‐Holdover  
 PRINTING, REPRODUCING ENCUMB.                          ‐             50               ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                           ‐             50               ‐         
 Grand Total              102,023    90,555        94,480  94,084               93,869 
 

91 
 
 

   

Section 3  

 Education 

92 
 
 

Education  
Mission Statement  
Easthampton Public Schools is committed to providing students with a highly qualified staff, rich and 
rigorous learning experiences, and state of the art resources in a welcoming, inclusive, and safe 
environment.  Considered full partners in their education, our students will learn to communicate 
effectively using mathematical thinking, scientific inquiry, oral and written expression, and 
technology.  Students will be prepared for success in college and careers as responsible, contributing 
members of a diverse global community.  The engagement of families and members of the local 
community is considered critical to our success in supporting all students in achieving their highest 
potential. 

Trends 
With the approval of the 2017‐2018 proposed operating budget, a two‐year trend of budget growth 
following an extended period of reductions to personnel, programs and services, and supply budget 
lines were established.  We hope that it is a trend that is able to be maintained for many years to 
come.  The FY2017 budget marked the first time that the School Department’s requested budget was 
fully funded since the FY2008 budget was proposed.  As a result, all services and programs were funded 
at the requisite level and 5.5 FTE positions were restored.  Another 4.5 FTE positions were able to be 
restored to the current year’s budget, in addition to all services and programs being funded at the 
requisite level.  A growing enrollment, in contrast to enrollment trends in most Western MA school 
districts, made the addition of these positions essential.  These positions deliver services and programs 
that were prioritized by the Leadership Team and offer Easthampton students important learning 
opportunities, support all students’ academic success, and keep Easthampton families in our district in 
an era where choice in public education is abundant in our area.   

We are proposing adding .1 FTE position in the FY2019 budget.  Although it is always important to 
practice fiscal restraint, we felt it particularly important to limit operating budget growth to the extent 
possible this year knowing that the community will be faced with the decision to support a building 
project for the city’s children in Pre‐Kindergarten through Grade 8 in May.  The proposed essential 
services budget will continue a wide array of programs and services already in place and will 
undoubtedly support learning opportunities for all children.  Furthermore, we believe that the rate of 
budget growth represented by the requested budget is both sustainable over time and strikes the 
appropriate balance between educational excellence and fiscal responsibility.       

93 
 
 

Strategic Objectives 
 Culture of Equity and Inclusion Promote an environment in which students are engaged and have 
equitable access to high quality curriculum and instruction that meets diverse needs and supports 
every student’s academic, social and emotional growth 
 Professional Excellence Support a culture in which all employees feel valued as educators of our 
students and are supported to grow professionally 
 Framework for Decision Making Articulate, align, and communicate a clear systemic and 
comprehensive framework for decision‐making throughout the Easthampton School Department 
 

Initiatives 
 Form stakeholder working groups for transforming school culture and climate and implement 
recommendations concerning diversity including those identified in the 10 Point Action Plan: School 
Culture and Climate 
 Improve inclusive practices districtwide, consistent with the Educator Effectiveness Guidebook for 
Inclusive Practice, in order to improve student learning 
 Expand training in Ross Greene’s Collaborative and Proactive Solutions model in the elementary 
schools in order to improve student engagement in learning 
 Create, and ensure fidelity to, a vertical curriculum map for social and emotional learning and 
bullying prevention curricula 
 Provide training for trauma‐ and poverty‐informed education 
 Develop a consistent districtwide understanding of the Massachusetts Tiered System of Support with 
a focus on Tier 2 interventions 
 Enhance the district Induction and Mentorship Program 
 Improve hiring practices to ensure highly qualified and diverse staff who will contribute to the 
district’s culture and vision 
 Create a district framework for staff communication  
 Establish a shared understanding of professionalism  
 Support the development and sustainability of professional learning communities 
 Develop a resource allocation cycle 
 Develop a curriculum renewal plan   
 Develop a technology renewal plan 
 Develop a maintenance renewal plan 
 Develop a capital improvement plan 
 Review, revise and communicate protocols and procedures for student support services  
 Train all district staff on how to access and utilize procedures, protocols, forms and documents 
 Develop a systemic process for recording and accessing academic data 
 Revise the protocols for collecting, reporting, submitting, and analyzing disciplinary data  
 Analyze stakeholder survey data to inform strategic planning and instructional decision making 
   

94 
 
 

Budget 
 

Department    3000‐ Education  

 
 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
  FY2018   
 
 3‐ Education   
 
 1‐Personnel Services  
 
 NON‐NET SPENDING PER.SER.                       11,553         11,222       983,837 
 SCHOOL PERSONAL SERVICES                10,452,927  10,778,824  15,945,377  16,299,165   16,264,165 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                10,464,479  10,790,046  16,929,214  16,299,165       16,264,165 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 MEDICAID ‐ SCHOOL                                   ‐         12,996                     ‐                        ‐   
 NON NET SPENDING PUR OF SER.                      951,039       963,190                     ‐          968,633             968,633 
 SCHOOL INTERGOVERMENTAL                    1,413,834    1,309,059                     ‐                          ‐   
 SCHOOL OTHER CHARGES & EXPEND                      456,917      421,978                     ‐                          ‐   
 SCHOOL PURCHASE OF SERVICES                    1,529,107    1,500,184                 ‐                          ‐   
 SCHOOL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS                       517,792       536,396                     ‐                          ‐   
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                   4,868,690    4,743,804                    ‐         968,633            968,633 
 3‐Holdover  
 NON‐NET EXP. HOLDOVER FY15                        20,355                     ‐                     ‐   
 NON‐NET SALARY FY15                               100                     ‐                      ‐   
 PERSONAL SERVICES ENC.                                    ‐         806,499                    ‐   
 SCHOOL EXP HOLDOVER FY15                        68,640       
 
 SCHOOL SALARY HOLD FY'15                      732,312     
 SUPPLIES & MATERIALS ENC.                                   ‐           48,533     
 3‐Holdover Total                       821,406        855,031        
 4‐Capital  
 HEATING REPAIRS ‐ WBMS CENTER             48,310     
 4‐Capital Total              48,310        
                 
Grand Total  16,154,575  16,437,191  16,929,214  17,267,798   17,232,798 
 

   

95 
 
 

   

Section 4 

Public Works 

96 
 
 

Public Works 
Mission Statement 
The mission of the Easthampton Department of Public Works is to ensure that all divisions provide and 
maintain public services necessary for the economic growth and quality of life for all its citizens.  Each 
division strives to deliver those services in a cost‐effective and environmentally sensitive manner for the 
short and long‐term benefits of our customers/residents and the environment. 

Organizational Overview 

Board of Public 
Works 

DPW Director

3 Custodians 2 Clericial 

Highway Motor Repairr 2 Enginnerings 

7 Staff 2 Staff
 

Accomplishments 
Highway: 

 Completed reconstruction of O’Neill Street 
 Completed reconstruction of Oliver Street 
 Replaced sections of sidewalks throughout the city as needed 
 Contracted with Precision Sidewalks to remove sidewalk trip hazards on certain city sidewalks 
 Repainted all pavement markings and crosswalks as required on certain city streets 
 Replaced approximately 1000 feet of old guardrail 
 Maintained all city roadway signs 
 Successfully removed all snow and ice during the winter months 
 Swept all city streets 

97 
 
 

Motor Repair: 

 Implemented a new maintenance tracking software 
 Implemented a new gas key program 
 Maintained and serviced approximately 70 municipal vehicles and equipment 
 

Engineering Division: 

 Worked on completion of the Integrated Water Resource Management Plan as it relates to water, 
wastewater and the sewer collection and storm drain system 
 Assisted various city departments, contractors and developers with projects related to the city 
 Completed design and solicited bids for Chapter 90 road reconstruction 
 Provided oversight to Chapter 90 road reconstruction projects of O’Neill Street and Oliver Street 
 Provided input and oversight to the Massworks grant for Church, George and Admiral Streets  
 Provides city representation on the Transportation Improvement Program (TIPS) committee 
 Provided input on the current redesign of Union Street under the Complete Streets Program 
 Completed a list of road/intersection projects under the Complete Streets Prioritization Program 
Plan 
 

Trends 
The Public Works Administration will continue to provide a high level of customer service while 
overseeing the daily operations of each department.   

The Highway Division is responsible for the maintenance and improvement of all city roads.  The roads 
are continually in need of repair, resurfacing or reconstruction.  Roadway resurfacing is funded by the 
Chapter 90 State Program.  The current Chapter 90 funding for FY2018 is $440,000 and includes both 
roadway and sidewalk repair and construction.  The trend citywide is that the standard rate of roadway 
deterioration continues to outpace the Chapter 90 funding that the city receives.  Future roadwork 
priorities are decided by many factors by the Board of Public Works.  The Highway Division is also 
responsible for sidewalk installation, repair, and replacement.  Sidewalk replacement is determined 
similarly to roadwork and in conjunction with road repair.  The Highway Division will continue to elevate 
all methods of road repair and reconstruction as well as provide assistance to other departments as 
needed.  Snow and ice removal for all city streets, municipally owned parking lots, and all school parking 
lots will remain a top priority during the winter months. 

Motor Repair will continue to be responsible for the maintenance all of DPW vehicles and equipment 
and will maintain approximately 70 municipal vehicles. 

The Engineering Department will continue to provide technical assistance, design, and construction 
oversight, which includes Chapter 90, Massworks grants and completion of the Integrated Water 
Resource Management Plan.  The Department will continue to provide assistance to all city departments 
as required. 

98 
 
 

Goals and Objectives  
Highway Division:  

 Continue to evaluate the equipment for replacement under the Capital Improvement Program.  
 Continued redesign of Union Street under the Complete Streets Program of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
 Continued implementation of approximately 92 miles of roadway maintenance and improvements 
including overlay, full depth patch, crack fill, and chip seal, utilizing Ch 90 funds and city funds.  
 Replace guardrail and street signs as needed 
 Conduct snow plowing and treatment of over 92 miles of roads for all winter weather events 
 Continued evaluation of all methods of road repair/construction 
 

Motor Repair: 

 Continued maintenance both scheduled and emergency of all municipally owned vehicles 
 Provide input and evaluation for replacement of all city‐owned vehicles 
 Continue to evaluate any new innovations in vehicles and equipment to determine its 
practicality for the city 
 

Engineering Division: 

 Performed all necessary work to place the road reconstruction projects out to bid 
 The City Engineer is the representative for the city on the committee of the Transportation 
Improvement Program (TIP) 
 Provide assistance to all city Boards, Commissions, Departments, residents, contractors, and 
regulatory Agencies 
 Continue the all‐inclusive approach to infrastructure management and improvement by 
combining the recommendations for future road maintenance/reconstruction projects with the 
Integrated Water Resource Management Plan 
 Efficiently manage operations and prioritize future capital improvement projects including GIS 
and storm water management 
 Assure compliance with removal and disposal of street sweeping and catch basin debris 
 Assure compliance with closed landfill regulations as it relates to the Oliver Street Landfill and 
the Loudville Road Landfill 
   

99 
 
 

Programs and Services 
The Department of Public Works (DPW) consists of multiple divisions collectively responsible for 
maintaining and improving the city’s public spaces and infrastructure. This includes the maintenance 
and development of city roads, sidewalks, buildings, the city water supply system, wastewater/sewage 
system, street lights, trash removal for municipal and park buildings and building operations for 4 
municipal buildings. The Divisions within the Department include Administration, Highway, Motor 
Repair, Water, Wastewater, Sewer, and Engineering.  

Administration: 

 Accounts  Payable  for  the  following  Divisions  under  the  Department  of  Public  Works:  Administration, 
Engineering,  Waste  Water  Enterprise,  Water  Enterprise,  Sewer  Enterprise,  Highway,  Motor  Repair, 
Traffic, Sanitary Landfill, Snow and Street Improvements, Building Operations, Trash and Street Lights 
 Track all Chapter 90 State Aid and any other grants awarded to the Divisions.  List and prepare reports as 
needed for all of the above 
 Process special billings for any miscellaneous water and sewer charges   
 Process bills for septic waste delivered to the Wastewater Treatment Plant on a monthly basis  
 Provide clerical support for the Director of Public Works, City Engineer, and all other divisions   
 Tracks complaints and disperses to proper Departments 
 Collect mail and over the counter monies for public works fees, such as water and sewer entrance 
fees and wastewater  
 Balance and deposit receipts 
 Maintain and complete all division expense accounts   
 Keep complete files on activities for the Highway, Water, Sewer and the Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Highway Division:  

 The Highway Division is responsible for all repairs, street openings and new construction of public 
ways  
 Order and install street signs on request; i.e., warning signs, stop, speed limit, etc.   
 Replace guard posts and rails when needed 
 Insurance claims upon damage 
 Paint crosswalks, no parking zones, public parking lots, school stencils, stop lines and arrows 
 Sweep all streets and parking lots in the spring and most side streets again in the fall for leaves 
 Load and deliver all voting booths, tables, and ballot boxes to local precincts as requested by City Clerk 
 Mow edges of roads and intersections 
 Sidewalks replaced as funds allow   
 Plow and sand city sidewalks during the winter months and clear them of brush 
 Highway curbing replaced as needed, granite, concrete and berm 
 Hot mix all ditches for Sewer and Water Department and driveway aprons as needed   
 Repair all potholes with hot mix except for winter   

100 
 
 

 Blacktop sidewalks, traffic islands, around catch basins and manholes when needed 
 Replace concrete sidewalks as needed 
 Replace and repair all signs under the control of the Department of Public Works 
 Repaint approximately 50 crosswalks annually  
 Repaint center and edge lines on major streets when funds permit 
 Ensure operation of traffic signals 
 Maintenance of silt basins and cutting grass at the capped landfill on Oliver Street and Loudville Road 
on an annual basis per Department of Environment Regulations 
 Plow and sand all town streets as required 

Motor Repair:   

 Maintain all trucks and equipment from the Department of Public Works, Police, Park & Recreation 
and Cemetery, and Council on Aging, as well as some Fire Department vehicles 
 Schedules service for all vehicles for the listed departments 
 Maintains plows, sanders and snow blowers 
 Emergency road calls, flat tires, broken plows, hydraulic lines, and disabled vehicles 
 Construct  and  rebuild  trailers,  hitches,  rebuild  dump  bodies,  plow  blades,  bucket  blades,  backhoe 
teeth, etc. 

Engineering Division: 

 Reviews all plans and specifications relating to the city and formulation of the road reconstruction 
list for approval by the Board of Public Works 
 The Engineering Division provides technical support to all city Departments, Boards, and 
Committees as requested 
 The City Engineer reviews a variety of projects for the Planning Board, Planning Department, 
Conservation Commission, and Zoning Board of Appeals 
 The City Engineer works with various state agencies as a city representative on local issues 
 Provides technical direction of engineering surveys, preparations of design plans and specifications 
for the construction of water mains, sanitary sewers, storm drains, streets and sidewalks 
 Provides engineering reviews, inspection services and cost estimates for all Public Works projects and 
private subdivisions submitted by the Planning Board 
 Provides engineering assistance to other city departments and maintains updated engineering plans 
and record ties 
 Assists the Director of Public Works with budgetary planning and capital improvements, provides 
engineering data and cost estimates, and supervises the DPW in the absence of the Directors 

101 
 
 

Budgets 
Department    1920‐ Building 
Operations  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

   
1  
1‐ General Government   
1‐Personnel Services  
BLDG OP PART TIME   8,643        7,485        16,591       17,352              17,352 
BUILDING OPERATION  REGULAR   37,686      38,558        38,730                 39,312 
39,312  
 LONGEVITY   300           300             300                 300                   300 
OVERTIME   2,450        2,799          3,000         3,000                3,000 
1‐Personnel Services Total   49,079      49,142        58,620  59,964              59,964 
2‐Purchase of Services  
AGRICULTURAL, HORTICULTURAL   ‐                ‐               100                 100                   100 
ELEC SUPPLIES   351           833          1,000          1,000                1,000 
EQUIP REPAIR   83           412             250                 250                   250 
 HEAT,FUEL   43,280      50,254        70,000           70,000              70,000 
 HEAT,POWER   74,910      90,101      110,000         110,000            110,000 
 HOUSE SUPPLIES   6,080        7,408          5,000             5,000                5,000 
 MAINT & REPAIRS   3,739        2,031        10,000             1,000                1,000 
MISC. PROF & TECH SERV   55,835      53,380        30,000           30,000              30,000 
PAINT,HARDWARE   3,705        1,541             200                 200                   200 
PESTICIDES   94              ‐               200                 200                   200 
PLUMB SUPPLIES            6,851          5,000             5,000                5,000 
5,624 
REPAIR & MAINTENANCE   595           580          1,000             1,000                1,000 
2‐Purchase of Services Total        213,391      232,750        223,750            223,750 
194,295 
3‐Holdover  
3‐Holdover Total   30,991        3,787               ‐                          ‐   
 Grand Total   274,365    266,319      291,370        283,714            283,714 
 

   

102 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
  

Department    4010‐ DPW Admin  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

   
1  
 4‐ Public Works   
1‐Personnel Services  
BPW STIPEND   900           875           900             900                 900 
 F.T. REGULAR   74,376      74,769      75,317        38,224            38,224 
 LONGEVITY   900           900           900             600                 600 
 SUPERVISORY               126,845    127,537    128,491      128,509          128,509 
 1‐Personnel Services Total            203,020    204,080    205,608      168,233          168,233 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ADVERTISING               249           250             250                 250 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING   150           150           150             150                 150 
 IN STATE TRAVEL   19             15             75               75                   75 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES   1,762        1,932        1,700          2,000              2,000 
 POSTAGE   347           188           450             500                 500 
 PROF. SERVICES   160           180           150             150                 150 
 RADIO, TEL, COMM   480           520           480             480                 480 
 REPAIR & MAINT   399             98           100             100                 100 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total   3,317        3,331        3,355          3,705              3,705 
 3‐Holdover  
 DPW ADMIN GEN'L OFFICE SUPPLIES   165              ‐                ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total   165              ‐                ‐         
 Grand Total       206,502    207,412    208,963      171,938          171,938 
 

Department    4100‐ Fuel 
   ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019  FY2019 
FY2018 
4‐ Public Works  
 2‐Purchase of Services  
GAS, OIL, AND LUBE                  96,306    95,811    130,000      135,000         135,000 
 MISC PROF & TECH SERV   10,268         976        8,043          2,000             2,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                106,574    96,787    138,043      137,000          137,000 
 Grand Total                106,574    96,787    138,043      137,000          137,000 

   

103 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
 Department    4110‐ Engineering  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

   
1  
4‐ Public Works   
1‐Personnel Services  
CELL PHONE ALLOWANCE             180          360             360                  360 
LONGEVITY DIFFERNTIAL    200            ‐               ‐                    ‐   
SALARY   47,773    56,015     70,602      129,882          129,882 
1‐Personnel Services Total   47,973    56,195     70,962      130,242          130,242 
2‐Purchase of Services  
ADVERTISING   95         165             ‐                    ‐   
COMPUTER & PERIPHERALS   ‐      13,950             ‐                    ‐   
COMPUTER FORMS & SUPPLIES   1,046      1,046       1,200          1,200              1,200 
COMPUTER SERVICES                                     ‐              ‐            500          7,500              7,500 
DUES & MEMBERSHIP             509          800          1,600              1,600 
EDUCATION & TRAINING             150          500          1,000              1,000 
IN STATE TRAVEL                 8            50               50                   50 
OFFICE SUPP             770          300             500                 500 
POSTAGE                                   ‐             13             ‐                    ‐   
PRINTING SUPPLIES                ‐            400             500                 500 
PROF SERV & TECH                       11,308            ‐               ‐                    ‐   
REPAIR & MAINT                               205            ‐            100             100                 100 
TOOLS & SUPPLIES                                 21            ‐            200          1,200              1,200 
2‐Purchase of Services Total                        12,675    16,612       4,050        13,650            13,650 
3‐Holdover    
COMPUTER SERVICES ENCUMB                ‐               ‐     
ENGINEERING GEN'L OFFICE                               641            ‐               ‐   
GENERAL OFFICE SUPPLIES ENC.             129             ‐   
MISCELLANEOUS PROF & TECH             975             ‐   
3‐Holdover Total                              641      1,104             ‐         
 Grand Total                         61,289    73,911     75,012      143,892          143,892 
     
 

   

104 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
Department    4210‐ Highway  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

