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Issue #721 ​Crisci Associates​, Harrisburg, PA April 23, 2018

PA Environment Digest Blog​ ​Twitter Feed​ ​PaEnviroDigest Google+

23 Companies, Groups, Individuals Honored With Governor's Award For Environmental
Excellence

Gov. Tom Wolf Wednesday announced the 23
companies, groups and individuals honored with
the 2108 ​Governor’s Award for Environmental
Excellence​.
Repurposing tons of scrap auto carpet. Making
streams healthier by planting native trees on the
family farm. Greatly reducing city lighting
expenses with energy efficiency changes. Training a volunteer stormwater pollution reduction
workforce.
These are just some of the 23 innovative and impassioned initiatives in Pennsylvania
chosen by the Department of Environmental Protection o receive the prestigious 2018
Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence.
“Just as important as Pennsylvania’s abundant natural resources are the Pennsylvanians
who invest their time, labor, and ingenuity to protect them,” said Gov. Tom Wolf. “Their
dedication results in public health and safety, environmental, economic, and recreation benefits
across the Commonwealth.”
"DEP received more than 60 applications, which we evaluated for their degree of
environmental protection, innovation, partnership efforts, economic impact, consideration of
climate change and sustainability, and results achieved,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell.
“It’s an honor to recognize the tremendous impact many Pennsylvanians have in protecting our
air, land, and water.”
The award winners will be honored at an ​April 24 Awards Dinner hosted by the PA
Environmental Council​ at the Harrisburg Hilton.
The award-winning projects accomplished the following results:
-- Volunteers:​ Enlisted 16,000 volunteers;
-- Greenhouse Gases:​ Prevented 258 million tons of greenhouse gases from entering the
atmosphere;
-- Cost Savings:​ Saved over $42 million in operation and maintenance costs;
-- Water Savings:​ Conserved 37 million gallons of water annually;
-- Waste Diverted: ​Diverted 29 million tons of waste and 57 million bottles from landfill
disposal;
-- Stream Buffers:​ Created 98,500 acres of riparian buffers;
-- Trees Planted:​ Planted 35,090 native trees and shrubs, and
-- Solar Energy:​ Installed 350 rooftop solar tubes.
The 2018 Environmental Excellence Award recipients include:
-- Statewide
-- ​Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation​: Graffiti: No Place in Nature​: Using drones
and geographic information mapping systems, the foundation linked volunteers with
opportunities to clean up graffiti at trail heads, boat launches, rock outcroppings, and vistas.
More than 170 volunteers scrubbed clean 37 graffiti sites and picked up 80 bags of trash, seven
boxes of glass and nails, and other debris items in this labor- and time-intensive process.
-- Allegheny County
-- Western Pennsylvania Conservancy: ​TreeVitalize Pittsburgh​: By increasing street tree
population, TreeVitalize Pittsburgh will increase environmental, economic, health, and aesthetic
benefits. With the assistance of over 12,000 volunteers, this project has planted over 28,000 trees
in Pittsburgh and Allegheny County, resulting in a 10 percent increase in city street trees and a
45 percent increase in street tree diversity.
-- Allegheny, Armstrong, Butler, Fayette, Greene, Indiana, Lawrence, Washington, and
Westmoreland Counties
-- ​Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission​, Water Resource Center: Municipal
Stormwater Workshop Series:​ The center developed a collaborative regional initiative to
address municipal separate storm sewer management across counties. More than 780 participants
attended 15 workshops at no cost, learning stormwater management methods. Participants
included local governments, elected officials, county planning departments, conservation
districts, engineering firms, and environmental nonprofits.
-- Allegheny, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe,
Montgomery, Northampton, Wyoming, and York Counties
-- Penn State Extension: ​Master Watershed Steward Program​:​ The program trains citizen
volunteers into an educated, organized workforce to partner with local and state governments and
organizations on water conservation projects. Last year, 194 master watershed stewards
volunteered 7,582 hours of service, including educating the public at community events,
monitoring 15 streams, planting 915 trees, and building 118 rain barrels.
-- Berks County
-- ​Berks County Water and Sewer Association​ -- Berks County Source Water Protection
Program:​ Incorporating new and existing protection zones to maintain safe drinking water in
Berks County, this program identifies possible sources of contamination for both surface water
and groundwater. The program combines education and water quality improvements to the
Chesapeake Bay and Schuylkill River watersheds and covers 266,000 people in Berks County.
-- Blair County
-- ​American Eagle Paper Mills​: Project Phoenix:​ American Eagle Paper Mills transforms 300
tons of waste paper into recycled paper every day. Recent retrofits reduced freshwater
withdrawal by 83 percent, reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 68 percent, and ceased
transportation of 10,000 tons of coal ash.
-- Butler County
-- Slippery Rock University: ​Healthy Planet, Healthy People Environmental Summer
Camp and Community Project Incubator​:​ To help high school teachers and students create
environmental stewardship projects, Slippery Rock University hosted a camp for educators that
included classroom instruction, leadership training, and immersive field experience. In
partnership with the EPA, the camp provided $1,700 in seed money for participating school
districts to kickstart their community projects. Thirteen projects completed in eight counties have
the potential to raise environmental awareness among 2 million Pennsylvanians.
-- Columbia County
-- Autoneum Bloomsburg: Carpet Trim and Waste Recycling:​ ​Autoneum Bloomsburg
repurposes automotive carpet and trim products, keeping 12,000 tons of virgin material from the
landfill and saving 25 Olympic-sized pools’ worth of water annually. Recycling has made
operations more cost-effective and price competitive, enabling the company to obtain more
customers.
-- Delaware County
-- AeroAggregates: Bottle to Building:​ ​AeroAggregates​ uses 13,000–26,000 tons of 100
percent postconsumer recycled glass annually to produce lightweight construction materials for
road and building projects. Not only do they repurpose the equivalent of about 55 million glass
bottles per year, but construction vehicle traffic decreases from five trucks to one because weight
is reduced.
-- Lancaster County
-- ​Pequea Creek Watershed Association​: Big Beaver–Esh Farm Stream Restoration:​ To
eliminate erosion from Big Beaver Creek and reconnect the creek to the natural floodplain, the
association regraded high streambanks, installed stream flow structures, planted streambank
stabilizing vegetation, and constructed livestock fencing. The improvements prevented the loss
of valuable land and reduced sediment levels by 121,000 pounds, nitrogen levels by 202 pounds,
and phosphorous levels by 183 pounds annually.
-- Lackawanna County
-- ​City of Scranton​: LED Street Lighting Conversion:​ Through investing in infrastructure
improvement projects, converting to LED lights, and installing lighting controls, the City of
Scranton has decreased its energy consumption and maintenance, improved visibility, increased
safety, and reduced hazardous waste output. The city will save nearly $400,000 annually.
-- Lehigh County
-- ​Wildlands Conservancy​: Building Partnerships and Restoring Riparian Buffers in the
Lehigh Valley:​ The conservancy led a significant effort to restore riparian buffers along streams
in the Lehigh Valley. Managing invasive species, planting native plants, installing deer
protection, and monitoring the buffers were key to success. This project will improve water
quality by shading the stream, prevent erosion and sediment loading, filter nutrients and
pollutants from runoff, and provide vegetation and habitat to support aquatic life.
-- Luzerne County
-- ​Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority​: Regional Stormwater Management Plan and MS4
Permit Compliance: ​A collaborative effort by 31 municipalities in Luzerne County resulted in a
municipal separate storm and sewer system (MS4) plan to reduce pollution and address aging
infrastructure in an affordable way. The collaboration allows for a regional Pollutant Reduction
Plan and enables more strategic, cost-effective implementation of stormwater best management
practices. The municipalities will save $200 million over the next 20 years while ensuring the
long-term sustainability of their stormwater systems. ​Click Here​ for another award given to
WVSA for this program.
-- ​Earth Conservancy​: Askam Borehole Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) Treatment System
Wayside Exhibit:​ Earth Conservancy installed two AMD treatment systems to prevent pollution
from flowing into Nanticoke Creek and reduce the contamination of local watersheds. A walking
path with signage teaches students about science and the community, enhances accessibility and
safety of the site, and educates visitors about the region’s mining history and the environment.
-- Northumberland County
-- Dr. Blair T. Carbaugh: ​Dr. Blair T. Carbaugh Conservation Area​:​ Dr. Carbaugh led a
project that reclaimed an abandoned coal mine site and turned it into the Anthracite Outdoor
Adventure Area for ATV use, along with a 100-acre conservation area with 500 American
Chestnut trees, planted by volunteers. Almost 19,000 passes to the park were sold in 2017.
-- Montgomery County
-- Merck & Co.: ​Merck Pennsylvania​ West Point Regional Waste Diversion and Recycling
Initiative:​ Merck standardized its facility services and established various waste reduction
services to improve waste diversion. In one year, the company recycled 1,896 tons of
nonhazardous materials; reused 190 tons of nonhazardous materials; sent 1,417 tons of
non-hazardous waste for energy recovery; and diverted 204 tons of compost from the landfill.
-- ​Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership​: Jenkintown Creek Restoration:
The collaborative partnership aims to improve water quality along the 3.7-mile Jenkintown
Creek. The restoration project resulted in four rain gardens, a 75-foot bioretention feature,
bioswale and wetland enhancements, streambank stabilization, and 3,775 herbaceous plants and
1,260 trees planted. More than 1,000 volunteers and students participated in learning about
stormwater runoff and the benefits of green infrastructure.
-- ​Upper Moreland School District​: Alternative Fuel Propane Infrastructure and Bus Fleet:
The school district converted its school bus fleet to propane and installed fueling infrastructure to
support not only its own use, but also the use of neighboring government organizations. The total
buses will displace 50,000 gallons of diesel and 10,000 gallons of gasoline annually. This fuel
source switch will save taxpayers $256,766 annually and will prevent 596 metric tons of carbon
dioxide from polluting the atmosphere.
-- Monroe County
-- ​Tobyhanna Army Depot: Sustainability​ at Tobyhanna Army Depot:​ Through a focused
environmental review, the depot developed a sustainability plan with innovative solutions to
minimize waste, conserve energy, and reduce water consumption. LED lighting, solar walls,
carports, energy-efficient heating, non-potable water reuse tanks, waste disposal plans, and a
robust recycling program are the key elements to achieving a strong sustainability plan. The
depot expects to save $532,042 in operating costs annually.
-- Philadelphia County
-- School District of Philadelphia: ​GreenFutures Sustainability Program​: ​The GreenFutures
program seeks to reduce energy consumption, increase waste diversion from landfills, increase
school green space, and create healthy environments and living habits for students and
communities district-wide. In one year the district saved over 1 million plastic water bottles by
installing 786 hydration stations, implemented a student-led energy education program,
completed a student summer solar installation program, constructed nine green schoolyards,
provided recycling services, launched a compost program, and conducted indoor environmental
quality assessments.
-- Potter County
-- ​Potter County Conservation District​: Water Quality Protection and Education Initiative
at Ludington Run and Beyond: ​The conservation district developed a comprehensive plan to
improve water quality and habitat restoration to Ludington Run. Stream bedding materials are
enhancing successful fish spawning, runoff carrying sediment and pollutants is discharging in a
safe manner, and stream plantings are stabilizing the soil and reversing the trend of thermal
pollution.
-- Westmoreland County
-- ​Loyalhanna Watershed Association​: Integrating STEM and Environmental Education
Programming at the Watershed Farm:​ Combing environmental education with STEM
(science, technology, engineering, and math) courses, this program focuses on agriculture, soils,
building design, water systems, and art in nature. In four months, more than 500 students have
been educated and 60 teachers employed. The farm has more than 40 cattle, 1,700 native trees
and shrubs, pollinator-friendly gardens, and honeybee hives
-- York County
-- ​Happy Hollow Farm​: Riparian Buffer Project: ​The English family have applied their
agricultural skills to installing riparian buffers along a creek on four acres of their farm. They’ve
planted more than 80 species of native trees and shrubs, becoming a model for other landowners.
The riparian buffer filters pollutants; provides food and habitat for wildlife; and produces nuts,
berries, and syrup, which can provide $6,000 per acre in economic opportunities annually.
The award winners will be honored at an ​April 24 Awards Dinner hosted by the PA
Environmental Council​ at the Harrisburg Hilton.
For more information on the program, visit the DEP ​Governor’s Award for
Environmental Excellence​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Deb Klenotic,
717-783-9954 or send email to: ​dklenotic@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Scranton Receives Governor’s Award For Environmental Excellence
Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority, Earth Conservancy Win Governor’s Environmental
Awards
American Eagle Paper Mill To Receive Governor’s Award For Environmental Excellence
Champions Of The PA Wilds Award Winners Announced
So Big, So Green: Traveling The Wilds Of Pennsylvania
Related Story:
Centre County Honors 58 Green Businesses, Schools And Organizations
[Posted: April 18, 2018]

Centre County Honors 58 Green Businesses, Schools And Organizations

The ​Centre County Recycling & Refuse Authority​ held an
awards luncheon Tuesday ​to honor 58​ of our area’s best green
businesses, schools and organizations.
Over 100 area business owners, teachers, school administrators
and employees were present at the awards luncheon, held in
coordination with Earth Day, to receive recognition for their efforts both in recycling and
sustainability.
CCRRA’s Recycling Coordinator, Joanne Shafer addressed the crowd and spoke of our
2018 Emerald Award Winners: The DEP Moshannon District Mining Office, Grace Lutheran
Church; Grace Lutheran Preschool & Kindergarten & State College Friends School.
Click Here​ for a list of those recognized.
For additional information on this awards luncheon, please contact Amy Schirf at
814-238-7005, or send email to: ​aschirf@centrecountyrecycles.org​.
To learn more about programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Centre County
Recycling & Refuse Authority​ website.
NewsClips:
Scranton Receives Governor’s Award For Environmental Excellence
Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority, Earth Conservancy Win Governor’s Environmental
Awards
American Eagle Paper Mill To Receive Governor’s Award For Environmental Excellence
Champions Of The PA Wilds Award Winners Announced
So Big, So Green: Traveling The Wilds Of Pennsylvania
Related Story:
23 Companies, Groups, Individuals Honored With Governor's Award For Environmental
Excellence
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

DCNR Good Natured Blog: Conservation In A Changing Climate

As we approach the annual Earth Day celebration
this weekend, one of our biggest challenges is how
to respond and adapt to a changing climate. We need
to act.
For the past year, staff members from across all of
DCNR’s bureaus participated in a rigorous process
to determine and prioritize the department’s greatest
climate change vulnerabilities, and identify
strategies to address them.
In the next several months, DCNR will be finalizing
a plan that includes objectives to prepare for and
mitigate the risks associated with climate impacts.
Here’s where we’re going, with some ideas about how you can join us.
Trees Are The Answer
Very heavy precipitation and flooding have increased significantly in Pennsylvania, and
that is expected to continue. Trails, roads and bridges, historical and cultural resources, and more
are at risk during flooding.
Extreme rain events also can affect groundwater supply and reduce water quality below
public thresholds for recreational use.
Turns out, planting trees, especially along streams, are a big part of the solution. DCNR
is leading the effort to protect and restore buffers along streams (known as riparian areas) to
control stormwater, and also to keep the water cool for fish, filter pollutants from the land, and
provide habitat for wildlife.
Do One Thing
If you can do one thing for the environment during Earth Month, plant a tree! (Especially
along a stream, but in your backyard or community is great, too.) Find information to help in
Common Trees of Pennsylvania​ (PDF), through the ​riparian buffer initiative​, or from
TreeVitalize​.
Check out some of the upcoming ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation tree planting events​.
Corridors For Wildlife
Climate impacts are expected to vary across the landscape in Pennsylvania. Some areas
will see significant impacts, while more resistant habitats will become increasingly important for
wildlife and conservation planning.
DCNR will work with partners to set conservation priorities through land acquisitions,
easements, and stewardship plans to create an interconnected system of habitats that allow
species to move north and to higher elevations in response to climate change.
Plant Smart
What we plant, how we plant, and where we plant can affect wildlife. Check
iConservePA​ for information on wise planting decisions that can provide benefits to wildlife.
DCNR’s ​Wild Plant Sanctuary Program​ is a good idea for larger landowners to
participate in a voluntary statewide network of habitat managed to conserve rare native plants.
Changing Forests
Forest ecosystems absorb and sequester a significant portion of U.S. carbon emissions.
Our forests are expected to change due to the decline of some species, increases in others,
hybridization, and immigration of southern species.
As the climate changes, new invasive species are expected to move into the
commonwealth, and those already here will increase in abundance.
DCNR will be adjusting its forest management practices to distribute risks, encourage
diverse age classes, and work with other state agencies responsible for land management to
develop and adopt statewide invasive species best management practices, and decrease forest
carbon loss.
Wood Products
Learn more about the DCNR ​Bureau of Forestry’s commitment​ to manage state forests in
an environmentally responsible manner. Use durable wood products harvested from properly
managed forests in construction projects to help sequester carbon permanently, and support local
jobs in the Pennsylvania forest products industry.
Science-Minded
Populations of rare, threatened, and endangered species, especially those near the edge of
their range in Pennsylvania, are expected to decline faster and possibly disappear because of
climate change and other stressors.
There will be an increased demand for data due to the impacts increased flooding,
drought, dry wells, sinkholes, and other climate change impacts.
DCNR will be working with partners to review and expand monitoring to ensure that
changes in natural communities, species distribution, and populations are detected. The
department will look to develop research projects that look for relationships between the timing
and intensity of weather events and sinkholes and landslides.
Citizen Science
Become a citizen scientist to help monitor and take care of Pennsylvania’s wildlife, trees,
plants, and water. Start by contacting ​your local state park​ to see what opportunities are available
or check the ​DCNR calendar.
To Your Health
Human health and safety concerns such as tick and mosquito-borne diseases, severe
storms, heat-related illness, and air quality are becoming more of a concern.
The number, geographic distribution, and length of time during the year that ticks and
mosquitos are active have been increasing, which also increases exposure to diseases such as
Lyme disease.
Preparedness plans to minimize exposure to risks and educate state park and forest
visitors will be reviewed and updated by DCNR.
Tick Awareness
Enjoy the outdoors, but remember to ​prevent tick bites​ (PDF). When outdoors, always
wear light-colored clothing (ticks stand out better), spray tick repellents on your clothes, tuck
pants into socks, and do a “tick check” upon returning home.
Showering also is recommended after a day afield, as well laundering, then drying
clothes in an electric dryer on high heat setting.
Energy Smart
With 121 state parks and 2.2 million acres of state forests, DCNR maintains a lot of
buildings, bridges, roads, and more. Infrastructure will be significantly challenged by higher
temperatures, increased flooding, and periodic drought.
The department will continue its significant work throughout the past several years on
energy conservation and renewable energy in our hundreds of buildings and vehicle fleet,
including high-performance buildings, solar panels, and electric vehicles.
Be Efficient
iConservePA​ reminds us of the many ways we can make strategic improvements and use
efficient practices to save energy, water, and money. You can learn about the department’s
sustainable practices​, such as high-performance buildings, or ​watch a video​ about DCNR’s green
efforts for inspiration.
Let’s Talk
As part of its climate change adaptation efforts, DCNR will emphasize the importance of
public engagement and place-based citizen science, and incorporate climate change into the daily
conversations staff have with visitors.
Staff will need more training and expertise on topics related to climate science,
adaptation, and mitigation.
Stay Connected
Implementing solutions requires learning and talking about the problems. We’ll be
talking about climate change impacts and solutions as we roll out our adaptation practices.
Stay connected with DCNR on our ​social media accounts​, through the ​Good Natured
blog​, and by attending programs and volunteer opportunities noted on ​our calendar of events​.
Two years from now when we will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, DCNR
hopes to have laid the framework for a more resilient and sustainable Pennsylvania.
Happy Earth Day!
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, Visit the ​Good Natured​ DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click
Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Public Invited To Lewisburg Tree Planting April 19
Lancaster Plans Record Tree Planting For Arbor Day April 27
Earth Day Guide To Where To Take Your Unwanted Stuff In Lancaster County
Penns Valley Conservation To Host Creek Cleanup, Tree Plantings Starting April 21
PPL Employees Participate In Weiser State Forest Earth Day Tree Planting
Multitude Of Earth Day Celebrations Keep It Fun, Educational
Lawrence County Holding Earth Day Celebration April 21
Wilkes University Earth & Environmental Science Day
Earth Day Event Held By The River In Wilkes-Barre
Earth Day 2018 Celebratory Events: Free Or Cheap
Youngwood Seeks Volunteers For Earth Day Cleanup
Pittsburgher’s Guide To Making Every Day Earth Day
7th Annual PRC ReuseFest Celebrates Earth Day In Pittsburgh
Riverfront North Earth Day Festival In Philadelphia April 21
Related Story:
April 24 DEP Climate Change Committee: PA Greenhouse Gas Emissions Drop 11.37% From
2000 to 2014, Mostly Due To Replacing Coal-Fired Power Plants

(Reprinted from the ​April 18 DCNR Resource​ newsletter. ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own
copy.)
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Celebrate Earth Day By Joining Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA

In celebration of Earth Day - April 22, ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​, whose vision is a clean
and beautiful Pennsylvania, encourages
residents to organize their own cleanups or
volunteer for one near them as part of the ​2018
Great American Cleanup of PA​.
Events registered through May 31 receive free
trash bags, gloves, and safety vests from
PennDOT district offices, as supplies last.
The Great American Cleanup of PA engages over 150,000 volunteers annually in litter
cleanups, illegal dump cleanups, beautification projects, special collections, and educational
events.
To help with the cost of trash disposal, the Department of Environmental Protection and
PA Waste Industries Association​ are sponsoring Let’s Pick It Up PA through April 30. During
this time, trash collected at registered events can be taken to participating landfills and receive
free or reduced cost disposal with prior approval.
“We are so grateful to our volunteers and sponsors who help make the Great American
Cleanup of PA, Pennsylvania’s premier community improvement initiative, possible,” said
Shannon Reiter, President of Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. “Last year, Pennsylvanians
coordinated and participated in 7,280 events. Over 20,000 tires and 5 million pounds of trash
were removed from our beautiful landscape. This year we hope to engage even more
Pennsylvania’s to join the Great American Cleanup of PA to help keep our communities clean
and beautiful.”
Just A Few Cleanup Events
Highlighted below are just a few of the many Great American Cleanup of PA Earth Day
events taking place across Pennsylvania via Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful/ Keep America
Beautiful affiliates.
-- Keep Blair Beautiful – Homer’s Gap Cleanup​ on April 21 at 9:00 in partnership with
Intermunicipal Relations Committee. Contact Katrina Pope at ​kpope@ircenvironment.org​ or
814-942-7472.
-- Keep Centre County Beautiful - ClearWater Conservancy ​is cleaning Spring Creek
Watershed on April 21 from 8:00 to 2:00. Contact Lexie Orr at
lexie@clearwaterconservancy.org​ or 814-380-8433.
-- Keep Harrisburg-Dauphin Beautiful - Great Harrisburg Litter CleanUp​ on April 21 from
9:00 to 1:00. Contact Julie Walter at ​jwalter@cactricounty.org​ or 717-232-9757 x105.
-- PA CleanWays of Mifflin County - Hawstone Road Cleanup​ on April 21 from 9:00 to
Noon. Contact Pam Sechrist at ​pammiff@verizon.net​ or 717-899-6701.
-- Reading Beautification Inc. – Riverfront Park Cleanup​ on April 21 from 8:00 to 1:00.
Contact Steven Harrity at ​steven.harrity@readingpa.gov​ or 610-655-6017.
To find an event near you visit the ​Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Calendar of Events​.
Choose the county that you are interested in and click refresh.
Join thousands of volunteers who are keeping our communities clean and beautiful and
register your event online​. Questions can be answered by Michelle Dunn, Great American
Cleanup of PA Program Coordinator, at 1-877-772-3673 ext. 113 or send email to:
mdunn@keeppabeautiful.org​.
Video Contest
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful is also ​calling for videos highlighting​ your 2018 Great
American Cleanup of PA event featuring groups, children, and adults having fun keeping your
communities clean and beautiful.
Cash prizes, sponsored by the Pennsylvania Waste Industries Association, are $200 for
the winning entry and $100 each for two runners up.
Recognize sponsors and incorporate Great American Cleanup of PA in your video. Send
a 60 second video to ​slarson@keeppabeautiful.org​.
The Great American Cleanup of PA is held annually from March 1 through May 31 and
is led by a coalition of non-profit, state agency and business partners such as ​the Department of
Environmental Protection, ​PennDOT​, the ​PA Food Merchants Association​, ​PA Waste Industries
Association​, ​ShopRite​ and ​The Fresh Grocer​, ​Wawa, Inc.​, ​Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania​, ​Giant
Food Stores, LLC​, ​BioHiTech​, ​Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority​,
Mahantango​, ​Republic Services​, ​Steel Recycling Institute​, ​Wegmans Food Markets​ and ​Weis
Markets, Inc​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
Sign up now for the ​2018 Great American Cleanup of PA​ and set up your own cleanup
and beautification event from March 1 to May 31.
NewsClips:
Youngwood Seeks Volunteers For Earth Day Cleanup
Earth Day Guide To Where To Take Your Unwanted Stuff In Lancaster County
Carr: Monroeville Still Accepting Registrations For Weekend Cleanup Day
Related Stories:
ClearWater Conservancy Watershed Cleanup Day April 21 In Centre County
Schuylkill Action Network 15th Annual Schuylkill Scrub Cleanup May 19
PA Resources Council, PA American Water, Partners Host 3 Drug Take-Back Day Collection
Events In Allegheny County
DEP, PennDOT, Local Officials, KPB Participate In Park Beautification Event In Chester,
Delaware County
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

EQB Approves Final Drinking Water Fee Increases, Now Moves Through Final Review

The ​Environmental Quality Board​ Tuesday approved the final regulation increasing Safe
Drinking Water Program fees to address major staff deficiencies caused by a decade of General
Fund budget cuts at DEP.
The Board also discussed a report about the adequacy of existing Oil and Gas Program
fees.
Safe Drinking Water
The final fees will generate approximately $7.5 million annually and will account for
nearly 50 percent of the program’s state funding. The fees will augment the $7.7 million in
funding currently coming from the state’s General Fund.
By increasing fees, DEP hopes to hire up to 33 additional staff in the Safe Drinking
Water Program to address ​major deficiencies in the program​ identified by the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency.
The final fees still use population served by water systems as basis for assessing the fees
but will be phased in over the next year.
The final regulation also makes other changes to the Safe Drinking Water Program,
including to provisions related to the lead and copper requirements for drinking water, provisions
for general permits to simplify permitting and other changes.
The regulation must still be given its final review by the Senate, House and Independent
Regulatory Review Commission
Oil & Gas Fees
The Board also heard a presentation on a ​report on the adequacy of DEP’s Oil and Gas
Regulatory Program fees​ that demonstrates current oil and gas well fees will not generate
adequate income to support the program starting in FY 2019-20, despite reductions in program
staff and operating expenses.
In a permit reform proposal ​white paper released in January​, DEP said the Oil and Gas
Program is running a $600,000 per month deficit and would soon propose regulation changes to
increase the well permit fee from $5,000 per well to $12,500 per well.
The Board also approved a final regulation setting emission limits on volatile organic
compounds from industrial cleaning solvents and additional RACT requirements for major
sources of nitrogen oxide and VOCs.
For more information and available handouts, visit the ​Environmental Quality Board
webpage or contact ​Laura Edinger at 717-772-3277 or send email to: ​ledinger@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs $12M Budget Increase To Meet Regulatory Requirements
Maykuth: Philly Water Has A Plan To Replace Decaying Water, Sewer Pipes
On Tap For Philadelphia: Higher Water Bills, Unhappy Home, Biz Owners
Nestle Waters Won’t Build Bottling Plant In Spring, Benner Twps, Centre County
Grant For Southwestern Water Takeover Of Dunkard Valley Comes Up Short
EEOC: Altoona Water Authority Violated Rights
McKelvey: Suspended PA Drinking Water Lab Tested Thousands Of Samples
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

