You are on page 1of 3

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

NSG3TCN Copyright Regulations 1969
WARNING
This material has been reproduced and communicated to you by 
or on behalf of 
La Trobe University pursuant to Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968 
(The Act).
The material in this communication may be subject to copyright 
HFNP & NIPPV under the Act. Any further reproduction or communication of this 
material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under 
High Flow Nasal Prongs & the Act.
Non‐Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation.

OVERVIEW Revision of O2 Delivery 
There are two means by which oxygen may transported within the 
circulation:
Revision O2 Delivery
High Flow Nasal Prongs (HFNP) 97% bound to Haemoglobin (measured by pulse oximetry as Sa02)
Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV) 3% dissolved in Plasma  (measured via ABG’s as PaO2)

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)
Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) Having assessed your patient’s 02 status via either of these means you 
may find they require supplemental O2 to maintain satisfactory 
levels:
PaO2 80 – 100 mmHg
Sa02 > 90%

3 4

A Brief Revision High Flow O2 Delivery
Simple variable methods of oxygen delivery may include: Becoming more common are hi‐flow nasal cannula/prong 
(HFNP) systems:
Delivery System Flow (L/Min) % O2 Delivered
Requires oxygen and air source to generate a blend of air 
Nasal Prongs 2 – 5 al
L/Min 24 – 40% & O2 but can deliver up to 100% O2 
Through the use of wide bore tubing can deliver up to 60 
Simple (Hudson) mask 5 - 10 L/min 35 – 50%
L/min (needs specialised wall spigot)
Rebreather mask 6 – 10 L/min 40 – 70% Flow delivered via a humidifier
Usually an active heated humidifier capable of providing 
Non-rebreather mask 10 (minimum) – 15 60 – 100%
L/min 100% body humidity
Use of high flows with HFNP can produce low levels of 
PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure), reducing WOB.

5 6

1
High Flow O2 Delivery High Flow O2 Delivery
Any adult patient in respiratory compromise who is not 
responding to simple oxygen therapy
When O2 >40% & flows >15L/min may be required to 
keep saturations above >94%
• Exacerbation COPD
• Pneumonia
• Pulmonary oedema
• Asthma
• Acute lung injury Including

7 8

CPAP CPAP
At some point in the care of the patient with respiratory  During normal unassisted respiration the lungs generate a negative 
compromise, it may become necessary to provide more support  pressure to draw air into the lungs.
than is possible via the use of simple methods 
By creating and maintaining a positive pressure in the upper 
In these cases Non‐Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation may  airways and lungs are splinted open, air is forced in, thus reducing 
become necessary the effort of breathing for the patient (WoB), dependent on the 
amount of flow.
NIPPV is generally delivered via a tight fitting face or nasal mask.
This positive pressure also facilitates alveolar recruitment, and so 
NIPPV is an increasingly common sub‐acute therapy for use in  FRC, and adds to PEEP (Positive End Expiratory Pressure) because it 
Obstructive Sleep Apnoea increases the volume of air left in the lungs at the end of 
expiration, improves alveolar gas exchange, and improves 
NIPPV can be delivered either as Continuous Positive Airway  oxygenation without the need to increase oxygen delivered.
pressure (CPAP) or as Bilevel Positive Airway pressure (BiPAP)

9 10

CPAP CPAP
NIV CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) involves the  Indications for the use of CPAP may include:
application of continuous positive pressure via a face or nasal  • Acute exacerbation of Asthma/COPD
mask.
• Severe LVF
The mask is connected via wide‐bore flexible tubing to a flow 
• Severe Acute Pulmonary Oedema
generator, which may then be connected directly to the wall 
medical gas outlets. Contraindications include:

The mask is then tightly fitted to the patient’s face.  Air leaks can  • Hypovolaemia/low circulating volume
compromise the efficacy of the treatment. • Facial fractures
CPAP can deliver oxygen levels up to 100% and at flows of up to 100  • Nausea & vomiting
– 150 l/min (dependent on the machine used).
• Recent upper airway or GIT surgery
In acute care CPAP makes use of HME filters to humidify the oxygen 
delivered.

11 12

2
CPAP BiPAP
So…CPAP takes care of the work of inspiration, but 
what about expiration??? 

Breathing out against the positive pressure and high 
levels of flow can be uncomfortable, but is 
facilitated by the use of an expiratory valve in the 
circuit.

Another means of easing this is to provide two 
levels of positive pressure, ie: BiPAP (Bi‐level 
positive airway pressure)

13 14

BiPAP CPAP/BiPAP
BiPAP offers high levels of positive pressure during inspiration 
and lower levels during expiration. (IPAP & EPAP) CPAP BiPAP

Non-invasive Non-invasive

The pt is able to exhale more comfortably against less resistance Full face or nasal mask Full face or nasal mask

Variable O2/Air & flow Variable O2/Air & flow

Equal pressure in insp & exp Pressure variable in insp & exp
As with CPAP, these pressure levels can be set by the clinician to 
suit the patient and their presenting complaint.  Appears more effective in APO Appears more effective in CAL

BiPAP is becoming more popular in the clinical setting as it is  Both CPAP and BiPAP may be delivered as an invasive ventilation mode using a
generally more adaptable to suit the situation and more  mechanical ventilator with a spontaneously breathing patient.
comfortable for the patient. 

15 16

CPAP/BiPAP References
Patients using CPAP must always be carefully monitored  Aitken, L., Marshall, A. & Chaboyer, W.  (2015) ACCCN’s Critical Care Nursing (3rd ed).  Mosby 
Elsevier, Sydney. 
Patients should be kept in direct visual contact
Australian Rescucitation Council (2014) Guideline 11.6.1: Targeted oxygen therapy in adult 
Complications of use may include: advanced life support.  Available at: http://resus.org.au/guidelines/
Reduced cardiac output. McCance, K., Huether, S.,Brashers, V. & Rote, N. (2010)  Pathophysiology: the biological basis for 
disease in adults & children (6th ed).  Missouri: Mosby.
Feeling of ‘suffocation’
Meier, P., Ebrahim, S., Otto, C. & Casas, J. (2013) Oxygen therapy in acute myocardial infarction –
Discomfort/Patient intolerance of very tight mask. good or bad? [editorial]. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013;(8): 
http://www.cochranelibrary.com/editorial/10.1002/14651858.ED000065
Gastric distension.
Respiratory Care Series ‐ Part 3 (2009)  Available at: 
Lung barotrauma. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6UxCB7FKGcA
Dry oral and nasal mucosa. Royal North Shore Hospital (2013) High Flow Nasal Cannula.  Available at: 
http://www.ecinsw.com.au/sites/default/files/field/file/NSLHD%20Nasal%20Prong.pdf
Inability to communicate
Urden, L., Stacy, K. M., & Lough, M. E. (2014). Thelan’s critical care nursing (7th ed). St Louis: 
Pressure areas (bridge of nose, etc) Elsevier Mosby.

17 18