4‐ Public Works   
 1‐Personnel Services  
 CDL,HOISTING,WTOP LIC.RENEWALS                              526           506           575             575                 575 
 CELL PHONE ALLOWANCE                                 ‐                ‐               720                 720 
 HWY STIPEND                           1,500        1,500        1,500          1,500              1,500 
 OVERTIME                         24,788      25,117      35,000        35,000            35,000 
 SALARY                       299,856    340,122    355,015      364,762          364,762 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                       326,671    367,245    392,090      402,557          402,557 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ADVERTISING                              201           342           500             500                 500 
 BITUMINOUS CONCETE                         71,451      74,238      90,000      200,000            90,000 
 BLDG & EQUIP SUPP                              971        1,443        5,000          2,000              2,000 
 CELL PHONE                              720           720              ‐                    ‐   
 COMPUTER SERVICES                              480           520           500             250                 250 
 CUSTODICAL SUPPLIES                              399              ‐             100             100                 100 
 DUES AND MEMBERSHIP                              100           200           300             300                 300 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                              526             40           500             500                 500 
 GAS, LUB,OIL                           3,093        1,854        2,000          3,000              3,000 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                                 ‐                ‐               25               25                   25 
 LIGHT,HEAT,POWER                           4,814        3,596        8,000          8,000              8,000 
 MASONRY SUPPLIES                                 ‐             344           500             500                 500 
 MEDICAL SUPPLIES                              467           344           500             500                 500 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                              512              ‐             200             200                 200 
 PAINT,HARDWARE,PLUMB                           4,238        2,429           500          2,500              2,500 
 PROF SERVICES                         31,067      14,573      30,000        30,000            30,000 
 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT                           1,027           930           500             800                 800 
 RADIOS,TEL,COMM.                                93           213           200             300                 300 
 RENTALS                           7,700        2,895      10,000        10,000            10,000 
 REPAIR,MAINT                         39,757      48,937      40,000        50,000            50,000 
 SAND,GRAVE,LOAM                           1,047        1,118        1,000          1,000              1,000 
 TIRES,TUBES,CHAIN                           4,105      12,326           750          7,500              7,500 
 TOOLS & SUPPLIES                           4,471        7,376        4,500          5,000              5,000 
 TRAVEL/MEALS                           1,290        1,340        1,500          1,000              1,000 
 UNIFORMS                           2,770        3,978        3,850          3,850              3,850 
 VEHICLE EQUIPMENT REPAIR                           7,030        7,299      10,000        12,000            12,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                       188,330    187,055    210,925      339,825          229,825 
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                           5,451        4,125              ‐         
 4‐Capital  
 4‐Capital Total                                 ‐      351,693              ‐          75,000                   ‐   
 Grand Total                       520,452    910,118    603,015      817,382          632,382 

105 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
Department   4230‐ Snow 
Emergency   

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

                                                          1  
4‐ Public Works   
1‐Personnel Services  
 SNOW OVERTIME   19,964      56,656      50,000        50,000            50,000 
 1‐Personnel Services Total   19,964      56,656      50,000        50,000            50,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 CHEMICALS   10,981      16,617        3,000          3,000              3,000 
 PAINT,HARDWARE,LUMBER                  ‐               50               50                   50 
 REPAIR & MAINT   1,075        1,968      15,000        15,000            15,000 
 SALT   165,329    265,855      45,000        45,000            45,000 
 SAND,GRAVEL,LOAM   872        1,909      11,000        11,000            11,000 
 SCHOOL PLOWING   21,775      31,085      10,000        10,000            10,000 
 SNOW ADVERTISING   332              ‐             275             275                 275 
 SNOW EQUIP RENTALS   46,094    141,815      65,000        65,000            65,000 
 TOOLS & SUPPLIES   ‐                ‐               25               25                   25 
 TRAVEL/MEALS   910        3,590           650             650                 650 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total   247,368    462,839    150,000      150,000          150,000 
 Grand Total   267,332    519,495    200,000      200,000          200,000 
 

Department    4240‐ Street Lights  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

   
1  
4‐ Public Works   
2‐Purchase of Services  
 ENERGY FOR LIGHT, HEAT, POWER   62,937    55,760      76,000        76,000            76,000 
MISC PROF & TECH SERV   27,216    17,650      25,000        25,000            25,000 
SUPPLIES & MATERIALS   895            ‐          4,000          4,000              4,000 
2‐Purchase of Services Total   91,048    73,410    105,000      105,000          105,000 
3‐Holdover  
ENERGY FOR LIGHT, HEAT, POWER   ‐        2,229              ‐   
MISCELLANEOUS PROF & TECH SERV   ‐              ‐                ‐   
ENERGY‐LIGHT,HEAT,POWER FY'15   2,274            ‐                ‐   
ST LIGHTS MISC PROF & TECH   155            ‐                ‐   
SUPPLIES & MATERIALS ENCUMB   ‐        1,476              ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total   2,429      3,705              ‐         
 Grand Total   93,477    77,115    105,000      105,000          105,000 

106 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
Department   4250‐ Motor Repair  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL     


FY2017  BUDGET  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2018  FY2019   FY2019 

4‐ Public Works   
1‐Personnel Services  
 CELL PHONE ALLOWANCE   ‐                ‐             720             720                 720 
 OVERTIME   202           353           500             500                 500 
 PROF. LICENCES   61             60             90               90                   90 
 SALARY   94,048      97,614      97,806      100,173          100,173 
 1‐Personnel Services Total   94,311      98,027      99,116      101,483          101,483 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 BLDG&EQUIP   274        1,317           400          1,000              1,000 
 CELL PHONE   720           720              ‐                    ‐   
 EDUC & TRAINING                  ‐             100             100                 100 
 EQUIP RENTALS   360           368           400             400                 400 
 LIGHT,HEAT,POWER                 ‐          1,000          1,000              1,000 
 PERIODICALS               ‐               25               25                   25 
 PROF SERVICES                     80           850           100             500                 500 
 REPAIR MAINT   518           125           300             500                 500 
TELEPHONE   105              ‐                ‐              100                 100 
 TOOLS & SUPPLIES   1,895           801        3,000          3,500              3,500 
 UNIFORMS   775           767           850             850                 850 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total   4,727        4,949        6,175          7,975              7,975 
 3‐Holdover  
 MOTOR REPAIR & MTN  35              ‐                ‐   
 MTR RPR MISC  BLDG/EQUIP    1,014              ‐                ‐     
 ONE TON 4 X 4   45,346              ‐                ‐     
 REPAIR & MAINTENANCE ENC              198              ‐     
 SMALL TOOLS & SUPPLIES           3,010              ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total   46,395        3,208              ‐         
 Grand Total   145,432    106,184    105,291      109,458          109,458 
 

Department    4260‐ Traffic  

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  
4‐ Public Works   
2‐Purchase of Services  
 EXP PROF SERV.                     78,187     67,707      61,000         65,000            65,000  
 SUPPLIES & MATERIALS                     10,799     17,861      34,000         35,000            35,000  
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                     88,986     85,567      95,000       100,000          100,000  
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                     15,400       1,000              ‐          
 Grand Total                   104,386     86,567      95,000       100,000          100,000  

107 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
 

Department    4300‐ Recycling & 
Hazardous Waste  

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  

 
4‐ Public Works     
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 HAZ. WASTE   3,000       2,501              ‐                     ‐    
 RECYCLING   4,485       4,680      10,600         10,600            10,600  
 TRASH ‐TOWN BUILDINGS   15,483     14,175      16,500         16,500            16,500  
 2‐Purchase of Services Total   22,968     21,356      27,100         27,100            27,100  
 3‐Holdover  
 MISC PROF & TECH SERV ENCUMB               ‐                ‐    
 MISCELLANEOUS PROF & TECH            200              ‐                250  
TRASH REMOVE MISC PROF & TECH   200             ‐                ‐    
3‐Holdover Total   200          200              ‐                250     
 Grand Total   23,168     21,556      27,100         27,350            27,100  
 

Department    4380‐ Landfill  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018 

 4‐ Public Works   
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 SAN LANDFILL PROF SERVICES                        30,321    24,030     40,000        33,000            33,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                        30,321    24,030     40,000        33,000            33,000 
 3‐Holdover  
 MISCELLANEOUS PROF & TECH SERV                               ‐      16,144             ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                               ‐      16,144             ‐         
 Grand Total                        30,321    40,174     40,000        33,000            33,000 
           
 

 
 

108 
 
 

Cemetery 
Mission Statement 
To ensure proper historical records are accurate, develop financial resources to support perpetual care, 
and provide burial services in well maintained and orderly cemeteries.   

Organizational Overview 

Park and Recreation 
Director

Cemetery Foreman

Cemetery Laborer

Accomplishments  

 Opened a new section for burials creating new revenue streams 
 Purchased a new dump body trailer 
 Resurfaced Lower Cemetery Road 
 

Trends 

 There is a need for additional cemetery plots within the city 
 Anticipating a continuing trend of cremation burials       

Goals and Objectives  

 Continue to sell and advertise new sections for burials 
 Seed and address plots and areas in need of attention 
 Tag unattended bushes for removal in the fall 
 Identify footstones that need to be raised to ground level  

109 
 
 

Programs and Services  

 Provide burial services for families and funeral homes 
 Maintain proper recordkeeping of plots and burials 
 Sell plots to residents 
 Keep cemeteries well maintained and clean 
 Assist families with locating loved ones buried in the cemetery   
 

Budgets 
Department   4910‐ Brookside 
Cemetery  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018 

4‐ Public Works   
1‐Personnel Services  
 PART TIME CLERICAL            600         600          600             600                 600 
 PART TIME REG           15,539    16,258     17,516        16,636            16,636 
 REGULAR SALARY              32,980    34,669     36,304        31,977            31,977 
 1‐Personnel Services Total             49,118    51,527     54,420        49,213            49,213 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 AGRICULTURAL                    ‐           115          100             100                 100 
 BLDG&EQUIP               2,634      3,175       2,800          2,800              2,800 
 REPAIR & MAINT                    440         132          700             700                 700 
 STONE & MASONRY                 150         150          100             120                 120 
 SUPPLIES                      ‐           202          260             260                 260 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total             3,224      3,774       3,960          3,980              3,980 
 3‐Holdover  
 BROOK/EAST CEM MISC BLDG/EQUP           2,609            ‐               ‐   
BROOKSIDE/EAST ST CEM                    50            ‐               ‐   
MISC. BLDG. & EQUIP. R&M SUPPL                      ‐           530             ‐   
3‐Holdover Total        2,658         530             ‐         
 Grand Total     55,001    55,832     58,380        53,193            53,193 
 

   

110 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
Department    4920‐ Main Street 
Cemetery 

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

 4‐ Public Works   
 1‐Personnel Services  
CLERICAL             1,000     1,000       1,000          1,000              1,000 
 1‐Personnel Services Total             1,000     1,000       1,000          1,000              1,000 
2‐Purchase of Services  
PROF SERVICES                       ‐             ‐         4,500          4,500  
 PUR OF SER               4,270     2,225             ‐                    ‐   
2‐Purchase of Services Total   4,270     2,225       4,500          4,500                   ‐   
3‐Holdover  
PURCHASE OF SERVICES ENCUMB   ‐          230             ‐   
3‐Holdover Total   ‐          230             ‐         
 Grand Total   5,270     3,455       5,500          5,500              1,000 

 
   

111 
 
 

Tree Warden 
Mission Statement 
To provide expertise for city trees including planting, maintaining, removal and inventory.   

Organizational Overview 

Park and Recreation 
Director

Tree Warden

Accomplishments  

 Planted 8 new trees throughout the city 
 Successfully bid and completed tree work throughout the city 
 Complied inventory list of city trees in need of removal or pruning 

Trends  

 The city tree inventory is aging and our harsh New England winters and storms are taking a toll on 
city trees, resulting in many that need attention 
 The increasing cost of tree work.  Prevailing wage rates make it tough to make budget dollars stretch 
to complete the annual work list  

Goals and Objectives  

 Perform two rounds of bid work for city trees: once in the fall and again in the spring.  Work will be 
concentrated on but not limited to New City, Downtown, and the Garfield Street area 

112 
 
 

Programs and Services  

 Provide residents, businesses and local tree companies with knowledge and determinations on trees 
throughout the city 
 Review, edit, and add to city tree inventory list 
 Provide the expertise and ability to perform small tree work and in‐house trimming as needed  

Budget 
Department    4951‐ Tree Warden 

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

4‐ Public Works   
1‐Personnel Services  
 OVERTIME PAY (GENERAL)                 1,194      1,146       1,200          1,200              1,200 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                  1,194      1,146       1,200          1,200              1,200 
2‐Purchase of Services  
SUPP & MATERIALS               1,183      2,330       1,000             500                 500 
TREE WARDEN SERVICES                15,126    15,045     17,000        25,000            25,000 
2‐Purchase of Services Total             16,310    17,376     18,000        25,500            25,500 
3‐Holdover  
SUPPLIES & MATERIALS                   ‐             10             ‐   
TREE SERVICES ENCUMB                       ‐        1,300             ‐     
 TREE WARDEN SUPPLIES                   867            ‐               ‐     
 TREE WARDEN TREE SUPPLIES             4,780            ‐               ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                 5,647      1,310             ‐         
 Grand Total             23,150    19,832     19,200        26,700            26,700 
 
 

   

113 
 
 

   

Section 5 

Human Services 

114 
 
 

Board of Health 
Mission Statement  
Our  mission  is  to  promote  the  health  of  Easthampton  residents  through  technical  assistance,  public 
education,  inspection  and  enforcement  of  state  and  local  regulations,  formulation  of  Easthampton‐
specific health regulation and policy, and the prevention and control of communicable disease through 
clinical  evaluation  and  nursing  case  management.  And  finally,  to  provide  a  trusting,  user‐friendly 
relationship with the community, thereby promoting confidence in our public health messages and work.  

Organizational Overview 

Board of 
Health

Health Agent

Clerk Nurse
 

Accomplishments 
 Accomplished more food inspections than any previously documented year (109 in calendar 2017). 
We performed an overall total of 290 inspections (food, housing, nuisance, camp, pool, other) 
 Worked with the Attorney General’s office to bring several nuisance properties into compliance 
through their receivership program and earned satisfactory results 
 Provided a “Quit Smoking” program to the public through a Cooley Dickinson health grant  
 Removed outdated files to make room for an office redesign to improve efficiency. We are 
converting to a digital file system for housing complaints 
 Created standardized training modules for Board members 

Trends 
 Demand for permitted food establishments as well as temporary events and festivals is on the rise 
 Recreational marijuana will increase the number of food establishments and will likely result in 
further complaints about clutter and hoarding. Housing complaints take a great amount of staff time 
as we work to meet demand 

115 
 
 

 Elderly residents threatened with homelessness due to condemnation have increased our workload 
due to case management tasks being done by the health agent (formerly done by Highland Valley 
Elder Services who have decreased their assistance to this group) 
 A new food code, housing code, camp code, lead code, and pool code are all being promulgated by 
the state and will take time and resources to learn and implement 
 Revisions in the city’s chicken ordinance may result in more inspections by health agent 

Goals and Objectives  
 Initiate a comprehensive food inspection program that will allow us to meet full inspection 
compliance (minimum 2 inspections annually for “high‐risk” permittees) 
 Redesign office space to better serve the public and increase our work efficiency 

Programs and Services 
 Quit Smoking program funded by Cooley Dickinson Health Care (as funding is available) 
 Flu clinic at White Brook Middle School and Easthampton High School 
 Nursing case management for communicable disease cases 
 Investigation, inspection, and follow up of all complaints 
 Annual inspection of permit holders 
 Technical assistance to the public on all matters regarding public health and permit requirements 
 

   

116 
 
 

Budget 
 

   5120‐ Board of Health  
Department 

 ACTUAL FY2016  ACTUAL  ORIGINAL  REQUESTED   RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019  FY2019 
FY2018  

 
  
1   
 5‐ Human Services 
 1‐Personnel Services 
 CLERICAL                                  8,690      9,142       9,434           9,863             9,863 
 P.T. CLERICAL                                      102            ‐            500              681 
 PART TIME NURSE                               12,639    11,937     14,024         14,238           14,238 
 SALARIES                                54,031    55,954     57,892         59,864           55,000 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                                75,461    77,033     81,850         84,646           79,101 
 2‐Purchase of Services 
 ADVERTISING                                          ‐              ‐            300              300                300 
 DUES & MEMBERSHIP                                      255         150          225              225                225 
 EDUC & TRAINING                                        80           30          350              350                350 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                                     622         743          650              100                100 
 MEDICAL SUPPLIES                                         ‐           247          400              200                200 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                                     808         536          400              400                400 
 POSTAGE                                      400         633          400              600                600 
 PROF SERVICES                                   1,119         680       1,000           3,792             1,200 
 RADIO,OTHER COMM.                                      193         180          268              268                268 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                                3,477      3,199       3,993            6,235             3,643 
 3‐Holdover 
 ADVERTISING ENCUMB.                                         ‐              ‐               ‐   
 BOARD OF HEALTH IN STATE TRAVEL FY 2015                                        72            ‐               ‐   
 IN STATE TRAVEL ENC                                          ‐           132             ‐   
 PRINTING SUPPLIES ENCUMB                                         ‐             23             ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                                       72         155             ‐         
 Grand Total                               79,010    80,387     85,843         90,881           82,744 
 

   

117 
 
 

Council on Aging  
Mission Statement  
The Easthampton Council on Aging (ECOA) is dedicated to serving seniors in the community, ages 55 and 
over, by providing essential programs and activities that meet the needs of our aging population.  To obtain 
this goal, the ECOA continues to provide case management services, health and fitness classes, social 
activities, accessible transportation, and educational courses that will enhance the quality of life for many 
Easthampton elders. 

Organizational Overview 

Director of the 
COA

Acitivities 
Coordinator  

Outreach 
Workers (2) 
Van Drivers (3)  Receptionist 
 

Accomplishments 
 The ECOA has become a host agency for the Senior Community Service Employment program, which 
is sponsored by the Springfield Elder Affairs Department.  As a result, our department has been 
given an opportunity to create an Administrative Assistant position at 20 hours a week (fully funded 
by Title V of the Older American Act) 
 The ECOA has been awarded with Title III grant money this year.  Out of this money, the Companion 
Program was given an additional $3,840, while the Home Shopping Delivery Program received 
$4,800 
 Fitness Membership is up to 109 active participants 
 Outreach is currently serving 150+ unduplicated clients for a variety of programs and services (e.g. 
SNAP, Mass Health, Medicare counseling, Fuel Assistance, and housing) 
 The ECOA has purchased My Senior Center Software (MSC).  MSC is a comprehensive database that 
will accurately record statistics for our activities/programs.  Now, information can be easily collected 
and organized for state reporting 
 Half‐way through FY2018 and the transportation program has already provided 2,972 1‐way trips 

118 
 
 

Trends 
 Our participants are seeking more opportunities to join health and fitness groups this year.  To meet 
this goal, the ECOA has allocated $2,421.46 on the state grant to support health and wellness‐based 
programs.  These classes/programs will be free for any Easthampton Senior 
 In 2017, the congregate meal program ended.  Since then, many of our participants have asked 
about the possibility of a future nutrition program.  As of February 2018, the ECOA launched a pilot 
program to determine the logistics of funding our own luncheon   

Goals and Objectives  
 The UMass Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging in Boston will complete their 
service needs assessment in FY2019.  The ECOA has been closely working with Dr. Caitlin Coyle 
(Research Fellow Adjunct Assistant Professor) to ensure that the goals of this project are met 
successfully.  The finalized report will provide essential information on economic security, housing, 
affordable healthcare, accessible transportation, and other issues that significantly impact the lives 
of Easthampton Seniors.  This information will help the ECOA and community at large to prepare for 
the demands that will follow a dramatic population spike in the 55+ age groups 
 The ECOA would like to develop a weekly nutrition program.  The menu will offer a variety of 
healthy, balanced, and affordable meals for participants.  If the program expands, we are hoping to 
find the funds to possibly support a part‐time cook at the center    
 In collaboration with Riverside Industries, the ECOA will be participating in a large‐scale art project 
that will be displayed throughout the city.  Artists would include local seniors and clients from RSI. 
 With increased gym membership in FY2018, the department will be looking into the possibility 
expanding the fitness center.  Any money obtained through membership has been placed into a 
revolving account.  This account continues to fund fitness instructor fees, purchase new gym 
equipment, and supply the center with a variety of supplies.          