DEP Establishes New Water Quality Project Grant Program With $12.6 Million Mariner
East 2 Pipeline Penalty

The Department of Environmental Protection Tuesday
announced it has ​created a new water quality project grant
program​ with the ​$12.6 million penalty assessed​ against the
Mariner East 2 Pipeline​. ​(​formal notice​)
Grants will be awarded for projects that reduce or minimize
pollution and protect clean water in the ​85 municipalities
along the length of the pipeline corridor.
Eligible grant applicants include the 85 municipalities, county conservation districts,
incorporated watershed associations, educational institutions, and non-profit organizations along
the length of the MEII pipeline.
The 45-day grant application round will open May 7 and close June 21. DEP anticipates
announcing the approved projects in the summer of 2018.
Examples of eligible projects include (but are not limited to:
-- Projects to improve water quality while enhancing community recreational opportunities, such
as restoration and enhancement of natural water resource features at community parks and public
properties, including lake restoration and wetland creation.
-- Projects to educate future generations about water resource protection, such as demonstration
projects that showcase pervious pavement, stormwater runoff management features and systems,
bioretention systems, constructed wetland complexes, stormwater runoff collection and reuse
projects, stormwater mitigation projects that reduce rate and volume and improve water quality
on a school or other public property.
-- Projects to improve and/or protect public drinking water sources and infrastructure, such as
repairs to drinking water system source facilities that improve resiliency of the water supply,
including water supply dam rehabilitation work and upgrades, and repairs to water treatment
infrastructure and water intakes.
-- Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) projects to address rate, volume and/or
sediment load, including flood-control project features and retrofits to existing stormwater runoff
control infrastructure that reduce rate and volume of stormwater runoff.
-- Projects that result in nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment load reductions within the Chesapeake
Bay watershed and impaired waters, including stream buffers, stream restoration projects,
wetland restoration or enhancement projects.
-- Projects that result in water quality improvements in DEP Priority Watersheds and Impaired
Watersheds within the 85 municipalities.
“It is important that we utilize this funding in an impactful way that will support
long-term water quality improvement projects in these communities,” said Gov. Tom Wolf.
In February, DEP collected the $12.6 million penalty for permit violations related to the
construction of the project. The penalty, one of the largest collected in a single settlement, was
deposited into the Clean Water Fund and the Dams and Encroachments Fund, in accordance with
the provisions of the Clean Streams Law and the Dam Safety and Encroachments Act.
These grants will be directed to the municipalities to eliminate pollution and protect the
public from unsafe dams, water obstructions, and encroachments.
“DEP will continue to both monitor permit compliance and ensure that Sunoco addresses
and remedies all pipeline project impacts, which are separate from this penalty. Our goal with the
penalty grant is to aid municipal leaders in providing meaningful local environmental benefits,”
said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell.
If a resident should witness pollution from the pipeline affecting streams or other
waterways, then please alert DEP at 1-800-541-2050.
Click Here​ for more information and how to apply. Questions should be directed to R.
Scott Carney, Chief Watershed Support Section, 717-783-2944.
For more information on DEP’s actions, visit DEP’s ​Mariner East II Pipeline​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Meyer: Sunoco Says Testing Done On Mariner East 1 Pipeline And It’s Safe, PUC Says Slow
Down
Hurdle: Here’s What $12.6M Mariner East 2 Pipeline Penalty Will Be Spent On
State Establishes $12.6M Grant Program With Mariner East II Pipeline Fines
Hurdle: DEP Sets Hearing On Proposed Mariner East 2 Construction In Chester County
ATF: 350 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site Recovered
Some Explosives Recovered That Were Stolen From The Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
Officials Uncertain If They Have All Stolen Explosives
ATF Agents Flood Lancaster County On Stolen Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Explosives
ATF Increases Reward To $20,000 For Info On Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise
Pipeline Construction Site In Lancaster
About 640 Pounds Of Dynamite Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
ATF Investigating 640 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site,
Reward Offered
600+ Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Worksite In Lancaster
County
ATF Now Says More Than 700 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sense Of Urgency Propels Search For Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sisk: Dynamite Disappears From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site, ATF Trying To Find It
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
FERC Reviews Its Policies For Approving Natural Gas Pipelines
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
Related Story:
Sunoco Mariner East II Pipeline Fined $12.6 Million, DEP Allows Construction To Resume
Environmental Groups Appeal DEP Agreement With Sunoco Allowing Restart Of Mariner East
2 Construction
PUC Ratifies Emergency Order Suspending Operations Of Mariner East 1 Pipeline
Senate Committee Meets April 24 To Consider Pipeline Safety, Construction Bills
DEP Hearing On Mariner East II Pipeline Permit Changes April 30 In Chester County, Extends
Comment Period
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

Gov. Wolf: $60 Million In PennVEST Funding For Water Infrastructure Projects In 12
Counties

Gov. Tom Wolf Wednesday announced the investment of $60 million for 12 drinking water,
wastewater, and nonpoint source projects across 12 counties through the ​Pennsylvania
Infrastructure Investment Authority​.
“The approval of this funding through PennVEST will continue Pennsylvania’s
commitment to clean water through a variety of water quality improvement projects across the
Commonwealth,” said Gov. Wolf. “These projects benefit the environment, economic
development and public health, as well as advance our shared goal of a clean and safe
environment for our families to enjoy, both now and for years to come.”
The funding comes from a combination of state funds approved by voters, Growing
Greener, Marcellus Legacy funds, federal grants to PennVEST from the Environmental
Protection Agency and recycled loan repayments from previous PennVEST funding awards.
Funds for the projects are disbursed after expenses for work have been paid and receipts are
submitted to PennVEST.
Nonpoint source pollution control projects funded include--
-- Chester County Conservation District ​received a $327,400 grant to cover costs related to
manure storage, concrete heavy use areas, riparian buffers, stream bank fencing, cattle walkways
and storm water controls on a county farm.
-- Chester City Stormwater Authority, Delaware County​ received a $5,960,276 loan to
implement the second phase of the catch basin retrofit program. There will be 250 existing catch
basins retrofitted or replaced.**
-- Armstrong Township, Lycoming County​ received a $600,000 grant to provide a
conservation easement to support preservation and enhance 49 acres of wetlands and 176
surrounding upland floodplain habitats, including 3,790 feet of riparian frontage on the West
Branch of the Susquehanna River.
-- Coal Township, Northumberland County​ received a $1,094,250 grant to implement a
streambank stabilization project. Work includes regrading, lined with rip-rap rock, and in some
sections precast reinforced concrete walls.
Click Here​ for a complete list of projects funded.
For more information on loan and grant water infrastructure funding, visit the ​PennVEST
website.
[Posted: April 18, 2018]

Joint State Govt. Commission Concludes PA Environmental Laws Adhere To Federal
Standards, Or Are Justified By A Compelling Interest

The ​Joint State Government Commission​ Thursday ​released a report on​ whether Pennsylvania’s
environmental laws and regulations are more stringent than federal requirements as required by
the ​Senate Resolution 385​ (Brooks-R-Crawford).
The report reviews the primary state and federal laws covering clean air, clean water,
natural resources use and conservation, waste management and recycling and the safe handling
of hazardous materials.
The report concluded, “(M)ost of Pennsylvania’s environmental law statutes adhere to the
federal regulations and are generally no more stringent than their federal counterparts. Where
additional regulations have been made, it is generally justified as a compelling and articulable
Pennsylvania interest and addresses definable public health, safety or environmental risks.
“In some instances, Pennsylvania regulations build upon and supplement federal law; in
others, Pennsylvania has acted in areas not regulated by the federal government.”
In addition, the report points to the fact Pennsylvania’s constitution includes the
Environmental Rights Amendment and spends several pages reviewing the impact of that
amendment and related court cases, noting--
“(I)nterpretations of Pennsylvania’s Environmental Rights Amendment (ERA) could
result in regulations found to be in compliance with federal law and other Pennsylvania
executive and legislative actions, but nonetheless violate the ERA.
“In such cases, Pennsylvania regulations may be required to be more stringent than
federal law in order to be constitutionally sound.”
“In 1996, Governor Thomas J. Ridge issued an ​executive order [1996-1] ​that provides
that state agencies may not exceed federal standards unless “justified by a compelling and
articulable Pennsylvania interest or required by state law,” and must address “definable public
health, safety, or environmental risks.”
“While as a general rule, Executive Order 1996-1 applies to all administrative
regulations, this restriction can come into conflict with the recently reinvigorated Environment
Rights Amendment (ERA) to the Pennsylvania Constitution.
“This new interpretation of the ERA could result in regulations that are in compliance
with federal law and Governor Ridge’s order yet fail to meet constitutional muster. In such cases,
Pennsylvania regulations will be required to be more stringent than federal law in order to be
constitutionally sound.”
The report notes Pennsylvania acted to deal with many pollution issues before the federal
government enacted its own laws. The report says--
“Pennsylvania enacted some of its most significant environmental laws and municipal
ordinances before the federal government became involved in environmental protection. To the
extent required by federal law, Pennsylvania has amended its statutes to come into compliance.
“In some instances, Pennsylvania has adopted regulations that are more stringent than
federal standards as well as regulations in areas that are not covered by federal law or
regulations.
“These are usually justified by the unique geology, topography, and hydrology of
Pennsylvania. In some instances, Pennsylvania has acted at the state level and preempted
municipal regulation; in others, more stringent municipal ordinances are permitted and/or
encouraged.”
Click Here​ for a copy of the full report.
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Op-Ed: In Praise Of Rachel Carson And Public Service

By James M. Seif, Former Secretary of The Department of Environmental Protection

Are you a public servant?
In a democracy, we all are servants. But for those
who officially wear the "uniform of public
service," as former Gov. Tom Ridge puts it, April
19 marks a day of stark contrasts.
On that day in 1995 we had planned to honor
public servants in Pennsylvania.
Gov. Ridge had readily agreed with our proposal
at the Department of Environmental Resources to
rename the Market Street State Office Building in honor of Rachel Carson.
A native of Springdale, Pa. on the Allegheny River northeast of Pittsburgh, and a
graduate of Pennsylvania College for Women, now Chatham University, she wrote one the most
influential books of the twentieth century - "Silent Spring."
Carson's 1962 tome touched off the public environmental debate that has continued
-sometimes quite vigorously, as in current times -- for the next six decades.
But on that same morning, a small group of demented misfits carried out an elaborate
plan to blow up the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Bldg. in Oklahoma City, Okla.
They took 168 lives - almost all of them federal employees; 15 were their children in the
building's day care center.
Injuries numbered nearly 700.
These people were targeted exactly because they were public servants; because ringleader
Timothy McVeigh was obsessed by his theories of federal law enforcement conspiracies and
survivalist fantasies.
We learned of the Oklahoma City attack just before the ceremony. But we decided to go
ahead. Rachel Carson was not just a public servant for her pioneering work on the environment,
but she was in fact an actual federal government employee for many years.
"Silent Spring" and Carson's several earlier works have put her in our memory as a
writer.
But, at the front entrance of "her building" on April 19, 1995 we remembered also that
she was a career civil servant for many years.
After getting her MS in Biology at Johns Hopkins, she joined the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service.
For the next two decades, she did research in both laboratory and field, all over the
United States, and lots of writing, including government pamphlets and magazine articles, as
well as another book, "Under the Sea Wind."
Her undergraduate degree, in fact, was in English, not biology. Because, as she put it,
understanding was key, but being able explain is just as important.
It has long been part of our culture to be skeptical, even suspicious, about government in
general.
This can be healthy, and it makes for a lot good newspaper cartoons. But today's rants
and mindless criticism simply go too far. Let's remember that these people work for the common
good, to help others, to educate, and to protect us.
We mourned public servants on April 19, 1995, with the same sentiments we feel on
Memorial Day. And we also celebrated public service.
Today?
Remember that Timothy McVeigh was executed, and that Rachel Carson's spirit of public
service lives forever.

James M. Seif​ is a former secretary of the Pennsylvania departments of Environmental
Resources and Environmental Protection from 1995 to 2001.
[​Editor:​ During his tenure as DEP Secretary, the agency ​won more national and
international awards​ for its initiatives than any other state environmental agency in history,
including for the brownfields recycling program that has been copied by other states, the federal
government and by other countries.
[Seif also served as Regional Administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency in Region 3, as an Administrative Assistant to Gov. Dick Thornburgh, an Assistant U.S.
Attorney in Pittsburgh and an Assistant Attorney General in Washington, D.C.
[He received a Lifetime Award for Public Service from the National Academy of Public
Administration for his 30-year state and federal government service and a Lifetime Achievement
Award from the Environmental and Energy Law Section of the Pennsylvania Bar Association.
[Linda Lear’s book-- ​Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature​-- mentions the relationship of
two professional women (a rarity at the time) from Pittsburgh who were classmates at the
Pennsylvania College for Women (now Chatham University) and shared a mutual interest in
biology-- Rachel Carson and Dorothy Thompson Seif, Jim Seif’s mother. The women worked,
corresponded and visited together until Rachel Carson died in 1964.
[In a ​1987 interview in the Los Angeles Times​, Dorothy Thompson Seif said of Rachel
Carson, "The thing that's so remarkable about her is that she was ordinary.
["I remember we were working late one night in the laboratory, and she stopped and
looked through the darkened window. She said, 'I've always wanted to write, but I haven't much
imagination. Biology has given me something to write about. I'd like someday to make the
animals and plants and woods as interesting to others as they are to me.’”
[Dorothy Thompson Seif collected the letters between them in an unpublished, "Letters
from Rachel Carson: A Young Scientist Sets Her Course.”
[Rachel Carson 1907 - 1964.]
NewsClip:
Op-Ed: In Praise Of Rachel Carson And Public Service, James M. Seif, Fmr DEP Secretary
Related Story:
New WITF Conservation Heritage Documentary: Rachel Carson - Voice Of Nature
[Posted: April 22, 2018]

Bills On Governor's Desk

The following bills were given final approval by the Senate and House and are now on the
Governor's desk for action--

Mine Medical Personnel:​ ​House Bill 1341​ (Pyle-R-Armstrong) further providing for training
and certification of emergency medical personnel responding to bituminous deep mine
accidents.. A ​House Fiscal Note​ and summary is available.

Farm High Tunnels:​ ​House Bill 1486​ (Zimmerman-R-Lancaster) exempting agricultural
high-tunnel structures from the Stormwater Management Act (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary).
Was signed into law as Act 15.

Senate/House Bills Moving Last Week

The following bills of interest saw action last week in the House and Senate--

House

Borough Electric Systems:​ ​House Bill 2030​ (Bernstine-R-Beaver) limiting use of revenue from
certain municipally-owned electric distribution systems was reported from the House
Appropriations Committee and passed with the House and now goes to the Senate for action. A
House Fiscal Note​ and summary is available.

Earth Day: ​House Resolution 715​ (Murt-R-Montgomery) designating April 22 as Earth Day
was adopted by the House (sponsor summary).

Earth Week:​ ​House Resolution 765​ (McCarter-D-Montgomery) designating the week of april
22-28 as Earth Week was adopted by the House (sponsor summary).

Arbor Day:​ ​House Resolution 803​ (Marsico-R-Dauphin) designation April 27 as Arbor Day
(​sponsor summary​) was adopted by the House.

Senate

Nominations:​ Gladys M. Brown was again confirmed as a commissioner on the Public Utility
Commission.

Mine Medical Personnel:​ ​House Bill 1341​ (Pyle-R-Armstrong) further providing for training
and certification of emergency medical personnel responding to bituminous deep mine accidents
was passed by the Senate without changes. A ​House Fiscal Note​ and summary is available. The
bill now goes to the Governor for his action.

Microgrids:​ ​House Bill 1412​ (Barrar-R-Delaware) proposing a regulatory framework to
encourage energy storage and microgrids to improve electric grid resiliency during disaster
emergencies and other circumstances was referred back to the House Veterans Affairs and
Emergency Preparedness Committee.

Ag Security Law:​ ​House Bill 1550​ (Klunk-R-York) changing restrictions on preserved land to
allow for an additional residence (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was referred to the Senate
Appropriations Committee.

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule/ Bills Introduced

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (April 30)​: ​House Bill 1401​ (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks) which amends Title 58 to impose a
sliding scale natural gas severance tax, in addition to the Act 13 drilling impact fee, on natural
gas production (NO money for environmental programs) and includes provisions related to
minimum landowner oil and gas royalties; ​House Bill 1446​ (Quinn-R- Bucks) encouraging
infrastructure for electric and natural gas fueled vehicles; ​House Bill 1284​ (Peifer-R-Pike)
directs DCED to develop a one-stop-shop online permitting portal for business (​sponsor
summary​); ​House Resolution 284​ (Moul-R-Adams) urging Congress to repeal the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency’s MS4 Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (​sponsor
summary​)​. ​<> ​Click Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (April 23):​ ​Senate Resolution 104​ (Bartolotta-R-Washington) resolution urging the
Governor to end the moratorium on new non-surface disturbance natural gas drilling on state
forest land (​sponsor summary​); ​House Bill 544​ (Moul-R-Adams) further providing for liability
protection for landowners opening their land for public recreation; ​House Bill 913​ providing for
the adoption of stormwater fees by incorporated towns; ​House Bill 914​ providing for the
adoption of stormwater fees by boroughs; ​House Bill 915​ providing for the adoption of
stormwater fees by first class townships; and ​House Bill 916​ providing for the adoption of
stormwater fees by Cities of the Third Class​. <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

House:​ [ Not in voting session. ] <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​ t​he ​Consumer Affairs and Professional Licensure Committee​ meets to consider
Senate Bill 835​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requiring the registration of land agents working for
pipeline companies (​sponsor summary​), ​Senate Bill 930​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) sets notification
requirements related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor summary​), ​Senate Bill 931
(Dinniman-D-Chester) requires the installation of automatic or remote controlled safety values in
natural gas pipelines in densely populated areas (​sponsor summary​); the ​Environmental
Resources and Energy and Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committees
hold a joint hearing on flooding and emergency response​.​ <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate
Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Bills Introduced

The following bills of interest were introduced last week--

Landslide Insurance:​ ​Senate Bill 1131​ (Costa-D-Allegheny) establishing the Landslide
Insurance and Assistance Program within the PA Emergency Management Agency (​sponsor
summary​).

Drinking Water Week:​ ​House Resolution 839​ (Carroll-D-Luzerne) designating the week of
May 6 to 11 Drinking Water Week in Pennsylvania.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
April​ 23, 24, 25
May​ 21, 22, 23
June​ 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29

House
April​ 30
May​ 1, 2, 22, 23
June ​4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 21, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time
To Save Nuclear Power Plants

The operators of Pennsylvania’s ​nuclear power
plants told​ the bipartisan ​House-Senate Nuclear
Energy Caucus​ Tuesday the federal government
will likely not act in time to prevent the closure of
up to one quarter of the nuclear power plants in the
state.
FirstEnergy Solutions, Talen Energy and
Exelon said while the Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission, U.S. Department of Energy and the
PJM Interconnection​ are discussing potential
solutions, they are “working around the edges” of what needs to be done.
The companies all agreed only the state could act in time like Connecticut, Illinois, New
Jersey and New York have already done.
The members of the Caucus also heard an ​overview of a study released Monday​ by The
Brattle Group which outlined the impacts the announced closure of four nuclear power plants in
Ohio and Pennsylvania will have, including an annual increase of over 20 million metric tons of
carbon dioxide emissions, tens of thousands of tons of incremental air pollutants and an annual
increase of electricity costs by an estimated $285 million.
Company Overviews
Each of the companies provided an overview of their nuclear plant operations in
Pennsylvania.
Donald Maul​, President and Chief Nuclear Officer for ​FirstEnergy Solutions​, said the
company ​announced plans on March 28​ to shutdown the 1,872 MW Beaver Valley Nuclear
Power Plant in Beaver County in 2021. A few days later FirstEnergy Solutions ​filed for
bankruptcy​.
Maul said the Beaver Valley plant prevents 9.5 million tons of greenhouse gases from
being emitted annually, employs 1,000 people and is responsible for an additional $70 to $120
million in contracted services annually.
Maul noted, economically, this is the kind of employer communities and states would be
fighting to get.
He said Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey and New York have already taken steps to
value the environmental benefits of nuclear energy in the marketplace and to promote grid
resiliency and fuel diversity and urged Pennsylvania to do the same.
Deborah Raggio​, Vice President for Regulatory and External Affairs Counsel for ​Talen
Energy​, said they have diverse portfolio of 8,400 MW of generation in Pennsylvania, including
the 2,600 MW Susquehanna Nuclear Power Plant in Luzerne County as well as coal and natural
gas plants.
She noted the Susquehanna plant prevents 10.5 million tons of greenhouse gases from
being emitted annually, has 1,000 full time jobs and an additional 2,000 contractors to support
refueling and other activities.
Raggio said while Talen has not announced a shutdown of their plant and they do have a
strategy in place to improve performance at the plant that could be in jeopardy if Talen is not
compensated for the plant’s environmental benefits, like other no or low carbon energy sources.
Efforts by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and PJM to deal with valuing
these benefits may not happen or be delayed, Raggio said. If action is to be taken, it looks the
state will have to take it like others have, she added.
Kathleen Barron​, Senior Vice President of Federal Regulatory Affairs and Policy for
Exelon noted Pennsylvania is second only to Illinois in the amount of electricity generated by
nuclear power-- 40 percent.
Exelon operates the Three Mile Island (Dauphin County), Peach Bottom (York County)
and Limerick (Montgomery County) nuclear power plants in Pennsylvania.
She cautioned in the next three years one-quarter of Pennsylvania’s nuclear generation
could be gone with the closures already announced, including the 837 MW ​Three Mile Island
Nuclear Power Plant​, which Exelon said would close by September 2019 if steps are not taken.
Barron said, “Help is not coming from Washington” and the existing electricity markets
are not designed to capture the value of the environmental benefits nuclear power plants provide.
She said there has been a heavy investments in wind and solar energy in Pennsylvania
totalling $3.5 billion, including $1 billion in state Renewable Energy Credits and federal tax
credits which has resulted in 1,300 MW of wind and 325 MW of solar electricity generation.
Barron said even if you double these annual investments, it would take up to 15 years to
get where Ohio and Pennsylvania are now in terms of environmental benefits with the Three
Mile Island, Beaver Valley, Davis-Besse and Perry nuclear power plants now in operation.
The loss of the four nuclear plants would wipe out more than 25 years of progress toward
a future built on low-carbon energy.
Sen. Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster), one of the co-chairs of the Caucus, asked the
companies about the stranded costs paid by ratepayers to generation facility owners as a result of
the 1995 deregulation of Pennsylvania electricity markets.
The payments were intended to compensate owners for their investments in generation
facilities made while those facilities were under a regulated electricity market.
Maul, from FirstEnergy, said generators were paid for stranded costs by ratepapers, but
coupled with that there was a cap on what ratepayers could be charged for electricity.
Barron, from Exelon, said stranded costs were not paid in the case of Three Mile Island
because there was a sale of the facility at the time and the sale price covered those costs. Exelon
did not own TMI until 2003.
Raggio, from Talen Energy, said there are continuing, significant costs for refueling and
ongoing maintenance as well as the market not valuing the environmental benefits of the
electricity being generated that are the issues today.
In response to a question from Rep. Robert Matzie (D-Allegheny) about the important
role natural gas has played in the state’s economy, Barron, from Exelon, said no one is against
natural gas, “that’s not the point.”
Barron said the markets are now looking at the fuels that are the cheapest at this point in
time. Nuclear energy is “at the end of its rope” now and once you turn off these nuclear plants
they will not be turned back on.
Raggio, from Talen, said some people have suggested companies should take advantage
of the bankruptcy laws to deal with this situation, but that “is not the answer.” The issue is the
market and how it values benefits and PJM and FERC have said that is not their job.
Maul said FirstEnergy is now going through bankruptcy and it is not a pretty picture,
adding, “We are looking for ways to keep these plants in the marketplace.”
He noted FirstEnergy also filed a request for an ​emergency federal order to avert
shutdown​ of nuclear and coal power plants after a DOE report showed how important these
plants were in the recent cold weather events.
Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne), a co-chair of the Caucus, expressed significant
concerns about The Brattle Group estimate that ratepayers could see a $285 million annual
increase in electricity costs for consumers, if the nuclear plants closed.
Copies of testimony/presentations: ​FirstEnergy Solutions​, ​Talen Energy​ and ​Exelon​.
The Brattle Group Study
Dr. Dean Murphy, from ​The Brattle Group​ provided a summary of a ​new report they
released Monday​ on the potential impact the announced closure of four nuclear power plants in
Ohio and Pennsylvania will have severe environmental and economic impacts.
Specifically, these closures would likely result in an increase of over twenty million
metric tons of CO2 emissions, tens of thousands of tons of incremental air pollutants, and
significantly higher electricity costs to consumers.
It would also put hundreds of millions in GDP and thousands of jobs at risk for residents
across Ohio, Pennsylvania and the broader region.
The report, based on prior studies of the impacts of nuclear plants in Ohio and
Pennsylvania, estimates that the combined impact of closing the Beaver Valley Power Station
(PA), Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station (OH), Perry Nuclear Generating Station (OH) and
Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station (PA) will:
-- Increase annual CO2 emissions by over 20 million metric tons, equivalent to 4.5 million cars
on the roads and potential social costs of over $900 million per year;
-- Increase annual emissions of harmful air pollutants such as SO2, NOX and particulate matter
by tens of thousands of tons, with potential social costs of $170 million per year;
-- Increase annual electricity costs by as much as $400 million annually for Ohio residents and
$285 million for Pennsylvanians;
-- Put more than 3,000 direct jobs at risk, as well as thousands of additional secondary jobs;
Eliminate tens of millions of dollars in local tax revenues.
The increase in CO2 and several harmful air pollutants due to these closures will be a
major setback to the region’s efforts to reduce emissions.
In 2017, these four nuclear plants provided one and a half times as much zero-emission
energy as the wind and solar resources across the entire PJM region.
PJM is the largest electricity market in North America, covering all or part of 13 states
including Ohio and Pennsylvania, and spanning from Illinois to New Jersey and Virginia.
The loss of these plants would quickly reverse the environmental benefits of all the PJM
wind and solar resources developed in the region over the past 25 years – benefits which were
supported with billions of dollars of customer and taxpayer investment through renewable energy
credits and federal tax credits.
“As this report makes clear, policymakers should take note of the critical environmental
and economic contributions of our nation’s nuclear plants, especially where their continued
operation is threatened,” noted Brattle Principals and study authors Drs. Dean Murphy and Mark
Berkman. “Any discussion of Pennsylvania’s and Ohio’s energy futures must recognize the
significant environmental and economic risks associated with allowing these four plants to close.
The impending closures indicate a significant concession in their clean energy commitments.”
Additional findings regarding the impact of these closures from the Brattle report include:
-- An electricity price increase of up to $2.43/MWh and $1.77/MWh for Ohio and Pennsylvania
residents, respectively (not accounting for any financial support the plants might need to
continue operating); and
-- Another 15 years, at the current renewable growth rate, for the region to return to the level of
zero-emissions generation in 2017.
“Thousands of lost jobs, major hits to local tax revenues, higher electricity costs for
consumers, and more harmful pollutants – any lawmaker should take steps to avoid such a
situation,” said Nuclear Matters Advocacy Council Member and former Senator Judd Gregg
(R-NH). “It is imperative that we act to prevent the closures of these four nuclear plants which
contribute needed diversity to Ohio and Pennsylvania’s overall energy supply and provide
residents a dependable power source in extreme weather situations. Following Vermont
Yankee’s shuttering in New England, we saw devastating effects. The loss of tax revenues forced
local officials to make major budget concessions to the detriment of their residents, including
cutting their municipal budget by 20 percent, drastically reducing police services and raising
their property taxes by 20 percent. Furthermore, in the year following the closure, carbon
emissions increased by 2.5 percent due to nuclear energy being replaced by emission producing
sources. It would be nothing short of irresponsible to allow the people of Ohio and Pennsylvania
to share a similar fate.”
“If these plants close, the livelihoods of thousands of Ohio and Pennsylvania residents
will disappear. The over 3,000 highly skilled individuals directly employed by these sites will
leave to seek employment at other facilities still operating around the country,” said Lonnie
Stephenson, President of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. “In total,
thousands of jobs that directly or indirectly rely on the nuclear industry in this region will be lost.
Positions at nuclear plants are good, well-paying jobs for hardworking residents, and without
them the fabric of these communities will be torn apart.”
In response to a question, Dr. Murphy pointed to a PJM evaluation which said the loss of
the nuclear plants would not affect the overall ability of PJM to meet electricity demands.
He also said the loss of jobs from the nuclear plants would not be made up by
replacement natural gas power plants because they take so few people to operate. Dr. Murphy
said the most significant jobs impact comes from the loss of secondary jobs throughout the local
economy around the nuclear plants.
“Impact of Announced Nuclear Closures in Ohio and Pennsylvania” was prepared for
Nuclear Matters by Dr. Dean Murphy and Dr. Mark Berkman of The Brattle Group.
To develop the collective estimates outlined in the report, The Brattle Group drew from
previous work estimating the impacts that the loss of the Ohio and Pennsylvania nuclear plants
would have on electricity prices and emissions: “​Ohio Nuclear Power Plants’ Contribution to the
State Economy​” (April 2017) and “​Pennsylvania Nuclear Power Plants’ Contribution to the State
Economy​” (December 2016). This latest report compares the results of these most recent
previous studies with sensitivity cases in order to outline various approximations.
Click Here​ for a copy of the new report.
Sen. Aument said near the end of the hearing the least cost strategy for electricity has
benefitted ratepayers, but now there is no strategy for the long term and that’s what the General
Assembly needs to look at.
Sen. Aument told ​PLS Reporter​ after the hearing, “A bailout, subsidy type approach that
we’ve seen in New York, Illinois, now New Jersey — I’ve not been satisfied that is politically
viable here in Pennsylvania."
He cited both intense lobbying from the natural gas industry and the state’s tight fiscal
situation in declining to immediately pursue subsidies for nuclear power.
Click Here​ for a video of the hearing. Copies of testimony/presentations: ​FirstEnergy
Solutions​, ​Talen Energy​ and ​Exelon​.
Senators Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster) and John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) along with
Representatives Becky Corbin (R-Chester) and Rob Matzie (D-Allegheny) serve as co-chairs of
the ​Nuclear Energy Caucus​.
(​Photo:​ Three Mile Island, Dauphin County.)
NewsClips:
FirstEnergy Exec Urges Legislators To Act On Behalf Of Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant
TMI Supporters Urge Lawmakers To Save Financially Troubled Nuclear Power Plant
Clock Ticks Toward Three Mile Island Shutdown
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
Report: Electricity Prices Could Increase $285M If 2 PA Nuclear Plants Close
Report: Exelon, FirstEnergy Nuclear Plant Closures Would Reverse PJM Wind, Solar Benefits
Closing Nuclear Reactors In OH, PA Will Thwart Climate Goals
Environmentalists And Nuclear Power? It’s Complicated
Energy Dept. Won’t Consider FirstEnergy’s Financial Woes In Decision On Coal, Nuclear
Plants
Study: REGGI Carbon Market In Northeast U.S. Creating Jobs, Revenue
It May Take More Than A Year For New Jersey To Rejoin RGGI Climate Pact
With NJ Nuclear Plant Shutting Down, Community Inherits 1.7M Pounds Of Waste
FERC Members Tell House Panel Grid Reliability, Resilience Order Moving Forward
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Related Stories:
Public Utility Commission Acts To Remove Barriers To Solar Energy Growth In PA
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
PUC Chairman Brown To Lead National Committee On Critical Infrastructure
PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Unanimously Confirmed By Senate For Second Term
House Committee Holds Hearing On Bipartisan Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy
Financing Program
Bipartisan Senate/House Bills Would Transition Pennsylvania To 100% Renewable Power By
2050
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

House Committee Holds Hearing On Bipartisan Commercial Property Assessed Clean
Energy Financing Program

The ​House Commerce Committee​ Wednesday held a hearing on ​Senate Bill 234​ (Blake-D,
Reschenthaler-R) that authorizes local governments to create energy improvement districts to
help fund energy efficiency, renewable energy and water conservation projects for commercial,
agricultural and industrial buildings to reduce their operating costs (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and
summary).
Sen. John Blake (D-Lackawanna) and Sen. Guy Reschenthaler (R-Allegheny), the
bipartisan sponsors of the bill, provided an overview of the commercial Property Assessed Clean
Energy Program created by the legislation.
They noted the C-PACE program overcomes some of the challenges of energy efficiency
financing and does not cost taxpayers a dime noting that financing is coming from private, not
public, institutions.
They said the program will create jobs, lower energy costs and increase competitiveness,
all while improving the environment.
Julian Boggs​, ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​, supports the legislation because it
will help further grow the energy efficiency industry in Pennsylvania by lowering the barriers
preventing commercial property owners from making efficiency investments.
He noted similar commercial programs have been authorized in over 30 other states.
Greg McQuaide​, CFO of ​Miller Electric Construction​ on behalf of the ​National Electric
Contractors Association​, encouraged adoption of the legislation.
He said the funding mechanism created in the bill is attractive to customers because it
requires little or no upfront capital.
Ben Taube​, ​Ygrene Energy Fund​, said he projects, based on his experience in other states
with similar programs, that adopting a residential PACE Program in Pennsylvania could create
approximately $800 million of new economic investime in the state over the next few years.
He said R-PACE, which is not now included in the bill, has been one of the most
successful, fastest growing energy saving programs in the country. He also listed a series of
myths and facts about the program dealing with concerns expressed by lending institutions and
others.
Elizabeth Marx​, ​Pennsylvania Utility Law Project​, expressed concerns about authorizing
PACE for residential properties because of reports homeowners have not been properly educated
about the terms of the loan.
Olaf Hasse​, ​F&M Trust​ on behalf of the PA Bankers Association, expressed concerns
about PACE since the entities doing the financing are not regulated by the same laws and
agencies as banks for commercial and residential lending.
Aaron Kraus​, ​Greenworks Lending​, the largest commercial PACE provider in the
country, provided an overview of the relationship-based process they use to offer PACE loans.
Jim Lauckner​, ​Chester County Economic Development Council​, said his organization,
which promotes the growth of smart energy industry through workforce development, would like
to see the PACE program adopted into law because it provides a better tool to finance energy
efficiency improvements.
Khari Mosley​, ​Blue Green Alliance​, said his group supports Senate Bill 234 because it
represents a great opportunity to create and sustain quality jobs. He noted Pennsylvania is now
an island without PACE. Ohio, Maryland, New Jersey and New York have already adopted
PACE funding initiative.
Written testimony was also provided by ​Groups Opposed To Residential PACE​,
Penn-Del-Jersey Chapter​ of National Electrical Contractors Association supporting the bill and
PACENation​ supporting Commercial PACE.
Rep. Brian Ellis (R-Butler), Majority Chair of the Committee, said his intention is to vote
on the bill in Committee on May 1. Rep. Ellis can be contacted at 717-787-7686 or by sending
email to: ​bellis@pahousegop.com​.
Rep. Curtis Thomas (D-Philadelphia) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted at
717-787-9471 or by sending email to: ​cthomas@pahouse.net​.
NewsClips:
Legere: PUC Says Law Meant To Close The Borders On Solar Energy Credits
Cusick: Bill Says Pennsylvania Should Use Only Renewable Energy By 2050
Murphy: Bills Setting 100% Renewable Energy Goal For PA Draw Bipartisan Support
Bagenstose: Bucks, Montgomery Mayors Sign On To Solar Power Pledge
Op-Ed: Make Pittsburgh’s Airport Even Smarter, Power It By The Sun, Not Natural Gas
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
Op-Ed: Trump, Pruitt Waging War On Fuel Standards
Op-Ed: Trump’s Fuel Efficiency Rollbacks Are A Wrong Turn For PA
Editorial: Standards For Gas Efficiency Area Good For Business
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Related Stories:
PA Environmental Council Supports Bill To Create Local Energy Efficiency, Clean Energy
Funding Program
Senate Passes Local Clean Energy Funding Bill To Save Energy, Money
Public Utility Commission Acts To Remove Barriers To Solar Energy Growth In PA
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
PUC Chairman Brown To Lead National Committee On Critical Infrastructure
PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Unanimously Confirmed By Senate For Second Term
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time To
Save Nuclear Power Plants
Bipartisan Senate/House Bills Would Transition Pennsylvania To 100% Renewable Power By
2050
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Bipartisan Senate/House Bills Would Transition Pennsylvania To 100% Renewable Power
By 2050

Democratic and Republican members of the House
and Senate Wednesday announced legislation to
transition Pennsylvania to 100 percent renewable
energy by 2050 in order to help fight climate
change.
The matching bills were introduced by Rep. Chris
Rabb (D-Philadelphia)-- ​House Bill 2132​ and Sen.
Charles McIlhinney (R-Bucks)-- Senate Bill 1140
(not yet online)​.
The scientific community in Pennsylvania and
internationally have stated that we must eliminate global warming pollution by 2050 to avoid a
climate change “tipping point” from which the planet cannot turn back.
"The vast majority of scientists agree: Climate change is real. And you don't have to be a
scientist to notice its effects. We've seen so many weather extremes in recent years, including
Hurricanes Katrina, Sandy, Harvey, Irma and Maria. Those last three all happened just last year,"
Rep. Rabb said. "Our military – hardly a liberal bastion – is already preparing for the effects of
climate change. The changing climate will force us to move some bases, and it threatens to
increase instability around the world. As the bipartisan American Security Project says, climate
security is national security."
While similar proposals are pending in state legislatures in California, Colorado,
Maryland, Massachusetts, and Washington, as well as proposals in both chambers of the U.S.
Congress, Pennsylvania’s proposal is groundbreaking in that it is the first bill of its kind in the
country to be introduced with a Republican legislator as its chief sponsor.
“Clean, renewable energy holds the key to promoting a healthier environment, a stronger
economy and a brighter future for future generations,” Sen. McIlhinney said. “The first steps in
that process are developing a workable, realistic plan to transition to 100 percent renewable
energy sources and ensuring our workforce is prepared to face the challenges of the new energy
economy.”
Under this legislation, the Commonwealth would be required to come up with a statewide
plan to transition to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050, in line with the most current science.
The proposals would create a Clean Energy Transition Task Force, a Clean Energy Center of
Excellence, and a Council for Clean Energy Workforce Development to develop the plan
forward for the commonwealth.
Poll after poll shows broad bipartisan support for this issue from Pennsylvania voters.
Last month, a poll by ​Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research found that 71 percent of
Pennsylvanians​ support Pennsylvania setting a goal of generating 100 percent of its electricity
using clean, renewable energy like wind and solar power, including 52 percent support from
Republicans polled.
In early April, a ​Franklin & Marshall poll showed that nearly 70 percent of
Pennsylvanians​ believe that it’s more important to pursue policies that prioritize the availability
of renewable energy over those that prioritize fossil fuel extraction.
“We have the technological ability and the support from Pennsylvania voters to transition
to 100 percent renewable energy,” said ​PennEnvironment​ Executive Director David Masur. “We
owe it to our kids, our grandkids, and the planet to use these tools to solve climate change as
quickly as possible, and the legislation announced today will do just that.”
At the announcement, the sponsors were joined by a diverse set of constituencies
showing their support for tackling climate change, including religious leaders, public health
experts, Pennsylvania academics involved in drafting previous international climate agreements,
and business leaders.
“As people of faith, we are called to protect and preserve what God has given us in order
that future generations will have what they need to live and thrive. Now that renewables have
entered the realm of the affordable and accessible, I believe we have a moral imperative to
support passage of this proposal,” said the Rev. Sandra Strauss, Director of Advocacy and
Ecumenical Outreach for the ​Pennsylvania Council of Churches​.
"This legislation should be strongly supported because Pennsylvania has both a strong
legal and moral duty to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions," noted ​Widener University Law
Professor Donald Brown. "Pennsylvania has a moral duty to act because the Commonwealth's
greenhouse gas emissions are already contributing to immense harms to ecological systems on
which life depends and human health around the world."
At the same time, a broad network of nearly 150 Pennsylvania civic leaders and
organizations released a new letter in support of the legislation and calling for immediate action
to solve climate change.
"Clean energy jobs are the wave of the future, and Pennsylvania should get out front to be
a leader," said Thea Gudonis, who works for the Pennsylvania-based solar company ​Solar States​.
"Solar is one of the fastest growing industries in the nation, with jobs that pay well and can't be
sent overseas. If Pennsylvania doesn't jump on this opportunity, certainly another state will."
"Not only will climate change have incredibly negative effects on our environment, but it
poses an extreme risk to the public's health here in Pennsylvania and globally," noted Dr. Robert
Little, president of the ​Harrisburg-Hershey Chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility​ and a
family doctor in Harrisburg for over 40 years. "This includes more asthma attacks, heat-related
deaths, and increases in diseases that were once rare in Pennsylvania like Lyme disease."
Still, legislators acknowledge that they face a daunting battle in the state Capitol building,
where lobbyists for the fossil fuel industry are numerous and incredibly influential.
“We see growing threats to our environment every day, and we can simply wait no longer
to address climate change,” said Rep. Steve McCarter (D-Montgomery). “This legislation is
Pennsylvania’s chance to commit to help preserve the one planet we have before it’s too late.”
But, with the science becoming clearer about what is needed to solve climate change and
the closing window of time, legislators agree that the only path forward is to put politics aside
and advocate for a clear and necessary plan to make Pennsylvania a leader in the fight against
global warming.
Rep. Rabb said, "I'd like Pennsylvania to get a jump on the jobs of the future, a jump on a
cleaner, sustainable future. As the father of two sons, I want them to have a better future, and I
want them to have that opportunity here. Pennsylvania has an opportunity here to be a leader, not
a follower. Let's take that opportunity and get this done -- together!"
Click Here​ for a sponsor summary of ​House Bill 2132​. Senate Bill 1140 is not yet
available online.
House Bill 2132 was referred to the House Environmental Resources and Energy
Committee.
Rep. John Maher (R-Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1522 or sending email to:
jmaher@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Mike Carroll serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by
calling 717-787-3589 or sending email to: ​mcarroll@pahouse.net​.
(​Photo:​ Windmills in Somerset County.)
NewsClips:
Cusick: Bill Says Pennsylvania Should Use Only Renewable Energy By 2050
Murphy: Bills Setting 100% Renewable Energy Goal For PA Draw Bipartisan Support
Legere: PUC Says Law Meant To Close The Borders On Solar Energy Credits
Bagenstose: Bucks, Montgomery Mayors Sign On To Solar Power Pledge
Op-Ed: Make Pittsburgh’s Airport Even Smarter, Power It By The Sun, Not Natural Gas
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Related Stories:
Public Utility Commission Acts To Remove Barriers To Solar Energy Growth In PA
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
PUC Chairman Brown To Lead National Committee On Critical Infrastructure
PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Unanimously Confirmed By Senate For Second Term
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time To
Save Nuclear Power Plants
House Committee Holds Hearing On Bipartisan Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy
Financing Program
[Posted: April 18, 2018]

PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Unanimously Confirmed By Senate For Second Term

The ​Public Utility Commission​ Wednesday thanked members of
the Senate for unanimously confirming the nomination of
Chairman Gladys M. Brown to her second five-year term as a
PUC Commissioner.
The Commission also thanked Gov. Tom Wolf, who nominated
Brown to continue her service on the Commission.
Chairman Brown was confirmed on April 17 by a 50-0 vote and
will continue to serve as Chairman of the PUC. She was sworn in
office for her new term at the PUC’s April 19 meeting.
“The Commission has many very important issues ahead and I
wanted to be a part of the resolution of these issues. They include
the Commission’s new responsibilities with the ‘One Call’ program, enforcement of transmission
pipeline safety guidelines, regulatory oversight of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority,
working to provide access to Broadband in unserved and underserved areas in the
Commonwealth and the implementation of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017,” noted Chairman
Brown during her ​March 26 hearing​ before the Senate Consumer Protection & Professional
Licensure Committee.
“In addition, in my role as Chairman, the Commission has put in place a ​#UtilityCareers
campaign, working with our utilities and educational institutions, to provide information on the
types of jobs available in the utility sector to ensure that the industry has a sufficient number of
skilled workers in place, in anticipation of the retirement of a large number of ‘baby boomers’ in
the next five to ten years. As technology continues to evolve, it is important that we have a
skilled workforce in place to maintain vital utility services for consumers.”
Chairman Brown will be sworn-in at the PUC’s public meeting on Thursday, April 19th.
Her new term will expire on April 1, 2023.
First nominated to serve as a PUC Commissioner by Gov. Tom Corbett in 2013, Brown
was appointed as Chairman of the PUC in 2015 by Gov. Tom Wolf.
Chairman Brown has been steadfast in her commitment to use the same fair and balanced
approach in dealing with PUC issues that she used in her more than 22 years as an aide in the
Pennsylvania Senate.
During that tenure she worked on many of the major utility issues considered by the
General Assembly, including deregulation bills for telecommunications, electricity and natural
gas; changes for the handling of consumer terminations and reconnections; the establishment of
energy efficiency programs; and expanded use of the distribution system improvement charge to
accelerate infrastructure improvements.
Prior to joining the Senate, Chairman Brown served as an assistant counsel for the
Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs in the Pennsylvania Department of State and as
a clerk for the late Honorable Paul A. Simmons, Judge for the U.S. District Court, Western
District of Pennsylvania.
A native of Middletown, Pa., Chairman Brown earned her bachelor’s and juris doctorate
degrees from the University of Pittsburgh. She lives in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, where she is
a member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association. She also is a member of the Dauphin County Bar
Association, the James S. Bowman Inns of Court, the Keystone Bar Association and the Central
Pennsylvania Food Bank Board of Directors. She is an active member at Bethel African
Methodist Episcopal Church in Harrisburg. She is also an active member in Epsilon Sigma
Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. and the Harrisburg Chapter of AABE
(American Association of Blacks in Energy).
Visit the ​Public Utility Commission​ website for more information on its responsibilities
and initiatives.
NewsClips:
FirstEnergy Exec Urges Legislators To Act On Behalf Of Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant
TMI Supporters Urge Lawmakers To Save Financially Troubled Nuclear Power Plant
Clock Ticks Toward Three Mile Island Shutdown
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
Legere: As Coal-Fired Power Plants Switch Off, PA Looks To Bring In New Businesses
Editorial: Fmr Coal-Fired Power Plants Get Playbooks For Future
Report: Electricity Prices Could Increase $285M If 2 PA Nuclear Plants Close
Report: Exelon, FirstEnergy Nuclear Plant Closures Would Reverse PJM Wind, Solar Benefits
Closing Nuclear Reactors In OH, PA Will Thwart Climate Goals
Study: REGGI Carbon Market In Northeast U.S. Creating Jobs, Revenue
It May Take More Than A Year For New Jersey To Rejoin RGGI Climate Pact
Environmentalists And Nuclear Power? It’s Complicated
Natural Gas, Renewable Energy Advocates Disagree On Potential To Grow Jobs In Pittsburgh
Will Pittsburgh Flourish As Hub Of Eds, Meds, Gas And Petrochemicals?
Biogas Needs Real Consideration As A Truly Clean Alternative To Natural Gas
Downed Power Line Ignites Major Armstrong County Brush Fire
Duquesne Light Rate Increase Would Hike Residential Bills By Nearly 9 Percent
PPL Enters Uncertain World Of Ratemaking In United Kingdom
Cusick: After Alert On Russian Hacking A Renewed Push To Protect Power Grid
Energy Dept. Won’t Consider FirstEnergy’s Financial Woes In Decision On Coal, Nuclear
Plants
FERC Members Tell House Panel Grid Reliability, Resilience Order Moving Forward
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
FERC Chair Opposes PJM-Like MOPR Prices As Standard Solution For State Policies
Trump May Invoke Cold War Era Defense Act To Boost Coal Plants
WV AG’s Office Files Action To Force EPA To Protect Coal, Steel Jobs
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Related Stories:
Public Utility Commission Acts To Remove Barriers To Solar Energy Growth In PA
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
PUC Chairman Brown To Lead National Committee On Critical Infrastructure
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time To
Save Nuclear Power Plants
House Committee Holds Hearing On Bipartisan Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy
Financing Program
Bipartisan Senate/House Bills Would Transition Pennsylvania To 100% Renewable Power By
2050
[Posted: April 18, 2018]

House Republicans List House Conventional Oil & Gas Bill On Voting Schedule For May 1

House Republicans Thursday listed ​House Bill 2154​ (Causer-R-Forest), the Conventional Oil
and Gas Act to regulate conventional drilling operations on the House Voting Schedule for May
1.
The House is scheduled to return to voting session on April 30 and the ​House
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ is likely to have a meeting to consider the bill
before May 1.
House Bill 2154 is identical to ​Senate Bill 1088​ (Hutchinson-R-Venango) that is due to
be considered in the near future by the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.
The Senate returns to voting session on Monday, April 23.
On April 11, the ​PA Environmental Council​ and ​Environmental Defense Fund
Wednesday ​sent a letter to the members​ of the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy
Committee expressing their concerns about legislation weakening environmental protection
standards for conventional oil and gas drilling about Senate Bill 1088.
The legislation, they said, would make Pennsylvania "the only state in the country to
walk back protections applied to oil and gas operations."
The text of the letter follows--
The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Pennsylvania Environmental Council
(PEC) respectfully submit the following comments on Senate Bill 1088 (P.N. 1546), which we
anticipate will come before the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee for a
vote early next week. At the start, we wish to express our appreciation to Senators Yaw and
Hutchinson for allowing additional time for review and comment on this legislation.
Senate Bill 1088 seeks to revert performance and protection standards for the
conventional oil and gas industry, which were modernized with the bipartisan enactment of Act
13 of 2012.
However, even today, that law has yet to be fully implemented by the Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP), as the agency was directed by the General Assembly in 2016 to
restart their rulemaking for the conventional industry.
It is our understanding that DEP is poised to issue a revised proposal for public comment
in the near future.
Senate Bill 1088 would not only reverse protection standards from the 2012 law, it would
actually be weaker in several important instances than the original 1984 Oil and Gas Act.
Pennsylvania would have the discreditable distinction of being the only state in the
country to walk back protections applied to oil and gas operations – whether conventional or
unconventional.
In fact, the way certain provisions are worded in this legislation, this bill could potentially
weaken standards applied to unconventional operations as well.
Both EDF and PEC believe that any potential divergence in standards must be based on
the practices and technologies employed at a well site, as well as objective risk assessment.
Unfortunately, Senate Bill 1088 is a blunt instrument that fails against both of these
metrics. This legislation contradicts leading industry practices as articulated in API standards and
recommended practices.
Under Act 13, and as defined in Senate Bill 1088, the fundamental distinction between
“conventional” and “unconventional” operations is one based on depth of drilling.
“Conventional” wells can be drilled horizontally, and in many cases are hydraulically
fractured at much shallower formations in closer proximity to groundwater – a fact this
legislation clearly acknowledges.
In other words, the legal distinction in Pennsylvania is made irrespective to the size of the
operator or operation, the practices employed at the well site, or the associated risks involved.
Any law that alters protection standards should only do so where the actual operations at
the well site allow.
In our view, any well that employs high volume hydraulic fracturing should be subjected
to stringent and uniform control.
Other states follow this distinction for their application of standards – for example, the
state of Illinois, which utilizes “high volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing operations” as a
threshold. Pennsylvania should do the same.
Beyond this fundamental problem, there are several other major concerns with Senate
Bill 1088 including, but not limited to:
-- Removal of language that requires additional analysis of potential impacts to Public
Resources. This language was in the 1984 law, reinforced by Act 13, and validated by the
Pennsylvania courts.
-- Removal of any requirement for operators to disclose chemicals used in the fracturing process.
Disclosure – for both conventional and unconventional operators – is currently required practice
in Pennsylvania as well as in virtually all other jurisdictions in the United States, and it should
remain that way.
-- Removing storage, spill, and leak prevention provisions, despite the fact that conventional sites
present spill and leak threats similar to unconventional operations. In fact, this legislation
provides express exemptions from the state’s Storage Tank and Spill Prevention Act, and
dramatically weakens spill and leak reporting requirements.
-- Exempting certain existing wastewater treatment facilities from state water protection
requirements, even though those protections have been applied for years.
-- Weakening protections for impacted drinking water supplies, including failure to ensure that,
in all instances, replacement supplies meet the standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act.
-- Reducing setback provisions from homes, buildings, and surface waters.
-- Weakening well integrity standards that are critical for groundwater protection.
-- As was already invalidated by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in 2013, attempting to preempt
local ordinances that address issues associated with oil and gas activities.
-- Maintaining woefully inadequate bonding and financial assurance requirements, which leaves
Pennsylvanians on the hook for costly remediation work in the decades to come.
Conclusion
Senate Bill 1088 is a wholesale weakening of necessary protection standards; standards
that are already the law in Pennsylvania, and that are accepted common practice in the industry
and other oil and gas producing states.
It also contradicts recent decisions of the Pennsylvania courts that have upheld
protections on both statutory and constitutional grounds.
For these reasons, we strongly urge you to oppose this bill.
Thank you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
Andrew Williams
Director, Regulatory and Legislative Affairs, U.S. Climate and Energy
Environmental Defense Fund
John Walliser
Senior Vice President, Legal & Government Affairs
Pennsylvania Environmental Council
Click Here​ for a copy of the letter.
Rep. John Maher (R-Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1522 or sending email to:
jmaher@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Mike Carroll serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by
calling 717-787-3589 or sending email to: ​mcarroll@pahouse.net​.
Related Stories:
PEC, EDF: Conventional Oil & Gas Bill Will Reverse, Weaken Environmental Protection
Standards For Fracking
PennFuture: Senate Bill 1088 Would Roll Back Conventional Drilling Rules To 1984 Levels
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Senate Committee Meets April 24 To Consider Pipeline Safety, Construction Bills