119 
 
 

Programs and Services   
Services  Programs (continued) 
 Transportation   Quilting group 
 Grocery Shopping Delivery   Genealogy group 
 Emergency Funds   Tax Assistance 
 Companion Program   Health insurance counseling 
 Medical equipment loan program   Newsletter 
 Information and Referral   Housing Options 
 Case management services/advocacy   SNAP application Assistance  
 RMV/ I.D. and License renewals   Fuel Assistance  
 Tax Assistance   Utility discount options 
 Health insurance counseling   Farmers market vouchers 
 Newsletter   Bingo 
 Foot care/Podiatry   
Programs   Art  
 Zumba and Ballroom Dancing   Active Adults hiking group 
 Yoga Class   Bocce 
 Mahjong and Phase 10   Computer collaborative class 
 Billiard table/pool group   Healthy Bones and Balance 
 Men’s group   Reiki  
 Readers theater   Reflexology 
 Needle Craft group   Fitness classes 
 Travel club 
 

120 
 
 

Budget 
 
Department   5410‐ Council on Aging    

 ACTUAL FY2016  ACTUAL  ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019  FY2019 
FY2018  

 
  
1   
 5‐ Human Services   
 1‐Personnel Services 
 FULL TIME PERMANENT                                 74,808   75,751      75,618         34,586          34,586 
 P.T. CLERICAL                                  6,379      7,118        8,129         14,920           14,920 
 P.T. PERMANENT                                13,222     9,935      15,481         47,214          57,000 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                              155,018  153,504   163,278      150,455        159,891 
 2‐Purchase of Services 
 BLDG& EQUIP REPAIR                                    478        709           400             400               400 
 EQUIPMENT REPAIR & MAINT                                      141        483              ‐                    ‐   
 FOOD SERVICE                                            ‐             42            50                50                  50 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                                      418        193       1,000           1,000             1,000 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                                   1,888     1,642        2,000           2,000             2,000 
 POSTAGE                                      294        386           350   350                350 
 PROF. SERVICE                                  2,923     1,727        2,700          3,518             2,700 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                                  6,142     5,182        6,500           7,318             6,500 
 3‐Holdover 
 COA  MISC PROF & TECH SERV FY 2015                                    154             ‐                ‐   
 COA MISC BLDG/EQUIP R&M SUPPLY FY'15                                       60              ‐                ‐   
 COUNCIL ON AGING IN STATE TRAVEL FY 2015                                       16              ‐                ‐   
 GENERAL OFFICE SUPPLIES ENCUMB                                           ‐                ‐                ‐   
 IN STATE TRAVEL ENCUMB                                           ‐            88              ‐   
 MISCELLANEOUS PROF & TECH SERV ENCUMB                                            ‐          197              ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                                      231       285              ‐         
 Grand Total                              161,390  158,971    169,778      157,774        166,391 

 
   

121 
 
 

Veterans Services 
Mission Statement 
The Department of Veterans’ Services program is established in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Law, Chapter 115. The purpose of the program is to provide information, advice, and assistance 
regarding benefits to veterans, as well as their spouses and dependents. 

On July 1, 2019, the City of Easthampton entered into an agreement with the Town of South Hadley, for 
a shared Veterans Agent.  

The locally‐appointed Veterans’ Agent works with veterans to obtain benefits including employment, 
vocational or other educational opportunities, hospitalization, medical care, burial and other veterans’ 
benefits. The approved benefits paid to Easthampton veterans are subject to a 75% reimbursement 
from the Commonwealth’s Department of Veterans’ Services. Administrative costs, including salary, are 
not reimbursable and the reimbursement is received as State Aid revenue approximately twelve to 
fifteen months after the expenditure. 

Programs and Services 
Federal Assistance   State and Local Assistance  
Providing information and direction concerning:  Providing information and direction concerning: 
• Death Benefits   • Annuities 
• Educational Benefits  • Awards and medals  
• Employment   • Burial information  
• Housing Assistance   • Chapter 115 benefits  
• Life Insurance   • Clothing  
• Medical Benefits   • Education  
• Social Security Disability  • Elder services  
  • Employment 
Community Events  • Flags and markers 
Plan, coordinate, and assist with:  • Financial assistance  
• Memorial Day Parade   • Pensions • Pharmaceuticals 
• Veterans Day Observance   • Real estate tax exemptions  
• Decorate Veterans’ Graves  • Record retention  
  • Sales tax exemptions  
  • Shelter and Veterans Services 
 
 
 

   

122 
 
 

Budget 
 
Department  5430‐ Veterans Services    

 ACTUAL FY2016  ACTUAL  ORIGINAL  REQUESTED   RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019  FY2019 
FY2018  

 
                                                             1   
 5‐ Human Services   
 2‐Purchase of Services 
 VETERANS CARE SOLD & SAIL                                 1,470     1,520       1,525           1,525             1,877 
 VETERANS POSTAGE                                    105         105          105              105                105 
 VETS MISC PROF & TECH SERV                               31,641   32,904     33,716         33,716           32,086 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                                33,216   34,529     35,346         35,346           34,068 
 Grand Total                                33,216   34,529     35,346         35,346           34,068 
 

Department   5440‐ Veterans Benefits 

 ACTUAL FY2016  ACTUAL  ORIGINAL  REQUESTED   RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019  FY2019 
FY2018  

   
1  
 5‐ Human Services  
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 VETERANS BEN MEDICAL                                          434    6,445        3,000                   ‐   
 VETERANS BEN MISC.                                        8,210   11,718      12,000                   ‐   
 VETERANS CASH BENEFITS                                  331,483  341,427    330,000       350,000         350,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                                   340,127  359,591    345,000       350,000         350,000 
 3‐Holdover  
 MISCELLANEOUS VET BENEFITS ENCUMB                                              ‐      3,532              ‐   
 VETERAN'S BENEFITS CASH VET BEN FY'15                                          683              ‐                ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                                          683     3,532              ‐         
 Grand Total                                  340,810  363,123    345,000       350,000         350,000 
 

   

123 
 
 

   

Section 6 

Culture and Recreation 

124 
 
 

Emily Wilson Library 
Mission Statement 
The Emily Williston Memorial Library and Museum is a nonprofit, educational institution. Its collections, 
services, exhibits, and programs help meet the informational, research, educational, and recreational 
needs of the City of Easthampton and surrounding communities. 

The Emily Williston Memorial Library is a vital center for learning and for social and cultural 
collaborations in the City of Easthampton. 

Accomplishments 
The library had some challenges and many achievements during FY2018.  We needed to close our 
building on Park Street to the public for 5 months (September 2017 through January 2018) in order to 
perform repairs to the foundation of the building.  We were fortunate to be able to relocate to a space 
donated to us in the Eastworks building.  We were able to offer most of our services and a limited 
amount of our collection to the public while operating in this temporary location. 

Despite the challenge of our aging building, we were able to offer a variety of new regular programs: 

 Lego club for children 
 Drop‐in craft time for adults 
 A graphic novel reading and discussion group 
 Baby‐time with songs and play 

We also collaborated with the Council on Aging to provide an extremely successful series of computing 
basics classes for Senior Citizens.  The classes covered everything from basic computer skills such as 
operating a mouse to more advanced work on how to shop on the internet, perform research, use 
email, and edit photos.  We will continue to offer these classes on a regular basis. 

We were involved with Winterfest once again, this year becoming a stop in the scavenger hunt as well 
as offering accessible crafts for children and adults during the day.  We have also increased our 
involvement with BookFest with library staff members serving on the planning committee as well as the 
committee for naming a poet laureate.  We will again serve as a site for BookFest programs and we are 
working with the high school to solidify the BookFest events for children. 

We worked with a wonderful group of community members to write a new strategic plan for the library.  
This plan will drive our work for the next four years, FY2019‐FY2022.  In order to develop this new plan, 
we met twice with this volunteer committee and then surveyed the wider community regarding current 
and future program and collection offerings.  The result is a very ambitious four‐year plan that we 
believe will allow us to provide even stronger services and collections to the community. 

125 
 
 

We received visits from the second and third grade classes from both the Center and the Pepin Schools.  
We worked with four class groups each week with each visit lasting one hour and ending with a story 
time with our Youth Services Librarian. 

While not everyone who might come to the library located at Park Street visited us while we were at the 
Eastworks building, we still saw about 75% of our normal usage at the Eastworks location even though 
we were operating in a space that was 90% smaller than our library building on Park Street. 

Library Collection Usage and Program Attendance statistics, January to December 2017: 

 The library was open 54 hours each week 
 The library was open 6 days each week (closed Sundays) 
 8,321 people of all ages have accounts at the library 
 87,627 items (books, DVDs, museum passes, books on CD, video games, and music CDs) were 
checked out to people at the library during the year.  (The foundation repairs forced our collection 
of more than 20,000 children’s books to be removed from circulation and placed into storage for the 
last 4 months of the year.  This combined with the inability of some people to be able to visit our 
Eastworks location, means that our circulation numbers are lower than normal for the year) 
 11,781 eBooks and electronic audiobooks were checked out by Easthampton library users 
 The library held 313 programs free of charge for members of the public of all ages 
 4,373 people of all ages attended programs at the library 
 An average of 592 people used the library’s public internet computers to perform research, read 
email, download and print forms, edit photographs and much more 
 The library’s wireless internet service was used by an average of 280 people each month 

Trends 
Our need to close the library building on Park Street and move library operations to a smaller space for 
five months did negatively impact overall use of the library’s services and materials.  Despite this, we 
have been able to grow our programs and services over the last year: 

 Attendance at programs for adults has increased by nearly 20% 
 Use of museum passes by library patrons has increased by 13% 
 Use of ebooks and electronic audiobooks has increased by 38% 
 Use of the library’s wireless internet has increased by 17% 

The library has also been working to make the main floor reading area more inviting while also creating 
more room for our growing collection of non‐print materials (DVDs, books on CD, and music CDs).  We 
have been able to remove some large pieces of shelving and replace those with more compact units.  
The result is a more open, light‐filled reading area on our main floor. 

As mentioned previously, the library had to close the Park Street building for five months to repair the 
building’s foundation.  The nature of this work necessitated that the walls in the Youth Department be 
torn open and all the wall mounted shelving to be removed.  We were able to rework our use of the 
space in the lower level and as a result, we have created a much more welcoming space for children and 
families.  We now have a circulation desk and office area for staff working in the Youth Department and 
we have been able to create a space for teens and young adults with a small space for two lounge chairs 
and an attractive area rug. 

126 
 
 

Goals and Objectives  
For FY19, the library will continue to increase the amount and variety of programs for people of all ages: 

 We will be adding a second regular story hour to our schedule for Saturday mornings, so families 
with young children will be able to come either on Thursday mornings or Saturday mornings or 
both!   
 We will begin a Minecraft game group for children ages 8 and older. 
 We will develop a delivery service to members of the community who are home‐bound. 
 We will work with local authors to hold regular author panels and book discussions at the library. 

We will begin a multi‐year effort to improve our services and programs for young adults: 

 We are currently writing an application for grant of $15,000 from the State of Massachusetts that 
would allow us to increase the amount and diversity of programs for young adults in the “tween” 
(ages 8‐12) and teen age categories over the next two fiscal years. 
 We will look to add a librarian to our staff who would specialize in service to young adults. 
 We will partner with Easthampton High School and Williston Northampton School staff to develop 
programs for teens. 
 We will partner with local organizations to offer space for book groups and other programs for 
homeschooled children. 

We will continue to work to diversify the collections of material we offer to the public: 

 We will add passes for more museums to our offerings. 
 We will add online services such as streaming movie service, Kanopy, and possibly other digital 
services to our collections. 
 We will explore the possibility of broadening our video game offerings as these have proven to be 
very popular and in‐demand items. 

Finally, we will continue to consider long‐range plans for our library facility. 

Programs and Services 
 The library holds more than 50,000 books, DVDs, CDs, and video games 
 The library offers access to more than 62,000 ebooks and electronic audio books that library 
users can download to their personal devices 
 We offer passes to 14 museums in Western Massachusetts and Connecticut 
 During the school year, the library receives visits from the second and third grade classes from 
the Center School and the Pepin School.  We work with four separate groups each week for one 
hour each visit 
 We offer free programs to people of all ages covering a wide variety of interests; from reading, 
to art, to computer‐based games to the basics of using computers 
 We offer free use of online research databases to all residents of Massachusetts 

127 
 
 

 Through our shared library network, we are able to borrow library materials from any public 
library in the state of Massachusetts and have those materials delivered to the library free of 
charge 
 We offer computers and wireless internet access to anyone who comes to our library building 
 We offer free one‐on‐one tutoring on the use of laptops, computer tablets and smart phones 
 We offer a safe, warm, quiet space for people to come to read, meet with others or do work on 
their personal laptops or other computing devices 
 

Budgets 
Department    6100‐ Library  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

 6‐ Culture & Recreation  
2‐Purchase of Services  
EMILY WILLISTON PUR OF SERVICE                    203,122    205,699    208,247      317,146          210,831 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                    203,122    205,699    208,247      317,146          210,831 
Grand Total                   203,122    205,699    208,247      317,146          210,831 

 
   

128 
 
 

Parks and Recreation 
Mission Statement 
The Easthampton Parks & Recreation Department is committed to enhancing the quality of life for all by 
providing clean and safe parks throughout the city that serve both passive and active recreational 
opportunities. 

Organizational Overview 

Park 
andRecreation 
Director

Clerk

Camp Nontuck 
Park Forman Pool Manager
Director

Park 
Maintenance
 

Accomplishments  

 Pulaski Park Renovation – Gazebo rehab, tree removal, benches and painting 
 Pool Area – Replaced segments of pool deck, rehab pool house bathrooms, repainted pool, replaced 
Spray Park feature, and added shade structure 
 Added Wi‐Fi to Boardwalk Plaza Area 
 Installed safety barriers for Nash Pond Dam 
 Tennis Court Renovations – new fencing, refurbished courts, added to benches, stonewall 
 Toteman Nature Trail – built new bridge on trail 
 Rebuilt and/or redesigned 3 baseball diamonds 
 Refurbished Picnic sites and consolidated inventory 
 Reviewed and updated park policies 
 Increased city park gate and rental revenues by 7% 
 Publication of Nonotuck Park Brochure 
 Harvestfest ‐ Added new vendors, food trucks and raised community awareness for fundraising 
groups 
 Camp Nonotuck – sold out for year 
 Rag Shag – Over 1,000 youth attended this annual tradition 

129 
 
 

 Host site for Special Olympics – softball and bocce 
 Contracted paddle boat, kayak, and canoe rentals for Boardwalk 
 City Wide Flea Market – Largest event to date 
 Fostered successful partnership with local sports teams and programs 

Trends 

 Ball Field usage request – There are many non‐resident and travel team requests for ball fields and 
field space and time.  The Parks Department has to balance town leagues and the time needed for 
staff to prep areas and maintain fields while ensuring quality fields 
 Boardwalk area request – The boardwalk area usage for functions and events was on the rise last 
year and we think it will continue to rise.  The Department has policies in place to protect the city 
and public during events 
 Millside Park usage – The increase usage of Millside Park for community fundraisers, concerts and 
park events will continue to rise with the revitalization of the park and the area.  The Parks 
Department continues to review and access all events and functions to ensure we are providing a 
facility that is safe and secure and meets the needs of all visitors and users 
 Food Truck request – Our city parks are a destination for residents and non‐residents from all over 
Western Massachusetts, and this has created a business opportunity for food trucks at Nonotuck 
Park, the Boardwalk and at Millside Park. Last year we had two regular vendors seek permission to 
provide food vendor services.  We feel this number will continue to rise based on the popularity of 
the food truck industry.  We currently have vendor request forms and fee structures in place for 
food truck vendors and will continue to review as the need/request increase 
 The proliferation of drones and model planes over public lands necessitates that we explore rules 
and regulations for operators in park settings 
 The growth of Wedding ceremonies in Parks leads us to explore whether we are able to meet the 
specialized needs of customers for this type of event 
 With the introduction of new and specialized programs such as pickleball and lacrosse, there is not 
enough space to meet the needs of new programs 

Goals and Objectives  

 Create passive recreation area near pond point in Nonotuck Park 
 Pavilion #1 and Pavilion #3 renovation – replacing support posts Replace benches and bleachers 
throughout Nonotuck Park – Partnership with ELL, CPA & Easthampton Parks and Recreation 
 Green Energy Audit for lighting fixtures at pavilions and bathrooms 

130 
 
 

 Recondition bocce courts 
 Finding funding source for Stone House Bathroom renovation ‐  Potential ADA Grant and CPA grant 
 Millside Park ‐ RFP for a new sign at the entrance, which includes proposals to add flowers and 
beautification to the park entrance, new lighting for the park, and to replace exercise equipment 
with a playground structure  
 Purchase new mower for park 
 Continue to grow revenues through rentals and park passes 
 Operate safe and well‐maintained ballfield area 
 Create family fun area near Pavilion # 1 in Nonotuck Park   
 Continue to expand and grow current special events 
 Work with community vendors on specialized programs such as yoga in park, fitness classes, and 
boating 
 Expand social media presence by adding twitter and/or Instagram 
 Beach volleyball pickup league 

 
Programs and Services 

 Provide safe and clean parks throughout the city 
 Maintain and prepare ballfields for youth, high school and adult sports 
 Maintain and operate 180,000‐gallon public pool; work in conjunction with Health Dept. to ensure 
public safety at the pool 
 Support passive recreation opportunities  
 Provide active recreation opportunities 
o 9 Baseball/Softball Diamonds 
o 5 soccer fields 
o 2 Tennis Courts 
o 2 Basketball Courts 
o Bocce Courts, Horseshoe pits, Beach Volleyball court, Public pool, and Toteman Trail 
 Maintain 4 pavilions and 30 picnic sites for rentals   
 Provide customer service and support for pavilions, picnic sites and special events rentals 
 Provide recreational and community programs and events that meet a diverse variety of age groups 
 Liaison to youth sports programs 
 Scheduling sports leagues, functions, and events in city parks 
 Programs ‐ Family Skate, Swim Lessons, Open Gym, Camp Nonotuck, Baton Classes, Co‐ed Softball, 
Arts in the Park, and Outdoor Movie Night 
 Maintain as well as create new partnerships with the community to better serve city residents’ 
recreational needs   

   

131 
 
 

Budget  
Department    6310‐ Recreation   

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018 

 6‐ Culture & Recreation  
 1‐Personnel Services  
 F.T. CLERICAL     19,463      20,572      22,228        22,986            22,986 
 SALARY              62,542      64,697      64,925        65,912            65,912 
 TEMP POSITIONS               22,658      22,447      23,400        26,880            26,880 
 1‐Personnel Services Total           104,663    107,715    110,553      115,778          115,778 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ADVERTISING                 490              ‐             100             100                 100 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                 890           900           949             949                 949 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                   382           597           750             750                 750 
 POSTAGE                  241           143           156             156                 156 
 RECREATIONAL               1,778        2,138        1,850          1,850              1,850 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total             3,781        3,778        3,805          3,805              3,805 
 3‐Holdover  
 REC DEPARTMENT RECREATIONAL                 219              ‐                ‐   
 3‐Holdover Total                 219              ‐                ‐         
Grand Total        108,662    111,493    114,358      119,583          119,583 
 

   

132 
 
 

Budget (continued) 
Department    6500‐ Park  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

6‐ Culture & Recreation  
 1‐Personnel Services  
 LONGEVITY                      500           500           500             500                 500 
 P.T. CLERICAL                      600           400           600             600                 600 
 SALARIES               100,676    103,539    105,268      106,849          106,849 
 TEMP POSITIONS                 70,215      78,037      84,823        91,038            91,038 
 1‐Personnel Services Total               171,992    182,476    191,191      198,986          198,986 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ARGRICULTURAL                         ‐                ‐             200             200                 200 
 BLDG & EQUIP R & M                   3,278        3,868        3,800          3,800              3,800 
CUST. SUPPLIES                      648        1,045           700             700                 700 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                         ‐                ‐               75                  ‐   
 FACILITIES                   4,091        6,318        3,000          3,000              3,000 
LIGHT,HEAT, POWER                 10,291      10,447        9,400        10,500            10,500 
 MANHAN RAIL TRAIL              2,500 
 OIL,GAS,LUBE                         ‐                ‐             300             300                 300 
 PAINT,HARDWARE, LUMBER                   4,491        5,111        5,000          5,000              5,000 
 POOL CHEMICALS                   3,396        1,253        3,000          3,000              3,000 
 REPAIR & MAINT.                   1,948        1,562        2,800          2,500              2,500 
 SAND,GRAVEL,LOAM                         ‐                ‐             350             350                 350 
 UNIFORMS                      200           226           400             400                 400 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                 28,343      29,831      29,025        29,750            32,250 
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                 47,100           637              ‐         
 4‐Capital  
 4‐Capital Total                         ‐        34,854              ‐         
Grand Total              247,435    247,797    220,216      228,736          231,236 

 
 

133 
 
 

   

Section 7 

Debt 

134 
 
 

Debt and Interest 
Debt Service appropriations provide for the payment of principal and interest costs for long and short‐
term bonds issued by the City for capital projects for General Fund, Enterprise, and CPA purposes. 
Typically, larger projects such as the Municipal Building are bonded for twenty years, while the 
financing for other projects and equipment is retired within five to ten years. The City’s goal is to 
finance capital projects for the shortest feasible term over the useful life of the project in accordance 
with the terms outlined in Massachusetts General Laws. This ensures that our debt burden will remain 
manageable.  