The ​Senate Consumer Affairs and Professional Licensure
Committee​ is scheduled to meet on April 24 to consider
several bills related to pipeline safety and construction. They
include--
-- ​Senate Bill 835​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requiring the
registration of land agents working for pipeline companies
(​sponsor summary​);
-- ​Senate Bill 930​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) sets notification
requirements related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor
summary​); and
-- ​Senate Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requires the installation of automatic or remote
controlled safety values in natural gas pipelines in densely populated areas (​sponsor summary​)
On March 20 the Committee held an extensive public ​hearing on pipeline safety
reviewing the state’s authority to regulate pipelines and the steps and missteps taken to deal with
a variety of issues related to the Sunoco Mariner East 1 and 2 Pipelines in Chester County and
other areas.
The meeting will be held in Room 461 Main Capitol starting at Noon. Committee
meetings are typically webcast through the ​Senate Republican​ website.
Sen. Tommy Tomlinson (R-Bucks) serves as Majority Chair of the Consumer Affairs
Committee and can be contacted by calling 717-787-5072 or sending email to:
rtomlinson@pasen.gov​. Sen. Lisa Boscola (D-Lehigh) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-4236 or sending email to: ​boscola@pasenate.com​.
NewsClips:
Meyer: Sunoco Says Testing Done On Mariner East 1 Pipeline And It’s Safe, PUC Says Slow
Down
Hurdle: Here’s What $12.6M Mariner East 2 Pipeline Penalty Will Be Spent On
State Establishes $12.6M Grant Program With Mariner East II Pipeline Fines
Hurdle: DEP Sets Hearing On Proposed Mariner East 2 Construction In Chester County
ATF: 350 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site Recovered
Some Explosives Recovered That Were Stolen From The Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
Officials Uncertain If They Have All Stolen Explosives
ATF Agents Flood Lancaster County On Stolen Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Explosives
ATF Increases Reward To $20,000 For Info On Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise
Pipeline Construction Site In Lancaster
About 640 Pounds Of Dynamite Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
ATF Investigating 640 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site,
Reward Offered
600+ Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Worksite In Lancaster
County
ATF Now Says More Than 700 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sense Of Urgency Propels Search For Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sisk: Dynamite Disappears From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site, ATF Trying To Find It
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
FERC Reviews Its Policies For Approving Natural Gas Pipelines
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
Related Stories:
Senate Hearing On Pipeline Safety Points To Need To Hold Pipeline Companies Accountable
For Impacts, Better Communication
DEP Establishes New Water Quality Project Grant Program With $12.6 Million Mariner East 2
Pipeline Penalty
DEP Hearing On Mariner East II Pipeline Permit Changes April 30 In Chester County, Extends
Comment Period
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Senate Committees Hold Hearing On Flooding, Emergency Response April 25
The Senate ​Environmental Resources and Energy​ and ​Veterans Affairs and Emergency
Preparedness​ Committees will hold a joint hearing April 25 on flooding and emergency
response.
The hearing will be held in Room 8E-B East Wing of the Capitol Building starting at
9:00. ​Click Here​ to watch the hearing live.
Sen. Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming) serves as Majority Chair of the ​Senate Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-787-3280 or sending email to:
gyaw@pasen.gov​. Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7105 or sending email to: ​yudichak@pasenate.com​.
Sen. Randy Vulakovich (R-Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the Senate Veterans
Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee and can be contacted by calling 717-787-6538
or by sending email to: ​rvulakovich@pasen.gov​. Sen. Jay Costa (D-Allegheny) serves as
Minority Chair and can be contacted by calling 717-787-7683 or by sending email to:
costa@pasenate.com​.
NewsClips:
Rain, Snow Racks Up $12.2M In Allegheny County Damage, Prompts Emergency Declaration
Allegheny County Declares Disaster Emergency Related To Precipitation Impacts, Landslides
Landslide Closes Guys Run Road In Harmar
Landslide Shuts Down River Road In Gilpin Monday Night
Falling Rocks, Debris Force Closure Of Route 906 In Fayette
Wall Collapse Reduces Route 11/15 To One Lane Near Harrisburg
Storm Expected Sunday Night, Warnings Of Flash Floods, Landslides In Western PA
Potentially Flooding Rains Expected For Central PA
Storm Forces 125 To Evacuate Scranton Apartment Building After Roof Blown Off
Heavy Rains Flood Basements In Delaware County
Work Begins On Solomon Creek Flood Wall Project In Wilkes-Barre
Solomon Creek Flood Wall Project Put Out For Bids
Flooding Fear Drives Girard Man’s Fight
Op-Ed: We Need Federal Flood Insurance Reforms
Editorial: Draft Floodplain Insurance Maps With Science
PennDOT Awards Contract To Rebuild Landslide-Damaged Route 30
PennDOT: Landslide Damaged Route 30 In Pittsburgh To Reopen By Mid-July
PennDOT Could Choose Contractor For Landslide-Damaged Route 30 This Weekend
Landslide Closes Guys Run Road In Harmar
Landslide Shuts Down River Road In Gilpin Monday Night
Falling Rocks, Debris Force Closure Of Route 906 In Fayette
Wall Collapse Reduces Route 11/15 To One Lane Near Harrisburg
Landslides A Common Annoyance In Western PA, Blame Weather, Geology
Editorial: Pool Resources To Address Regional Landslides
Storm Expected Sunday Night, Warnings Of Flash Floods, Landslides In Western PA
Woman Dies After Falling Into Berks County Quarry
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

The Feds
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations

The ​Federal Energy Regulatory Commission​ Friday
issued a Notice of Inquiry​ inviting comments on its
process determining the need for and evaluating the
environmental impacts of natural gas pipelines.
More specifically, FERC is asking for comments
on how the Commission should change its--
--- Methodology for determining whether there is a need
for a proposed project, including the Commission’s
consideration of precedent agreements and contracts for
service as evidence of such need;
-- Consideration of the potential exercise of eminent domain and of landowner interests related to
a proposed project;
-- Evaluation of the environmental impact of a proposed project; and
-- Certificate processes including pre-filing, post-filing, and post-order issuance.
FERC has not changed its process for 19 years.
Click Here​ for a copy of the Notice of Inquiry and instructions on how to submit
comments through the ​FERC website​.
(​Photo:​ Mariner East 2 Pipeline construction, ​LancasterOnline.com​.)
NewsClips:
FERC Reviews Its Policies For Approving Natural Gas Pipelines
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
Meyer: Sunoco Says Testing Done On Mariner East 1 Pipeline And It’s Safe, PUC Says Slow
Down
Hurdle: Here’s What $12.6M Mariner East 2 Pipeline Penalty Will Be Spent On
State Establishes $12.6M Grant Program With Mariner East II Pipeline Fines
Hurdle: DEP Sets Hearing On Proposed Mariner East 2 Construction In Chester County
ATF: 350 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site Recovered
Some Explosives Recovered That Were Stolen From The Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
Officials Uncertain If They Have All Stolen Explosives
ATF Agents Flood Lancaster County On Stolen Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Explosives
ATF Increases Reward To $20,000 For Info On Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise
Pipeline Construction Site In Lancaster
About 640 Pounds Of Dynamite Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
ATF Investigating 640 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site,
Reward Offered
600+ Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Worksite In Lancaster
County
ATF Now Says More Than 700 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sense Of Urgency Propels Search For Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sisk: Dynamite Disappears From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site, ATF Trying To Find It
Related Story:
Senate Committee Meets April 24 To Consider Pipeline Safety, Construction Bills
DEP Establishes New Water Quality Project Grant Program With $12.6 Million Mariner East 2
Pipeline Penalty
DEP Hearing On Mariner East II Pipeline Permit Changes April 30 In Chester County, Extends
Comment Period
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

News From Around The State

High School Students Participate In Westmoreland County's Envirothon April 30

It’s extracurricular. It’s outside. And it’s fun!
It’s the Westmoreland County Envirothon – a
yearly academic competition that pits teams of
high school students to see which has the most
knowledge of the natural world.
This year, 95 students from nine Westmoreland
County high schools are scheduled to participate
in the Envirothon on Monday, April 30 at Twin
Lakes Park in Greensburg.
During the hands-on competition, students may be
asked to identify an amphibian, measure a tree, or examine animal skulls to identify the species.
They will be asked to answer challenging questions related to forestry, soil, land use,
aquatic ecology, and wildlife, and to address an environmental issue, which this year focuses on
the benefits of grassland and pastureland management.
“This is a tough competition, and students have a significant amount of information to
study in addition to their regular coursework. All of these students should be commended for
their hard work,” said Jen Novak, the Westmoreland Conservation District’s education program
coordinator.
The 95 students scheduled to participate in this year’s Westmoreland County competition
represent Burrell High School, Derry Area High School, Franklin Regional Senior High School,
Greater Latrobe Senior High School, Kiski Area High School, Mount Pleasant Area
Junior-Senior High School, Norwin High School, Southmoreland High School, and Yough
Senior High School.
The team that wins the Westmorland County Envirothon will go on to compete in the
state competition, to be held in May at Susquehanna University and Camp Mount Luther in
Snyder and Union counties, respectively.
The Westmoreland Conservation District has hosted the local Envirothon every year
since 1986.
A number of cooperating organizations and agencies also assist the Westmoreland
Conservation District in hosting the event, including: the Game Commission, Fish and Boat
Commission, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Bureau of Forestry,
Department of Environmental Protection, Westmoreland County Bureau of Parks and
Recreation, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Westmoreland County
Beekeepers Association.
This year’s Westmoreland County Envirothon received funding support from the
Pennsylvania Envirothon, Inc.​; ​Apex Energy, LLC​; and ​Smithfield​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Westmoreland County Conservation District​ website.
To learn more about Envirothon competitions, visit the ​PA Envirothon​ website.
(​Photo:​ 2017 First Place Winners - Southmoreland High School Team 1. ​Click Here​ to see all
the 2017 winners.)
NewsClips:
Apollo-Ridge 1st, 2nd Graders Release Brook Trout Into Kiski River On Field Trip
Wildlife Leadership Academy Promotes Conservation Among Teens
Wilkes University Earth & Environmental Science Day
Earth Day Event Held By The River In Wilkes-Barre
Welshans: Wildlife Leadership Academy Ensures Future Of Conservation Lives On In Youth
Facts Matter Cry Ralliers In Bethlehem’s March For Science
Schneck: When, How To Watch The Lyrid Meteor Shower
Related Stories:
Pennsylvania Statewide Envirothon Provides Spring Update
PA’s Penncrest High School Team Winners Of International Envirothon Competition
DEP Keystone Energy Education Workshops For Teachers Coming Up In May
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

Pennsylvania Statewide Envirothon Provides Spring Update

The statewide ​PA Envirothon​ organization ​provided a
Spring Update​ on activities featuring stories on--
-- Details On Upcoming 2018 Statewide
Pennsylvania Envirothon May 22-23 at Susquehanna
University in Seilinsgrove
-- Oral Presentation Component Of The State
Envirothon
-- Volunteer Needed To Help Lead The National
Anthem At State Envirothon
-- Coaches, Teachers Can Attend Recovery Of Harrisburg Peregrine Falcons
-- Mike Dupuy, Master Falconer, Featured Speaker At State Envirothon
-- Envirothon Gear For Sale
-- Where Are They Now? Ryan Ling, DCNR Assistant District Forester
“When people ask me why I chose a career in forestry, I always answer without
hesitation the same two reasons, ‘Scouting and the Envirothon.’”
-- 2017 Monroe County Conservation Educator Of the Year Maricatherine Garr
In Pennsylvania
The Envirothon competition was created in 1979 by the Fulton, Luzerne and Schuylkill
conservation districts and by 1984 the program expanded to a statewide competition.
Now more than 15,000 high school students across the state compete in 67 county
Envirothons.
Pennsylvania teams have won the now international Envirothon competition in 1988,
1989, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2009 and 2017. This year’s international
competition will be held at Idaho State University July 22-28.
At the state level, the Envirothon is sponsored by Pennsylvania’s 67 county conservation
districts, the State Conservation Commission, and the Pennsylvania Association of Conservation
Districts. The program is managed by a board of directors representing those sponsors.
Technical expertise is provided by the following partners: departments of Agriculture,
Education, Environmental Protection, Conservation and Natural Resources, the Game
Commission, Fish and Boat Commission, and U.S.D.A. Natural Resources Conservation
Service.
Sponsors and partners of the statewide Envirothon are Shell Oil Company, The Hershey
Company, EQT Foundation, Philadelphia Insurance Companies, Weis, Southwest Energy, Chief
Oil & Gas LLC, UGI Utilities and Marcellus Shale Coalition.
Click Here​ for a complete list of sponsors and partners.
For more information on Envirothon, visit the ​PA Envirothon​ website. Questions should
be directed to 814-623-7900 ext. 111 or send email to: ​lsteach@envirothonpa.org​. ​Click Here​ to
sign up for their newsletter.
(​Photo​: 5-member ​Penncrest High School Team​ from Delaware County won the 2017
International NCF-Envirothon competition: Bill Gill (Smithfield Foods), Mark Samilenko and
Chrissa Kuntz (coaches), Rachel Hughes, Dennis Harrsch, Thy-Lan Gale, Abigail Schwartz,
Cole Gaboriault, and Millie Langley (NCF-Envirothon).)
NewsClips:
Apollo-Ridge 1st, 2nd Graders Release Brook Trout Into Kiski River On Field Trip
Wildlife Leadership Academy Promotes Conservation Among Teens
Wilkes University Earth & Environmental Science Day
Earth Day Event Held By The River In Wilkes-Barre
Welshans: Wildlife Leadership Academy Ensures Future Of Conservation Lives On In Youth
Facts Matter Cry Ralliers In Bethlehem’s March For Science
Schneck: When, How To Watch The Lyrid Meteor Shower
Related Story:
High School Students Participate In Westmoreland County's Envirothon April 30
PA’s Penncrest High School Team Winners Of International Envirothon Competition
DEP Keystone Energy Education Workshops For Teachers Coming Up In May
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Root Mass Farm In Berks County Receives Small Farm Environmental Sustainability
Grant

The ​FruitGuys Community​ Wednesday
announced the award of $47,534 in Small Farms
Environmental Sustainability Grants to 13
recipients, including the ​Root Mass Farm​ in Oley,
Berks County.
The $3,986 Environmental Sustainability Grant to
Root Mass Farm will allow them to build a high tunnel greenhouse and plant 21 fig trees.
Root Mass Farm, a 5-acre farm run by Lindsay Shapiro and Landon Jefferies, grows a
diverse mix of annual vegetables, melons, perennial herbs, and small berries. They use organic
methods and place a strong emphasis on soil health while striving to create a vibrant farm
ecosystem.
Their produce is sold at two Philadelphia farmers’ markets and through
Community-Supported Agriculture agreements.
Neither Lindsay nor Landon grew up on a farm or in the presence of farming parents.
We’re children of the suburbs who got hooked on growing food.
Landon spent summers in college interning on sustainable vegetable farms in
Massachusetts and New York. After a few growing seasons cut short by the impending school
year, Landon decided to take a semester off to see a season through from beginning to end.
He then honed his farming chops at the Wyck Home Farm in Philly for 3 seasons, selling
to Germantown neighbors steps away from where the food was grown.
Since starting the farm, he’s not only scaled up his agriculture know-how, but also picked
up some new tricks. He can now fix the brakes of a Dodge van, change the spark plug on a
tractor, and convince a pig to return to its home.
Prior to starting Root Mass, Lindsey knew almost nothing about farming, but she liked
the idea of making something useful and working in the sunshine. The learning curve has been
both steep and rewarding.
Sometimes though, she still feels overwhelmed by all the things she doesn’t know. The
height of her farming career will come when she wins the hay bale toss at the Oley Valley
Community Fair.
They described their methods in their own words: “At Root Mass Farm, we respect the
health of the soil, the health of the plants, and the health of the people who work the land (us!).
We aim to nourish a thriving farm ecosystem, full of insects, birds, fungus, microscopic stuff,
and even weeds.
“We use manure, organic fertilizers, and cover crops to build fertility in our soil. We use
radishes and broadforks to improve drainage. We use our muscles and our shuffle hoes to knock
back weeds, and we rely on the spiders, ladybird beetles, and floating row cover to do a lot of our
pest management.
“If things get bad, we may use a pesticide approved for organic use, but mostly we just
try to keep things lively. If you’d like to get a more personal sense of how things are done
around here, we encourage you to visit the farm. After all, we could use your help squashing
potato beetles and taming the pigweed.”
Click Here​ to watch their video “Dream Fig With Root Mass Farm.”
To learn more, visit the ​Root Mass Farm​ website.
For more information on the Small Farms Environmental Sustainability Grants, visit the
Fruitguys Community Fund​ website.
Click Here​ to find Community Supported Agriculture farms near you courtesy of the ​PA
Association for Sustainable Agriculture​.
NewsClips:
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
Natural Lands Trust Strikes Back Against School District’s Eminent Domain Play
County Commissioners Join Fight Against School District Taking Preserved Farmland
Midstate School District Faces Growing Calls To Stop Eminent Domain Move On Farm
Cumberland School District Warned Of Far-Reaching Effects If Preserved Farmland Acquired
More PA Dairy Farmers Calling It Quits As Milk Prices Keep Falling
Initiative Aims To Connect Struggling Dairy Farmers With Resources
U.S. House Committee’s Farm Bill Fails American Family Farmers On Conservation, Other
Issues
Related Stories:
Op-Ed: As Earth Week Approaches, We Celebrate Our Vibrant, Growing PA Sustainable
Agriculture Community
Nearly 2,800 Acres, 27 Farms Added To PA's Agricultural Land Preservation Program
Penn State Extension, Agriculture Officials Look To Slow Spread Of Spotted Lanternfly
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Op-Ed: As Earth Week Approaches, We Celebrate Our Vibrant, Growing PA Sustainable
Agriculture Community

By Melissa Cipollone, ​PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture

"Whether it's chips, crickets or vegetables,
Pennsylvanians are buying more organic food than
ever." New data puts ​Pennsylvania second in the nation
for total organic sales​ (California is first).
Our Executive Director, Hannah Smith-Brubaker,
observes state policymakers taking note: “When I visit
with legislators, I just can’t believe the change in literacy
even from five years ago,” Smith-Brubaker said. “And it
can’t just be the farmers. It’s that the consumers are
prioritizing it.”
Thinking critically about market access​ while playing some mean harmonica.
We celebrate the expertise and talents of our vibrant sustainable ag community, which are
captured in this short video from this year’s Farming for the Future Conference created by Joe
Harrison from ​USDA Agricultural Marketing Service​.
For more than a decade, businesses band together to undergird PASA’s mission on Earth
Week.
Eleven years ago, ​Four Seasons Produce​ of Ephrata, Lancaster County pioneered an
important annual fundraising campaign for PASA by donating a portion of their produce sales
during Earth Week to us.
Their campaign has raised $250,000 to date!
The following year, ​Lady Moon Farms​ significantly grew the campaign by also pledging
a portion of their Earth Week sales to PASA. During the past decade, several other businesses
have joined the charge.
Mother Earth Organic Mushrooms​ of Chester County is participating for its ninth year,
and two years ago our friends at ​Kimberton Whole Foods​ led the ‘retailers charge’ by jumping
aboard the program and contributing per case of organics as well.
The PASA community can support this program by shopping at Kimberton during Earth
Week (April 15th - 21st), as well as the following natural food retailers, which are also
partnering in the program: ​Weaver’s Way Cooperative​, ​Harvest Market Natural Foods​, and East
End Food Coop​.
“PASA is all of us speaking with one voice. Let’s all show our support during this special
week allowing PASA's mission to continue to grow!” says Tom Beddard, owner of Lady Moon
Farms. We deeply appreciate the generosity of these businesses and the value they place on
building a more sustainable food system.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events to support
sustainable farming operations, visit the ​PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture​ webpage.
Click Here​ to find Community Supported Agriculture farms near you courtesy of the ​PA
Association for Sustainable Agriculture​.
(​Photo:​ ​Kimberton Whole Foods​.)
NewsClips:
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
Natural Lands Trust Strikes Back Against School District’s Eminent Domain Play
County Commissioners Join Fight Against School District Taking Preserved Farmland
Midstate School District Faces Growing Calls To Stop Eminent Domain Move On Farm
Cumberland School District Warned Of Far-Reaching Effects If Preserved Farmland Acquired
More PA Dairy Farmers Calling It Quits As Milk Prices Keep Falling
Initiative Aims To Connect Struggling Dairy Farmers With Resources
U.S. House Committee’s Farm Bill Fails American Family Farmers On Conservation, Other
Issues
Related Stories:
Root Mass Farm In Berks County Receives Small Farm Environmental Sustainability Grant
Nearly 2,800 Acres, 27 Farms Added To PA's Agricultural Land Preservation Program
Penn State Extension, Agriculture Officials Look To Slow Spread Of Spotted Lanternfly

(Reprinted from the ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​ website.)
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Anthracite Heritage Museum Celebrating Our Anthracite Legacy Program By Robert
Hughes EPCAMR April 21

The ​Anthracite Heritage Museum​ will host Robert Hughes,
Executive Director of the Eastern PA Coalition for
Abandoned Mine Reclamation for a presentation on the topic
of ​The Sustainability Factor of Coalfield Community Groups
in Anthracite and Bituminous Region and EPCAMR's Role​,"
one in the new Anthracite Legacy Lecture Series.
The presentation by Hughes will be geared towards
abandoned mines, mine reclamation, mine water pollution,
environmental advocacy of long-term community groups
within the coalfields, and survey results of groups from
across Pennsylvania that continue to work on legacy abandoned mine issues that make them
sustainable and continue to persevere.
Lessons learned and advice from long-standing community groups from across
Pennsylvania that have worked in the anthracite and bituminous coalfield communities will be
highlighted.
An explanation of the Surface Mining Reclamation Control Act, the RECLAIM Act,
Environmental Good Samaritan Act, and brief highlights of regional EPCAMR Programs,
Environmental Education Watershed Tours, water quality monitoring, aquatic connectivity
surveys, and technical services that we're providing to the state and the public at large will be
discussed as well including our underground mine mapping project, statewide conferences on
abandoned mine reclamation, and 3D underground mine pool modeling.
Click Here​ for more information. The presentation will be held from 2:00 to 4:00 at the
Anthracite Heritage Museum​ site at McDade Park in Scranton.
For more information on EPCAMR, visit the ​Eastern PA Coalition for Abandoned Mine
Reclamation​ website.
(​Photo:​ Robert Hughes.)
NewsClips:
Kiski, Conemaugh Mine Runoff Treatment Systems Clogged With Sediment
Earth Conservancy’s Environmental Workforce Training Program Ends With 21 Graduates
Acid Mine Drainage Yields Valuable Rare Earth Elements
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

West Norriton Twp, Montgomery County: Stormwater In Your Backyard, Everyone Has
A Story To Tell

West Norriton Township​ in Montgomery County recently posted a story map online to educate
its residents about stormwater called: ​Stormwater In Your Backyard, Everyone Has A Story To
Tell​.
The goal of the project was to create an interactive online tool that uses geography and
maps to tell a story about stormwater everyone will understand.
It provides information about local stormwater impacts and the best ways to help reduce
pollutants entering streams.
The Story Map was developed by ​Cedarville Engineering Group, LLC​ as part of West
Norriton Township's effort to meet the MS4 Stormwater education requirement.
Click Here​ to visit Stormwater In Your Backyard. ​Click Here​ to learn more about the
Township’s Pollutant Reduction Plan.
For more information on stormwater management, visit DEP’s ​Municipal Stormwater
webpage.
NewsClips:
Bethlehem Twp Hears Plan For Meeting Sediment Pollution
Harveys Lake Residents Fire Questions At Council About Stormwater Decision
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

Learn To Green Your Property For Clean Water At April 24 Workshop In Centre County

Interns with the ​Penn State Agriculture and Environment
Center ​and other partners will hold a workshop for homeowners to learn how to green their
property for clean water on April 24 at the ​American Philatelic Society​, 100 Match Factory Place
in Bellefonte, Center County near Big Spring Spirits from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Spring has sprung (well, it’s trying!) and you can learn how to green your property for
clean water at this free workshop!
Attendees will learn about stormwater runoff and how to implement simple, green
practices on their own properties to better manage runoff while cultivating their yards.
Landscaping with native plants will be emphasized, and practices like rain gardens, rain barrels,
native meadows and riparian buffers will be discussed.
“This is a great time to think about your spring landscaping plans,” said Matt Royer,
Director of the AEC. “Our student interns will share tips and ideas about managing water on a
property and how the use of native plants in landscaping can improve water quality, wildlife
habitat, and beautify your home at the same time.”
All attendees will receive a free Homeowner’s Guide to Stormwater and learn how to use
the guide to develop a plan for their own land.
The workshop is co-sponsored by ​Borough of Bellefonte​, ​Penn State Sustainability
Institute​, ​ClearWater Conservancy​, ​Spring Creek Trout Unlimited​, ​Spring Creek Watershed
Commission​, and the American Philatelic Society.
There is no cost to attend, but registration is requested. ​Click Here​ to register online.
Questions should be directed to Matt Royer, Director, ​Penn State Agriculture and Environment
Center​, by sending email to: ​mroyer@psu.edu​.
NewsClips:
Bethlehem Twp Hears Plan For Meeting Sediment Pollution
Harveys Lake Residents Fire Questions At Council About Stormwater Decision
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

Volunteers Plant Nearly 1,000 Trees Along Tributaries To Brandywine River In Southeast

Stroud Water Research Center​ in Chester
County celebrated National Volunteer
Week on a chilly but sunny Friday
afternoon by restoring 2.75 acres
(approximately 119,790 square feet) along
two swales that transport rainwater into
Buck and Doe Run. Buck and Doe Run is a
major tributary of the Brandywine River,
which eventually flows downstream to
provide drinking water for the city of
Wilmington, Delaware.
Volunteers from ​Exelon Generation​, one of the monetary supporters of the planting, were
joined by volunteers from ​Wilmington Trust​, the ​Southern Chester County Young Business
Leaders​, ​Lincoln University​ students, and local community members to plant nearly 1,000 trees
and shelters.
“Powering our communities is just the beginning of our commitment to improve the
quality of life for people in the communities where we live, work and serve. We provide
opportunities for our employees to support the organizations that they care about through
volunteer service, and we are honored to continue our partnership with Stroud Water Research
Center by supporting their watershed restoration and environmental education efforts,” said Bill
Swahl, vice president of Exelon Generation.
The planting, on a property that was once part of the famed King Ranch, is an upstream
continuation of watershed restoration sites planted by the Stroud Center with the help of
volunteers in the fall of 2017.
Research has shown that trees greatly help keep pesticides and other contaminants out of
streams.
“With each planting that we do at the Stroud Center, we try to learn something new about
how to quickly and efficiently plant trees and get them to help protect our freshwater resources,”
said Bern Sweeney, Ph.D., principal investigator and distinguished research scientist, “and the
support and commitment of companies like Exelon Generation is vital to our ability to install
these plantings. We are grateful for their support and enthusiasm to spend the day planting trees
for the health of our streams.”
Funding for this project was provided by ​Exelon Generation​ and ​TreeVitalize​.
To learn more about upcoming volunteer opportunities, visit the ​Stroud Events​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Stroud Water
Research Center​ website, ​Click Here​ to subscribe to UpStream. ​Click Here​ to subscribe to
Stroud’s Educator newsletter. ​Click Here​ to become a Friend Of Stroud Research, ​Like them on
Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, include them in your ​Circle on Google+​ and visit their ​YouTube
Channel​.
NewsClips:
Public Invited To Lewisburg Tree Planting April 19
Lancaster Plans Record Tree Planting For Arbor Day April 27
Penns Valley Conservation To Host Creek Cleanup, Tree Plantings Starting April 21
PPL Employees Participate In Weiser State Forest Earth Day Tree Planting
After Growth Spurt, Tree Pittsburgh Finally Has Roots
AP: 2 Firefighters Hurt In Falls Battling Brush Fire In Blair County
Logan Twp In Blair County Imposes Ban On Burning
Downed Power Line Ignites Major Armstrong County Brush Fire
Related Stories:
CBF-PA: More Tree Planting Events Scheduled In Pennsylvania, Sign Up Today!
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Penn State Extension Watershed Winds Newsletter Now Available

The latest issue of the Watershed Winds
newsletter is now available from Penn State
Extension featuring articles on--
-- ​Extension Presents At Lawrence/Mercer
County ALARM Water Workshop
-- ​Northampton Residents Learn About
Drinking Water, Septic Management
-- ​Second Class Of Master Watershed Stewards Graduate In York County​ ​(photo)
-- ​Crawford County Pond Workshop Draws Large Crowd
-- ​Pond and Lake Management Workshop May 11
Click Here​ to subscribe to a variety of Penn State Extension topic areas.
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Protecting One Of Pennsylvania's Prized Waters: Spring Creek In Centre County

By Joan Smedinghoff, ​Chesapeake Bay Program

Spring Creek flows through Centre County
near Pennsylvania State University.
Designated one of the ​best fishing waters for
wild trout​, this stream is known for the
fishing opportunities it offers.
The Spring Creek watershed is about
12 percent impervious, meaning that 12
percent of the land that drains into the
waterway contains hard surfaces like
buildings, roads and sidewalks. Fisheries
experts consider impervious surface cover
above 10 percent as likely to harm local fish populations.
However, Spring Creek itself is still listed as a ​Class A wild trout stream​, meaning that it
supports a population of naturally produced trout to support a long-term sport fishery.
Experts believe this is because the creek is fed in large part by springs connected to a
large groundwater reservoir. This helps the appropriately named Spring Creek have good flow
even during dry periods and maintain a moderate temperature year round, which helps support
fish populations.
Despite this source of fresh water, ​runoff is still​ an in issue, and local groups are working
to decrease pollution from entering the creek.
The ​Spring Creek Chapter of Trout Unlimited​ and the ​ClearWater Conservancy​ of
Central Pennsylvania both received ​Chesapeake Bay Small Watershed grants​ to plant forest
buffers along the creek.
Forest buffers​ prevent pollution from entering waterways, stabilize stream banks, provide
food and habitat to wildlife and keep streams cool during hot weather.
Click Here​ to learn more about Spring Creek and its surrounding watershed.
For more information on protecting and cleaning up Pennsylvania’s Chesapeake Bay
Watershed, visit the DEP ​PA’s Chesapeake Bay Plan​ webpage.
(Reprinted from the ​Chesapeake Bay Program Blog​.)
NewsClips:
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
Volunteers Clean Up Plastic Pellets That Spilled Into Pocono Creek
Protecting Pennsylvania Prized Waters- Spring Creek, Centre County
Bethlehem Twp Hears Plan For Meeting Sediment Pollution
Nestle Waters Won’t Build Bottling Plant In Spring, Benner Twps, Centre County
Crews Responding To Heating Oil Spill In Bensalem
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

Vote Now In Chesapeake Bay Foundation Save The Bay Photo Contest, 2 Entries From PA

Voting is now open for the
Viewers’ Choice Award in the
2018 Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Save The Bay Photo Contest​. The
last day to vote is April 27.
There are two entries from
Pennsylvania to vote for--
-- ​Hooded Merganser​ from the
Children’s Lake in Boiling Springs, Cumberland County by Zackary Gleiter; or
-- The ​Jurassic​ in Kitchen Creek at ​Ricketts Glen State Park​ in Luzerne County by Joseph
Simons III.
Click Here​ to vote for your [Pennsylvania] favorite.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Protecting Pennsylvania Prized Waters- Spring Creek, Centre County
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

Susquehanna River Basin Commission Hearing On Proposed Fee Changes, Water Projects
May 10

The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ is scheduled to hold a public hearing May 10 to on
water withdrawal requests, changes to fee schedule, proposed records retention policy and
changes to the Susquehanna River Watershed Comprehensive Plan. ​(​formal notice​)
The deadline for comments on these proposals is May 21, in addition to the hearing.
Comments may be submitted online. ​Click Here​ for instructions on submitting comments.
The hearing will be held in Room 8E-B East Wing Capitol Building, Harrisburg from
2:30 to 5:00.
For more information, visit SRBC’s Public Participation Center webpage. Questions
should be directed to Jason Oyler, General Counsel, 717-238-0423, Ext. 1312, fax
717-238-2436.
NewsClips:
Crable: Susquehanna Heritage Designation Would Mean More Federal Dollars For Lancaster
Ecotourism
Rain Thwarts Efforts To Find Source Of Oil Sheen On Susquehanna At Lock Haven
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

DEP Suspends Accreditation Of Analytical Laboratory Services, Inc. For Violations

The Department of Environmental Protection Friday suspended the laboratory accreditation of
Analytical Laboratory Services, Inc.’s​ Middletown facility (ALS-Middletown) in Dauphin
County for continued violations relating to the handling and reporting of Safe Drinking Water
compliance samples.
As a result, ALS-Middletown is no longer allowed to conduct tests and analysis of
microbiology samples to demonstrate compliance with water quality standards for public
drinking water suppliers.
Between July 2017 and March 2018, DEP’s Laboratory Accreditation Program (LAP)
received numerous complaints from ALS-Middletown customers regarding drinking water
reporting, sample handling and sample analysis violations.
During December 2017 and February 2018, the LAP conducted two on-site assessments
which revealed repeated deficiencies and violations that had been identified during past on-site
assessments in 2013 and 2015.
On December 7, 2017 and March 13, 2018, DEP issued ALS-Middletown Notices of
Violations that outlined the repeated violations found by the Department and observed during the
on-site assessments.
“The department finds it necessary to take this action to protect public health and safety,”
said Dr. Martina McGarvey, director of the Bureau of Labs for DEP. “ALS-Middletown has
demonstrated an inability or an unwillingness to provide and implement an acceptable corrective
action report that will show its ability to end the repeated violations.”
Specifically, the violations included:
-- Failure to notify public water supplies within 1 hour of the determination of an MCL
(Maximum Contaminant Level) exceedance;
-- Failure to notify DEP in writing within 24 hours of the determination of an MCL exceedance;
Failure to ensure Chains of Custody are complete and accurate; and
-- Invalidating sample results that should have been reported to DEP’s Public Water Supply and
Drinking Water Electronic Reporting Systems.
An MCL is the maximum permissible level of a contaminant in water which is delivered
to a user of a public water system under the Safe Drinking Water Act. If a contaminant is found
above the MCL value, the public water supplier must take corrective actions to ensure safe and
potable water is supplied to the users.
To regain accreditation, ALS-Middletown must provide a written response to each
violation listed in the March NOV. This response must provide all documentation necessary to
ensure the violations are corrected and will not reoccur.
DEP also plans to enter into a Consent Order and Agreement with ALS-Middletown to
ensure the implementation of all corrective actions.
For more information on this program, visit DEP’s ​Laboratory Accreditation Program
webpage.
NewsClip:
McKelvey: Suspended PA Drinking Water Lab Tested Thousands Of Samples
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Schuylkill Action Network 15th Annual Schuylkill Scrub Cleanup May 19

The ​Schuylkill Action Network​ and its partners will
hold the ​15th Anniversary Schuylkill Scrub Cleanup​ on
May 19 at the Upper Merion Boathouse Park, Water
Street in Bridgeport, Montgomery County from 10:00
to 12:30.
Join ​United By Blue​, ​Schuylkill Action Network​, the
Philadelphia Water Department​, ​Schuylkill River
Greenways​, ​Partnership for the Delaware Estuary​, and
Luke’s Lobster​ as volunteers tackle the trash on the
banks of our beloved river.
The Schuylkill Scrub is a watershed initiative to
cleanup as many sections of the river as possible, and
with your help, we'll do our part in the Greater Philadelphia Area!
The Schuylkill River Watershed, in southeastern Pennsylvania, supports wildlife and
recreation from the Appalachian Mountains all the way down to the Delaware River, and into the
Atlantic Ocean.
In the Greater Philadelphia Area, the Schuylkill provides beautiful recreational areas and
a home to Pennsylvania woodland creatures.
Unfortunately, the river can be affected by trash and pollutants carried in through storm
drains and littering.
Do your part in the Schuylkill Scrub by lending a hand at our cleanup effort this May!
The Schuylkill Action Network will provide all cleanup supplies, and volunteers will
enjoy snacks by Luke's Lobster after the cleanup. It is recommended volunteers wear sturdy
shoes that you don’t mind getting dirty or wet.
United By Blue thanks ​Zipcar​ for its transportation support during the 2018 cleanup
season.
Click Here​ to learn more about the cleanup or call 215-278-7858 ext. 4 or by sending
email to: ​cleanup@unitedbyblue.com​.
Volunteer or sign up now for the ​2018 Great American Cleanup of PA​ and set up your
own cleanup and beautification event now through May 31.
NewsClips:
Youngwood Seeks Volunteers For Earth Day Cleanup
Earth Day Guide To Where To Take Your Unwanted Stuff In Lancaster County
Carr: Monroeville Still Accepting Registrations For Weekend Cleanup Day
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Related Stories:
ClearWater Conservancy Watershed Cleanup Day April 21 In Centre County
PA Resources Council, PA American Water, Partners Host 3 Drug Take-Back Day Collection
Events In Allegheny County
DEP, PennDOT, Local Officials, KPB Participate In Park Beautification Event In Chester,
Delaware County
Celebrate Earth Day By Joining Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

ClearWater Conservancy Watershed Cleanup Day April 21 In Centre County

Join the ​ClearWater Conservancy​ and its partners
for the 22nd Annual Watershed Cleanup Day on
April 21 from 8:00 a.m. to Noon at multiple sites
followed by a volunteer picnic at Circleville Park
with games and live music.
Last year over 550 volunteers​ were able to
cleanup and dispose of over 38.1 tons of trash from
59 sites along roadsides, parks, streams and
sinkholes.
The Centre County Recycling and Refuse
Authority is an active partner in this cleanup.
Click Here​ to download a flyer on the event or call 814-237-0400 or send email to:
lexie@clearfwaterconservancy.org​ for more information.
Volunteer or sign up now for the ​2018 Great American Cleanup of PA​ and set up your
own cleanup and beautification event now through May 31.
NewsClips:
Youngwood Seeks Volunteers For Earth Day Cleanup
Earth Day Guide To Where To Take Your Unwanted Stuff In Lancaster County
Carr: Monroeville Still Accepting Registrations For Weekend Cleanup Day
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Related Stories:
Schuylkill Action Network 15th Annual Schuylkill Scrub Cleanup May 19
PA Resources Council, PA American Water, Partners Host 3 Drug Take-Back Day Collection
Events In Allegheny County
DEP, PennDOT, Local Officials, KPB Participate In Park Beautification Event In Chester,
Delaware County
Celebrate Earth Day By Joining Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

DEP, PennDOT, Local Officials, KPB Participate In Park Beautification Event In Chester,
Delaware County
The secretaries of the Department of Environmental Protection and Department of
Transportation joined City of Chester (Delaware County) officials, residents, and ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ at Sun Village Park for beautification activities to celebrate the
community’s cleanup of the park and the positive impact of state partnership and investment.
The community has worked for two years on an ongoing project to remove trash, tires,
and graffiti; paint murals; plant flowers; and complete other projects to clean and beautify the
four-acre park.
The project has received technical support, supplies, and other assistance from Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful through support from DEP, PennDOT, and the ​PennDOT
Adopt-a-Highway Program​.
“Everyone plays a part in keeping Pennsylvania clean. The Chester community’s
dedication to cleaning up Sun Village Park, making it a more accessible outdoor natural space, is
a model for communities across the Commonwealth,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell,
“DEP is pleased to support Chester’s great effort and success.”
“While the ultimate solution would be for people to stop littering our roads, I am
extremely proud of the work of PennDOT’s Adopt-A-Highway volunteers,” said PennDOT
Secretary Richards. “We’ve taken steps to make it easier for them to beautify our roadways by
developing an online portal to take care of registration and material ordering needs – saving time
and eliminating paperwork.”
Today’s event kicked off a weekend cleanup project at Sun Village Park as part of the
statewide ​Great American Cleanup of Pennsylvania​, going on through May 31.
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful coordinates the campaign with support from DEP,
PennDOT, the Pennsylvania Waste Industries Association, and other partners.
Last year the campaign brought over 132,000 Pennsylvanians together to collect more
than 5 million pounds of trash and plant trees, shrubs, and flowers.
Secretaries McDonnell and Richards joined Mayor Thaddeus Kirkland, Councilwoman
Portia West, Reverend Horace Strand, community cleanup organizer Bonita Taylor, and other
community leaders and residents, along with Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful director Shannon
Reiter, in planting additions to a butterfly garden and painting park benches and murals.
Taylor led participants in a walking tour that showcased the community’s progress in
transforming the park.
Sign up now for the ​2018 Great American Cleanup of PA​ and set up your own cleanup
and beautification event through May 31.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
NewsClips:
Youngwood Seeks Volunteers For Earth Day Cleanup
Earth Day Guide To Where To Take Your Unwanted Stuff In Lancaster County
Carr: Monroeville Still Accepting Registrations For Weekend Cleanup Day
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Related Stories:
Schuylkill Action Network 15th Annual Schuylkill Scrub Cleanup May 19
ClearWater Conservancy Watershed Cleanup Day April 21 In Centre County
PA Resources Council, PA American Water, Partners Host 3 Drug Take-Back Day Collection
Events In Allegheny County
Celebrate Earth Day By Joining Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

PA Resources Council, PA American Water, Partners Host 3 Drug Take-Back Day
Collection Events In Allegheny County

The ​PA Resources Council​, ​PA American Water​ and
other partners are holding 3 National Drug Take-Back
Day collection events in Allegheny County on April
28.
Nationwide on ​Drug Take-Back Day​, more
than 5,000 collection sites enable patients, caregivers
and pet owners to properly dispose of unwanted
prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications at
no cost.
“This program provides a safe, convenient and
responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public
about the potential for abuse of medications,” according to PRC Regional Director Justin
Stockdale. “People should not flush medications down the toilet or throw them in the trash since
improper disposal poses a very real threat to the environment.”
The Allegheny County collection events will be held from 10:00 to 2:00--
-- Green Tree:​ Green Tree Borough Building, 10 W. Manilla Ave., Pittsburgh
-- Mt. Lebanon:​ Medical Rescue Team South, 315 Cypress Way, Pittsburgh
-- Robinson:​ The Mall at Robinson, Sears parking lot, 100 Robinson Centre Dr., Pittsburgh
“Building off of the success of past collections, PRC will again collaborate with the DEA
and local law enforcement to provide residents with a safe and convenient option, thanks to the
support of our many sponsors,” said Stockdale. “PRC is proud to collaborate with PA American
Water as well as the Borough of Green Tree, Municipality of Mt. Lebanon, Robinson Township,
The Mall at Robinson and the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy.”
Click Here​ for more information concerning the three local collection events or call
412-488-7452.
Locations of other drug take-back collection locations are available on the DEA ​Drug
Take-Back Day​ website.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
7th Annual PRC ReuseFest Celebrates Earth Day In Pittsburgh
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Op-Ed: Join Fight Against Opioid Addiction On Prescription Drug Take Back Day
Op-Ed: Will Harrisburg’s Glass Recycling Program Really Be Green And Progressive?
Editorial: Americans Recycle When It’s Worth It
Developer Changes Keystone Landfill Gas Refinery Site
Related Stories:
Schuylkill Action Network 15th Annual Schuylkill Scrub Cleanup May 19
ClearWater Conservancy Watershed Cleanup Day April 21 In Centre County
DEP, PennDOT, Local Officials, KPB Participate In Park Beautification Event In Chester,
Delaware County
Celebrate Earth Day By Joining Keep PA Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Of PA
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

PA Resources Council Distributing Residential Recycling Bins In Pittsburgh

The ​PA Resources Council​ is working to distribute 4,000
recycling bins to residents of the City of Pittsburgh.
The bins are designed to increase recycling rates in
Pittsburgh to help fight litter, save energy, prevent
deforestation, and prevent valuable resources from entering
the regions’ landfills.
To be eligible for a free recycling bin, participants
must:
-- Reside within the City of Pittsburgh Limits;
-- Reside in a single-family dwelling (properties with over
five units are not eligible for this program); and
-- Register for a free recycling bin at one of the events below that are not sold out so far--
All events run from 8:00 – 2:00. Residents are required to sign up for a time slot to pick
up their recycling bins--
-- July 28:​ Point Breeze Distribution Event, URA’s Parking Lot on Meade Street. ​Click Here​ to
register.
-- August 11:​ Fairywood Distribution Event, B Keppel Trucking at 100 Beechnut Drive,
Pittsburgh PA 15205. ​Click Here​ to register.
Currently City of Pittsburgh residents are instructed to place their recyclables in blue
plastic bags in designated recycling collection sites on their biweekly recycling pickup day.
However, excess plastic bags cause issues to recycling plants (Materials Recovery
Facilities or MRFs), clogging the machinery, reducing efficiency, and placing employees at risk.
Using bins reduces the need for these bags and have the ability to increase recycling
rates.
By placing your recyclable materials, unbagged, in your new blue recycling bin, you’ll
help keep valuable materials out of our landfills!
Please continue to place your materials out in your regular pickup location on your
regular recycling day.
Questions should be directed to PRC’s Pittsburgh office at 412-488-7490.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
7th Annual PRC ReuseFest Celebrates Earth Day In Pittsburgh
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Op-Ed: Join Fight Against Opioid Addiction On Prescription Drug Take Back Day
Op-Ed: Will Harrisburg’s Glass Recycling Program Really Be Green And Progressive?
Editorial: Americans Recycle When It’s Worth It
Developer Changes Keystone Landfill Gas Refinery Site
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council Distributing Residential Recycling Bins In Pittsburgh
DEP Invites Comments On Revised General Permit On Processing Grubing Waste
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Applications For Calendar 2017 Recycling Performance Grants Due Sept. 28

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the April 21 PA Bulletin it is
now accepting applications for Section 904 Recycling Performance Grants covering calendar
year 2017. The deadline for applications is September 28.
For more information, read the ​PA Bulletin notice​ and visit the DEP ​Recycling
Performance Grants​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Mark Vottero by sending email
to: ​mvottero@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
7th Annual PRC ReuseFest Celebrates Earth Day In Pittsburgh
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Op-Ed: Join Fight Against Opioid Addiction On Prescription Drug Take Back Day
Op-Ed: Will Harrisburg’s Glass Recycling Program Really Be Green And Progressive?
Editorial: Americans Recycle When It’s Worth It
Developer Changes Keystone Landfill Gas Refinery Site
Related Stories:
PA Resources Council Distributing Residential Recycling Bins In Pittsburgh
DEP Invites Comments On Revised General Permit On Processing Grubing Waste
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

DEP Invites Comments On Revised General Permit On Processing Grubing Waste

The Department of Environmental Protection is inviting public comments on proposed
modifications to the WRGR 103 Residual Waste General Permit which authorizes processing by
grinding, mixing, screening and biological decomposition of tree stumps, roots, leaf waste,
stump grindings and grubbing material for beneficial use as mulch. ​(​April 21 PA Bulletin, page
2339​)
​ ​Click Here​ for a copy of the existing permit.
Comments are due June 20. Comments should be sent to: Chris Solloway, DEP Bureau of
Waste Management, PO Box 69170, Harrisburg, PA 17106-9170 or send email to:
ra-epbenuseall@pa.gov​.
To request a copy of the proposal contact Chris Solloway, DEP Bureau of Waste
Management, 717-787-7382.
For all the details, read the ​April 21 PA Bulletin, page 2339​.
NewsClips:
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
7th Annual PRC ReuseFest Celebrates Earth Day In Pittsburgh
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Op-Ed: Join Fight Against Opioid Addiction On Prescription Drug Take Back Day
Op-Ed: Will Harrisburg’s Glass Recycling Program Really Be Green And Progressive?
Editorial: Americans Recycle When It’s Worth It
Developer Changes Keystone Landfill Gas Refinery Site
Related Story:
Applications For Calendar 2017 Recycling Performance Grants Due Sept. 28
PA Resources Council Distributing Residential Recycling Bins In Pittsburgh
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

DEP Suspends Enforcement Of Low-RVP Gasoline Requirement In Pittsburgh After Final
Regulation Repealing The Requirement Published

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice ​in the April 21 PA Bulletin it is
suspending the enforcement of the low-RVP summertime gasoline requirement in the Pittsburgh
Region starting May 1 since a final regulation repealing the requirement was published in the
April 7 PA Bulletin​.
The low-RVP requirement affects Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Fayette,
Washington and Westmoreland counties and has typically raised the cost of gasoline in the
region from 10 to 15 cents a gallon.
DEP’s Bureau of Air Quality concluded the low-RVP gasoline requirement contributed
minimally to improved air quality and was trending toward no air quality benefits for the region.
Click Here​ for more.
The final regulation repealing the low-RVP gasoline requirement must still be approved
by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an amendment to the State Air Quality
Implementation Plan.
The April 21 notice said-- “In light of the uncertainty as to when the EPA may act on this
SIP revision, and in an effort to inform the regulated community as to the Department's
intentions regarding summertime gasoline volatility requirements compliance obligations for the
Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley Area, the Department is providing this notice that it is suspending the
enforcement” of the requirement.
For more information or questions regarding compliance requirements under 25
Pa. Code Chapter 126, Subchapter C, contact Susan Foster, Chief, Division of Compliance and
Enforcement, Bureau of Air Quality, (717) 772-3369, ​sufoster@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Experts Say Allergy Sufferers Should Brace For Pollen-geddon
Erie County’s Air Quality Earns High Marks
More Smog, Less Soot In Lehigh Valley Compared To Last Year
Harrisburg Air Pollution Ranks Among 25 Worst In Country
Crable: Air Pollution In Lancaster Continues Among Worst In Nation
Study: Pittsburgh’s Air Quality Among Worst In The Nation
Pittsburgh Region’s Air Pollution Worsening, Report Says
Allegheny County: We Are Strengthening Air Quality Standards
Allegheny County Defends Anti-Pollution Efforts, Promises To Do More
Editorial: Don’t Let Regional Progress Be Stalled By Air Pollution
Philly Area Flunks Latest Lung Association Smog Report
Op-Ed: Keep The Fuel Rules On Vehicles, DEP Secretary McDonnell
Related Story:
DEP Sets Hearing May 22 On Sunoco Marcus Hook Terminals Air Permit In Delaware County
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

DEP Sets Hearing May 22 On Sunoco Marcus Hook Terminals Air Permit In Delaware
County

The Department of Environmental Protection is scheduled to hold a May 22 public hearing on a
proposed air quality permit for the Sunoco Marcus Hook Terminals in Delaware County. ​(​April
21 PA Bulletin, page 2305​)
The hearing will be held at the Marcus Hook Community, 7 W. Delaware Avenue,
Marcus Hook from 6:00 to 8:00.
To register to speak at a hearing, or to inquire if a hearing will be held, please contact
Virginia Cain, Environmental Community Relations Specialist, at 484-250-5808. The last day to
pre-register to speak at the hearing will be at 3:00 p.m. on May 15.
The Department maintains the right to cancel this public hearing if we do not receive any
pre-registered speakers by May 17, or if the Department determines that there is not a significant
interest. If the public hearing is cancelled, notification of the cancellation ​will be posted online​.
For all the details, read the ​April 21 PA Bulletin notice, page 2305​.
NewsClips:
Experts Say Allergy Sufferers Should Brace For Pollen-geddon
Erie County’s Air Quality Earns High Marks
More Smog, Less Soot In Lehigh Valley Compared To Last Year
Harrisburg Air Pollution Ranks Among 25 Worst In Country
Crable: Air Pollution In Lancaster Continues Among Worst In Nation
Study: Pittsburgh’s Air Quality Among Worst In The Nation
Pittsburgh Region’s Air Pollution Worsening, Report Says
Allegheny County: We Are Strengthening Air Quality Standards
Allegheny County Defends Anti-Pollution Efforts, Promises To Do More
Editorial: Don’t Let Regional Progress Be Stalled By Air Pollution
Philly Area Flunks Latest Lung Association Smog Report
Op-Ed: Keep The Fuel Rules On Vehicles, DEP Secretary McDonnell
Related Story:
DEP Suspends Enforcement Of Low-RVP Gasoline Requirement In Pittsburgh After Final
Regulation Repealing The Requirement Published
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Pittsburgh 2030 District Reports $26.7M Energy, $3.9M Water Savings In 5th Annual
Progress Report

The ​Green Building Alliance​ and its partners issued
their ​5th annual report on accomplishments​ of their
Pittsburgh 2030 District​ initiative showing through
2017 participating buildings reduced energy costs by
$26.7 million and water use by 164 million gallons
resulting in $3.9 million in savings.
Overall, the 506 buildings in the Pittsburgh
2030, which are striving for a 50 percent reduction in
energy and water use by 2030. So far they have
reduced energy use by 12 percent and water use by 14.5 percent from their baseline consumption
levels.
The District’s peer-to-peer network laid the groundwork for regional collaboration.
Through the newly launched District Affiliate program, the Pittsburgh 2030 District invites all
property owners and managers in Western Pennsylvania to join the 2030 Challenge.
Six partners have already committed, including Hazelwood Green, Chatham University,
Community College of Allegheny County, Hill House Association, Huth Technologies, and
Oxford Development Company.
Chatham University’s director of sustainability, Dr. Mary Whitney, explains, “Even
though Chatham is located outside the boundary of the original Pittsburgh 2030 District, the new
District Affiliate program allows Chatham’s commitment and progress toward our carbon
neutrality goals.”
Want to learn more and join this growing group? Contact the Pittsburgh District 2030 by
sending email to: ​Pittsburgh@2030Districts.org​.
“Businesses from more than 25 different sectors are joining together to advocate for
healthy places,” explains 2030 District Senior Director Angelica Ciranni. “By combining
measurable goals with extensive resources and financial opportunities, the District Affiliate
program leverages six years of progress, and provides an avenue for everyone to improve their
impact.”
In addition to participation by District Affiliates, the official boundaries of the District are
expanding yet again.
As one 2030 District with two boundaries in 2017, the addition of the commercial portion
of Uptown between the Central Business District and Oakland boundaries creates one contiguous
District.
This expansion adds a potential of 77 buildings and 1.1 million square feet eligible to
participate as Property Partners.
Click Here​ for a copy of the report.
For more information, visit the ​Pittsburgh 2030 District​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up
for their quarterly newsletter.
Related Stories:
PSECU Reaffirms Commitment To Environmental Sustainability In Recognition Of Earth Day
Weis Markets Continues To Reduce Environmental Impact
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Weis Markets Continues To Reduce Environmental Impact

In honor of Earth Day, Sunbury-based ​Weis Markets
Friday announced its sustainability program has
decreased its carbon emissions by more than 20 percent
since 2008 according to its new report, ​Weis
Sustainability 2017: Together we make a difference​.
The report highlights Weis Markets’ award-winning
sustainability programs, which incorporate innovative
energy-saving measures designed to lower energy
consumption, increase recycling activities and reduce
refrigerant emissions.
While Weis Markets emissions have been reduced year
over year since 2008, there was a slight emissions
increase of 1.7 percent as a result of the company
acquiring 44 new stores that expanded its footprint by
more than 25 percent in 2016.
The company retrofitted new stores with as many sustainability features as possible as
they were converted to Weis Markets locations and continues to expand its sustainability
programs in all stores.
“We remain committed to serving as a strong steward of the environment, and to the
continuous improvement of our sustainability program,” said Jonathan Weis, chief executive
officer for Weis Markets. “We will continue to increase our sustainability efforts throughout our
growing footprint, and as we find new ways to reduce our environmental impact we will further
expand our role as a leader in retail sustainability and as a responsible corporate citizen in the
communities we serve.”
Key sustainability achievements and accolades for Weis Markets in 2017 include:
-- Increasing paper and cardboard recycling by more than 10 percent over the previous year. The
company diverted more than 40,000 tons of materials from landfills, including 28,000 tons of
cardboard, 332 tons of mixed paper, 875 tons of plastic bags and 77 tons of electronics, which
marked a 133 percent increase over 2016.
-- Being recognized by ​EPA’s GreenChill Program​, which encourages reduced refrigerant usage
to help lower the overall environmental impact on the ozone layer and climate change. Awards in
2017 include the 2017 Superior Goal Achievement, the 2017 Exceptional Goal Achievement,
and Store Recertification Excellence.
-- Reduced the environmental impact of the company’s distribution system by expanding its fleet
of energy-efficient vehicles by 50 percent.
“Expanding our sustainability efforts across the Weis Markets footprint has been a team
effort,” said R. Kevin Small, vice president, store development at Weis Markets. “From our
corporate leadership to our in-store associates and distribution center staff—we are encouraged
by the steady progress and are proud of the dedication of our 23,000 associates. Together we are
making a difference.“
Click Here​ for a copy of the report. Visit the ​Weis Markets Sustainability​ webpage for
more information.
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PSECU Reaffirms Commitment To Environmental Sustainability In Recognition Of Earth Day
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[Posted: April 20, 2018]