The proposed FY2019 debt service budget provides for the payment of principal and interest costs 
for long and short‐term bonds issued by the city for General Fund purposes. For FY2019, the total 
Debt Service budget for the General Fund is $2.3 million, an increase of $150,591. The increase is due 
to the anticipated BAN of $1.250 million of the municipal equipment and the scheduled pay down of 
municipal BAN’s issued for the Pre‐K‐8 School Building design as well as the design of the complete 
street project.  

Budget  
Department    7100‐ Debt 
Principal  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 7‐ Debt & Interest  
 H.S. STATE HOUSE NOTE        196,150      200,000      200,000        200,000 
 HIGH SCHOOL           700,000    700,000      700,000      700,000        700,000 
 PAYSON OFFICE BLDG               65,000      67,634        66,190        65,120          65,120 
 PLAINS SEWER            142,526    145,405      148,343      151,340        151,340 
 PLAINS SEWER PHASE 2         20,564      20,968        21,381        21,801          21,801 
INTEGRATED WATER MGMT            44,495        45,463          45,463 
 PRINCIPAL TEMP LOANS           225,000      90,000      265,000      445,000        445,000 
 PUBLIC SAFETY             70,000      65,000               ‐                  ‐   
 PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG     275,000    275,000               ‐                  ‐   
 SEWER OUTFALL REPAIRS    13,028      13,285        13,546        13,812          13,812 
SOUTHERN WATER          110,000    114,626      112,020      110,210        110,210 
STORAGE   
 WWTP HEADWORKS                  70,807      72,410               ‐                  ‐   
 WWTP PHASE 3 UPGRADE                 7,299        7,299          7,299          7,299            7,299 
 WWTP PHASE II   74,492      73,011        76,977        81,630          81,630 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total   1,773,716  1,840,788   1,655,251   1,841,675     1,841,675 
Grand Total  1,773,716  1,840,788   1,655,251   1,841,675     1,841,675 

135 
 
 

Budget (continued) 
Department    7500‐ Debt 
Interest  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED   RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

                                                    1  
 7‐ Debt & Interest  
 50 PAYSON BLDG                    9,784        5,615        4,474         3,051             3,051 
 H.S. STATE HOUSE NOTE INT.                                    ‐        18,184      15,600       11,700           11,700 
 HEADWORKS                  1,464              ‐               ‐                    ‐   
 HIGH SCHOOL            414,750    400,750    386,750     365,750         365,750 
 INT ‐ INTEGRATED WATER                                    ‐                ‐        16,622       21,110           21,110 
 INTEREST ON BANS              7,218        4,082      25,000       25,000           25,000 
 MWPAT SUBSIDY                                    ‐                ‐               ‐                    ‐   
 PLAINS SEWER     44,170      41,291      38,354       35,357           35,357 
 PLAINS SEWER P2           7,440        7,025        6,601         6,170             6,170 
 PUB.SAFETY BLDG     15,125        8,250             ‐                    ‐   
 PUBLIC SAFETY                     3,700        1,950             ‐                    ‐   
 S. WTR STORAGE               19,025      11,231        9,392         6,984             6,984 
 SEWER OUTFALL            4,451        4,183         3,909             3,909 
4,714 
 SRF SEWER ADMIN.                5,849        5,271      11,975         5,813             5,813 
 WWTP PHASE II                  10,494        9,139        7,878         6,153             6,153 
 Grand Total           543,735    517,239    526,829     490,996         490,996 
 

Statutory Debt Limit 
The aggregate level of the City of Easthampton’s outstanding debt obligation is limited by State law. 
The statutory debt limit is established by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, and Section 10 at 
5% of our total Equalized Valuation (EQV). The EQV is determined every other year by the State 
Department of Revenue. Easthampton’s 2017 EQV $1,523,884,600 Debt Limit (5% of EQV) $ 
76,194,230 Easthampton’s total issued and outstanding long‐term debt principal, both inside and 
outside the debt limit as of June 30, 2017, is $17,001,438, significantly below the statutory debt limit. 

136 
 
 

Debt  
The total long‐term annual debt service from FY2019 through FY2037, including both principal and 
interest, is shown below. The chart indicates the amount of long‐term and short‐term debt service for 
the General Fund (both Debt Excluded and Non‐Excluded), as well as the long‐term debt service for the 
Community Preservation Act (CPA) Fund and Water & Sewer Enterprise Fund. 

Fiscal Year  Exclusion Enterprise General  Total 


Fund  Fund 
FY2019  $1,433,950  $517,050  $397,671  $2,348,671  
FY2020  $1,407,550  $510,828  $388,931  $2,307,309  
FY2021  $1,325,650  $501,192  $275,084  $2,101,927  
FY2022  $993,750  $398,648  $262,000  $1,654,398  
FY2023  $967,750  $395,056  $262,000  $1,624,806  
FY2024  $946,750  $302,436  $1,249,186  
FY2025  $924,000  $302,113  $1,226,113  
FY2026  $896,000  $301,786  $1,197,786  
FY2027  $868,000  $301,450  $1,169,450  
FY2028  $840,000  $301,109  $1,141,109  
FY2029  $812,000  $300,759  $1,112,759  
FY2030  $784,000  $113,849  $897,849  
FY2031  $756,000  $113,771  $869,771  
FY2032  $728,000  $68,314  $796,314  
FY2033     $68,328  $68,328  
FY2034     $68,342  $68,342  
FY2035     $68,357  $68,357  
FY2036     $68,372  $68,372  
FY2037     $68,387  $68,387  
Total   $13,683,400  $4,770,147  $1,585,686  $20,039,234  

$2,500,000

$2,000,000

$1,500,000
GF
Enterprise
$1,000,000
Exclusion

$500,000

$0
FY2019
FY2020
FY2021
FY2022
FY2023
FY2024
FY2025
FY2026
FY2027
FY2028
FY2029
FY2030
FY2031
FY2032
FY2033
FY2034
FY2035
FY2036
FY2037

137 
 
 

   

Section 8 

 Unclassified 

138 
 
 

Retirement  
The Easthampton Retirement System is funded through members’ deductions, investments, and annual 
appropriations from the City of Easthampton.  Pension Funds are invested with the Public Retirement 
Investment Trust (PRIT), a state‐run agency that pools pension contributions from around the state in 
order to maximize returns and reduce management fees. The annual assessment is determined by the 
Public Employees Retirement Administration Commission (PERAC) and is based on salaries, age, and 
service time of unit participants that comprise the Easthampton Retirement System. These units include 
the Easthampton Housing Authority, DPW Water Division, DPW Sewer Division, DPW Wastewater 
Division, School Department workers (non‐teaching personnel), and city employees. The unfunded 
liability is a significant factor in determining the annual assessment. 

Department    9111‐ Contributory 
Retirement  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

 8‐ Unclassified  
1‐Personnel Services  
CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT                   2,577,998    2,719,728    2,840,817  2,982,646     2,982,646 
1‐Personnel Services Total                   2,577,998    2,719,728    2,840,817  2,982,646     2,982,646 
Grand Total                  2,577,998    2,719,728    2,840,817  2,982,646   2,982,646 
 

 
 
 

139 
 
 

Workers Compensation 
Workers’ Compensation is available to those employees injured on the job. The city is insured through 
the Massachusetts Inter‐local Insurance Agency (MIIA) which is owned and operated by the 
municipalities of Massachusetts. Employees injured on the job receive 60% of their pay tax‐free and the 
city is responsible for 100% of associated medical bills. In addition, because fire and police personnel are 
not eligible under Massachusetts law for regular workers’ compensation coverage, a separate insurance 
policy with premiums based largely on claims experience is purchased to cover these personnel for 
injuries incurred in the line of duty. The police and fire MGL Chapter 41 Section 111F Injured on Duty 
(IOD) premium is also included here. Under this statute, public safety employees injured on duty receive 
100% of their regular earnings. These IOD earnings are considered non‐taxable wages by both the 
Department of Revenue and the Internal Revenue Service. The city is insured with CHUBB insurance for 
111F with management of claims via Cabot Risk Services.  The city’s Workers’ Compensation insurance 
premiums reflect a 3.62% budgetary increase for FY2019. 

Department    9120‐ Workers 
Compensation  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

 8‐ Unclassified  
2‐Purchase of Services  
111F W/C   37,863     ‐           51,950    51,950      51,950 
CITY RELATED W/C   42,854         97,586         56,975     59,824     59,824 
 SCHOOL RELATED   64,281         82,935         78,750     82,688       82,688 
2‐Purchase of Services Total   144,999       180,520       187,675    194,461      194,461 
Grand Total  144,999       180,520       187,675   194,461   194,461 

 
   

140 
 
 

Medicare Expense 
Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) tax is a payroll (or employment) tax imposed by the Federal 
Government on both employees and employers. As a result of Federal legislation, all local government 
employees hired after March 31, 1986, are considered Medicare Qualified Government Employees or 
MQGE and are required to be covered under the Medicare program. The city is responsible for a 
matching Medicare payroll tax of 1.45% on all these employees. Annual increases in this tax liability 
have been reflective of a rise in total city payroll subject to this tax and as more senior employees whose 
wages were not subject to the tax leave city employment and are replaced by newly‐hired employees 
whose wages are now fully subject to this tax liability. 

Department    9121 ‐ Employer 
Share Medicare  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

8‐ Unclassified  
2‐Purchase of Services  
 MEDICARE TAX   106,468       112,747       110,000   120,000   120,000 
 SCHOOL MEDICARE   151,905       163,606       160,000    170,000  170,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total   258,372       276,353       270,000   290,000    290,000 
Grand Total  258,372       276,353       270,000   290,000     290,000 

 
 

   

141 
 
 

Employee Benefits 
The Massachusetts Title IV, Chapter 32B mandates that employees in the Commonwealth are to be provided 
a plan of group life insurance, group accidental death and dismemberment insurance, and group general or 
blanket hospital, surgical, medical, dental and other health insurance benefits. The City of Easthampton 
complies with all State guidelines. The city is a member of the Hampshire County Group Insurance Trust 
which is established under Section 12 of Chapter 32B. The Trust is a 70 member self‐insured unit providing 
coverage with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts to over 11,000 active and retired municipal 
employees and their eligible dependents. This budget reflects a 4.7% increase for FY 2019 with corresponding 
plan design changes to prevent a double‐digit increase in premium costs. The city contracts directly with Blue 
Cross Blue Shield to provide dental coverage. 

Department    9140‐ Employee 
Benefits  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

8‐ Unclassified  
2‐Purchase of Services  
CHP 32B INSURANCES   1,156,907  1,252,244  1,386,658  1,778,912   1,455,991 
CHP32B CITY RETIREES SHARE   284,229  327,067  475,472  475,800   499,246 
CHP32B SCHOOL RETIREES   532,819  602,519  657,733  724,784   690,619 
CITY RET SHARE ‐ OTHER RET SYS   2,318         
SCH RET SHARE ‐ OTHER RET. SYS.   4,302         
SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENT   ‐    (14,892)       
SCHOOL RELATED   1,817,251  1,988,987  2,154,866  2,547,932   2,262,610 
2‐Purchase of Services Total   3,797,827  4,155,925  4,674,729  5,527,427   4,908,467 
Grand Total  3,797,827  4,155,925  4,674,729  5,527,427   4,908,467 
 

   

142 
 
 

Liability Insurance 
This budget category includes property and liability coverage for all city‐owned property, as well as 
liability coverage for all elected and appointed city officials. The city’s Building and Liability insurance 
premiums reflect a zero budgetary increase for FY2019. 

Department   9450‐ Liability 
Insurance  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

8‐ Unclassified  
2‐Purchase of Services  
CITY LIAB. INS.   170,346       180,454       191,993  191,993   191,993 
RETIREMENT REIMB.   (2,193)         (2,193)                 ‐                         ‐   
SCHOOL LIAB INS   78,532         75,907         88,207  88,207   88,207 
 SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENT   (9,012)         (8,217)                 ‐                         ‐   
 2‐Purchase of Services Total   237,673       245,951       280,199  280,199   280,199 
3‐Holdover    
LIABILITY INSURANCE ENC          
LIABILITY INSURANCE FY 2015   4,500     
3‐Holdover Total   4,500     
Grand Total  242,173       245,951       280,199  280,199   280,199 
 

 
   

143 
 
 

Reserve Fund 
Authorized by state statute, the Reserve Fund provides the city’s operations with an option for the 
funding of extraordinary or unforeseen expenditures during the year. Transfers from this account 
require the approval of the City Council. Historically the fund has contained approximately $100,000 at 
the start of the budget year. In recent fiscal years, the fund has been increased to $200,000 to allow for 
more flexibility due to the financial constraints of the budget. Most commonly, the Reserve Fund 
account has been used to make up for any overdrafts in departmental operations, or unforeseen 
equipment failures. The table below shows past year “actuals” as zero because budgeted funds are 
transferred into other accounts when approved by the Committee, rather than expenses being charged 
directly to the Reserve Fund. 

Department    9510‐ Reserve 
Fund  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

8‐ Unclassified  
2‐Purchase of Services  
CITY COUNCIL TRANSFER APPROVED            
RESERVE FUND            200,000   200,000    200,000 
2‐Purchase of Services Total            200,000    200,000      200,000 
Grand Total           200,000   200,000   200,000 

 
 

   

144 
 
 

Unemployment 
The city does not pay unemployment insurance, but instead, is assessed by the State Division of 
Unemployment Assistance (DUA) on a pay‐as‐you‐go basis for the cost of any and all benefits actually 
paid to former city and Pre K‐12 School employees. Currently, the maximum number of weeks an 
individual may receive benefits is thirty (30). Claimants receive a weekly benefit payment that is half of 
their average weekly wage, up to a maximum benefit amount which is currently $769.00 per week, plus 
a dependency allowance of $25.00 per week for each dependent child. The dependency allowance 
cannot exceed more than 50% of the weekly benefit amount. The city is responsible for reimbursing the 
State for 100% of the benefits paid to former employees. There is an inherent complexity in tracking 
unemployment costs and estimating liability given that an employee’s “benefit year” may cross fiscal 
years, claimants may be subject to partial benefits if they have other earnings, and claimants who 
become unemployed more than once during a benefit year may reactivate a prior claim and resume 
collecting benefits. 

Department    9511‐ 
Unemployment   

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL   REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

 8‐ Unclassified  
2‐Purchase of Services  
 UNEMPLOYMENT COMP APPROP.   70,000    70,000        50,000            50,000            50,000 
2‐Purchase of Services Total   70,000    70,000        50,000            50,000            50,000 
Grand Total  70,000    70,000        50,000            50,000            50,000 
 

   

145 
 
 

   

Section 9 

Community Preservation Act 

146 
 
 

Community Preservation Act  
The Planning Department administered the FY2018 CPA appropriated approximately $830,000 under the 
direction  of  the  Community  Preservation  Act  Committee.    Easthampton  adopted  the  Community 
Preservation  Act  in  2001.  The  Act  creates  a  3%  tax  surcharge  which  generates  revenue  for  projects 
addressing open space, affordable housing, historic preservation, and recreation. The Committee makes 
recommendations to the City Council on the expenditure of the funds.  
  
The Community Preservation Act (CPA) budget reflects a $24,404 decrease for FY2019. This decrease is 
due to a trend of decreasing state matching funds, the committee takes a conservative approach to 
forecasting revenue, and has adjusted to the decreasing state match accordingly.  

The Community Preservation Act requires that at least 10% of each year’s Community Preservation Fund 
revenues be spent or set aside for spending on each of the three Community Preservation core 
categories ‐ open space, affordable housing and historic preservation. The remaining 70% of the 
Community Preservation Fund may be allocated among those three categories, recreation, and up to 5% 
on administration cost as the Community Preservation Committee and City Council see fit.  

In FY2019 the CPA Committee continues to fund a portion of the administrative cost of the Assistant City 
Planner, this year the CPA committee has elected to increase the historic preservation set‐a‐side 
significantly; funding an additional $200,000 in anticipation of a large renovation project at the Old 
Town Hall.  

Goals and Objectives  
 
The  final  Community  Preservation  Plan  for  FY2019  is  nearing  completion.    As  in  past  years,  the 
Preservation  Plan  identifies  possibilities  for  future  projects/expenditures  through  an  assessment  of 
current  resources  and  needs  in  the  community  and  helps  potential  project  applicants  understand  the 
Committee’s priorities and the approval process by outlining the possibilities for Community Preservation 
and the criteria for project approval.  
 
The  CPA  Committee  continues  to  respond  to  less  state  matching  funds  through  the  CPA  program  by 
soliciting longer‐term plans from interested organizations.  The  Committee  continues  to evaluate high 
demand for projects with reductions in available funding.  The renovation of the second floor of Old Town 
Hall is one of the more significant expected requests in either FY2019 or FY2020 and the Committee has 
begun  to  reserve  some  funding  for  that  project.    For  the  complete  list  of  priority  projects  please  see 
Appendix F. 
 
   

147 
 
 

 
Budget  
 
Department    CPA  

 
 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL  ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 
FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 
1‐Personnel Services  
 SALARY CPA ADMIN.                      6,812       6,988   8,200          8,500             8,500 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                      6,812       6,988        8,200             8,500                 8,500 
 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ADMIN. EXP.                      1,972       2,364  4,500          4,500        4,500 
 BRICKYARD BROOK CONS.AREA                101,200    83,800      
CENTER/PEPIN PLAYGROUND                      3,203    15,492    
COOK/COUNTY RD                                ‐    327,500    
CPA HISTORICAL BUDGET                                ‐                   ‐    75,000         75,000           75,000 
HISTORICAL BUDGET‐ Set Aside                                ‐                   ‐          200,000             200,000 
CPA HOUSING BUDGET                                ‐                   ‐         75,000        75,000             75,000 
CPA OPEN SPACE BUDGET                                ‐                   ‐        75,000        75,000             75,000 
ECHODALE ORCHARD            
 EHS BATTING CAGE            
 EXP FOOTBALL FIELD WBMS                279,508         
 FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER                                ‐           
 HISTORICAL RECORDS                                ‐      12,774     
HOMEBUYER & HOUSING                                 ‐             105     
HOUSING AUTH. REASONABLE                               ‐         2,208     
HOUSING REHAB PROGRAM            
LOWER MILL POND            
MANHAN RAIL TRAIL            
 MANHAN TRAIL IMPR.                400,000                 ‐       
 MUTTERS FLD/BRICKYARD BRK                                ‐      20,800     
NONOTUCK PARK SOCCER                228,410                 ‐       
OLD TOWN HALL ‐ 2ND FL            
OLD TOWN HALL ‐ 2ND FLR           
OLD TOWN HALL                118,573    13,805                            ‐   
RESERVE                                ‐                   ‐    248,300          23,596              23,596 
STOVETOP FIRE SUPPRESSORS                                ‐         7,690     
 TOWN CLOCK REPAIRS            
 WBMS ATHLETIC FIELD LIGHTS                         538  129,000     
2‐Purchase of Services Total            1,133,404  615,537     477,800        453,096             453,096 
Grand Total           1,140,216  622,525  486,000        461,596             461,596 

148 
 
 

  Section 10 
 
 Enterprise 
 

149 
 
 

Enterprise 
Mission Statement  
The mission of the Easthampton Department of Public Works is to ensure that all divisions provide and 
maintain public services necessary for the economic growth and quality of life for all its citizens.  Each 
division strives to deliver those services in a cost‐effective and environmentally sensitive manner for the 
short and long‐term benefits of our customers/residents and the environment. 