PSECU Reaffirms Commitment To Environmental Sustainability In Recognition Of Earth
Day

In recognition of Earth Day, April 22, Pennsylvania’s
largest credit union, ​PSECU,​ Friday reaffirmed its
commitment to sustainability through an
environmentally friendly business model, green
headquarters facility, and support of
conservation-focused community initiatives.
PSECU’s business philosophy​ focuses on
providing products and services electronically, which
not only reduces operational costs that can then be
returned to members by means of low- and no-fee products and services, but also reduces the
credit union’s environmental impact.
“PSECU provides a full array of convenient, electronically delivered services, so unlike
other financial institutions, you won’t find a physical PSECU branch on every corner. We’re
about giving members account access where it’s most convenient for them – in their living room,
on vacation, or at the grocery store,” said PSECU President Greg Smith. “Our members love this
model, and it has great benefits for the environment, too – just think of all of the construction
materials saved by not building branch offices, paper documents that don’t need to be printed
and handed out, and gasoline saved by eliminating frequent trips back and forth to the local
branch.”
After outgrowing its old headquarters, PSECU took the opportunity to build a new one
that truly embodied its commitment to sustainability.
Following five years of discussion and planning, in 2014, PSECU opened its new,
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold Certified headquarters facility –
built from 20 percent recycled components.
Click Here​ to view a video on the environmentally friendly aspects of the building.
The credit union’s 47-acre Susquehanna Township location also includes large spaces of
natural habitat that require no irrigation systems and that encourage local biodiversity.
The new headquarters building resulted in 38.1 percent energy cost savings from the use
of a natural gas-powered cogeneration heating and cooling system, incorporates
water-conserving plumbing features, captures and treats 90 percent of stormwater runoff, and
harnesses natural sunlight for 75 percent of its lighting needs.
It also includes a rooftop garden and nature walking path for employees to enjoy.
Supports Community Projects
Additionally, following the ‘people helping people’ credit union philosophy, PSECU
strives to support the betterment of the communities it serves through financial education
offerings, employee volunteerism, and corporate sponsorships and giving. These efforts include
several eco-friendly ones.
“PSECU’s vision is to be recognized as our members’ trusted financial partner,” said
Barb Bowker, PSECU Vice President of Marketing and Membership Development. “To us, that
doesn’t only mean providing the highest quality products and services. It also means supporting
projects and causes that are important to members and non-members alike – like caring for the
environment we all share.”
These projects include--
-- April 21​, PSECU will also be sponsoring the ​2018 Mechanicsburg Earth Day Festival​. Held
annually in downtown Mechanicsburg, the one-day event includes live music, workshops,
vendors, and children’s activities focused on environmental stewardship.
Specifically, PSECU will fund the event’s ​secure electronic recycling and paper
shredding components​, which begin at 9 a.m. at the ​First United Methodist Church​ located at 135
W. Simpson Street. ​Last year’s PSECU-sponsored paper shredding collection​ brought in
between 2,500 and 2,700 pounds of paper for recycling, which saved approximately 13 trees.
-- May 1​, PSECU will launch its second annual PSECU Gives Back campaign through which
individuals vote to determine one of four nonprofit organizations to receive popular vote-based
financial support from the credit union.
This year, one of the four highlighted options will be ​Pennsylvania Envirothon​, an
organization that combines in-class curriculum and outdoor training to help students to learn
more about aquatic ecology, forestry, soil and land use, wildlife, and current environmental
issues to better equip future generations to address complex natural resource concerns.
Additional information about PSECU Gives Back will be available on their Facebook
page when the campaign opens.
-- ​Pennsylvania Recreation & Parks Society​ (PRPS), the principal statewide association
providing professional development, leadership, advocacy, and resources for those working and
volunteering in the parks and recreation field, is also a beneficiary of PSECU financial support.
As an added benefit, PRPS Friend members are eligible for PSECU membership. Visit
psecu.com/join​ to learn more.
“On behalf of PSECU and our more than 850 employees, it’s my honor to reaffirm our
commitment to environmental sustainability,” said Smith. “Working together, we can make
positive changes today that ensure a healthy planet can be shared with generations to come.”
(​Photo:​ PSECU LEED Gold Certified headquarters building in Harrisburg.)
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[Posted: April 20, 2018]

Public Utility Commission Acts To Remove Barriers To Solar Energy Growth In PA
The Public Utility Commission Thursday approved
a Final Implementation Order for Act 40 of 2017
(Act 40), formally establishing new qualifications
for systems that qualify for the solar photovoltaic
(solar PV) requirements under the state’s
Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards (AEPS)
Act.
Previously, the Commission sought comment on
tentative interpretations of certain provisions of
Act 40​.
In approving the final order, the Commission voted
5-0 to ​adopt a joint motion​ by PUC Chairman Gladys M. Brown and Vice Chairman Andrew G.
Place reaffirming the law’s provisions to “close the borders” for Tier 1 solar credit qualifications;
thereby eliminating eligibility for certain out-of-state facilities.
“The Commission is clarifying Act 40 implementation in a way that has broad-based
support among stakeholders and is consistent with legislative intent,” said Chairman Brown.
“As other states that have passed similar legislation have recognized, this is an important tool for
Pennsylvania to promote environmental stewardship and economic development.”
Chairman Brown noted Thursday’s motion still enables some out-of-state facilities -
specifically facilities already certified as AEPS Tier 1 Solar Photovoltaic and having contracts
with a Pennsylvania utility, supplier, load serving entity, electric or municipal cooperative for the
sale of solar credits – to maintain certification until those contracts expire.
Additionally, any out-of-state Tier 1 solar credit generated before Oct. 30, 2017, retains
its Tier 1 solar attribute for the banking life span enumerated in the AEPS.
Pennsylvania’s AEPS Act requires Electric Distribution Companies (EDCs) and Electric
Generation Suppliers (EGSs) to source a specific percentage of electricity from alternative
resources in the generation that they sell to Pennsylvania customers.
That percentage increases annually and will require 0.5 percent of the electricity supplied
by Pennsylvania’s EDCs and EGSs to come from solar PV resources by 2021.
While Act 40 does not change the solar requirements under the AEPS Act, it does modify
the requirements that facilities must meet to qualify for Pennsylvania’s solar PV carveout.
The Final Implementation Order will be published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin and
posted on the PUC’s website. Additionally, copies of the Order will be distributed by the PUC’s
Office of Competitive Market Oversight (OCMO) to OCMO’s Committee Handling Activities
for Retail Growth in Electricity.
Documents related to this action can be found at the PUC Docket No.: ​M-2017-2631527​.
To learn more the PUC's role in encouraging alternative energy generation, visit the
PUC's​ ​Alternative Energy​ webpage.
Reaction
PennFuture ​said the PUC’s action Thursday took an important step forward for clean
energy by reversing a decision that had allowed out-of-state solar energy projects to count
towards in-state credits for renewable and clean energy, thus removing a major barrier that has
stalled growth of the Commonwealth’s solar industry.
Pennsylvania, like many surrounding states, has a program that requires a certain amount
of electricity generated by clean renewable energy like solar. These programs have provided a
useful tool to jumpstart renewable energy industries in states around the country.
Unfortunately, Pennsylvania was one of the only states with “open borders,” which meant
it allowed solar energy projects from 13 surrounding states and the District of Columbia, to count
towards compliance with the program.
This greatly decreased the number of solar projects in the state, lowered the value of solar
credits, and resulted in Pennsylvania losing solar job growth and industry market share, while
other surrounding states saw the industry’s success increase.
Last December, Gov. Tom Wolf signed into law a bipartisan bill that would require
credited solar projects to be developed and sourced in state.
Unfortunately, the PUC Law Bureau originally proposed implementing that bill in a way
that would make it almost completely ineffective, further holding back the solar energy sector’s
growth in Pennsylvania.
Thursday, the five PUC commissioners voted unanimously to support the intent of the
Legislature, creating increased and better quality opportunities for solar businesses in
Pennsylvania.
“PennFuture congratulates the PUC for taking an important step toward leveling the
playing field for solar energy in the Commonwealth,” said PennFuture President and CEO
Jacquelyn Bonomo. “This decision is a critical first step in our work to ensure that clean energy
investments are prioritized and provided the same support fossil fuel technologies have received
for well over a century. While Pennsylvania still has much more to do to support renewable
energy, it’s positive that an overwhelming bipartisan group of legislators recognized the
importance of supporting the state solar industry.”
Around the nation, solar energy is a success story. The Solar Foundation reports: “Solar
makes up just under two percent of overall U.S. energy generation, yet it employs twice as many
workers as the coal industry, almost five times as many as nuclear power, and nearly as many
workers as the natural gas industry.”
NewsClips:
Legere: PUC Says Law Meant To Close The Borders On Solar Energy Credits
Cusick: Bill Says Pennsylvania Should Use Only Renewable Energy By 2050
Murphy: Bills Setting 100% Renewable Energy Goal For PA Draw Bipartisan Support
Bagenstose: Bucks, Montgomery Mayors Sign On To Solar Power Pledge
Op-Ed: Make Pittsburgh’s Airport Even Smarter, Power It By The Sun, Not Natural Gas
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Related Stories:
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
PUC Chairman Brown To Lead National Committee On Critical Infrastructure
PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Unanimously Confirmed By Senate For Second Term
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time To
Save Nuclear Power Plants
House Committee Holds Hearing On Bipartisan Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy
Financing Program
Bipartisan Senate/House Bills Would Transition Pennsylvania To 100% Renewable Power By
2050
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 30

The first meeting of the Public Utility Commission’s ​Combined Heat and Power Working Group
meeting will be May 30 in Harrisburg. ​(​formal notice​)
The PUC adopted a policy statement and formed the Working Group at its meeting on
April 5 to engage with stakeholders and encourage the deployment of, and reduce barriers to,
CHP initiatives in the Commonwealth.
CHP captures the waste heat energy this is typically lost through power generation, using
it to provide heating and/or cooling for manufacturing and business.
“CHP offers a variety of benefits,” noted Chairman Gladys M. Brown ​in a supporting
statement​ at the PUC public meeting,” First and foremost, CHP supports environmental
stewardship through increased efficiency. Also, it provides economic benefits to its adopters
through reductions in energy consumption. Further, it supports reliability and resiliency as a
distributed energy resource.”
The meeting will be held in the ​Forest Room, Keystone Building, 400 North Street,
Harrisburg starting at 1:00. A call-in number will be published, ​Click Here​.
For more background, visit the PUC’s ​Combined Heat and Power​ webpage. Questions
should be directed to Joe Sherrick 717-787-5369 or send email to: ​josherrick@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Legere: PUC Says Law Meant To Close The Borders On Solar Energy Credits
Cusick: Bill Says Pennsylvania Should Use Only Renewable Energy By 2050
Murphy: Bills Setting 100% Renewable Energy Goal For PA Draw Bipartisan Support
Bagenstose: Bucks, Montgomery Mayors Sign On To Solar Power Pledge
Op-Ed: Make Pittsburgh’s Airport Even Smarter, Power It By The Sun, Not Natural Gas
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Related Stories:
Public Utility Commission Acts To Remove Barriers To Solar Energy Growth In PA
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
PUC Chairman Brown To Lead National Committee On Critical Infrastructure
PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Unanimously Confirmed By Senate For Second Term
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time To
Save Nuclear Power Plants
House Committee Holds Hearing On Bipartisan Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy
Financing Program
Bipartisan Senate/House Bills Would Transition Pennsylvania To 100% Renewable Power By
2050
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

PUC Chairman Brown To Lead National Committee On Critical Infrastructure
Public Utility Commission Chairman Gladys M. Brown has been
appointed to lead the Committee on Critical Infrastructure for the
National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners​.
The NARUC ​Committee on Critical Infrastructure​ is intended to
provide a forum for state regulators to explore and analyze solutions
to concerns about utility infrastructure security, reliability and
resilience.
The committee also gives state regulators opportunities to share best
practices and collaborate, often with federal counterparts. Committee
chairs are appointed by the NARUC President for a one-year term
and may be reappointed for a maximum of three consecutive terms.
“We are so pleased to welcome Chairman Brown to lead the Committee on Critical
Infrastructure,” said NARUC President John Betkoski III. “She brings previous committee and
taskforce experience and has the experience required to ensure that our state commissions have
access to the tools they need to help ensure that utility critical infrastructures are secure and can
recover quickly from natural or manmade disruptions to service.”
Under Chairman Brown’s leadership, the PUC has worked with utilities and other
stakeholders to enhance the Commonwealth’s ability to safeguard against and respond to
large-scale cyber and physical events.
The Commission also collaborated with Gov. Tom Wolf to host a first-ever statewide
“Black Sky” exercise as a mechanism to enhance preparation and coordination for large-scale
outages, which could be the result of natural disasters or manmade cyber or physical events.
PUC efforts are focused on fostering greater communication between utilities in different
sectors; developing and promoting best practices for mid-size and smaller entities; and
integrating other state agencies, emergency responders and non-government organizations
(NGOs) in Black Sky planning.
“I am honored to chair the Committee on Critical Infrastructure and I thank President
Betkoski and the NARUC Board for this appointment,” said Chairman Brown. “I am looking
forward to working collectively with state commissions and utilities across the country to
address the challenges and opportunities involving infrastructure security and resilience.”
Chairman Brown began her service as a PUC Commissioner in 2013 and was appointed
Chairman in 2015. She was recently unanimously confirmed to serve a second 5-year term,
through April 1, 2023, and continues to serve as chair of the Commission.
To learn more, visit NARUC’s ​Committee on Critical Infrastructure​ webpage.
NewsClips:
FirstEnergy Exec Urges Legislators To Act On Behalf Of Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant
TMI Supporters Urge Lawmakers To Save Financially Troubled Nuclear Power Plant
Clock Ticks Toward Three Mile Island Shutdown
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
Legere: As Coal-Fired Power Plants Switch Off, PA Looks To Bring In New Businesses
Editorial: Fmr Coal-Fired Power Plants Get Playbooks For Future
Report: Electricity Prices Could Increase $285M If 2 PA Nuclear Plants Close
Report: Exelon, FirstEnergy Nuclear Plant Closures Would Reverse PJM Wind, Solar Benefits
Closing Nuclear Reactors In OH, PA Will Thwart Climate Goals
Study: REGGI Carbon Market In Northeast U.S. Creating Jobs, Revenue
It May Take More Than A Year For New Jersey To Rejoin RGGI Climate Pact
Environmentalists And Nuclear Power? It’s Complicated
Natural Gas, Renewable Energy Advocates Disagree On Potential To Grow Jobs In Pittsburgh
Will Pittsburgh Flourish As Hub Of Eds, Meds, Gas And Petrochemicals?
Biogas Needs Real Consideration As A Truly Clean Alternative To Natural Gas
Downed Power Line Ignites Major Armstrong County Brush Fire
Duquesne Light Rate Increase Would Hike Residential Bills By Nearly 9 Percent
PPL Enters Uncertain World Of Ratemaking In United Kingdom
Cusick: After Alert On Russian Hacking A Renewed Push To Protect Power Grid
Energy Dept. Won’t Consider FirstEnergy’s Financial Woes In Decision On Coal, Nuclear
Plants
FERC Members Tell House Panel Grid Reliability, Resilience Order Moving Forward
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
FERC Chair Opposes PJM-Like MOPR Prices As Standard Solution For State Policies
Trump May Invoke Cold War Era Defense Act To Boost Coal Plants
WV AG’s Office Files Action To Force EPA To Protect Coal, Steel Jobs
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Related Stories:
Public Utility Commission Acts To Remove Barriers To Solar Energy Growth In PA
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
First Meeting Of PUC Combined Heat & Power Working Group May 5
PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Unanimously Confirmed By Senate For Second Term
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time To
Save Nuclear Power Plants
House Committee Holds Hearing On Bipartisan Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy
Financing Program
Bipartisan Senate/House Bills Would Transition Pennsylvania To 100% Renewable Power By
2050
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

DEP Keystone Energy Education Workshops For Teachers Coming Up In May

The Department of Environmental Protection is again hosting a series of Keystone Energy
Education Workshops for teachers in May.
This free teacher workshop focuses on energy education. Attendees will learn--
-- All about the ​Energy Pathway​ in the ​Eco-Schools USA Program
-- Where to get energy data and resources
-- How to use your building as a teaching tool
-- Ways to teach about alternative/renewable energy and fuels
-- How to assist a student energy team in measuring their successes
Participants will get take home instruments and curated activity and lesson plans to use at
their school.
The workshops scheduled so far will be held from 8:30 to 3:00 on these dates--
-- May 8:​ ​DEP Northwest Regional Office​, Meadville, Crawford County. ​Click To Register​.
-- May 9:​ ​Westmoreland County Conservation District Office​, Greensburg, Westmoreland
County. ​Click To Register​.
-- May 17:​ ​King’s Gap Environmental Center​, Carlisle, Cumberland County. ​Click To Register​.
For more information on education activities, visit DEP’s ​Environmental Education
webpage, call 717-772-1828 or send email to: ​ra-eplearningcenter@pa.gov​. Click Here to sign
up for DEP’s ​Teaching Green​ newsletter.
NewsClips:
Apollo-Ridge 1st, 2nd Graders Release Brook Trout Into Kiski River On Field Trip
Wildlife Leadership Academy Promotes Conservation Among Teens
Wilkes University Earth & Environmental Science Day
Earth Day Event Held By The River In Wilkes-Barre
Welshans: Wildlife Leadership Academy Ensures Future Of Conservation Lives On In Youth
Facts Matter Cry Ralliers In Bethlehem’s March For Science
Schneck: When, How To Watch The Lyrid Meteor Shower
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High School Students Participate In Westmoreland County's Envirothon April 30
Pennsylvania Statewide Envirothon Provides Spring Update
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

April 24 DEP Climate Change Committee: PA Greenhouse Gas Emissions Drop 11.37%
From 2000 to 2014, Mostly Due To Replacing Coal-Fired Power Plants

The ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ is scheduled to meet on April 24 to hear
presentations on DCNR’s Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Plan and the final ​2017 PA
Greenhouse Gas Inventory​.
Also ​on the agenda​ is more discussion of the 2018 ​update to the PA Climate Change
Action Plan​.
Inventory
The ​PA Greenhouse Gas Inventory​ shows carbon dioxide equivalent reductions of 11.37
percent (304.05 to 269.47 million metric tons-- 34.58 million metric tons) from 2000 to 2014
(the latest year information is available).
A very significant portion of those reductions came from the replacement of coal-fired
power plants with natural gas in Pennsylvania. Emissions from coal-fired plants dropped from
111.04 million metric tons to 74.68 million metric tons-- 36.36 million metric tons-- between
2000 and 2014.
The increased use of natural gas to generate electricity also increased emissions from that
source from 1.13 million metric tons to 21.42 million metric tons from 2000 to 2014
These sectors decreased emissions from 2000 to 2014: Residential, Commercial,
Transportation.
These sectors increased emissions from 2000 to 2014: Industrial, Agriculture, Waste.
The meeting will be held in​ Room 105 Rachel Carson Building starting at 10:00. There
is no provision for call-in or WebEx access to the meeting.
For more information and available handouts, visit the ​DEP Climate Change Advisory
Committee​ webpage. Questions should be directed to ​ John Krueger, 717-783-9264 or send
email to: ​jkrueger@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
DCNR Secretary To Talk Climate Change At Saint Vincent College April 17
Op-Ed: Keep The Fuel Rules On Vehicles, DEP Secretary McDonnell
Report: Exelon, FirstEnergy Nuclear Plant Closures Would Reverse PJM Wind, Solar Benefits
Closing Nuclear Reactors In OH, PA Will Thwart Climate Goals
EPA Report: Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Power Plants Plunge
Study: REGGI Carbon Market In Northeast U.S. Creating Jobs, Revenue
It May Take More Than A Year For New Jersey To Rejoin RGGI Climate Pact
Related Story:
DCNR Good Natured Blog: Conservation In A Changing Climate
[Posted: April 20, 2018]

DEP Hearing On Mariner East II Pipeline Permit Changes April 30 In Chester County,
Extends Comment Period

The Department of Environmental Protection Monday announced it will hold a public hearing on
April 30 in Chester County to receive comments on two permit modification applications
submitted by Sunoco, LP requesting construction modifications for its ​Mariner East II pipeline​.
(​April 21 PA Bulletin, page 2340​)
Both requests are for sites in West Whiteland Township, Chester County.
Sunoco’s proposal to change the methodology from Horizontal Directional Drilling
(HDD) to conventional bore for one drill site, and from HDD to a combination of conventional
bore, open trench, and HDD for the other drill, would both be considered requests for major
permit modifications that require approval from DEP, after consideration of public comments.
The April 30 hearing will be held at the ​E. N. Peirce Middle School​, 1314 Burke Road,
West Chester from 6:30 to 9:30.
Individuals will have the opportunity to present up to three minutes of verbal testimony;
relinquishing of time to other speakers is not allowed, and groups are asked to designate one
speaker per organization.
DEP also requests, but does not require, those providing oral remarks bring a written
copy of their comments in order to aid the transcriptionist at the hearing.
Those presenting testimony during the hearing are asked to pre-register by contacting
Virginia Cain, Community Relations Coordinator at 484-250-5808 or by sending email to:
vicain@pa.gov​.
Priority will be given to residents from Chester County given the geographic scope of the
modification applications.
DEP has also extended the comment period from April 21, 2018 until May 11, 2018.
Full copies of the application for proposed modifications are available for review on
DEP’s ​Mariner East II Pipeline​ webpage.
Comments on the applications can be emailed or postal mailed to: PA Department of
Environmental Protection, Southeast Regional Office, Waterway and Wetlands Program, 2 East
Main Street, Norristown, Pennsylvania, 19401 or send email to: ​RA-EPWW-SERO@pa.gov​.
Questions should be directed to Neil Shader, DEP Press Secretary, 717-787-1323 or send
email to: ​nshader@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Meyer: Sunoco Says Testing Done On Mariner East 1 Pipeline And It’s Safe, PUC Says Slow
Down
Hurdle: Here’s What $12.6M Mariner East 2 Pipeline Penalty Will Be Spent On
State Establishes $12.6M Grant Program With Mariner East II Pipeline Fines
Hurdle: DEP Sets Hearing On Proposed Mariner East 2 Construction In Chester County
ATF: 350 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site Recovered
Some Explosives Recovered That Were Stolen From The Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
Officials Uncertain If They Have All Stolen Explosives
ATF Agents Flood Lancaster County On Stolen Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Explosives
ATF Increases Reward To $20,000 For Info On Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise
Pipeline Construction Site In Lancaster
About 640 Pounds Of Dynamite Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
ATF Investigating 640 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site,
Reward Offered
600+ Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Worksite In Lancaster
County
ATF Now Says More Than 700 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sense Of Urgency Propels Search For Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sisk: Dynamite Disappears From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site, ATF Trying To Find It
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
FERC Reviews Its Policies For Approving Natural Gas Pipelines
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
Related Stories:
Senate Committee Meets April 24 To Consider Pipeline Safety, Construction Bills
DEP Establishes New Water Quality Project Grant Program With $12.6 Million Mariner East 2
Pipeline Penalty
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

PennFuture: Senate Bill 1088 Would Roll Back Conventional Drilling Rules To 1984 Levels

PennFuture​ Tuesday issued a statement opposed to ​Senate Bill 1088​ (Hutchinson-R-Venango)
they said would roll back fundamental rules for conventional oil and gas drilling to 1984 levels.
“This bill ignores common sense progress that has been made over the course of more
than three decades, and also ignores the importance of public input, allowing conventional
operators to avoid their responsibilities as stewards of our state natural resources,” said
PennFuture President and CEO Jacquelyn Bonomo. “This bill is harmful to landowners and
municipalities, as it gives the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and
landowners only 15 days to raise objections to proposed conventional well locations, essentially
silencing citizens in the process of expanding industry.”
Although this right has been upheld by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ​in the Robinson
Township decision​ based on the Environmental Rights Amendment, Senate Bill 1088 also blocks
local governments from making their own zoning decisions.
“We will not accept this draconian weakening of our environmental protections,”
Bonomo said.
PennFuture said among the many troubling provisions of this bill, Senate Bill 1088 also:
-- Eliminates additional review when conventional oil and gas wells could potentially impact
state parks and forest lands, which puts into jeopardy endangered plants, animals, and sites of
cultural and historical significance.
-- Seeks to leave Pennsylvanians with the tab for the plugging of abandoned conventional oil and
gas wells, of which there are nearly 400,000 in the Commonwealth. This is unfair to citizens and
the conventional drillers should be held to the same high level of accountability as the
unconventional oil and gas industry.
-- Eliminates the ability to hold conventional oil and gas operators accountable for their
violations by forcing the Department to issue “warnings” rather than “notices of violation” that it
can no longer factor into calculating penalties.
-- Exempts conventional oil and gas drillers from meeting Safe Drinking Water Act standards,
meaning the industry can more easily contaminate water supplies.
-- Removes a requirement that conventional drillers that impact drinking water to restore it to a
level of supply and purity set out in the Safe Drinking Water Act.
“It’s troubling that in the 21st century we still have an industry and lawmakers willing to
wash their hands of any environmental responsibilities,” Bonomo said. “Pennsylvania history is
stained by impacts from this type of short-sighted political giveaway – polluted waterways,
scarred landscapes, and taxpayers footing the bill for industrial misdeeds. It’s stunning that this
bill is even being considered.”
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PennFuture
website.
Related Stories:
PEC, EDF: Conventional Oil & Gas Bill Will Reverse, Weaken Environmental Protection
Standards For Fracking
House Republicans List House Conventional Oil & Gas Bill On Voting Schedule For May 1
[Posted: April 17, 2018]

Nearly 2,800 Acres, 27 Farms Added To PA's Agricultural Land Preservation Program

The ​PA Agricultural Land Preservation Program​ Monday added 2,793 more acres on 27 farms in
15 counties, according to Russell Redding, Secretary of the Department of Agricultural.
“The farms preserved today exemplify our diverse production agriculture industry – each
is unique in the products it grows and the people who call it home,” said Redding. “Our work to
protect these farms represents targeted investments in the security of our food supply and the
quality of our environment. They’re made possible because of the commitment of farmers to
preserving their operations, who in turn use the funding to invest in the future of their operations
and our economy.”
The 27 farms preserved today are found in Berks, Bucks, Centre, Chester, Erie, Juniata,
Lancaster, Lawrence, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Mercer, Northampton, Susquehanna, and York
counties.
Since the Commonwealth’s program began in 1988, federal, state, county, and local
governments have purchased permanent easements on 5,297 farms totaling 549,728 acres in 59
counties for agricultural production.
Funding for farmland preservation has increased more than 45 percent, or $12.5 million,
which means $40 million is available for the program this fiscal year, Redding added. Since
taking office, the Wolf administration has preserved 533 farms totaling 44,325 acres of prime
farmland across Pennsylvania.
In some cases, federal funding helps to preserve these lands. In 2016, the department
signed a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources
Conservation Service that allows Pennsylvania’s program to submit farms for consideration by
the federal Agricultural Conservation Easement Program.
The department secured more than $1.7 million under its most recent cooperative
agreement to preserve eight farms totaling 1,652 acres, with the potential for additional funding
in 2018.
The PA Agricultural Conservation Easement Purchase Program, as it is formally known,
is dedicated to slowing the loss of prime farmland to non-agricultural uses.
Funding allows state, county, and local governments to purchase conservation easements,
from owners of quality farmland. State, county, local, and federal funds committed at Monday’s
meeting, and allocated to county programs, will secure the purchase of development rights to
preserve farms waiting on the county backlog lists.
For more information, visit the Department of Agriculture’s ​Farmland Preservation
Program​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Natural Lands Trust Strikes Back Against School District’s Eminent Domain Play
County Commissioners Join Fight Against School District Taking Preserved Farmland
Midstate School District Faces Growing Calls To Stop Eminent Domain Move On Farm
Cumberland School District Warned Of Far-Reaching Effects If Preserved Farmland Acquired
Earth Conservancy’s Environmental Workforce Training Program Ends With 21 Graduates
Related Stories:
Root Mass Farm In Berks County Receives Small Farm Environmental Sustainability Grant
Op-Ed: As Earth Week Approaches, We Celebrate Our Vibrant, Growing PA Sustainable
Agriculture Community
Penn State Extension, Agriculture Officials Look To Slow Spread Of Spotted Lanternfly