Organizational Overview 

Board of Public 
Works 

DPW Director

2 Clericial 

Water Wastewater Sewer

6 Staff 8 Staff 4 Staff

Accomplishments 
Water: 

 Worked on completion of the Integrated Water Resource Management Plan 
 Inspected and cleaned (sediment removal) a 4 million gallon storage tank on Drury Lane  
 Inspected and cleaned (sediment removal) a 1 million gallon storage tank at Peaceful Valley 
 Completed Sanitary Survey 
 Completed semi‐annual fire hydrant flushing of 750 hydrants 
 Maintained approximately 100 miles of water main and 5,500 service connections 
 Completed system wide leak detection survey 
 Replaced 10 water services 
 Repaired 15 water main breaks 
   

150 
 
 

Wastewater: 

 Worked on completion of the Integrated Water Resource Management Plan regarding the 
wastewater treatment plant and sewer pump stations 
 Adhered to all requirements of the NPDES permit 
 Rebuilt the Adams Street Pump Station with Public Works personnel 
 Rebuilt Torrey Street Pump Station with Public Works personnel 
 Assured compliance with the Industrial Pretreatment Program 
 Upgraded alarm system to 3 pump stations with Public Works personnel 
 

Sewer: 

 Worked on completion of the Integrated Water Resource Management Plan regarding the sewer 
system and storm drainage system 
 Replaced and/or rebuilt approximately 45 catch basins and manholes 
 Repaired or replaced 20 sewer services  
 Responded to all sewer requests from residents and businesses 
 Flushed sewer and drain lines as needed 
 Cleaned approximately 1000 catch basins 
 

Trends 
The Water Division continues to provide clean, safe drinking water for Easthampton while adhering to 
all requirements of the DEP Water Withdrawal Permit.  They will continue to elevate and improve the 
water pumping and distribution system.   

The Wastewater Division will continue to operate the Wastewater Treatment Plant and 18 pump 
stations in accordance with the DEP issued NPDES Discharge Permit.  They will continue to evaluate all 
aspects of the Wastewater Treatment Plant and Pump Stations as well as recommend and make 
improvements as needed. 

The Sewer Division will continue to maintain the sewer collection system and storm drainage system 
while adhering to all environmental regulations that protect the public and the environment.  They will 
continue to evaluate the sewer and storm water systems and make necessary improvements.   

   

151 
 
 

Goals and Objectives  
Water: 

 Continued operation of the potable water system 
 Continued replacement of water meters to insure appropriate revenue collection 
 Insure protection of the water supply aquifer 
 Continued evaluation of equipment and methods required to provide safe drinking water 

Wastewater: 

 Continued operation of the Wastewater Treatment Plant and pump stations while adhering to the 
requirements of the NPDES permit 

Sewer: 

 Continued evaluation of equipment, processes and methods needed to operate the Wastewater 
Treatment Plant 
 Continued operation and maintenance of the sewer collection system and storm drain system 
 Continued protection of the public and environment 
 Continued evaluation of the infrastructure to determine necessary maintenance and upgrades 

Programs and Services 
Water Division:   

 Check pumping stations on a daily basis 
 Check Nashawannuck Dam on a daily basis 
 Read 5,702 water accounts 4 times per year 
 Take samples of drinking water as required by DEP regulations 
 Installation of water service connections for new construction on existing mains  
 Renewal of water services, as needed (approximately 30 per year) 
 Continue meter replacement program (approximately 150 per year) 
 Installation of new meters in new construction (approximately 20 per year) 
 Flush mains to insure cleanliness 

152 
 
 

 Operate all hydrants as needed 
 Replace hydrants as needed 
 Replace water mains as needed 
 Insure proper reporting to State agencies 
 Maintain the city’s well fields and pump stations 
 Provide assistance to Highway Division for snow plowing 
 Provide assistance to other Divisions as needed 

Wastewater Division: 

 Operates and maintains a 3.8 m.g.d. Wastewater Treatment Plant, 18 pump stations, maintains interior, 
exterior and surrounding grounds for 10 buildings  
 Routinely  perform  preventive  maintenance  on  approximately  60  pumps  and  their  drive  units,  7 
boilers, 7 emergency generators, 9 compressors, 12 drive units, a belt press, 2 hydraulic units, 4 debris 
grinders and drives, 7 pieces of chlorination equipment, 10 air operated valves and over 500 valves 
and gates 
 Routinely  repairs  all  equipment  listed  above  plus  electrical  and  instrument  repairs,  piping  and 
plumbing repairs and tank repairs such as drive chain and flights 
 Maintain reports using computer 
 Routinely perform lab tests to meet NPDES Permit 
 Routinely perform lab tests for process control 
 Routinely  maintain  records  of  lab  results,  maintain  DEP  monthly  report  and  NPDES  report  with 
computer 
 Routinely perform equipment checks for proper operation 
 Routinely removes and disposes of any rags in system 
 Routinely removes and disposes of inorganic grit 
 Routinely de‐water sludge and dispose of at an incineration facility 
 Routinely check chlorine equipment 
 Monitor industries for Industrial Pretreatment Program 

Sewer Division: 

 Installation of sewer service connections for new construction on existing mains  
 Repair and renewal of existing services as needed  
 Repair and replacement of sewer mains as needed 
 Repair and replacement of storm drains 
 Flush approximately 1/2 of the city’s sewer system per year 
 Clean approximately 1/2 of the city’s catch basins per year 
 Repair and replace all deteriorated catch basins   
 Repair and replace all deteriorated manholes  

153 
 
 

 Raise structures for paving of selected streets  
 Assist Highway Division in snow plowing and removal operations 
 Assist other Divisions as needed 
 Maintenance of all headwalls and outfalls 

Budgets  
Department    Reserves 

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 

 10‐ Enterprise  
2‐Purchase of Services  
 SEWER RESERVE FUND                                     ‐             ‐       15,000        15,000            15,000 
 WATER RESERVE FUND                                     ‐             ‐       15,000        15,000            15,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                                     ‐             ‐       30,000        30,000            30,000 
Grand Total                                    ‐             ‐       30,000        30,000            30,000 
 

   

154 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
Department    4410‐ Sewer  

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  

 
 10‐ Enterprise  
 
 1‐Personnel Services  
 CDL,HOISTING,WTPO LIC RENEWALS                          605            270         1,000           1,000            1,000  
 CELL PHONE ALLOWANCE                            ‐                 ‐              360              360               360  
 OVERTIME                     23,317       31,525       40,000         40,000          40,000  
 SALARIES                   242,745     227,140     250,066       249,777        249,777  
 1‐Personnel Services Total                   266,667     258,935     291,426       291,137        291,137  
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ADVERTISING                       1,099               ‐              100              100               100  
 AGRICULTURAL                            59            116            150              150               150  
 BITUMINOUS CONCRETE                     30,000       30,000       35,000         35,000          35,000  
 CELL PHONE                          360            360               ‐                   ‐                   ‐    
 CHEMICALS                            ‐              800               ‐                   ‐                   ‐    
 COMP. SERVICES                            ‐              517               ‐                   ‐    
 CURB IRON CASTING                       3,363               ‐         10,000         10,000          10,000  
 CUSTODIAL SUPLLIES                          436               ‐              100              100               100  
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                       1,280            225         1,000           1,000            1,000  
 FORMS & SUPPLIES                          345               ‐                 ‐                   ‐    
 GAS, OIL, & LUBE                            ‐                 ‐           1,000           1,000            1,000  
 IN STATE TRAVEL                              5               ‐                50                50                 50  
 LIGHT, HEAT, POWER                       2,987         1,696         3,000           3,000            3,000  
 MANHLE & BASINS                          138         9,549       10,000         10,000          10,000  
 MASONRY SUPPLIES                       3,351         9,820       15,000         15,000          15,000  
 MEDICAL SUPPLIES                            67            317            175              175               175  
 MISC BLDG & EQUIP                       2,152         3,783         2,000           2,000            2,000  
 MISC PROF SERV                     40,168       41,745       25,000         25,000          25,000  
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                            ‐                 ‐              200              200               200  
 OTHER PUBLIC WORKS SUPPLY                          967               ‐                 ‐                   ‐    
 PAINT HARDWARE, LUMBER                          135            585            600              600               600  
 PIPE & FITTINGS                       8,803         3,350       10,000         10,000          10,000  
 POSTAGE                       2,970         2,970         3,200           3,200            3,200  
 PRINTING                          892            892            900              900               900  
 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT                       2,075            669         7,500           7,500            7,500  
 REPAIR & MAINT                     13,018       10,362       12,000         12,000          12,000  
 SAND, GRAVEL, LOAM                       4,078         1,049         2,000           2,000            2,000  

155 
 
 

           
Department    4410‐ Sewer   (continued) 

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 TIRE,TUBES,CHAIN                       1,019        1,556        1,000          1,000            1,000 
 TOOLS & SUPPLIES                       3,300      13,095        4,000          4,000            4,000 
 TRAVEL/MEALS                          400             70           550             550               550 
 UNIFORMS                       2,819        2,111        2,125          2,125            2,125 
 Equipment Rental               ‐                ‐            5,000            5,000 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                   126,285    135,638    146,650      151,650        151,650 
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                     18,139        2,164              ‐         
 4‐Capital  
 4‐Capital Total                     10,575      19,842              ‐        360,000                 ‐   
Grand Total                  421,665    416,578    438,076      802,787        442,787 

Budgets (continued) 
Department    4460‐ Waste 
Water  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
 10‐ Enterprise  
 1‐Personnel Services  
 CDL,HOISTING,WTPO LIC RENEWALS                               668                80              200              200                    200 
 CELL PHONE ALLOWANCE                                    ‐                   ‐                720              720                    720 
 OVERTIME                          59,138         59,801         65,000         60,000               60,000 
 SALARIES                      355,849       376,873       390,214       404,789             404,789 
 1‐Personnel Services Total                       415,655       436,754       456,134       465,709             465,709 
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 CELL PHONE                               720              720                 ‐                        ‐   
 CHEMICALS                        77,294         69,434         82,000         90,000               90,000 
COMPUTER SERVICES                              508           2,014           1,000           1,000                 1,000 
 CUSTODIAL SUPPLIES                            2,660           3,020           3,000           3,000                 3,000 
 DUES & MEMBERSHIPS                           2,200           2,200           2,500           2,500                 2,500 
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                           6,045           7,425           4,000           4,000                 4,000 
 ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES                         28,476         12,147         25,000         25,000               25,000 
 EQUIPMENT RENTAL                              950           1,022                 ‐                        ‐   
 GAS, OIL, LUBE                                   ‐             1,666           1,500           1,500                 1,500 
 IN STATE TRAVEL                                 38                28              200              200                    200 
 IRON, STEEL                              462              681              500              500                    500 
 LAB SUPPLIES                        20,008         18,673         35,000         30,000               30,000 

156 
 
 

Department    4460‐ Waste  (continued) 


Water  

 ACTUAL FY2016   ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017  BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019 
FY2018 
           
 LIGHT,HEAT, POWER                         93,539       121,699       120,000       125,000             125,000 
 MASONRY SUPPLIES                                   ‐                   ‐                500              500                    500 
 MEDICAL SUPPLIES                              115              545              450              500                    500 
MISC BLDG & EQUIP                        48,130         44,259         50,000         50,000               50,000 
 MISC PROF SERV                       228,333       229,873       290,000       290,000             290,000 
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                           2,425           1,226           1,500           1,500                 1,500 
 PAINT, HARDWARE, LUMBER                       ‐                   ‐             1,500           2,000                 2,000 
 PIPE & FITTINGS                  2,955                 ‐             2,000           2,500                 2,500 
 PLUMBING SUPPLIES                 1,498                 ‐                   ‐                        ‐   
POSTAGE                     400              100              500              500                    500 
 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT                1,236              871           2,500           3,000                 3,000 
 PUMP STATION REPAIR MAINTANCE              32,344         32,347         30,000         30,000               30,000 
 RADIO,TEL, COMM.                7,953           8,395         10,500         11,000               11,000 
 REPAIR & MAINT                3,016           4,832           3,000           3,000                 3,000 
 TIRE,TUBE,CHAIN                      533                 ‐             1,000           1,000                 1,000 
 TOOLS & SUPPLIES                 4,959         10,652           7,000           7,000                 7,000 
 TRAVEL/MEALS                     380              298              100              100                    100 
 UNIFORM                 3,422           3,259           3,425           3,500                 3,500 
 2‐Purchase of Services Total          570,598       577,387       678,675       688,800             688,800 
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total             40,986         44,778                 ‐         
 4‐Capital  
 4‐Capital Total           184,706         29,868                 ‐         
Grand Total      1,211,945    1,088,786    1,134,809    1,154,509          1,154,509 
 

157 
 
 

Budgets (continued) 
Department    4500‐ Water  

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  

 
10‐ Enterprise  
 
 1‐Personnel Services  
 CDL,HOISTING,WTOP LIC RENEWALS                          986            880         1,000           1,000              1,000  
 CELL PHONE ALLOWANCE                            ‐                 ‐              720              720                 720  
 FT REGULAR                   301,817     317,739     319,693       309,057          309,057  
 OVERTIME                     42,910       35,750       50,000         65,000            65,000  
 1‐Personnel Services Total                   345,713     354,369     371,413       375,777          375,777  
 2‐Purchase of Services  
 ADVERTISING                       4,580            447            800              800                 800  
 AGRICULTURAL                       1,189               ‐              300              300                 300  
 BITUMINOUS CONCRETE                     40,006       30,319       55,000         55,000            55,000  
 BLDG. & EQUIP  SUPPLIES                     29,405       13,546       15,000         15,000            15,000  
 CELL PHONE                          720            630               ‐                     ‐    
 CHEMICALS                          468         1,142         1,000           1,000              1,000  
 COMPUTER & PERIPHERALS                       2,457            171               ‐                     ‐    
 COMPUTER SERVICES                          870         2,694         2,500           2,500              2,500  
CURB IRON CASTING                       4,301         2,760         5,000           5,000              5,000  
 CUST. SUPPLIES                          432            236            500              500                 500  
 DUES AND MEMBERSHIPS                       3,992         4,122         4,200           4,200              4,200  
 EDUCATION & TRAINING                       3,990         4,140         4,000           4,000              4,000  
 EQUIP RENTAL                            ‐           1,215         1,000           3,500              3,500  
 GAS,OIL & LUBE                       1,562            695         1,500           1,500              1,500  
 HYDRANTS AND PARTS                     13,302       21,475       18,000         18,000            18,000  
 IN STATE TRAVEL                          537            108            500              500                 500  
 LIGHT, HEAT, POWER                   109,250     140,281     150,000       150,000          150,000  
 MASONRY SUPPLIES                          252               ‐           1,000           1,000              1,000  
 MEDICAL SUPPLIES                          427            600            250              250                 250  
 METER PARTS                       7,426       12,354       15,000         15,000            15,000  
 MISC. PROF SERV                     66,035       55,769       48,000         65,000            65,000  
 OFFICE SUPPLIES                       1,432            769         1,000           1,000              1,000  
 PAINT,HARDWARE, LUMBER                          876              81            500           2,500              2,500  
PIPE & FITTINGS                     15,249       17,468       30,000         30,000            30,000  
 POSTAGE                       4,870         5,165         7,000           7,000              7,000  
 PRINTING                       2,563         3,156         2,600           2,600              2,600  
 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT                     14,523         1,056         1,000           5,000              5,000  

158 
 
 

Department    4500‐ Water   (continued) 

 ACTUAL FY2016    ACTUAL   ORIGINAL  REQUESTED  RECOMMEND 


FY2017   BUDGET  FY2019   FY2019  
FY2018  
           
           
PUBLIC WORKS SUPPLIES                          444            551               ‐                     ‐    
RADIOS, PHONES COMM.                       4,477         4,206         4,500           4,500              4,500  
 REPAIR & MAINT                       6,082         4,236         5,000           5,000              5,000  
 SUPPLIES & MATERIALS                            ‐              761               ‐                     ‐    
 TIRE,TUBE, CHAIN                            92            607            200              200                 200  
 TOOLS & SUPPLIES                     14,869         3,003         7,500           7,500              7,500  
 TRAVEL/MEALS                          942            272            500              500                 500  
 UNIFORMS                       3,100         2,917         2,600           2,600              2,600  
 WATER PLANT SCADA                     23,628         9,200       15,000         15,000            15,000  
 2‐Purchase of Services Total                   384,347     346,150     400,950       426,450          426,450  
 3‐Holdover  
 3‐Holdover Total                     29,737         5,634               ‐          
 4‐Capital  
 4‐Capital Total                   328,460     115,764               ‐          
Grand Total               1,088,257     821,917     772,363       802,227          802,227  
 

   

159 
 
 

   

160 
 
 

 
 
APPENDIX A  
GLOSSARY OF TERMS 
 
 
   

161 
 
 

Glossary of Terms 
 


Abatement: A reduction or elimination of a real or personal property tax, motor vehicle excise, 
a fee, charge, or special assessment imposed by a governmental unit. Granted only on 
application of the person seeking the abatement and only by the committing governmental 
unit. 

Accounting System: The total structure of records and procedures that identify, record, classify, 
and report information on the financial position and operations of a governmental unit or any 
of its funds, account groups, and organizational components. 

Accrued Interest: The amount of interest that has accumulated on the bond since the date of 
the last interest payment, and in the sale of a bond, the amount accrued up to but not including 
the date of delivery (settlement date). (See Interest) 

Amortization: The gradual repayment of an obligation over time and in accordance with a 
predetermined payment schedule. 

Appellate Tax Board (ATB): Appointed by the governor, the ATB has jurisdiction to decide 
appeals from local decisions relating to property taxes, motor vehicle excises, state‐owned land 
(SOL) valuations, exemption eligibility, property classification, and equalized valuations. 

Appropriation: An authorization granted by a town meeting, City Council or other legislative 
body to expend money and incur obligations for specific public purposes. An appropriation is 
usually limited in amount and as to the time period within which it may be expended. (See 
Encumbrance, Free Cash) 

Arbitrage: As applied to municipal debt, the investment of tax‐exempt bonds or note proceeds 
in higher yielding, taxable securities. Section 103 of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Code 
restricts this practice and requires (beyond certain limits) that earnings be rebated (paid) to the 
IRS. 

Assessed Valuation: A value assigned to real estate or other property by a government as the 
basis for levying taxes. In Massachusetts, assessed valuation is based on the property's full and 
fair cash value as set by the Assessors. (See Full and Fair Cash Value) 

162 
 
 

Audit: An examination of a community's financial systems, procedures, and data by a certified 
public accountant (independent auditor), and a report on the fairness of financial statements 
and on local compliance with statutes and regulations. The audit serves as a valuable 
management tool for evaluating the fiscal performance of a community. 

Audit Report: Prepared by an independent auditor, an audit report includes: (a) a statement of 
the scope of the audit; (b) explanatory comments as to application of auditing procedures; (c) 
findings and opinions; (d) financial statements and schedules; and (e) statistical tables, 
supplementary comments, and recommendations. It is almost always accompanied by a 
management letter. 

Available Funds: Balances in the various fund types that represent non‐recurring revenue 
sources. As a matter of sound practice, they are frequently appropriated to meet unforeseen 
expenses, for capital expenditures or other one‐time costs. Examples of available funds include 
free cash, stabilization funds, overlay surplus, water surplus, and enterprise net assets 
unrestricted (formerly retained earnings). 


Balance Sheet: A statement that discloses the assets, liabilities, reserves, and equities of a fund 
or governmental unit at a specified date. 

Betterments (Special Assessments): Whenever a specific area of a community receives benefit 
from a public improvement (e.g., water, sewer, sidewalk, etc.), special property taxes may be 
assessed to reimburse the governmental entity for all or part of the costs it incurred. Each 
parcel receiving benefit from the improvement is assessed for its proportionate share of the 
cost of such improvements. The proportionate share may be paid in full or the property owner 
may request that the assessors apportion the betterment over 20 years. Over the life of the 
betterment, one year’s apportionment along with one year’s committed interest computed 
from October 1 to October 1 is added to the tax bill until the betterment has been paid. 

Bond: A means to raise money through the issuance of debt. A bond issuer/borrower promises 
in writing to repay a specified sum of money, alternately referred to as face value, par value or 
bond principal, to the buyer of the bond on a specified future date (maturity date), together 
with periodic interest at a specified rate. The term of a bond is always greater than one year. 
(See Note) 

163 
 
 

Bond and Interest Record: (Bond Register) – The permanent and complete record maintained 
by a treasurer for each bond issue. It shows the amount of interest and principal coming due 
each date and all other pertinent information concerning the bond issue. 