[Posted: April 16, 2018]

Penn State Extension, Agriculture Officials Look To Slow Spread Of Spotted Lanternfly

With spring and the accompanying emergence
of insects upon us, grape growers, orchardists,
nursery operators, homeowners and others in
southeastern Pennsylvania are bracing for
infestations of ​Spotted Lanternfly​, an invasive
pest from Asia that appeared for the first time
in the United States in Berks County nearly
four years ago.
Potentially at stake are Pennsylvania's grape, tree-fruit, hardwood and nursery industries,
which generate agricultural crops and forest products worth nearly $18 billion annually. The
insect also can cause damage to high-value ornamentals in home landscapes and can affect
quality of life for residents.
After the lanternfly's discovery in 2014, the state Department of Agriculture imposed a
quarantine regulating the movement of plants, plant-based materials and outdoor household
items out of the quarantine area.
Originally covering parts of eastern Berks County, the quarantine now encompasses all of
Berks, Bucks, Chester, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Carbon, Delaware, Lancaster,
Lebanon, Monroe, Philadelphia and Schuylkill counties.
Penn State Extension educators and College of Agricultural Sciences researchers are
working with state and federal agriculture officials to study the insect, develop control strategies,
and educate local leaders, growers and the public about what to do if they find spotted
lanternflies or their eggs.
The goal is to stop the pest's spread and, ultimately, to eradicate it.
Emelie Swackhamer​, Penn State Extension horticulture educator based in Montgomery
County, her Northampton County-based extension colleague ​Amy Korman​, and other Penn State
specialists have spoken at scores of public meetings and industry workshops, authored articles
and fact sheets, served as expert sources for news media stories, trained ​Penn State Master
Gardeners ​and other volunteers, and testified at General Assembly committee hearings.
Swackhamer said enlisting the public to help control lanternfly populations is a top
priority. "This is a community problem, and it's going to take a community effort to solve it," she
said.
Part of that effort is ensuring that citizens and businesses don't unwittingly carry
lanternflies or their eggs to other areas.
"Spotted lanternflies are great hitchhikers, and they will lay eggs on a multitude of
outdoor objects, such as cars, RVs and campers, plant materials, and other items that could be
transported out of the quarantine area," Swackhamer said. "To raise awareness, the state
Department of Agriculture is using the slogan, 'Look before you leave,' emphasizing the need to
inspect vehicles and other items before traveling out of a quarantined county."
Lanternfly eggs are expected to hatch in late April or early May, so knowing what egg
masses look like and destroying any that are found is an important control tactic, she said. But as
eggs hatch, what can a grower or homeowner do to combat an infestation?
"When I get calls from residents seeking advice, I talk them through an integrated pest
management (IPM) thought process," Swackhamer said. "Start with mechanical approaches, such
as scraping and destroying egg masses and swatting or vacuuming nymphs and adults, if
practical. If you kill one female that could lay 100 eggs in its lifetime, you can have an impact on
next year's population."
She also recommends conserving natural enemies such as spiders and praying mantids
that prey on lanternflies.
"If someone wants to use pesticides, they can try least-toxic options first, and they must
take timing into account — not all methods will work on all life stages of the insect."
The pest does not attack fruit or foliage. Rather, it uses its piercing-sucking mouthparts to
feed on the woody parts of plants, such as grape vines and the trunks and branches of trees,
where it excretes a substance known as honeydew and inflicts wounds that weep with sap.
The honeydew and sap can attract bees and other insects and provide a medium for
growth of fungi, such as sooty mold, which covers leaf surfaces and can stunt growth. Plants
with heavy infestations may not survive.
The role of Penn State agricultural researchers and extension educators — as part of the
University's land-grant partnership with federal, state and county governments — is to bring
science-based information to bear in solving emerging issues such as the spotted lanternfly.
With a pest that is new to North America, these efforts must start at square one.
"The spotted lanternfly is a fascinating insect," said Korman, who is an entomologist by
training. "Everything we learn about it is a new discovery. But the novelty also makes it
frustrating, because we don't yet know enough about it to provide all the answers people are
seeking."
To develop near-term solutions for managing lanternfly infestations, Korman and
Swackhamer have done applied research to test the efficacy of various pesticides, both contact
insecticides and systemic products that are applied to plants and kill the pests when they feed on
the sap. They also have looked at "softer," lower-toxicity products.
"What we've found so far is that these insects are not difficult to kill, but we need to
conduct more tests before we're comfortable giving formal, research-based recommendations,"
Swackhamer said.
Researchers at Penn State's ​Fruit Research and Extension Center​ in Biglerville, Adams
County, also have conducted pesticide efficacy trials with an eye toward providing control
solutions for growers of grapes and apples.
Until research bears more fruit, Penn State Extension and Penn State's ​Department of
Entomology​ are deploying state and federal funds to add staff and enhance extension
programming.
Entomologists also are seeking additional USDA grants to continue research on spotted
lanternfly biology and behavior, the development of biocontrols such as natural enemies, and
other topics related to this exotic and unusual pest.
As the battle against spotted lanternfly rages on, Korman urges homeowners and others
not to let the "good-idea fairy" persuade them to use unconventional — and perhaps illegal —
control methods that may be hazardous to themselves or harmful to the environment.
"Our goal is to provide research-based recommendations, deliver IPM solutions and
promote pesticide safety, and people can draw on Penn State Extension resources to help them
address these issues," she said.
For more information about how to identify and control spotted lanternfly, how to report
an infestation and how to comply with quarantine regulations, visit the Penn State Extension
Spotted Lanternfly​ webpage or the state Department of Agriculture ​Spotted Lanternfly​ webpage
for more background and quarantine areas.
(​Photo:​ Spotted Lanternfly fourth-instar nymphs begin to appear in July and molt to become
adults, Penn State Extension.)
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Nearly 2,800 Acres, 27 Farms Added To PA's Agricultural Land Preservation Program
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

Registration Now Open For Juniata River Sojourn June 14-17

Do you enjoy paddling down lazy rivers and
want to join a fantastic paddling trip this year?
Registration is now open for the ​Juniata River
Sojourn​ from June 14 to 17.
This trip spanning four day will allow
to sojourners to connect with nature by
paddling 59 miles of the Juniata River from
Huntingdon to Mifflin.
Camping and food is included in the
registration fees. Participants can choose to
paddle all or portions of the trip.
Trip proceeds will benefit the ​Nature Abounds' Natural Biodiversity Program​.
Click Here​ for all the details and to register.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Nature Abounds​ website.
For information on sojourns statewide, visit the PA Organization for Watersheds and
Rivers ​Sojourn​ webpage.
NewsClip:
Schuylkill River Sojourn Celebrating 20 Years On The River
Related Stories:
Registration Now Being Accepted For June 15-23 Delaware River Sojourn
Schuylkill River Sojourn June 2-8
Wildlands Conservancy Lehigh River Sojourn June 23-25
Register Now For Rails-To-Trails Conservancy June 10-14 Delaware & Lehigh Sojourn
[Posted: April 16, 2018]

DCNR Video: PA Outdoor Corps: Creating The Next Generations Of Conservationists

The ​PA Outdoor Corps​ is a partnership to create the
next generation of conservationists. Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy
Adams Dunn shares how the program offers young
people life-changing experiences in the outdoors.
Hear from recent PA Outdoors Corps members about
what their experience meant to them, how it changed
the way they view conservation, and why they
recommend that others take advantage of the
opportunity.
New crews forming now! ​Click Here​ for more information on how you can join the PA
Outdoor Corps.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, Visit the ​Good Natured​ DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click
Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.

(Reprinted from the ​April 18 DCNR Resource​ newsletter. ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own
copy.)
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

April 18 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR

The ​April 18 edition of the Resource​ newsletter is now
available from the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources featuring stories on--
-- ​DCNR Good Natured Blog: Conservation In A Changing
Climate
-- ​Volunteers Needed To Plant Trees Across Pennsylvania
-- ​Community Clean Water Toolbox To Expand Local
Engagement In Reducing Water Pollution
-- ​Participate In Susquehannock State Forest Management &
Habitat Tour April 29
-- ​Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Volunteer Sarah Reeping​ ​(photo)
-- ​Video: PA Outdoor Corps: Creating The Next Generations Of Conservationists
-- ​Canoe Creek State Park Conducting Prescribed Burn Between April 23-May 18
-- ​DCNR Appoints New Manager Of Tioga State Forest District
-- ​DCNR Facilitates Tree Climbing Training for rockview Forestry Camp Inmates
-- ​Participate In Earth Day Events Throughout Pennsylvania
-- ​Participate In International Dark Sky Week!
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, Visit the ​Good Natured​ DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click
Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Brodhead Watershed Assn May 5 Hike In Search Of Imperiled Golden-Winged Warbler
In Monroe County

The ​Brodhead Watershed Association​ will host a "Walk
and Talk" hike on May 5 ​in search of the golden-winged
warbler​ as part of the ​Get Outdoors Poconos​ hiking
series.
On private land in the northern part of Monroe
County stands a messy tangle of shrubs in open
woodland. To the golden-winged warblers returning
from Latin America in May and looking for a place to
nest, this mess means home.
The imperiled golden-winged warbler, a tiny bird
that looks a bit like a chickadee dressed for a party.
After a discussion at Barrett Paradise Friendly Library with golden-winged warbler
expert Dr. Jeff Larkin, a guided hike will explore private property and show how landowners can
help protect the warbler, which is at risk because of lack of habitat.
Hikers will see how the property owners re-established missing habitat – a patchwork of
scrubby, low vegetation for nesting and raising young, combined with mature forest and dense
thickets for food and cover.
The 2.4-mile trail is often steep, but wide and grassy. Along the way, hikers might see
evidence of other wild residents, including coyotes and red-tailed hawks. The trail offers another
treat: an extensive, exhilarating view in all directions.
Hikers hold meet at the ​Barrett Paradise Friendly Library​, 6500 Route 191, Cresco at
9:00 a.m.
The hike is free, but registration is required. Call 570-839-1120 or 570-629-2727 or send
email to: ​info@brodheadwatershed.org​ to register.
Click Here​ for all the details on the hike.
For information about this and other hikes, visit the ​Get Outdoors Poconos​ webpage. The
hike series is administered by Brodhead Watershed Association and supported by a grant from
the William Penn Foundation.
Learn more about programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Brodhead
Watershed Association​ website.
[Posted: April 19, 2018]

Lacawac Sanctuary Field Station & EE Center Spring Newsletter Now Available

The ​Spring newsletter​ is now available from the
Lacawac Sanctuary Field Station and
Environmental Education Center​ in Wayne County
featuring articles on--
-- New STEAM Mentoring Education Program For
Girls Launched
-- Climate Change Research At Lacawac
-- Lacawac Awards Moeller Research Grants
-- Gov. Wolf Announces Investment In Lacawac
Sanctuary STEM Education Center
-- SEEDS To Install Solar Array At Lacawac
-- What’s Happening In Environmental Education At Lacawac
-- Workshops & Ecology Workshop Series
-- Upcoming Environmental Field Trips
-- Farm To Plate Dinner August 11
-- Lacawac Welcomes New Director Of Science & Research Dr. Beth Norman
-- In Memoriam: Lacawac Volunteer John Whitehouse
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Lacawac Sanctuary​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates (right panel). ​Follow on
Twitter​. ​Like on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
[Posted: April 20, 2018]
Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. ​[Agenda Not Posted] ​means not posted within 2 weeks
of the advisory committee meeting. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

Note:​ DEP ​published the 2018 meeting schedules​ for its advisory committees and boards.

April 21--​ ​NEW​. ​Anthracite Heritage Museum​. ​The Sustainability Factor Of Coalfield
Community Groups In Anthracite and Bituminous Region and EPCAMR’s Role​, Robert Hughes,
Executive Director of the Eastern PA Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation. McDade
Park, Scranton. 2:00 to 4:00.

April 22--​ ​Earth Day. What Are You Doing?

April 22--​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association​. ​Get Outdoors Poconos​. ​Gravel Family Nature
Preserve Hike, Monroe County​.

April 23--​ ​DEP Williamsport Office Earth Day Open House​. ​DEP Northcentral Regional Office​,
208 West Third Street, Williamsport. 4:30 to 6:30.

April 22--​ ​Butler County Household Hazardous Waste & Electronics Waste Collection Event​.
129 Ash Stop Road, Evans City, Butler County.

April 24--​ ​NEW​. ​Senate Consumer Affairs and Professional Licensure Committee​ meets to
consider ​Senate Bill 835​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requiring the registration of land agents working
for pipeline companies (​sponsor summary​), ​Senate Bill 930​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) sets
notification requirements related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor summary​), ​Senate Bill 931
(Dinniman-D-Chester) requires the installation of automatic or remote controlled safety values in
natural gas pipelines in densely populated areas (​sponsor summary​). Room 461. Noon.
Committee meetings are typically webcast through the ​Senate Republican​ website. ​Click Here
for more.

April 24--​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: John Krueger, 717-783-9264 or
jkrueger@pa.gov​.
-- 2017 PA Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory
-- 2018 PA Climate Change Action Plan Update
-- DCNR Climate Change Mitigation & Adaptation Plan

April 24--​ ​CANCELED​. DEP ​Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. Next Scheduled Meeting
May 3. DEP Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, ​jvollero@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)
April 24--​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​. ​Public Water Supply Assistance Program​.
Technical and Regulatory Considerations For Public Water Supply Managers and Consultants
Workshop​. ​SRBC Offices, 4423 North Front Street, Harrisburg. 8:00 to 3:00.

April 25--​ ​NEW​. Senate ​Environmental Resources and Energy​ and ​Veterans Affairs and
Emergency Preparedness​ Committees hold a joint hearing on flooding and emergency response.
Room 8E-B East Wing Capitol Building. 9:00. ​Click Here​ to watch the hearing live. ​Click Here
for more.

April 25-- ​CANCELED. ​DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​ meeting. The
next scheduled meeting is July 25. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269 or ​nherb@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice​)

April 25--​ ​DEP Hearing On Proposed NPDES Water Quality Permit For NRG Cheswick
Generating Station In Allegheny County​. ​Springdale Jr./Sr. High School Marshall Auditorium,
501 Butler Road, Springdale. 6:00 p.m.

April 25--​ ​DEP Hearing On Proposed NPDES Water Quality Permit For Brunner Island Power
Plant In York County​. Union Fire Company, 201 York Street, Manchester. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 25-- ​POWR, PEC Regional Watershed Group Workshop​. ​Montour Preserve Visitors
Center​, 700 Preserve Road in Danville, Montour County. 10:00 to 2:00.

April 26-- ​ ​[Agenda Not Posted] ​DEP ​Agricultural Advisory Board​ meeting. DEP Southcentral
Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Jay Braund,
717-772-5636, ​jbraund@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

April 26--​ ​Pike/Wayne County Envirothon​. ​Wallenpaupack Environmental Learning Center​,
Hawley, Wayne County.

April 26-- ​PA Anthracite Section Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration Spring
Meeting​. ​Capriotti's, 1 Banks Avenue, McAdoo, Schuylkill County. 5:30.

April 26-27--​ ​PA Wilds Center Awards Dinner and Entrepreneur’s Conference​. Pajama Factory,
Williamsport, Lycoming County.

April 27-28--​ ​Friends of Flight 93​. ​Tree Planting at Flight 93 Memorial Somerset County​.

April 27-30-- ​2018 City Nature Challenge In Pittsburgh Region​.

April 28-​- ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council​, ​PA American Water​. ​Drug Take-Back Day Collection
Event In Allegheny County​. ​Green Tree Borough Building, 10 W. Manilla Ave., Pittsburgh.
10:00 to 2:00.

April 28-​- ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council​, ​PA American Water​. ​Drug Take-Back Day Collection
Event In Allegheny County​. ​Medical Rescue Team South, 315 Cypress Way, Pittsburgh.​ 10:00
to 2:00.

April 28-​- ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council​, ​PA American Water​. ​Drug Take-Back Day Collection
Event In Allegheny County​. ​The Mall at Robinson, Sears parking lot, 100 Robinson Centre Dr.,
Pittsburgh.​ 10:00 to 2:00.

April 28--​ ​Stroud Water Research Center​. ​Wildlands Conservancy​. ​Citizen Science Volunteer
Training​. Emmaus, Lehigh County. 9:00 to 3:00.

April 28--​ ​Manada Conservancy Native Plant Sale​. ​Hummelstown Borough Park, Dauphin
County. 10:00 to 3:00

April 28--​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy​. ​Foods Of The Delaware​. ​Silver Birches
Waterfront​, 205 PA 507, Hawley, Wayne County.

April 28--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Backyard Habitat Biodiversity Workshop​.
Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve​, 614 Dorseyville Road, Pittsburgh. 10:00.

April 28--​ ​Clinton County CleanScapes​. ​Piatt, Porter & Watson Townships Community Cleanup
Day In Lycoming County​.

April 28-29--​ ​PA Environmental Council​. ​Illegal Dump Cleanup In Susquehanna County​.

April 30--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Hearing On Mariner East II Pipeline Permit Changes​. ​E. N. Peirce
Middle School​, 1314 Burke Road, West Chester, Chester County. 6:30 to 9:30

April 30--​ ​NEW​. Dept. of Labor & Industry ​Uniform Construction Code Review and Advisory
Council​ meeting. L&I Building, 651 Boas Street, Room E100, 1st Floor, Harrisburg. 10:00.
Contact: Cindy Holtry 717-783-4560 or send email to: ​choltry@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

April 30--​ ​NEW​. ​Westmoreland County Conservation District​. ​High School Student
Envirothon​. Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg.

May 1--​ ​DEP Hearing On Letterkenny Army Depot Air Quality Permit, Franklin County​. DEP’s
Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg. ​(no time given - probably
10:00)

May 1--​ ​Capital Chapter Society Of Women Environmental Professionals​ ​2018 Annual
Conference​. ​Central Penn College​ Conference Center, 600 College Hill Road in Summerdale,
Cumberland County.

May 2--​ ​DEP Hearing (If Requested) On Jeld-Wen, Inc. RACT II Air Quality Plan, Bradford
County​. ​DEP Northcentral Regional Office, 208 West Third Street, Williamsport. 10:00.
May 2-4--​ ​PA Association Of Environmental Professional​. ​Annual Conference​. State College.

May 3-- ​DEP ​Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:30.
DEP Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, ​jvollero@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

May 3--​ ​Bi-State Solution To Protecting Clean Water In The Brandywine-Christina Watershed​.
Mendenhall Inn​, Route 52, Mendenhall, Chester County. 8:30 - 4:30.

May 4-6--​ ​Kettle Creek Watershed Association​. ​Special Veterans Project Healing Waters Fly
Fishing Weekend In Potter County​. ​Kettle Creek Adventures Lodge B&B​, Cross Fork, Potter
County.

May 5--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Habitat Restoration Project In Butler County​. ​148
Thompson Road, Sarver, Butler County. 9:00 to Noon.

May 5--​ ​NEW​. ​Brodhead Watershed Association​. ​Walk and Talk Hike In Search Of Imperiled
Golden-Winged Warbler In Monroe County​. ​Barrett Paradise Friendly Library​, 6500 Route 191,
Cresco. 9:00

May 7-​- ​Public Utility Commission Workgroup On Universal Service & Energy Conservation
Programs​. ​Keystone Building, Executive Chambers, Harrisburg. 1:00 to 3:00.

May 8--​ ​Registration Open​. ​2018 PA Groundwater Symposium​. Ramada Inn in State College,
Centre County.

May 8-- ​DEP Keystone Energy Education Workshop For Teachers​. ​DEP Northwest Regional
Office​, Meadville, Crawford County. 8:30 to 3:00.​ ​Click To Register​.

May 8-10--​ ​PA Section American Water Works Association​. ​70th Annual Conference​. ​Kalahari
Resort and Convention Center​ at Pocono Manor, Monroe County.

May 9--​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson 717-787-3730 or send email to: ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

May 9-- ​DEP Keystone Energy Education Workshop For Teachers​. ​Westmoreland County
Conservation District Office​, Greensburg, Westmoreland County.​ ​ 8:30 to 3:00.​ ​Click To
Register​.

May 9--​ ​PUC Hearing On Transource Power Line Project​. ​Airville Volunteer Fire Department,
3576 Delta Road, Airville, York County. Hearings at 1:00 and 6:00.

May 10--​ ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace 717-783-9438 or send email to: ​twallace@pa.gov​.

May 10--​ ​NEW​. ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ holds a hearing on water withdrawal
requests, changes to fee schedule and proposed records retention policy. Room 8E-B East Wing
Capitol Building, Harrisburg. 2:30 to 5:00. Contact: Jason Oyler, General Counsel,
717-238-0423, Ext. 1312, fax 717-238-2436. ​(​formal notice​) ​Click Here​ for more.

May 14-- ​PUC Hearing On Transource Power Line Project​. ​Airville Volunteer Fire Department,
3576 Delta Road, Airville, York County. Hearings at 1:00 and 6:00. ​Click Here​ for more.

May 15--​ ​CANCELED​. PUC Hearing On Transource Power Line Project. ​Airville Volunteer
Fire Department, 3576 Delta Road, Airville, York County. Hearings at 1:00 and 6:00. ​Click
Here​ for more.

May 15-- ​Pike County Conservation District​. ​Stormwater Management Field Tour​. Pike County
Training Center, 135 Pike County Boulevard,Lords Valley. 10:00 to 3:00.

May 16-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP
Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

May 16--​ ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
Contact: Executive Director Lee Ann Murray, 717-787-8171, ​leemurray@pa.gov​.

May 17--​ ​NEW​. DEP ​Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to: ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice​)

May 17-- ​DEP Keystone Energy Education Workshop For Teachers​. ​King’s Gap Environmental
Center​, Carlisle, Cumberland County.​ ​8:30 to 3:00.​ ​Click To Register​.

May 19-- ​Foundation for Sustainable Forests​. ​Loving The Land Through Working Forests Field
Conference​. ​Floraroze Forest​ near 9201 South Creek Road, Girard, Erie County. 7:30 to 4:00.

May 19--​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy​. ​Milford Experimental Forest Native Plants Walk​.
Milford, Pike County. 9:00 to Noon.

May 22--​ ​PUC Hearing On Transource Power Line Project​. ​New Franklin Fire Department
Social Hall, 3444 Wayne Road, Chambersburg. Franklin County. Hearings at 1:00 and 6:00.

May 22--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board​ meeting. Rescheduled for
May 29. DEP Contact: John Brakeall, 717-783-9731 or send email to: ​jbrakeall@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice​)

May 22--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Hearing On Sunoco Marcus Hook Terminal Air Permit​. ​Marcus Hook
Community, 7 W. Delaware Avenue, Marcus Hook, Delaware County. 6:00 to 8:00.

May 22-23--​ ​Choose Clean Water Coalition​. ​9th Annual Clean Water Conference​. Lancaster
Marriott.
May 23--​ ​NEW​. ​House Consumer Affairs Committee​ holds a hearing on ​House Bill 2075
(Charlton-R-Delaware) replacement of lead water and damaged sewer laterals (​sponsor
summary​). Room B-31 Main Capitol. 10:00. ​Committee meetings are typically webcast
through the ​PA House Republican ​website.

May 23--​ ​PUC Hearing On Transource Power Line Project​. ​New Franklin Fire Department
Social Hall, 3444 Wayne Road, Chambersburg. Franklin County. Hearings at 1:00 and 6:00.

May 23-24--​ ​Penn State Extension Healthy Trees, Healthy People Program​. ​Frick Environmental
Center,​ 2005 Beechwood Boulevard, Pittsburgh.

May 24--​ ​DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Dawn Hissner 717-772-2189 or send email to:
dhissner@pa.gov​.

May 26--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Backyard Habitat Organic Garden Solution
Workshop​. ​Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve​, 614 Dorseyville Road, Pittsburgh. 10:00.

May 29--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: John Brakeall, 717-783-9731 or send email to:
jbrakeall@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

May 30-- ​DEP State Board for Certification of Sewage Enforcement Officers​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kristen Szwajkowski 717-772-2186 or send
email to: ​kszwajkows@pa.gov​.

May 30--​ ​NEW​. Public Utility Commission. ​Combined Heat and Power Working Group
meeting. Forest Room, Keystone Building, 400 North Street, Harrisburg. 1:00. A call-in
number will be published, ​Click Here​. Contact: Joe Sherrick 717-787-5369 or send email to:
josherrick@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

May 30-31--​ ​Penn State Energy Days​. ​Penn Stater Conference Center​, State College, Centre
County.

May 31--​ ​Philadelphia Air Management Services Public Hearing [If Requested] On Proposed
State Air Quality Implementation Plan Revisions RACT Controls For VOCs, NOx​. Spelman
Building, 321 University Avenue, 1st Floor Conference Room, Philadelphia. 6:00.

June 5--​ ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Cambria Office, 286 Industrial Park
Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Peggy Scheloske 724-404-3143 or send email to:
mscheloske@pa.gov​.

June 5--​ ​CANCELED​. DEP ​Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to:
kshiffer@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

June 6-- ​DEP Coastal Zone Advisory Committee​ meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Stacey Box 717-772-5622 or send email to:
sbox@pa.gov​.

June 7--​ ​House Game and Fisheries Committee​ holds a hearing on Chronic Wasting Disease.
Room 60 East Wing. 10:00.

June 7--​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry 717-772-5713 or send email to: ​lahenry@pa.gov​.

June 10-14--​ ​Rails-To-Trails Conservancy​. ​Delaware & Lehigh Trail Sojourn​. Eastern
Pennsylvania.

June 12--​ ​DEP Weathering The Storm Stormwater Education Workshop​. ​Alumni Room of the
Waldron Campus Center, Gannon University, 109 University Square, Erie. 8:30 to 3:30.

June 13-- ​DEP State Board For Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators​. 10th
Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar Chescattie,
717-772-2814 or ​eschescattie@pa.gov​.

June 13--​ ​DEP Weathering The Storm Stormwater Education Workshop​. ​Winnie Palmer Nature
Reserve, Saint Vincent College, 744 Walzer Way, Latrobe, Westmoreland County. 8:30 to 3:30.

June 14--​ ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436, ​kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

June 14--​ ​PUC En Banc Hearing On Supplier Consolidated Billing By Electricity Suppliers​.
Hearing Room 1, Keystone Building, 400 North Street, Harrisburg. 1:00.

June 15--​ ​NEW​. ​Susquehanna River Basin Committee​ business meeting. Radisson Hotel
Baltimore. 9:00.

June 20-21--​ ​Registration Open​. ​20th Anniversary PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation
Conference​. Ramada Conference Center, State College.

June 23--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Backyard Habitat Flowers And Feathers, The
Connection Between Plants and Birds Workshop​. ​Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve​, 614
Dorseyville Road, Pittsburgh. 10:00.