Bond Anticipation Note (BAN): Short‐term debt instrument used to generate cash for initial 
project costs and with the expectation that the debt will be replaced later by permanent 
bonding. Typically issued for a term of less than one year, BANs may be re‐issued for up to five 
years, provided principal repayment begins after two years (MGL Ch. 44 §17). Principal 
payments on school‐related BANs may be deferred up to seven years (increased in 2002 from 
five years) if the community has an approved project on the Massachusetts School Building 
Authority (MSBA) priority list. BANs are full faith and credit obligations. 

Bond Authorization: The action of town meeting or a City Council authorizing the executive 
branch to raise money through the sale of bonds in a specific amount and for a specific 
purpose. Once authorized, issuance is by the treasurer upon the signature of the mayor, or 
selectmen. (See Bond issue) 

Bonds Authorized and Unissued: Balance of a bond authorization not yet sold. Upon 
completion or abandonment of a project, any remaining balance of authorized and unissued 
bonds may not be used for other purposes, but must be rescinded by town meeting or the City 
Council to be removed from community's books. 

Bond Issue: Generally, the sale of a certain number of bonds at one time by a governmental 
unit. 

Bond Rating (Municipal): A credit rating assigned to a municipality to help investors assess the 
future ability, legal obligation, and willingness of the municipality (bond issuer) to make timely 
debt service payments. Stated otherwise, a rating helps prospective investors determine the 
level of risk associated with a given fixed‐income investment. Rating agencies, such as Moody's 
and Standard and Poors, use rating systems, which designate a letter or a combination of 
letters and numerals where AAA is the highest rating and C1 is a very low rating. 

Budget: A plan for allocating resources to support particular services, purposes, and functions 
over a specified period of time. (See Performance Budget, Program Budget) 

Budget Message: A statement that, among other things, offers context by summarizing the 
main points of a budget, explains priorities, describes underlying policies that drive funding 
decisions, and otherwise justifies the expenditure plan and provides a vision for the future. 

164 
 
 

Budget Unit: A board or department to which the municipality’s legislative body appropriates 
funds. 


Capital Assets: All tangible property used in the operation of government, which is not easily 
converted into cash, and has an initial useful life extending beyond a single financial reporting 
period. Capital assets include land and land improvements; infrastructure such as roads, 
bridges, water and sewer lines, easements, buildings and building improvements, vehicles, 
machinery, and equipment. Communities typically define capital assets in terms of a minimum 
useful life and a minimum initial cost. (See Fixed Assets) 

Capital Budget: An appropriation or spending plan that uses borrowing or direct outlay for 
capital or fixed asset improvements. Among other information, a capital budget should identify 
the method of financing each recommended expenditure, i.e., tax levy or rates, and identify 
those items that were not recommended. (See Capital Assets, Fixed Assets) 

Capital Improvements Program: A blueprint for planning a community's capital expenditures 
that comprises an annual capital budget and a five‐year capital program. It coordinates 
community planning, fiscal capacity, and physical development. While all of the community’s 
needs should be identified in the program, there is a set of criteria that prioritizes the 
expenditures. 

Capital Outlay Expenditure Exclusion: A temporary increase in the tax levy to fund a capital 
project or make a capital acquisition. Exclusions require a two‐thirds vote of the selectmen or 
City Council (sometimes with the mayor’s approval) and a majority vote in a community‐wide 
referendum. The exclusion is added to the tax levy only during the year in which the project is 
being funded and may increase the tax levy above the levy ceiling. 

Cash: Currency, coin, checks, postal and express money orders and bankers’ drafts on hand or 
on deposit with an official or agent designated as custodian of cash and bank deposits. 

Cash Management: The process of monitoring the ebb and flow of money in an out of 
municipal accounts to ensure cash availability to pay bills and to facilitate decisions on the need 
for short‐term borrowing and investment of idle cash. 

165 
 
 

Cemetery Perpetual Care: These funds are donated by individuals for the care of grave sites. 
According to Ch. 114, s 25, funds from this account must be invested and spent as directed by 
perpetual care agreements. If no agreements exist, interest (but not principal) may be used as 
directed by the cemetery commissioners for the purpose of maintaining cemeteries. 

Certification: Verification of authenticity. Can refer to the action of a bank, trust company, or 
DOR’s Bureau of Accounts (BOA) in the issuance of State House Notes, to confirm the 
genuineness of the municipal signatures and seal on bond issues. The certifying agency may 
also supervise the printing of bonds and otherwise safeguard their preparation against fraud, 
counterfeiting, or over‐issue. Also refers to the certification by the Bureau of Local Assessment 
(BLA) that a community’s assessed values represent full and fair cash value (FFCV). (See 
Triennial Certification) 

Certificate of Deposit (CD): A bank deposit evidenced by a negotiable or non‐negotiable 
instrument, which provides on its face that the amount of such deposit plus a specified interest 
payable to a bearer or to any specified person on a certain specified date, at the expiration of a 
certain specified time, or upon notice in writing. 

Cherry Sheet: Named for the cherry colored paper on which they were originally printed, the 
Cherry Sheet is the official notification to cities, towns and regional school districts of the next 
fiscal year’s state aid and assessments. The aid is in the form of distributions, which provide 
funds based on formulas and reimbursements that provide funds for costs incurred during a 
prior period for certain programs or services. Links to the Cherry Sheets are located on the DLS 
website at www.mass.gov/dls. (See Cherry Sheet Assessments, Estimated Receipts) 

Cherry Sheet Assessments: Estimates of annual charges to cover the cost of certain state and 
county programs. 

Cherry Sheet Offset Items: Local aid that may be spent without appropriation in the budget, 
but which must be spent for specific municipal and regional school district programs. Current 
offset items include racial equality grants, school lunch grants, and public libraries grants. (See 
Offset Receipts) 

Classification of Real Property: Assessors are required to classify all real property according to 
use into one of four classes: residential, open space, commercial, and industrial. Having 
classified its real properties, local officials are permitted to determine locally, within limitations 
established by statute and the Commissioner of Revenue, what percentage of the tax burden is 
to be borne by each class of real property and by personal property owners. (See Classification 
of the Tax Rate). 

166 
 
 

Classification of the Tax Rate: Each year, the selectmen or City Council vote whether to 
exercise certain tax rate options. Those options include choosing a residential factor (MGL Ch. 
40 §56), and determining whether to offer an open space discount, a residential exemption (Ch. 
59, §5C), and/or a small commercial exemption (Ch. 59, §5I) to property owners. 

Collective Bargaining: The process of negotiating workers' wages, hours, benefits, working 
conditions, etc., between an employer and some or all of its employees, who are represented 
by a recognized labor union, regarding wages, hours and working conditions. 

Community Preservation Act (CPA): Enacted as MGL Ch. 44B in 2000, CPA permits cities and 
towns accepting its provisions to establish a restricted fund from which monies can be 
appropriated only for a) the acquisition, creation and preservation of open space; b) the 
acquisition, preservation, rehabilitation, and restoration of historic resources; and c) the 
acquisition, creation, and preservation of land for recreational use; d) the creation, 
preservation, and support of community housing; and e) the rehabilitation and restoration of 
open space, land for recreational use, and community housing that is acquired or created using 
monies from the fund. Acceptance requires town meeting or City Council approval or a citizen 
petition, together with referendum approval by majority vote. The local program is funded by a 
local surcharge up to 3 percent on real property tax bills and matching dollars from the state 
generated from registry of deeds fees. (See DOR IGR 00‐209 as amended by IGR 01‐207 and IGR 
02‐208) 

Community Preservation Fund (CPA): A special revenue fund established pursuant to MGL Ch. 
44B to receive all monies collected to support a community preservation program, including 
but not limited to, tax surcharge receipts, proceeds from borrowings, funds received from the 
Commonwealth, and proceeds from the sale of certain real estate. 

Compensating Balance Agreement: An alternative to the payment of direct fees for banking 
services. In this case, a bank specifies a minimum balance that the municipality must maintain 
in non‐interest bearing accounts. The bank can then lend this money (subject to a reserve 
requirement) and earn interest, which will at least cover the cost of services provided to the 
municipality. Compensating balance agreements are permitted under MGL Ch. 44 §53F and 
must be approved annually by town meeting or the City Council. 

Conservation Fund: A city or town may appropriate money to a conservation fund. This money 
may be expended by the conservation commission for lawful conservation purposes as 
described in MGL Ch. 40 §8C. The money may also be expended by the conservation 
commission for damages arising from an eminent domain taking provided that the taking was 
approved by a two‐thirds vote of City Council or town meeting. 

167 
 
 

Consumer Price Index: The statistical measure of changes, if any, in the overall price level of 
consumer goods and services. The index is often called the "cost‐of‐living index." 

Cost‐Benefit Analysis: A decision‐making tool that allows a comparison of options based on the 
level of benefit derived and the cost to achieve the benefit from different alternatives. 


Debt Authorization: Formal approval by a two‐thirds vote of town meeting or City Council to 
incur debt, in accordance with procedures stated in MGL Ch. 44 §§1, 2, 3, 4a, 6‐15. 

Debt Burden: The amount of debt carried by an issuer usually expressed as a measure of value 
(i.e., debt as a percentage of assessed value, debt per capita, etc.). Sometimes debt burden 
refers to debt service costs as a percentage of the total annual budget. 

Debt Exclusion: An action taken by a community through a referendum vote to raise the funds 
necessary to pay debt service costs for a particular project from the property tax levy, but 
outside the limits under Proposition 2½. By approving a debt exclusion, a community calculates 
its annual levy limit under Proposition 2½, then adds the excluded debt service cost. The 
amount is added to the levy limit for the life of the debt only and may increase the levy above 
the levy ceiling. 

Debt Limit: The maximum amount of debt that a municipality may authorize for qualified 
purposes under state law. Under MGL Ch. 44 §10, debt limits are set at 5 percent of EQV. By 
petition to the Municipal Finance Oversight Board, cities and towns can receive approval to 
increase their debt limit to 10 percent of EQV. 

Debt Service: The repayment cost, usually stated in annual terms and based on an amortization 
schedule, of the principal and interest on any particular bond issue. 


Encumbrance: A reservation of funds to cover obligations arising from purchase orders, 
contracts, or salary commitments that is chargeable to, but not yet paid from, a specific 
appropriation account. 

168 
 
 

Enterprise Funds: An enterprise fund, authorized by MGL Ch. 44 §53F½, is a separate 
accounting and financial reporting mechanism for municipal services for which a fee is charged 
in exchange for goods or services. It allows a community to demonstrate to the public the 
portion of total costs of a service that is recovered through user charges and the portion that is 
subsidized by the tax levy, if any. With an enterprise fund, all costs of service delivery‐‐ direct, 
indirect, and capital costs—are identified. This allows the community to recover total service 
costs through user fees if it chooses. Enterprise accounting also enables communities to reserve 
the "surplus" or net assets unrestricted generated by the operation of the enterprise rather 
than closing it out to the general fund at year‐end. Services that may be treated as enterprises 
include, but are not limited to, water, sewer, hospital, and airport services. (See DOR IGR 08‐
101) 

Equalized Valuations (EQVs): The determination of the full and fair cash value of all property in 
the commonwealth that is subject to local taxation. EQVs have historically been used as 
variables in distributing certain state aid accounts and for determining county assessments and 
certain other costs. The Commissioner of Revenue, in accordance with M.G.L. Ch. 58 s 10C, is 
charged with the responsibility of bi‐annually determining an equalized valuation for each town 
and city in the Commonwealth 

Estimated Receipts: A term that typically refers to anticipated local revenues listed on page 
three of the Tax Recapitulation Sheet. Projections of local revenues are often based on the 
previous year's receipts and represent funding sources necessary to support a community's 
annual budget. (See Local Receipts) 

Excess and Deficiency (E&D): Also called the "surplus revenue" account, this is the amount by 
which cash, accounts receivable, and other assets exceed a regional school district’s liabilities 
and reserves as certified by the Director of Accounts. The calculation is based on a year‐end 
balance sheet, which is submitted to DOR by the district’s auditor, accountant, or comptroller 
as of June 30. The regional school committee must apply certified amounts exceeding five 
percent of the district’s prior year operating and capital costs to reduce the assessment on 
member cities and towns. Important: E&D is not available for appropriation until certified by 
the Director of Accounts. 

Excess Levy Capacity: The difference between the levy limit and the amount of real and 
personal property taxes actually levied in a given year. Annually, the board of selectmen or 
council must be informed of excess levying capacity and evidence of such acknowledgment 
must be submitted to DOR when setting the tax rate. 

169 
 
 

Exemptions: A discharge, established by statute, from the obligation to pay all or a portion of a 
property tax. The exemption is available to particular categories of property or persons upon 
the timely submission and approval of an application to the assessors. Properties exempt from 
taxation include hospitals, schools, houses of worship, and cultural institutions. Persons who 
may qualify for exemptions include disabled veterans, blind individuals, surviving spouses, and 
seniors. 

Expenditure: An outlay of money made by municipalities to provide the programs and services 
within their approved budget. 


Fiduciary Funds: Repository of money held by a municipality in a trustee capacity or as an agent 
for individuals, private organizations, other governmental units, and other funds. These include 
pension (and other employee benefit) trust funds, investment trust funds, private‐purpose trust 
funds, and agency funds. 

Fiscal Year (FY): Since 1974, the Commonwealth and municipalities have operated on a budget 
cycle that begins July 1 and ends June 30. The designation of the fiscal year is that of the 
calendar year in which the fiscal year ends. Since 1976, the federal government fiscal year has 
begun on October 1 and ended September 30. 

Fixed Assets: Long‐lived, tangible assets such as buildings, equipment, and land obtained or 
controlled as a result of past transactions or circumstances. 

Fixed Costs: Costs that are legally or contractually mandated such as retirement, FICA/Social 
Security, insurance, debt service costs or interest on loans. 

Float: The difference between the bank balance for a local government’s account and its book 
balance at the end of the day. The primary factor creating float is clearing time on checks and 
deposits. Delays in receiving deposit and withdrawal information also influence float. 

Foundation Budget: The spending target imposed by the Education Reform Act of 1993 for 
each school district as the level necessary to provide an adequate education for all students. 

170 
 
 

Free Cash: (Also Budgetary Fund Balance) remaining, unrestricted funds from operations of the 
previous fiscal year including unexpended free cash from the previous year, actual receipts in 
excess of revenue estimates shown on the tax recapitulation sheet, and unspent amounts in 
budget line‐items. Unpaid property taxes and certain deficits reduce the amount that can be 
certified as free cash. The calculation of free cash is based on the balance sheet as of June 30, 
which is submitted by the community's auditor, accountant, or comptroller. Important: free 
cash is not available for appropriation until certified by the Director of Accounts. (See Available 
Funds) 

Full‐time equivalent (FTE): A unit that indicates the workload of an employed person in a way 
that makes workloads comparable across various contexts. FTE is often used to measure a 
worker's hours to track cost reductions in an organization. An FTE of 1.0 is equivalent to a full‐
time worker while an FTE of 0.5 signals half of a full workload. 

Full and Fair Cash Value (FFCV): Fair cash value has been defined by the Massachusetts 
Supreme Judicial Court as "fair market value, which is the price an owner willing but not under 
compulsion to sell ought to receive from one willing but not under compulsion to buy. It means 
the highest price that a normal purchaser not under peculiar compulsion will pay at the time, 
and cannot exceed the sum that the owner after reasonable effort could obtain for his 
property. A valuation limited to what the property is worth to the purchaser is not market 
value. The fair cash value is the value the property would have on January first of any taxable 
year in the hands of any owner, including the present owner." (Boston Gas Co. v. Assessors of 
Boston, 334 Mass. 549, 566 (1956)) 

Full Faith and Credit: A pledge of the general taxing powers for the payment of governmental 
obligations. Bonds carrying such pledges are usually referred to as general obligation or full 
faith and credit bonds. 

Fund: An accounting entity with a self‐balancing set of accounts that are segregated for the 
purpose of carrying on identified activities or attaining certain objectives in accordance with 
specific regulations, restrictions, or limitations. 

Fund Accounting: Organizing the financial records of a municipality into multiple, segregated 
locations for money. A fund is a distinct entity within the municipal government in which 
financial resources and activity (assets, liabilities, fund balances, revenues, and expenditures) 
are accounted for independently in accordance with specific regulations, restrictions or 
limitations. Examples of funds include the general fund and enterprise funds. Communities 
whose accounting records are organized according to the Uniform Municipal Accounting 
System (UMAS) use multiple funds. 

171 
 
 


GASB 34: A major pronouncement of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board that 
establishes new criteria on the form and content of governmental financial statements. GASB 
34 requires a report on overall financial health, not just on individual funds. It requires 
complete information on the cost of delivering value estimates on public infrastructure assets, 
such as bridges, road, sewers, etc. It also requires the presentation of a narrative statement the 
government's financial performance, trends and prospects for the future. 

GASB 45: This is another Governmental Accounting Standards Board major pronouncement 
that each public entity account for and report other post‐employment benefits in its accounting 
statements. Through actuarial analysis, municipalities must identify the true costs of the OPEB 
earned by employees over their estimated years of actual service. 

General Fund: The fund used to account for most financial resources and activities governed by 
the normal town meeting/City Council appropriation process 

General Obligation Bonds: Bonds issued by a municipality for purposes allowed by statute that 
are backed by the full faith and credit of its taxing authority. 

Governing Body: A board, committee, commission, or other executive or policymaking body 
including the school committee of a municipality. 

Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA): This organization provides leadership to the 
government finance profession through education, research and the promotion and recognition 
of best practices. 

Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB): The ultimate authoritative accounting and 
financial reporting standard‐setting body for state and local governments. 


Indirect Cost: Costs of a service not reflected in the operating budget of the entity providing the 
service. An example of an indirect cost of providing water service would be the value of time 
spent by non‐water department employees processing water bills. A determination of these 
costs is necessary to analyze the total cost of service delivery. The matter of indirect costs arises 
most often in the context of enterprise funds. 

172 
 
 

Interest: Compensation paid or to be paid for the use of money, including amounts payable at 
periodic intervals or discounted at the time a loan is made. In the case of municipal bonds, 
interest payments accrue on a day‐to‐day basis but are paid every six months. 

Interest Rate: The interest payable, expressed as a percentage of the principal available for use 
during a specified period of time. It is always expressed in annual terms. 

Investments: Securities and real estate held for the production of income in the form of 
interest, dividends, rentals or lease payments. The term does not include fixed assets used in 
governmental operations. 


Law Enforcement Trust Fund: A revolving fund established to account for a portion of the 
proceeds from the sale of property seized from illegal drug‐related activities. Funds may be 
expended to defray certain qualified law enforcement costs as outlined in MGL Ch. 94C, s 47. 
Funds from this account may be expended by the police chief without further appropriation. 

Levy Ceiling: A levy ceiling is one of two types of levy (tax) restrictions imposed by MGL Ch. 59 
§21C (Proposition 2½). It states that, in any year, the real and personal property taxes imposed 
may not exceed 2½ percent of the total full and fair cash value of all taxable property. Property 
taxes levied may exceed this limit only if the community passes a capital exclusion, a debt 
exclusion, or a special exclusion. (See Levy Limit) 

Levy Limit: A levy limit is one of two types of levy (tax) restrictions imposed by MGL Ch. 59 §21C 
(Proposition 2½). It states that the real and personal property taxes imposed by a city or town 
may only grow each year by 2½ percent of the prior year's levy limit, plus new growth and any 
overrides or exclusions. The levy limit can exceed the levy ceiling only if the community passes a 
capital expenditure exclusion, debt exclusion, or special exclusion. (See Levy Ceiling) 

Line Item Budget: A budget that separates spending into categories, or greater detail, such as 
supplies, equipment, maintenance, or salaries, as opposed to a program budget. 

Local Aid: Revenue allocated by the Commonwealth to cities, towns, and regional school 
districts. Estimates of local aid are transmitted to cities, towns, and districts annually by the 
"Cherry Sheets." Most Cherry Sheet aid programs are considered general fund revenues and 
may be spent for any purpose, subject to appropriation. 

173 
 
 

Local Appropriation Authority: In a town, the town meeting has the power to appropriate 
funds, including the authorization of debt. In a city, the City Council has the power upon the 
recommendation of the mayor. 