July 11--​ ​DEP Technical Advisory Committee On Diesel Powered (Mining) Equipment​. DEP
New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00. DEP Contact: Peggy Scheloski,
724-404-3143 or ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.
July 25-- ​DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​ meeting. 12th Floor
Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269 or
nherb@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

July 25-27--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Professional Recyclers of PA​. ​28th Annual Recycling &
Organics Conference​. Best Western Premier Hotel, Harrisburg.

July 28--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council​. ​Recycling Bin Distribution Event In Pittsburgh​. Point
Breeze Distribution Event, URA’s Parking Lot on Meade Street. 8:00 to 2:00.​ ​Click Here​ to
register.

July 28--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Backyard Habitat Gardening for Pollinators and
Butterflies Workshop​. ​Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve​, 614 Dorseyville Road, Pittsburgh.
10:00.

August 11--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council​. ​Recycling Bin Distribution Event In Pittsburgh​.
Fairywood Distribution Event, B Keppel Trucking, 100 Beechnut Drive, Pittsburgh. ​8:00 to 2:00.
Click Here​ to register.

August 20-23--​ ​U.S. Biochar Initiatives Conference​. ​Chase Center on the Riverfront​,
Wilmington, Delaware.

September 6-9--​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy​. ​Educational Retreat For Women Forest
Landowners​. ​Highlights Workshop Facility​ in Boyd’s Mill, Milanville, Wayne County.

September 20--​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Funding Advisory
Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry
717-772-5713 or send email to: ​lahenry@pa.gov​.

September 22--​ Joint meeting of DEP Recycling Fund Advisory Committee and ​Solid Waste
Advisory Committee​. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry,
717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​.

September 23--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Backyard Habitat Trees and Shrubs,
Supporting Wildlife In Winter Workshop​. ​Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve​, 614 Dorseyville
Road, Pittsburgh. 10:00.

September 28--​ ​DEP Low-Level Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Rich Janati, 717-787-2147, ​rjanati@pa.gov​.

October 1-3--​ ​Engineers’ Society of Western PA​. ​PA Brownfield Conference​. Sands Bethlehem
Casino, Bethlehem.

October 17-21--​ ​Passive House Western PA​. ​North American Passive House Network 2018
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.
October 18--​ ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to: ​jmelnic@pa.gov​.

November 1-2--​ ​PA Water And Wastewater Technology Summit​. ​Penn Stater Conference
Center Hotel, State College.

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities. ​Click Here​ to sign
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

DEP Regulations In Process
Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
March 3, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 1374

DEP Technical Guidance In Process
Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (February 2018)​ - DEP webpage

Other DEP Proposals For Public Review
Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel

Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.

DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events
Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule

You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

PA Environment Digest Blog​ ​Twitter Feed​ ​PaEnviroDigest Google+

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

April 27--​ ​NRCS-PA Conservation Innovation Grants
April 30--​ ​Northeast PA Audubon Society College Scholarship
May 1-- ​PEC Pocono Forests & Water Conservation Mini-Grants
May 1--​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission Spring Photo Contest
May 15--​ ​Manada Conservancy Short Story Writing Contest
May 15--​ ​PA Anthracite Section SME Student Scholarships
May 18--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
May 18--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
May 18--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
May 18--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
May 23--​ ​SBA Flood Assistance Clearfield, Washington, 8 Other Counties
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Abatement, Treatment Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Orphaned Or Abandoned Well Plugging Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Program Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails & Recreation Grants
June 1--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Land Conservation, Recreation Mini-Grants
June 3-- ​Goddard Student Leadership Legacy Institute Camp Program
June 8--​ ​Keep PA Beautiful Great American Cleanup Of PA Video Contest
June 8-- ​Keep America Beautiful National Youth Advisory Council
June 21-- ​NEW​. ​DEP Mariner East II Pipeline Water Quality Project Grants
June 30--​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ (first come, first serve)
July 20--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
July 20--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
July 20--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
July 20--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
September 5--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
September 15--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
September 15--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
September 15--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
September 15--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
September 28-- ​NEW​. ​DEP Calendar 2017 Recycling Performance Grants
October 31--​ ​PA Resources Council Gene Capaldi Lens On Litter Photo Contest
December 31--​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.

-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

PA Environment Digest Blog​ ​Twitter Feed​ ​PaEnviroDigest Google+

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

Op-Ed: In Praise Of Rachel Carson And Public Service, James M. Seif, Fmr DEP Secretary
Air
Experts Say Allergy Sufferers Should Brace For Pollen-geddon
Erie County’s Air Quality Earns High Marks
More Smog, Less Soot In Lehigh Valley Compared To Last Year
Harrisburg Air Pollution Ranks Among 25 Worst In Country
Crable: Air Pollution In Lancaster Continues Among Worst In Nation
Study: Pittsburgh’s Air Quality Among Worst In The Nation
Pittsburgh Region’s Air Pollution Worsening, Report Says
Allegheny County: We Are Strengthening Air Quality Standards
Allegheny County Defends Anti-Pollution Efforts, Promises To Do More
Editorial: Don’t Let Regional Progress Be Stalled By Air Pollution
Philly Area Flunks Latest Lung Association Smog Report
Op-Ed: Keep The Fuel Rules On Vehicles, DEP Secretary McDonnell
Alternative Fuels
5 Lancaster Parking Garages Will Offer Free Electric Vehicle Charging
Awards & Recognition
Scranton Receives Governor’s Award For Environmental Excellence
Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority, Earth Conservancy Win Governor’s Environmental
Awards
American Eagle Paper Mill To Receive Governor’s Award For Environmental Excellence
Champions Of The PA Wilds Award Winners Announced
So Big, So Green: Traveling The Wilds Of Pennsylvania
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
Frye: Hydrilla, Super Evil Of The Invasive Plant World, Is Spreading
Budget
Legislative Deadlock Looms Over PA Trout Season
Editorial: Fishing License Dispute Impedes Key Industry
Editorial: Severance Tax Shibboleths
Editorial: Ensure Funding Stream For National Parks
U.S. House Committee’s Farm Bill Fails American Family Farmers On Conservation, Other
Issues
Chesapeake Bay
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
Protecting Pennsylvania Prized Waters- Spring Creek, Centre County
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Climate
DCNR Secretary To Talk Climate Change At Saint Vincent College April 17
Op-Ed: Keep The Fuel Rules On Vehicles, DEP Secretary McDonnell
Report: Exelon, FirstEnergy Nuclear Plant Closures Would Reverse PJM Wind, Solar Benefits
Closing Nuclear Reactors In OH, PA Will Thwart Climate Goals
EPA Report: Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Power Plants Plunge
Study: REGGI Carbon Market In Northeast U.S. Creating Jobs, Revenue
It May Take More Than A Year For New Jersey To Rejoin RGGI Climate Pact
Coal Mining
Legere: As Coal-Fired Power Plants Switch Off, PA Looks To Bring In New Businesses
Editorial: Fmr Coal-Fired Power Plants Get Playbooks For Future
FERC Members Tell House Panel Grid Reliability, Resilience Order Moving Forward
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
Energy Dept. Won’t Consider FirstEnergy’s Financial Woes In Decision On Coal, Nuclear
Plants
Trump May Invoke Cold War Era Defense Act To Boost Coal Plants
WV AG’s Office Files Action To Force EPA To Protect Coal, Steel Jobs
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Compliance Action
McKelvey: Suspended PA Drinking Water Lab Tested Thousands Of Samples
Delaware River
Op-Ed: Gas And Water(front) Don’t Mix Along Delaware
Drinking Water
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs $12M Budget Increase To Meet Regulatory Requirements
Maykuth: Philly Water Has A Plan To Replace Decaying Water, Sewer Pipes
On Tap For Philadelphia: Higher Water Bills, Unhappy Home, Biz Owners
Nestle Waters Won’t Build Bottling Plant In Spring, Benner Twps, Centre County
Grant For Southwestern Water Takeover Of Dunkard Valley Comes Up Short
EEOC: Altoona Water Authority Violated Rights
McKelvey: Suspended PA Drinking Water Lab Tested Thousands Of Samples
Earth Day
Public Invited To Lewisburg Tree Planting April 19
Lancaster Plans Record Tree Planting For Arbor Day April 27
Earth Day Guide To Where To Take Your Unwanted Stuff In Lancaster County
Penns Valley Conservation To Host Creek Cleanup, Tree Plantings Starting April 21
PPL Employees Participate In Weiser State Forest Earth Day Tree Planting
Multitude Of Earth Day Celebrations Keep It Fun, Educational
Lawrence County Holding Earth Day Celebration April 21
Wilkes University Earth & Environmental Science Day
Earth Day Event Held By The River In Wilkes-Barre
Earth Day 2018 Celebratory Events: Free Or Cheap
Youngwood Seeks Volunteers For Earth Day Cleanup
Pittsburgher’s Guide To Making Every Day Earth Day
7th Annual PRC ReuseFest Celebrates Earth Day In Pittsburgh
Riverfront North Earth Day Festival In Philadelphia April 21
Economic Development
Champions Of The PA Wilds Award Winners Announced
So Big, So Green: Traveling The Wilds Of Pennsylvania
Legere: As Coal-Fired Power Plants Switch Off, PA Looks To Bring In New Businesses
Editorial: Fmr Coal-Fired Power Plants Get Playbooks For Future
Natural Gas, Renewable Energy Advocates Disagree On Potential To Grow Jobs In Pittsburgh
Will Pittsburgh Flourish As Hub Of Eds, Meds, Gas And Petrochemicals?
Report Compares Benefits Of Petrochemicals Built In Northeast To The Gulf Coast
Biogas Needs Real Consideration As A Truly Clean Alternative To Natural Gas
Op-Ed: Gas And Water(front) Don’t Mix Along Delaware
Earth Conservancy’s Environmental Workforce Training Program Ends With 21 Graduates
Education
Apollo-Ridge 1st, 2nd Graders Release Brook Trout Into Kiski River On Field Trip
Wildlife Leadership Academy Promotes Conservation Among Teens
Wilkes University Earth & Environmental Science Day
Earth Day Event Held By The River In Wilkes-Barre
Welshans: Wildlife Leadership Academy Ensures Future Of Conservation Lives On In Youth
Facts Matter Cry Ralliers In Bethlehem’s March For Science
Schneck: When, How To Watch The Lyrid Meteor Shower
Emergency Response
Crews Responding To Heating Oil Spill In Bensalem
Energy
FirstEnergy Exec Urges Legislators To Act On Behalf Of Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant
TMI Supporters Urge Lawmakers To Save Financially Troubled Nuclear Power Plant
Clock Ticks Toward Three Mile Island Shutdown
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
Legere: As Coal-Fired Power Plants Switch Off, PA Looks To Bring In New Businesses
Editorial: Fmr Coal-Fired Power Plants Get Playbooks For Future
Report: Electricity Prices Could Increase $285M If 2 PA Nuclear Plants Close
Report: Exelon, FirstEnergy Nuclear Plant Closures Would Reverse PJM Wind, Solar Benefits
Closing Nuclear Reactors In OH, PA Will Thwart Climate Goals
Study: REGGI Carbon Market In Northeast U.S. Creating Jobs, Revenue
It May Take More Than A Year For New Jersey To Rejoin RGGI Climate Pact
Environmentalists And Nuclear Power? It’s Complicated
Natural Gas, Renewable Energy Advocates Disagree On Potential To Grow Jobs In Pittsburgh
Will Pittsburgh Flourish As Hub Of Eds, Meds, Gas And Petrochemicals?
Biogas Needs Real Consideration As A Truly Clean Alternative To Natural Gas
Downed Power Line Ignites Major Armstrong County Brush Fire
Duquesne Light Rate Increase Would Hike Residential Bills By Nearly 9 Percent
PPL Enters Uncertain World Of Ratemaking In United Kingdom
Cusick: After Alert On Russian Hacking A Renewed Push To Protect Power Grid
Energy Dept. Won’t Consider FirstEnergy’s Financial Woes In Decision On Coal, Nuclear
Plants
FERC Members Tell House Panel Grid Reliability, Resilience Order Moving Forward
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
FERC Chair Opposes PJM-Like MOPR Prices As Standard Solution For State Policies
Trump May Invoke Cold War Era Defense Act To Boost Coal Plants
WV AG’s Office Files Action To Force EPA To Protect Coal, Steel Jobs
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Energy Conservation
Op-Ed: Trump, Pruitt Waging War On Fuel Standards
Op-Ed: Trump’s Fuel Efficiency Rollbacks Are A Wrong Turn For PA
Editorial: Standards For Gas Efficiency Area Good For Business
Farming
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
Natural Lands Trust Strikes Back Against School District’s Eminent Domain Play
County Commissioners Join Fight Against School District Taking Preserved Farmland
Midstate School District Faces Growing Calls To Stop Eminent Domain Move On Farm
Cumberland School District Warned Of Far-Reaching Effects If Preserved Farmland Acquired
More PA Dairy Farmers Calling It Quits As Milk Prices Keep Falling
Initiative Aims To Connect Struggling Dairy Farmers With Resources
U.S. House Committee’s Farm Bill Fails American Family Farmers On Conservation, Other
Issues
Flooding
Rain, Snow Racks Up $12.2M In Allegheny County Damage, Prompts Emergency Declaration
Allegheny County Declares Disaster Emergency Related To Precipitation Impacts, Landslides
Landslide Closes Guys Run Road In Harmar
Landslide Shuts Down River Road In Gilpin Monday Night
Falling Rocks, Debris Force Closure Of Route 906 In Fayette
Wall Collapse Reduces Route 11/15 To One Lane Near Harrisburg
Storm Expected Sunday Night, Warnings Of Flash Floods, Landslides In Western PA
Potentially Flooding Rains Expected For Central PA
Storm Forces 125 To Evacuate Scranton Apartment Building After Roof Blown Off
Heavy Rains Flood Basements In Delaware County
Work Begins On Solomon Creek Flood Wall Project In Wilkes-Barre
Solomon Creek Flood Wall Project Put Out For Bids
Flooding Fear Drives Girard Man’s Fight
Op-Ed: We Need Federal Flood Insurance Reforms
Editorial: Draft Floodplain Insurance Maps With Science
Forests
PPL Employees Participate In Weiser State Forest Earth Day Tree Planting
Public Invited To Lewisburg Tree Planting April 19
Lancaster Plans Record Tree Planting For Arbor Day April 27
Penns Valley Conservation To Host Creek Cleanup, Tree Plantings Starting April 21
After Growth Spurt, Tree Pittsburgh Finally Has Roots
AP: 2 Firefighters Hurt In Falls Battling Brush Fire In Blair County
Logan Twp In Blair County Imposes Ban On Burning
Downed Power Line Ignites Major Armstrong County Brush Fire
Geologic Hazards
PennDOT Awards Contract To Rebuild Landslide-Damaged Route 30
PennDOT: Landslide Damaged Route 30 In Pittsburgh To Reopen By Mid-July
PennDOT Could Choose Contractor For Landslide-Damaged Route 30 This Weekend
Landslide Closes Guys Run Road In Harmar
Landslide Shuts Down River Road In Gilpin Monday Night
Falling Rocks, Debris Force Closure Of Route 906 In Fayette
Wall Collapse Reduces Route 11/15 To One Lane Near Harrisburg
Landslides A Common Annoyance In Western PA, Blame Weather, Geology
Editorial: Pool Resources To Address Regional Landslides
Storm Expected Sunday Night, Warnings Of Flash Floods, Landslides In Western PA
Woman Dies After Falling Into Berks County Quarry
Green Infrastructure
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
Bethlehem Twp Hears Plan For Meeting Sediment Pollution
Hazardous Sites Cleanup
Hopey: Federal Judge Rules PPG Is Liable For Glass Dump Pollution
Laboratories
McKelvey: Suspended PA Drinking Water Lab Tested Thousands Of Samples
Lake Erie
Water Dance Erie Events Unites Artists, Conservationists
Land Conservation
Natural Lands Trust Strikes Back Against School District’s Eminent Domain Play
County Commissioners Join Fight Against School District Taking Preserved Farmland
Midstate School District Faces Growing Calls To Stop Eminent Domain Move On Farm
Cumberland School District Warned Of Far-Reaching Effects If Preserved Farmland Acquired
Earth Conservancy’s Environmental Workforce Training Program Ends With 21 Graduates
Land Recycling
Sale Of Sands Casino Could Mean Redevelopment Of More Fmr Steel Land
Littering/Illegal Dumping
Youngwood Seeks Volunteers For Earth Day Cleanup
Earth Day Guide To Where To Take Your Unwanted Stuff In Lancaster County
Carr: Monroeville Still Accepting Registrations For Weekend Cleanup Day
Mine Reclamation
Kiski, Conemaugh Mine Runoff Treatment Systems Clogged With Sediment
Earth Conservancy’s Environmental Workforce Training Program Ends With 21 Graduates
Acid Mine Drainage Yields Valuable Rare Earth Elements
Oil & Gas
Southwestern Energy Asks Entire PA Superior Court To Reconsider Fracking Trespass Decision
Southwestern Energy Appeals PA Court Decision On Rule Of Capture
Cusick: 5 Takeaways From StateImpact’s Forum On Natural Gas Royalties
Editorial: Severance Tax Shibboleths
Fracking Water Solution In Coudersport Good For Everyone
Natural Gas, Renewable Energy Advocates Disagree On Potential To Grow Jobs In Pittsburgh
Will Pittsburgh Flourish As Hub Of Eds, Meds, Gas And Petrochemicals?
Report Compares Benefits Of Petrochemicals Built In Northeast To The Gulf Coast
Biogas Needs Real Consideration As A Truly Clean Alternative To Natural Gas
Op-Ed: Make Pittsburgh’s Airport Even Smarter, Power It By The Sun, Not Natural Gas
Oil & Gas Conference Returns To Pittsburgh Oct. 23-25
Gasoline Tops $3/Gallon In Some Parts Of PA, How High Will It Go?
Pipelines
Meyer: Sunoco Says Testing Done On Mariner East 1 Pipeline And It’s Safe, PUC Says Slow
Down
Hurdle: Here’s What $12.6M Mariner East 2 Pipeline Penalty Will Be Spent On
State Establishes $12.6M Grant Program With Mariner East II Pipeline Fines
Hurdle: DEP Sets Hearing On Proposed Mariner East 2 Construction In Chester County
ATF: 350 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site Recovered
Some Explosives Recovered That Were Stolen From The Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
Officials Uncertain If They Have All Stolen Explosives
ATF Agents Flood Lancaster County On Stolen Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Explosives
ATF Increases Reward To $20,000 For Info On Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise
Pipeline Construction Site In Lancaster
About 640 Pounds Of Dynamite Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site
ATF Investigating 640 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site,
Reward Offered
600+ Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Worksite In Lancaster
County
ATF Now Says More Than 700 Pounds Of Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sense Of Urgency Propels Search For Explosives Stolen From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Construction Site
Sisk: Dynamite Disappears From Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Site, ATF Trying To Find It
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
FERC Reviews Its Policies For Approving Natural Gas Pipelines
FERC Seeks Public Comments On Natural Gas Pipeline Evaluations
Radiation Protection
FirstEnergy Exec Urges Legislators To Act On Behalf Of Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant
TMI Supporters Urge Lawmakers To Save Financially Troubled Nuclear Power Plant
Clock Ticks Toward Three Mile Island Shutdown
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
Report: Electricity Prices Could Increase $285M If 2 PA Nuclear Plants Close
Report: Exelon, FirstEnergy Nuclear Plant Closures Would Reverse PJM Wind, Solar Benefits
Closing Nuclear Reactors In OH, PA Will Thwart Climate Goals
Environmentalists And Nuclear Power? It’s Complicated
Energy Dept. Won’t Consider FirstEnergy’s Financial Woes In Decision On Coal, Nuclear
Plants
Study: REGGI Carbon Market In Northeast U.S. Creating Jobs, Revenue
It May Take More Than A Year For New Jersey To Rejoin RGGI Climate Pact
With NJ Nuclear Plant Shutting Down, Community Inherits 1.7M Pounds Of Waste
FERC Members Tell House Panel Grid Reliability, Resilience Order Moving Forward
FERC Chair Takes Up Coal Lobby Line On Plant Retirements
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Recreation
Champions Of The PA Wilds Award Winners Announced
So Big, So Green: Traveling The Wilds Of Pennsylvania
Sen. Yudichak To Make Good On 165-Mile Delaware & Lehigh Trail Hike Pledge
April 20 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Crable: Susquehanna Heritage Designation Would Mean More Federal Dollars For Lancaster
Ecotourism
Schuylkill River Sojourn Celebrating 20 Years On The River
Project Will Remove Logjam On Schuylkill River Near Thun Trail
Read The River Before You Launch
Hopey: Penn State Outing Club Can No Longer Take Hikes
Carr: School Mountain Bike Team To Maintain Trails At Boyce Park
Tredway Trail To Add New Sights, With 1.5 Mile Expansion
Ground Breaks For Philly Greenway Along Fmr Conrail Heroin Hotspot
Archbald Reopens Staback Park After Closing it To Cut Costs
Cyclists To Pass Thru Lehigh Valley On Ride Past 9/11 Memorial Sites
Editorial: Ensure Funding Stream For National Parks
Recycling/Waste
Keep Blair Beautiful, IRC Recycling Waste Drop-Off In Blair County
Sign Up, Clean Up In Clinton County
7th Annual PRC ReuseFest Celebrates Earth Day In Pittsburgh
Wilkes-Barre To Begin Picking Up Yard Waste April 23
Op-Ed: Join Fight Against Opioid Addiction On Prescription Drug Take Back Day
Op-Ed: Will Harrisburg’s Glass Recycling Program Really Be Green And Progressive?
Editorial: Americans Recycle When It’s Worth It
Developer Changes Keystone Landfill Gas Refinery Site
Renewable Energy
Legere: PUC Says Law Meant To Close The Borders On Solar Energy Credits
Cusick: Bill Says Pennsylvania Should Use Only Renewable Energy By 2050
Murphy: Bills Setting 100% Renewable Energy Goal For PA Draw Bipartisan Support
Bagenstose: Bucks, Montgomery Mayors Sign On To Solar Power Pledge
Op-Ed: Make Pittsburgh’s Airport Even Smarter, Power It By The Sun, Not Natural Gas
Report: Nuclear Plant Loss Would Undo Renewable Growth
U.S. House Committee Hearing Summary With FERC Commissioners
AP: Market Forces Are Driving A Clean Energy Revolution In The U.S.
Schuylkill River
Project Will Remove Logjam On Schuylkill River Near Thun Trail
Schuylkill River Sojourn Celebrating 20 Years On The River
Stormwater
Bethlehem Twp Hears Plan For Meeting Sediment Pollution
Harveys Lake Residents Fire Questions At Council About Stormwater Decision
Susquehanna River
Crable: Susquehanna Heritage Designation Would Mean More Federal Dollars For Lancaster
Ecotourism
Rain Thwarts Efforts To Find Source Of Oil Sheen On Susquehanna At Lock Haven
Wastewater Facilities
Maykuth: Philly Water Has A Plan To Replace Decaying Water, Sewer Pipes
Watershed Protection
Crable: Streamside Buffer Projects Aim To Grow Profits For Farmers In Lancaster
Volunteers Clean Up Plastic Pellets That Spilled Into Pocono Creek
Protecting Pennsylvania Prized Waters- Spring Creek, Centre County
Bethlehem Twp Hears Plan For Meeting Sediment Pollution
Nestle Waters Won’t Build Bottling Plant In Spring, Benner Twps, Centre County
Crews Responding To Heating Oil Spill In Bensalem
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Wildlife
A Beautiful Day For Some Fishing
Families Flock To Forkston In Mehoopany Creek Watershed For First-Day Fishing
AP: Fishing Enthusiasts Hit The Pocono Shorelines
Volunteers Clean Up Plastic Pellets That Spilled Into Pocono Creek
Apollo-Ridge 1st, 2nd Graders Release Brook Trout Into Kiski River On Field Trip
Legislative Deadlock Looms Over PA Trout Season
Editorial: Fishing License Dispute Impedes Key Industry
Anglers To Have Additional Public Fishing On Spruce Creek, Little Juniata River
Frye: Hydrilla, Super Evil Of The Invasive Plant World, Is Spreading
Wildlife Leadership Academy Promotes Conservation Among Teens
Hayes: Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Eats Two Of Her Hatching Young
Why Is Pittsburgh Peregrine Falcon Eating Her Young?
Schneck: When Will Hummingbirds Return To PA?
Schneck: Where To Find The Sky-Dancing Woodcock In PA
Video Action Sequence: Osprey Catches Trout
Frye: Managed Dove Fields Eyed As Key To Recruiting Small Game Hunters
Frye: Be On The Lookout For Box Turtles, They May Need Some Help
Frye: Time For Catching Trophy Pre-Spawn Smallmouth Bass Fast Approaching
Hayes: Urban Beavers Making Home In Pittsburgh
Black Bear Captured In Millcreek Twp Near Erie
Other
Facts Matter Cry Ralliers In Bethlehem’s March For Science
Wildfires
Forecasters Warn Of Rare, Life-Threatening Wildfire Weather In Oklahoma, Southern Plains
Hurricanes
Puerto Rico Hit By Island-Wide Blackout
Puerto Rico Suffers Island-Wide Power Outage
Island-Wide Blackout Hits Puerto Rico, Officials Blame Excavator
Lights Back On For About Half Of Puerto Rico
Federal Policy
Fmr Republican EPA Heads Slam Pruitt’s Latest Moves
Op-Ed: Keep The Fuel Rules On Vehicles, DEP Secretary McDonnell
Op-Ed: Trump, Pruitt Waging War On Fuel Standards
Op-Ed: Trump’s Fuel Efficiency Rollbacks Are A Wrong Turn For PA
Editorial: Standards For Gas Efficiency Area Good For Business
Trump May Invoke Cold War Era Defense Act To Boost Coal Plants
Cusick: After Alert On Russian Hacking A Renewed Push To Protect Power Grid
U.S. House Committee’s Farm Bill Fails American Family Farmers On Conservation, Other
Issues
Editorial: Ensure Funding Stream For National Parks

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Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice ​in the April 21 PA Bulletin it is
suspending the enforcement of the low-RVP summertime gasoline requirement in the Pittsburgh
Region starting May 1 since a final regulation repealing the requirement was published in the
April 7 PA Bulletin​.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - April 21, 2018

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.
DEP Regulations In Process
Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
March 3, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 1374

Technical Guidance & Permits

Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 59 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the April 21 PA Bulletin -
pages 2282 to 2341​.

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the April 21 PA Bulletin of
draft technical guidance on the Beneficial Use Of Biosolids and Residential Septage at Active
Mine Sites for public comment.

DEP also ​published notice​ in the April 21 PA Bulletin of final technical guidance on Stormwater
Management for Agricultural High Tunnels, Processing Completion Reports for coal Mining
Operations, Bonding: Direct-Submittal of Bonds for Mining Operations and Implementation
Guidance for NPDES CAFO Permits and Water Quality Management Permits for Manure
Storage Facilities.

DEP ​published notice​ in the April 21 PA Bulletin of final 2018 ozone season nitrogen oxide
emission limits for nonelectric generating units.

The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ published notices in the April 21 PA Bulletin listing
projects approved​ and ​projects rescinded​ in February.

DEP Technical Guidance In Process
Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (February 2018)​ - DEP webpage

Other DEP Proposals For Public Review
Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities. ​Click Here​ to sign
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel

Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.

DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events

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Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or
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PA Environment Digest​ is edited by David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department
of Environmental Protection, and is published as a service of ​Crisci Associates​, a
Harrisburg-based government and public affairs firm whose clients include Fortune 500
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Did you know you can search back issues since May 28, 2004 of the PA Environment Digest on
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once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. Add your constructive comment
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Register Now For 20th PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference

Registration is now open for the ​20th Anniversary PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference
to be held June 20-21 at the Ramada Inn & Conference Center in State College. Join ​PA
Environment Digest​ as a ​sponsor of this terrific Conference​.