Local Receipts: Locally generated revenues, other than real and personal property taxes. 
Examples include motor vehicle excise, investment income, hotel/motel tax, fees, rentals, and 
charges. Annual estimates of local receipts are shown on the tax rate recapitulation sheet. (See 
Estimated Receipts) 


Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA): A quasi‐independent government authority 
that partners with Massachusetts communities to support the design and construction of 
educationally‐appropriate, flexible, sustainable and cost‐effective public school facilities. 

Maturity Date: The date that the principal of a bond becomes due and payable in full. 

Massachusetts Municipal Depository Trust: An investment program, founded in 1977 under 
the supervision of the State Treasurer, in which municipalities may pool excess cash for 
investment. 

Minimum Required Local Contribution: The minimum that a city or town must appropriate 
from property taxes and other local revenues for the support of schools (Education Reform Act 
of 1993). 

Municipal(s): (As used in the bond trade) "Municipal" refers to any state or subordinate 
governmental unit. "Municipals" (i.e., municipal bonds) include not only the bonds of all 
political subdivisions, such as cities, towns, school districts, special districts, but also bonds of 
the state and agencies of the state. 

Municipal Revenue Growth Factor (MRGF): An estimate of the percentage change in a 
municipality’s revenue growth for a fiscal year. It represents the combined percentage increase 
in the following revenue components: automatic 2 1/2 percent increase in the levy limit, 
estimated new growth, the change in selected unrestricted state aid categories and the change 
in selected unrestricted local receipts. 

M.G.L.: Massachusetts General Laws. 

 
174 
 
 


Net School Spending (NSS): School budget and municipal budget amounts attributable to 
education, excluding long‐term debt service, student transportation, school lunches and certain 
other specified school expenditures. A community’s NSS funding must equal or exceed the NSS 
Requirement established annually by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 
(DESE). (See Education Reform Act of 1993) Includes both school budget and municipal budget 
amounts attributable to education, excluding long‐term debt service, student transportation, 
school lunches and certain other specified school expenditures. A community’s NSS funding 
must equal or exceed the NSS Requirement established annually by the Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). 

New Growth: The additional tax revenue generated by new construction, renovations and 
other increases in the property tax base during a calendar year. It does not include value 
increases caused by normal market forces or by revaluations. New growth is calculated by 
multiplying the assessed value associated with new construction, renovations and other 
increases by the prior year tax rate. The additional tax revenue is then incorporated into the 
calculation of the next year's levy limit. For example, new growth for FY07 is based on new 
construction, etc. that occurred between January and December 2005 (or July 2005 and June 
2006 for accelerated new growth communities). In the fall of 2006, when new growth is being 
determined to set the FY07 levy limit, the FY06 tax rate is used in the calculation. 

Note: A short‐term loan, typically with a maturity date of a year or less. 


Objects of Expenditures: A classification of expenditures that is used for coding any 
department disbursement, such as “personal services,” “expenses,” or “capital outlay. 

Official Statement: A document prepared for potential investors that contains information 
about a prospective bond or note issue and the issuer. The official statement is typically 
published with the notice of sale. It is sometimes called an offering circular or prospectus. 

175 
 
 

Offset Receipts: A local option that allows estimated receipts of a particular department to be 
earmarked for use of the department and appropriated to offset its annual operating budget. If 
accepted, MGL Ch. 44 §53E limits the amount of offset receipts appropriated to no more than 
the actual receipts collected for the prior fiscal year. The Director of Accounts must approve the 
use of a higher amount before appropriation. Actual collections greater than the amount 
appropriated close to the general fund at year‐end. If actual collections are less, the deficit 
must be raised in the next year’s tax rate. 

Operating Budget: A plan of proposed expenditures for personnel, supplies, and other 
expenses for the coming fiscal year. 

Other Amounts to be raised: (Tax Recapitulation Sheet) Amounts not appropriated but raised 
through taxation. Generally, these are locally generated expenditures (e.g., overlay, teacher pay 
deferral, deficits) as well as state, county and other special district charges. Because they must 
be funded in the annual budget, special consideration should be given to them when finalizing 
the budget recommendations to the City Council or town meeting. 

Overlapping Debt: A community's proportionate share of the debt incurred by an overlapping 
government entity, such as a regional school district, regional transit authority, etc. 

Overlay: (Overlay Reserve or Allowance for Abatements and Exemptions) An account 
established annually to fund anticipated property tax abatements, exemptions and uncollected 
taxes in that year. The overlay reserve need not be funded by the normal appropriation 
process, but rather is raised on the tax rate recapitulation sheet 

Overlay Deficit: A deficit that occurs when the amount of overlay raised in a given year is 
insufficient to cover abatements, statutory exemptions, and uncollected taxes for that year. 
Overlay deficits must be provided for in the next fiscal year. 

Overlay Surplus: Any balance in the overlay account of a given year in excess of the amount 
remaining to be collected or abated can be transferred to this account. Within 10 days of a 
written request by the chief executive officer of a city or town, the assessors must provide a 
certification of the excess amount of overlay available to transfer. Overlay surplus may be 
appropriated for any lawful purpose. At the end of each fiscal year, unused overlay surplus is 
“closed” to surplus revenue, i.e., it becomes a part of free cash. 

Override: A vote by a community at an election to permanently increase the levy limit. An 
override vote may increase the levy limit no higher than the levy ceiling. The override question 
on the election ballot must state a purpose for the override and the dollar amount. (See 
Underride.) 

176 
 
 

Override Capacity: The difference between a community’s levy ceiling and its levy limit. It is the 
maximum amount by which a community may override its levy limit. 


Performance Budget: A budget that stresses output both in terms of economy and efficiency. 

Principal: The face amount of a bond, exclusive of accrued interest. 

Program: A combination of activities to accomplish an end. 

Program Budget: A budget that relates expenditures to the programs they fund. The emphasis 
of a program budget is on output. 

Proposition 2½: A state law enacted in 1980, Proposition 2½ regulates local property tax 
administration and limits the amount of revenue a city or town may raise from local property 
taxes each year to fund municipal operations. 

Purchased Services: The cost of services that are provided by a vendor. 


Refunding of Debt: Transaction where one bond issue is redeemed and replaced by a new bond 
issue under conditions generally more favorable to the issuer. 

Reserve for Abatements and Exemptions: (See Overlay) 

Reserve Fund: An amount set aside annually within the budget of a city (not to exceed 3 
percent of the tax levy for the preceding year) or town (not to exceed 5 percent of the tax levy 
for the preceding year) to provide a funding source for extraordinary or unforeseen 
expenditures. In a town, the finance committee can authorize transfers from this fund for 
"extraordinary or unforeseen" expenditures. Other uses of the fund require budgetary transfers 
by town meeting. In a city, transfers from this fund may be voted by the City Council upon the 
recommendation of the mayor. 

177 
 
 

Revaluation: The assessors of each community are responsible for developing a reasonable and 
realistic program to achieve the fair cash valuation of property in accordance with 
constitutional and statutory requirements. The nature and extent of that program will depend 
on the assessors’ analysis and consideration of many factors, including, but not limited to, the 
status of the existing valuation system, the results of an in‐depth sales ratio study, and the 
accuracy of existing property record information. Every three years, assessors must submit 
property values to the DOR for certification. Assessors must also maintain fair cash values in the 
years between certifications so that each taxpayer in the community pays his or her share of 
the cost of local government in proportion to the value of his property. (See Triennial 
Certification) 

Revenue Anticipation Borrowing: Cities, towns, and districts may issue temporary notes in 
anticipation of taxes (TANs) or other revenue (RANs). The amount of this type of borrowing is 
limited to the total of the prior year’s tax levy, the net amount collected in motor vehicle and 
trailer excise in the prior year and payments made by the Commonwealth in lieu of taxes in the 
prior year. According to MGL Ch. 44 s 4, cities, towns and districts may borrow for up to one 
year in anticipation of such revenue. 

Revenue Anticipation Note (RAN): A short‐term loan issued to be paid off by revenues, such as 
tax collections and state aid. RANs are full faith and credit obligations. (See Bond Anticipation 
Note) 

Revenue Bond: A bond payable from and secured solely by specific revenues and thereby not a 
full faith and credit obligation. 

Revolving Fund: Allows a community to raise revenues from a specific service and use those 
revenues without appropriation to support the service. For departmental revolving funds, MGL 
Ch. 44 §53E½ stipulates that each fund must be set up by by‐law and that a limit on the total 
amount that may be spent from each fund must be established at that time. Wages or salaries 
for full‐time employees may be paid from the revolving fund only if the fund is also charged for 
all associated fringe benefits. 


Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund: A fund established to account for proceeds of the sale of cemetery 
lots. The proceeds may only be appropriated to pay for the cost of the land, its care, and 
improvement or the enlargement of the cemetery under provisions of MGL Ch. 114 §15. 

178 
 
 

Sale of Real Estate Fund: A fund established to account for the proceeds of the sale of 
municipal real estate other than proceeds acquired through tax title foreclosure. MGL Chapter 
44 s 63 states that such proceeds shall be applied first to the retirement of debt on the 
property sold. In the absence of such debt, funds may generally be used for purposes for which 
the town or city is authorized to borrow for a period of five years or more. 

Security: For Massachusetts municipalities, bonds or notes evidencing a legal debt on the part 
of the issuer. 

Special Assessments: (See Betterments) 

Special Exclusion: For a few limited capital purposes, a community may exceed its levy limit or 
levy ceiling without voter approval. Presently, there are two special expenditure exclusions: 1) 
water and sewer project debt service costs which reduce the water and sewer rates by the 
same amount; and 2) a program to assist homeowners to repair or replace faulty septic 
systems, remove underground fuel storage tanks, or remove dangerous levels of lead paint to 
meet public health and safety code requirements. In the second special exclusion, homeowners 
repay the municipality for the cost plus interest apportioned over a period of time, not to 
exceed 20 years (similar to betterments). 

Stabilization Fund: A fund designed to accumulate amounts for capital and other future 
spending purposes, although it may be appropriated for any lawful purpose (MGL Ch. 40 §5B). 
Communities may establish one or more stabilization funds for different purposes and may 
appropriate into them in any year, and any interest shall be added to and become a part of the 
funds. A two‐thirds vote of town meeting or City Council is required to establish, amend the 
purpose of, or appropriate money to or from the stabilization fund. (See DOR IGR 04‐201) 

Surplus Revenue: The amount by which cash, accounts receivable, and other assets exceed 
liabilities and reserves. 


Tax Rate: The amount of property tax stated in terms of a unit of the municipal tax base; for 
example, $14.80 per $1,000 of assessed valuation of taxable real and personal property. 

179 
 
 

Tax Rate Recapitulation Sheet (Recap Sheet): A document submitted by a city or town to the 
DOR in order to set a property tax rate. The recap sheet shows all estimated revenues and 
actual appropriations that affect the property tax rate. The recap sheet should be submitted to 
the DOR by September 1 (in order to issue the first half semiannual property tax bills before 
October 1) or by December 1 (in order to issue the third quarterly property tax bills before 
January 1). 

Tax Title (or Tax Taking): A collection procedure that secures a city or town's lien on real 
property and protects the municipality's right to payment of overdue property taxes. 
Otherwise, the lien expires if five years elapse from the January 1 assessment date and the 
property has been transferred to another owner. If amounts remain outstanding on the 
property after issuing a demand for overdue property taxes and after publishing a notice of tax 
taking, the collector may take the property for the city or town. After properly recording the 
instrument of taking, the collector transfers responsibility for collecting the overdue amounts 
to the treasurer. After six months, the treasurer may initiate foreclosure proceedings 

Tax Title Foreclosure: The procedure initiated by a city or town treasurer in Land Court or 
through land of low value to obtain legal title to real property already in tax title and on which 
property taxes are overdue. The treasurer must wait at least six months from the date of a tax 
taking to initiate Land Court foreclosure proceedings (MGL Ch. 60 §65). 

Triennial Certification: The Commissioner of Revenue, through the Bureau of Local Assessment, 
is required to review local assessed values every three years and to certify that they represent 
full and fair cash value (FFCV). Refer to MGL Ch. 40 §56 and Ch. 59 §2A(c). 

Trust Fund: In general, a fund for money donated or transferred to a municipality with specific 
instructions on its use. As custodian of trust funds, the treasurer invests and expends such 
funds as stipulated by trust agreements, as directed by the commissioners of trust funds or by 
town meeting. Both principal and interest may be used if the trust is established as an 
expendable trust. For nonexpendable trust funds, only interest (not principal) may be expended 
as directed. 


Uncollected Funds: Recently deposited checks included in an account’s balance but drawn on 
other banks and not yet credited by the Federal Reserve Bank or local clearinghouse to the 
bank cashing the checks. (These funds may not be loaned or used as part of the bank’s reserves 
and they are not available for disbursement.) 

180 
 
 

Underride: A vote by a community to permanently decrease the tax levy limit. As such, it is the 
opposite of an override. (See Override) 

Undesignated Fund Balance: Monies in the various government funds as of June 30 that are 
neither encumbered nor reserved, and are therefore available for expenditure once certified as 
part of free cash. 

Uniform Municipal Accounting System (UMAS): UMAS succeeds the so‐called Statutory System 
(STAT) and is regarded as the professional standard for municipal accounting in Massachusetts. 
As a uniform system for local governments, it conforms to Generally Accepted Accounting 
Principles (GAAP), offers increased consistency in reporting and record‐keeping, as well as 
enhanced comparability of data among cities and towns 

Unreserved Fund Balance (Surplus Revenue Account): The amount by which cash, accounts 
receivable, and other assets exceed liabilities and restricted reserves. It is akin to a 
"stockholders’ equity" account on a corporate balance sheet. It is not, however, available for 
appropriation in full because a portion of the assets listed as "accounts receivable" may be 
taxes receivable and uncollected. (See Free Cash) 


Valuation (100 Percent): The legal requirement that a community’s assessed value on property 
must reflect its market or full and fair cash value.  


Warrant: An authorization for an action. For example, a town meeting warrant establishes the 
matters that may be acted on by that town meeting. A treasury warrant authorizes the 
treasurer to pay specific bills. The assessors’ warrant authorizes the tax collector to collect taxes 
in the amount and from the persons listed, respectively 

   

181 
 
 

APPENDIX B 
FUND DESCRIPTIONS & BALANCES 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
182 
 
 

Fund Descriptions  

The financial operations of the city are organized into funds and account groups, each of which 
is a separate fiscal and accounting entity. All revenues received or expenditures made by the 
city are accounted for through one of the funds or account groups listed below. 

Governmental Funds 

Most city functions are financed through what are called Governmental Funds. These are the 
activities generally supported by “non‐exchange” revenue, such as taxes. There are four types 
of governmental funds maintained by the city: the General Fund, Special Revenue Funds, 
Permanent Funds, and the Capital Project Funds. 

General Fund: The General Fund is the major operating fund of the city government and it 
encompasses a majority of city operations, and it is defined as covering all resources that are 
not required to be accounted for elsewhere. The General Fund is supported by revenues from 
real estate & personal property taxes, state aid, excise taxes, investment income, fines & 
forfeitures, and fees & charges. Most of the city’s departments including the Schools are 
supported in whole or in part by the General Fund. 

Special Revenue Funds: Special Revenue Funds are used to account for revenues that are 
legally restricted to specific purposes, with the exception of major capital projects and 
permanent funds. These revenues must be accounted for separately from the General Fund for 
a variety of reasons, and often span multiple fiscal years. The city’s Special Revenue Funds are 
grouped into five categories: 

Revolving Funds: Revolving Funds allow the city to raise revenues from a specific 
program and use those revenues to support the program without appropriation. 
Revolving Funds are established by statute or by‐law. The city maintains revolving funds 
for a number of purposes including School Department, Parks and Recreation, Animal 
Control, and the School Lunch Program. 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: The funds in this grouping are restricted to a 
specific use by statute and also require an appropriation by the City Council. These 
funds include property insurance claims greater than $100,000, monies from Cemetery 
sale of lots and graves, and Sale of Real Estate. 

School Grants: The School Grant Funds account for specially financed education 
programs using revenue from grants received from the Federal or State government. 

183 
 
 

These include the State Kindergarten Enhancement grant, the State Special Education 
Revolving Fund (Circuit Breaker), and Federal Title I and Title IIA grants. 

Other Intergovernmental Funds: These funds account for revenues received by the city 
from the Federal or State government for specific purposes other than education. These 
include a variety of grants such as the Chapter 90 Highway Program, State Election 
Grants, State Library Aid, and the Elderly Formula Grant. 

Other Special Revenue Funds: These funds account for any other miscellaneous special 
revenues not included in the previous categories. These include private donations for 
specific purposes, such as grants received from private or non‐profit foundations, gifts 
made to specific departments, and payments from developers for infrastructure 
improvements related to proposed projects. This category also includes the Community 
Preservation Fund and the Conservation Fund. 

Permanent Funds: Permanent Funds are used to report resources that are legally restricted to 
the extent that only earnings, and not principal, may be used to support the government and its 
citizens. Many times, such funds are referred to as ‘Trust” funds, and the acceptance of such 
funds generally involves acceptance by City Council for each fund’s individual requirements. 
There are two accounts associated with each permanent fund, the expendable income, and the 
non‐expendable principal. 

Expendable Trust Funds: This heading accounts for the expendable income portion of 
the permanent funds. This heading is also used to account for funds received by the city 
in a trustee capacity where both the principal and earnings of the fund may be 
expended on a restricted basis for the benefit of the city or its Citizens. This includes the 
Scholarship Tax Check‐off Fund and the Elderly/Disabled Fund. 

Non‐expendable Trusts: are used to account for trusts where the principal must remain 
intact. Generally income earned on the non‐expendable trust principal may be 
expended in accordance with the conditions of a trust instrument or statute, and is 
accounted for in the previous category. An example is the Cemetery Department’s 
Perpetual Care Trust. 

Capital Project Funds: The Capital Project Funds are used to account for monies used for the 
acquisition or construction of major capital facilities (buildings, roads, etc.) other than those 
financed by other dedicated funds, such as the Community Preservation Act Fund or Chapter 90 
Highway Funds. In addition to “projects,” the city’s Capital Stabilization Funds also account for 

184 
 
 

capital outlay for items purchased pursuant to the city’s capital plan, such as Departmental 
Equipment. The primary source of funding for these funds is proceeds from the city’s issuance 
of bonds, but may also be derived from private sources, grants, or transfers from other city 
funds. 

Proprietary (Enterprise) Funds 

Proprietary Funds cover the city’s “business‐type” activities and are referred to as such in the 
financial statements. These statements comprise the Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds of the 
city. All direct and indirect costs including the overhead of each service are intended to be 
captured by user fees and/or general fund subsidies. These funds account for their own fixed 
assets and long‐term liabilities. Although the long‐term debt of the funds is ultimately the legal 
obligation of the general fund, it is budgeted and paid for by the Enterprise Fund for which the 
project was approved. City Council has approved the use of the Enterprise Fund accounting for 
the Water, Sewer, and Solid Waste utilities. However, for the purposes of the financial 
statements only the Water and Sewer Funds are considered “business‐type” activities. 

Fiduciary Funds 

Fiduciary funds are used to account for resources held for the benefit of parties outside of the 
government. The city is the trustee, or fiduciary, and the government and its citizenry do not 
benefit directly from such funds. This means that the city is responsible for assets in a purely 
custodial manner that can be used only for the trust beneficiaries and Agency Funds. Under this 
heading the city maintains only Agency Funds, such funds for “special detail” for overtime labor 
billed to outside parties, collection of Deputy Fees payable to the Deputy Collector, firearms 
licenses payable to the Commonwealth, and fees derived from and expenses related to the use 
of school facilities by outside parties. 

Account Groups  

The last category of fund account entities maintained by the city is the Account Groups. For 
which there are two, the General Long‐term Debt Account Group and the General Fixed Assets 
Account Group.  

The first of these groups is the General Long‐term Debt Account Group which accounts for the 
balances due on long‐term debt that the city has approved. The liabilities accounted for in this 
fund extend to future years, versus those that affect the current year alone shown in other 

185 
 
 

funds. When borrowing is approved the liability is increased in this fund, and when debt is paid 
down or rescinded the liability is reduced.  

The second of these groups is the General Fixed Asset Account Group. As infrastructure is 
developed, construction completed, and capital outlays are made, the city’s inventory of Fixed 
Assets is increased. The value of these assets is then depreciated on a fixed schedule annually. 

Basis of Accounting 

By necessity, the city produces financial reports that have different bases of accounting. Since 
the goal of financial reporting is to provide useful information to its users, the measurement 
focuses of reporting must change with respect to the needs of the audience. The day to day 
method of accounting used by the city is UMAS, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ 
Universal Municipal Accounting System. This accounting system is prescribed by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Revenue and is intended to demonstrate 
compliance with state statutes and local near‐term decisions (e.g. budget). This system 
prescribes the use of the modified accrual basis of accounting, which is the basis used by all 
governmental fund types. Under the modified accrual basis, revenues are recognized when 
susceptible to accrual (i.e. when they become both measurable and available). “Measurable” 
means the amount of the transaction can be determined and “available” means collectible 
within the current period or soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current 
period. The city considers that property taxes are available if they are collected within 60 days 
after year‐end. Expenditures are recorded when the liability is incurred. Principal and interest 
on general long‐term debt are recorded as liabilities in the fiscal years that the payments are 
due. The full accrual basis of accounting is used for the city’s financial statements, which are 
produced based on generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). The statements report 
information about the city with a broad overview. The statements use accounting methods 
most similar to those used by a private‐sector business and are typically used to demonstrate 
the long‐term financial position of the city. The users of this information are often bond rating 
agencies and others seeking information consistent with entities in other states. The 
Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) issues guidance for how GAAP based financial 
statements should be prepared for government entities. The accrual basis of accounting is 
utilized by the proprietary and agency funds. Under this method, revenues are recorded when 
earned and expenses are recorded at the time liabilities are incurred 

186 
 
 

Budgeting 

An annual budget is adopted for the city’s General, Community Preservation Act, and Enterprise 
Funds. Although legislative approval is required for capital projects, borrowing authorizations, 
annual budgets are not prepared for any other fund. 

 The city’s annual budget is adopted on a statutory basis, specific to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and it differs in some respects from GAAP. The major differences between the 
budget and GAAP basis are that:  

1. Budgeted revenues are recorded when cash is received, except for real estate and 
personal property taxes, which are recorded as revenue when levied (budget), as 
opposed to when susceptible to accrual (GAAP).  

2. For the budget, encumbrances are treated as expenditures in the year the 
commitment is made. Also, certain appropriations, known as special articles, do not 
lapse and are treated as budgetary expenditures in the year they are authorized as 
opposed to when the liability is actually incurred (GAAP). 

 3. The depreciation of Fixed Assets is not recognized as a current expense on a 
budgetary basis, except to the extent that actual maintenance costs are included in 
departmental budgets.  

Following are three tables which are excerpted from the city’s financial statements prepared on 
a GAAP basis. These tables display the results of operations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
2017. There’s one table for Governmental Funds and one for Proprietary Funds. Since Fiduciary 
funds do not involve the measurement of operations, there is no corresponding table for that 
grouping.  

Under GASB Statement 34, and further by Statement 54, “Major Funds” are defined as 
individual funds that have a reached a significant threshold with respect to total fund balance, 
and have dedicated revenue sources. “Major Funds” must be shown separately from the 
general fund. The remaining individual funds are aggregated in the “Non‐major” category for 
the purposes of the financial statements. The third and final table displayed is the statement for 
the “Non‐major” Governmental Funds. 

187 
 
 

188 
 
 

189 
 
 

190 
 
 

191 
 
 

 
 
APPENDIX C 
Enterprise Indirect Charges  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

192 
 
Page 1 of 4

Enterprise Cost Assessment:


The FY2019 budget allocated the DPW Administrative budget cost based on the relative percentage relationship between the seven
primary public works operation centers. This process assures accurate assessment of these costs and assumes the budgets of these
major departments reflect the relative level of work required from the support staff involved in their direct administration. Once this
relationship is calculated, the relative percentage attributable to enterprises is equally divided between both the water and sewer receipts.
In FY 19 the ratio of fund appropriated to the primary operating areas, including engineering, highway, snow, motor repair and three
 enterprises is 67%.
Also reflected in this section of the budget is the percentage of costs in Highway and Motor Repair that are expended to support the
enterprises, as calculated by the Director of the Department of Public Works and his staff.

For the FY 2019 budget these percentages remain, as follows:

Highway: 15% Water 8% Sewer


Motor Repair: 13% Water 13% Sewer

In addition, engineering support is provided to the enterprise operations on an ongoing basis. This percentage remains at 30% of the
budget and includes associated departmental expenses in the calculation. Finally, the motor fuel account is calculated based on actual
FY 17 consumption and the average cost per gallon as of January 2018.

Public WorkWater & Sewer Appropriation FY19


Water Enterprise
4010 DPW Administration Percentage 67% 171,938.00 0.50 57,599.23
4100 DPW Motor Fuel Actual use 1.00 6,508.57
4110 DPW Engineering Percentage 30% 143,892.00 1.00 43,167.60
4210 DPW Highway Percentage 15% 632,382.00 1.00 94,857.30
4250 DPW Motor Repair Percentage 13% 109,458.00 1.00 14,229.54
Total Water 216,362.24

Sewer Enterprise
4010 DPW Administration Percentage 67% 171,938.00 0.50 57,599.23
4100 DPW Motor Fuel Actual use 1.00 13,703.07
4110 DPW Engineering Percentage 30% 143,892.00 1.00 43,167.60
4210 DPW Highway Percentage 8% 632,382.00 1.00 50,590.56
4250 DPW Motor Repair Percentage 13% 109,458.00 1.00 14,229.54
Total Sewer/WWTP 179,290.00

Total Enterprise Charges for Public Works 395,652.23


Page 2 of 4

Enterprise Cost Assessment:


The employee benefit charges associated with enterprises are the actual costs for employees who work in, or have retired from the water,
sewer and waste water departments. These amounts are calculated to accurately reflect the true expenses resulting from employment
in these departments. The workers comp and liability insurances are estimated on the prior year premium plus the expected increase
in the cost of insurance for 2019.

Water & Sewer 2019


Water Enterprise
9111 Retirement Assessment actual 100% 102,160.00
9120 Workers Comp estimated 100% 8,933.12
9121 Medicare Contribution actual 1.45% 5,448.77
9140 32B Insurance actual 100% 120,375.98
9450 Liability Insurance estimated 100% 27,340.19
        264,258.06

Sewer Enterprise (includes WWTP)


9111 Retirement Assessment actual 100% 174,029.00
9120 Workers Comp estimated 100% 27,142.40
9121 Medicare Contribution actual 1.45% 10,974.27
9140 32B Insurance actual 100% 216,924.12
9450 Liability Insurance estimated 100% 5,974.85
        435,044.64

Total Water/Sewer Enterprise 699,302.69


Page 3 of 4

Indirect Enterprise Cost Assessment

Ratio 1 is based on the Enterprise Revenue/Expenditure budget compared to the total revenue/expenditure budget (10%)
Water Salaries are 33% of Enterprise Salaries, and Sewer/WWTP Salaries are 67% of Enterprise Salaries.
Ratio 2 is based on the Enterprise % of total bills from tax collections, water and sewer. ( 34%)
This is then applied to the salaries in collections and postage expense.
The cost of billing software and forms are actual cost and the form cost is deducted from Computer Dept.
Building Maintenance is 1/4 of four buildings, 33% for one of three floors, divided by 20 (approx.) rooms times 69%.
(Enterprise % of D.P.W.)

Water/Sewer Enterprise FY 19
Water Enterprise
1210 Mayor Ratio 1 10% 128,200.00 50% 6,410.00
1350 City Auditor Ratio 1 10% 134,015.00 50% 6,700.75
1410 Assessor Ratio 1 10% 97,721.00 50% 4,886.05
1450 Payroll/Treas Exp Ratio 1 10% 257,131.72 50% 12,856.59
1450 Collections Ratio 2 34% 103,949.60 50% 17,671.43
1450 Billing Software/forms Actual 7,095.00 50% 3,547.50
1451 Computer Ratio 1 10% 207,148.00 50% 10,357.40
1510 City Attorney Ratio 1 10% 50,000.00 50% 2,500.00
1520 Personnel (Salary %) Ratio 1 10% 152,935.00 33% 5,046.86
1920 Building Maintenance pro-rated 283,714.00 50% 407.06
-
Total Water Enterprise 70,383.64

Sewer Enterprise
1210 Mayor Ratio 1 10% 128,200.00 50% 6,410.00
1350 City Auditor Ratio 1 10% 134,015.00 50% 6,700.75
1410 Assessor Ratio 1 10% 97,721.00 50% 4,886.05
1450 Payroll/Treas Exp Ratio 1 10% 257,131.72 50% 12,856.59
1450 Collections Ratio 2 34% 83,949.60 50% 14,271.43
1450 Billing Software/Forms Actual 7,095.00 50% 3,547.50
1451 Computer Ratio 1 10% 207,148.00 50% 10,357.40
1510 City Attorney Ratio 1 10% 50,000.00 50% 2,500.00
1520 Personnel (Salary %) Ratio 1 10% 152,935.00 67% 10,246.65
1920 Building Maintenance pro-rated 283,714.00 50% 407.06
-
72,183.43

Total Water/Sewer Enterprise 142,567.06


Page 4 of 4

Debt - Water, Sewer, Retained Earnings

Water/Sewer Enterprise
Water Enterprise FY 19
Principal 7100 100% 110,210.00
Interest 7500 100% 6,983.63
Total Water 117,193.63

Sewer/WWTP Enterprise
Principal 7100 100% 321,345.22
Interest 7500 100% 78,510.83
Total Sewer 399,856.05

Retained Earnings
Principal 7100 -
Interest 7500 -
Total Retained Earnings -

Total Enterprise Debt 517,049.68

Total Enterprise Indirect Cost 1,754,571.67


 

APPENDIX D 
Net School Spending  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

   

194 
 
Page 1 of 2

Municipal Education Spending for FY 2019:
Net School Spending

Admin allocation: Expenditures Sub totals


Auditor salary & exp             134,015.00
Computer (one salary, KVS software, backups, maint.)                44,392.65
HR Employee Administration                76,467.50
Treasurer (less tax title, payroll, collections )             117,456.32
Total indirect allocations             372,331.47
percent allocation (percent of tax levy FY 2017)                          0.38
Admin allocation             141,485.96            141,485.96

Other: 
Personnel (Insurance Amin.)                32,651.62
Payroll processing at 57%)                44,649.66
School resource officer (at 83%) (based on FY18 rates)                54,821.10
Park Field Use Agreement                  8,859.70
Building Op. Expense 1/4 @ 30% (50 Payson 3rd floor)                19,977.15
4100 Fuel (per budget formula) 3,388.15
4230 Snow 29,632.40
4230 Sanding 16,200.00
4400 sewer 26,247.48
4500 water 16,147.20
            252,574.46            252,574.46
Actual:
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS:
9111 ‐ CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT (per PERAC) 721,063.00
9120 ‐ WORKERS COMPENSATION (ACTUAL BUDGET ) 82,687.50
9121 ‐ MEDICARE TAX (ACTUAL BUDGET) 170,000.00
9140 ‐ CHAPTER 32B INSURANCE (ACTUAL BUDGET) 2,262,609.60
9450 ‐ LIABILITY INSURANCE (ACTUAL BUDGET) 88,206.84
9511 ‐ UNEMPLOYMENT COMP. (ACTUAL  BUDGET at 64%  ) 32,000.00
         3,356,566.94        3,356,566.94

School Choice/Charter School Payments/SPED          2,375,657.00


Less: School Revenue (Charter reimb.)            (192,499.00)
         2,183,158.00        2,183,158.00

Total Net municpal spending for FY 2019        5,933,785.36

School Net School Spending as proposed in the 2019 budget $ 16,264,165.00

Total Net Education Spending FY 2019 $ 22,197,950.36
Page 2 of 2

Municipal Education Spending for FY 2019:
Net School Spending
Non‐Net Spending

Expenditures Sub totals


1450 Ret. Emp. Benefit Admin.                 20,875.63
School Crossing Guards                39,600.00
6500 Park Facilities Use (rental & bathroom fees)                  4,150.00
7570 ‐ HS Debt Principal Payment             700,000.00
7570 ‐ Excluded HS State House Note Principal             200,000.00
7580 ‐ HS Debt Interest Payment             365,750.00
7580 ‐Excluded HS State House Note Interest                11,700.00
7560 ‐ New School BAN Principal Payment             150,000.00
7520 ‐ New School BAN Interest Payment                  6,500.00
Ch 32B Retiree Insurance             690,619.25
Tota City Non‐Net  Education Spending FY 2019          2,189,194.88 $     2,189,194.88

Proposed school non‐net spending appropriation in $ 968,633.00
2019 budget

Total Non‐Net Education Spending  ‐ FY 2019 $     3,157,827.88

TOTAL ESTIMATED EDUCATION SPENDING FOR FY 2019 $   25,355,778.24

Note: Total education spending for FY 2018 was projected to be $24,712,989.86
This budget represents an increase of: 2.60%

FY 2019 ‐ Total Indirect Municipal Appropriation ‐ 
  in support of the public school system operation $     8,122,980.24

FY 2019 ‐ Net Spending Excess ‐ dollars in excess of minimum required net spending 
  under education reform  Required $20,018,106 $     2,179,844.36

FY 2019 ‐ Change in Net Spending ‐ compared to prior year estimated net spending,
includes municipal spending (FY18 $21,586,352.30) $         611,598.06

FY 2019 Net Per Pupil Spending ‐ (based on a locally estimated population  $           14,565.58


  of 1524 students in school budget ‐ K‐12)

FY 2019 Net Per Pupil Spending ‐ based on D.O.E. foundation
  entrollment of 1636 students $           13,568.43
(DOE estimated Foundation Enrollment includes pre‐K thru 12, vocational
school placements and out of district SPED enrollment)

FY19 DOE Foundation Budget per pupil = $10,922.00
 

APPENDIX E 
School Budget Detail 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

   

196 
 
 

APPENDIX F  
Community Preservation Act  
Priority Project List  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

198 
 
 

EASTHAMPTON CPA – PRIORITY PROJECT LISTS 

The following lists, submitted by public and private organizations with an interest in community preservation 
in Easthampton, illustrate the types of projects that might come to the CPA for funding in the near future. 
These lists do not necessarily represent the CPC’s goals or priorities; the Committee is not obligated to fund 
any of the projects listed below and may fund other projects. Each list is ordered from highest to lowest 
priority by their respective organization. The dates in parenthesis indicate the most recent year that that 
organization submitted an update to their list. Approximate project costs are included if they were provided 
by that organization.  

AFFORDABLE & FAIR HOUSING PARTNERSHIP (2016) 

Janna Tetreault, jannatetreault@hotmail.com  

 Continue housing rehabilitation program for low‐ and moderate‐income homeowners 

 Use CPA funds to make capital improvements at the Town Lodging House  

 Use CPA funds to acquire land from property owners who are willing to give land to the 
city for creation of affordable housing 

 Use CPA funds to hire a consultant or develop a guide to establish procedures and best 
practices that would enable property owners to do small affordable housing projects on 
small infill lots or within existing homes or buildings 

 Continue to use CPA to provide down payment assistance to first‐time homebuyers (up to 
100% AMI) 

 Explore opportunities to use CPA funds to supplement existing rental support programs 
that offer help to people with first, last and security deposits 

AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION (2017) 

Russell Braen, russell@parkhillorchard.com 

 Acquisition or protection of agricultural land on Park Hill that connects or adds to contiguous 
protected land as opportunities arise; for example, the small farm between Echodale and the 
Laurin's farm 

 Expand the network of farmland throughout the city as other opportunities arise 

199 
 
 

COMMUNITY GARDEN COMMITTEE (2017) 

Grace Mrowicki, grace.mrowicki@gmail.com 

 Site prep/work at install location for a small donated greenhouse 

 Installation of bathroom facility (single composting toilet) 

 Creation of new community garden within the downtown area 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION (2017) 

Melissa Coady, conservation@easthampton.org 

 Baseline documentation and reports for all city‐owned open space properties 

 Create citywide recreation guide/brochure with property information and trail maps 

 Increase access through signage at all conservation land 

 Future recreational & educational programming at Echodale Orchard 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION (2017) 

Mike Czerwiec, historical@easthampton.org  
John Bruner, jbruner@hampshire.edu  

 Update listings of structures around the city that are over 50 years old 

 Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey of historic sites: 

 Original settlement area at Clapp St and Fort Hill Rd ~$15,000 (2015 estimate) 

 Native American settlement at the Oxbow 

 Native American fort on Mt. Tom 

 Cemetery inventories and preservation, especially at the East Street Cemetery 

 Old waterworks building on Hendrick Street: historic architectural study and re‐use plan 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (2016) 

Deb Walker, deborah@etonhousing.com 

 Replace four sets of stairs at Dickinson Court ~$4,000 (2014 estimate) 

 ADA improvements to Cliffview Laundry Room ~$70,000 (2016 estimate) 

200 
 
 

KESTREL LAND TRUST (2017) 

Mark Wamsley, www.kestreltrust.org 

 CR on undeveloped land on Reservation Rd 

MANHAN RAIL TRAIL COMMITTEE (2017) 

Barbara LaBombard, cityclerk@easthampton.org 
Scott Cavanaugh, manhanrailtrail.org 

 Increase and improve connections from the rail trail to popular destinations such as parks and 
schools 

 Create new trails and spurs to the Plains and New city neighborhoods 

PARKS AND RECREATION (2017) 

John Mason, parksandrec@easthampton.org 
Note: all cost estimates in this list are from 2017 

 Nonotuck Park Playground phase 2 ($30,000) 

 Parking and walkways (add $25,000) 

 Fencing (add $5,000) 

 Stone Building Bath House Renovation ($300,000) 

 Removal and replacement of old plumbing and fixtures ($150,000) 

 Preservation and restoration of exterior historical stonework ($100,000) 

 Interior finish work ($50,000) 

 Nonotuck Pool Reconstruction ($1,000,000) 

 Replace pool deck, pumps, pipes, & plumbing 

 Refurbish pool bathhouse 

 Install rubber membrane on the bottom of the pool to seal cracks 

 Plain & Strong Streets Playground: multiuse basketball/pickle ball courts ($100,000) 

 Install asphalt playing surface ($80,000) 

 Paint lines basketball & pickleball ($8,000) 

201 
 
 

 2 basketball hoops & 2 benches ($12,000) 

 Parson & Federal Streets Park: new playground structure ($70,000) 

 Large playground structure ($50,000) 

 Small playground pieces ($15,000) 

 Safety surfacing ($5,000) 

 Nonotuck Park Athletic Fields: bleachers & benches ($36,000) 

 8 bleachers & benches ($3,000 each) 

 Concrete and installation ($12,000) 

PASCOMMUCK CONSERVATION TRUST (2017) 

John Bator, president, www.pctland.org  

 Trail improvements and signage at the Old Trolley Line Conservation Area ~$15,000 

 Permanent protection of city‐owned parcel bordering Holyoke St and Hendrick St 

 Preservation/protection of meadow and forest land along the Manhan River  

 Protection/preservation of land along East Street (the foothills of Mt. Tom)  

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT (2017) 

Nancy Follansbee, nfollansbee@epsd.us  

 Easthampton High School: Construct an outdoor ropes course 

OTHER CITY DEPARTMENTS & CITY ADMINISTRATION (2017) 

Mayor Karen Cadieux, mayor@easthampton.org 
Jessica Allan, allanj@easthampton.org 

 Protection / acquisition of open space land & water supply in priority areas as opportunities 
arise  

 Historic Town Hall: elevator & 2nd floor renovation ~$4.5M (many funding sources) 

 Continued preservation of City Clerk Vital Records ‐ birth, marriage, and death certificates 
~$12,000 (2016 estimate) 

 Signage at all CPA funded projects and properties 

202 
 
 

 Create new pocket parks in neighborhoods that lack access to green open space 

 White Brook siltation weir & sedimentation basin for water entering Nash Pond 

 Town Lodging House renovation 

 EMILY WILLISTON LIBRARY (2016) 

 Nora Blake, ewmlibrary.org 
 Janice Doppler, (library board member)  

 Exterior renovation of historic building: repointing bricks, repair / replacement windows, A/C, 
and possibly more 

 LATHROP COMMUNITIES, LAND CONSERVATION COMMITTEE (2017) 

 Barbara Walvoord, lathropland.wordpress.com 

 Invasive plant removal along Bassett Brook and throughout the open space on the Lathrop 
property ~$60,000 ‐ 80,000 (2016 estimate)  

203