Handbook

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Edition 6.1
September 2009
Handbook written by Tom Clarke and Daniel Spreadbury.
See the About Sibelius dialog for a full list of the software development team and other credits.
We would like to thank all those (too numerous to list) who have provided helpful comments and
suggestions for Sibelius and its documentation.
Please email any suggestions for improvements to this Handbook to docs@sibelius.com (but please
do not use this address for suggestions or queries about the Sibelius program itself – see the separate
Latest information & technical help sheet for the correct address for your country).
This product is subject to the terms and conditions of a software license agreement.
Sibelius copyright © Avid Technology, Inc. and its licensors 1987–2009
Sibelius Handbook copyright © Avid Technology, Inc. 1992–2009
Published by Avid Technology, Inc., The Old Toy Factory, 20–23 City North, Fonthill Road, London
N4 3HF, UK
All rights reserved. This Handbook may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means – electronic,
recording, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise – in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the publisher. Although every care has been
taken in the preparation of this Reference, neither the publisher nor the authors can take responsibility for any loss or damage arising from any errors or
omissions it may contain.
Sibelius, the Sibelius logo, Scorch, Flexi-time, Espressivo, Rubato, Rhythmic feel, Arrange, ManuScript, Virtual Manuscript Paper, House Style,
SoundStage, Opus, Inkpen2, Helsinki, Reprise, magnetic, multicopy, Optical, Dynamic parts, SoundWorld, Panorama, the blue notes and double helix
logos, SibeliusMusic.com, SibeliusEducation.com, ‘The fastest, smartest, easiest way to write music’ and ‘99% inspiration, 1% perspiration’ are all trade-
marks or registered trademarks of Avid Technology, Inc. in the USA, UK and other countries. All other trademarks are acknowledged as the property of
their respective owners.
Contents
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Start here 5
The story of Sibelius. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
About this Handbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Before you install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Installing Sibelius for Windows . . . . . . . . 12
Installing Sibelius for Mac. . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Registering Sibelius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
MIDI setup for Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
MIDI setup for Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
About the projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Project 1 33
1.1 Opening a score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
1.2 Editing and inputting notes . . . . . . . . 40
1.3 Selections and copying music. . . . . . . 46
1.4 Flexi-time™ input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
1.5 Alphabetic and step-time input . . . . . 53
1.6 Playback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
1.7 Text and dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Project 2 65
2.1 Creating a new score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
2.2 Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
2.3 Clefs, key signatures and tuplets . . . . 74
2.4 Marking up a score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
2.5 Layout and formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
2.6 Dynamic parts™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
2.7 Exporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Project 3 89
3.1 Writing for keyboard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
3.2 Writing for guitar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
3.3 Ideas and drum notation . . . . . . . . . . . 95
3.4 Chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
3.5 Repeats and codas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
3.6 Arranging and playback . . . . . . . . . . 108
Project 4 111
4.1 Setting up a worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . 113
4.2 Scales and arpeggios . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
4.3 Layout and formatting . . . . . . . . . . . 120
4.4 Classroom Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Project 5 127
5.1 Using video. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
5.2 Writing music to picture. . . . . . . . . . 131
5.3 Adding a soundtrack to video . . . . . 134
Index 135
Contents
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Start here
Start here
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The story of Sibelius
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The story of Sibelius
Twins Ben and Jonathan Finn first began work on Sibelius when they were students in 1987, and
spent six years of their spare time developing a vast range of sophisticated features, with an intui-
tive user interface and built-in intelligence that had never been seen in previous music programs.
In 1993, after graduating from Oxford and Cambridge Universities, the Finns started their own
company to sell the program, unsure of what to expect.
Sibelius proved to be an instant success, and over the course of the following decade the Finns’
company grew beyond all expectations, with offices in the USA, UK and Australia, and customers
in more than 100 countries worldwide.
In 2006, Sibelius was acquired by Avid, makers of Pro Tools and other industry-standard
products for digital media production and music creation, and continues to go from strength to
strength. In fact, it’s the world’s best-selling music notation software.
Who uses Sibelius?
Sibelius is designed for every kind of musician – including you! Sibelius users range from students,
teachers, schools and universities to composers, arrangers, performers, and the world’s leading
publishers. It’s perhaps a tribute to the ease of use and sophistication of Sibelius that one and the
same program is used both by elementary schools and top professionals.
It handles every kind of music, too – from early music to jazz, from rock to avant garde, from choir
to symphony orchestra.
Famous Sibelius users include conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, composer Steve Reich, choral
composer John Rutter, rock guitarist Andy Summers, jazz musician Jamie Cullum, and the Royal
Academy of Music, London. Top publishers such as Hal Leonard, Music Sales and Boosey &
Hawkes use Sibelius both for traditional publishing and to deliver music via the Internet straight to
a customer’s printer.
Sibelius has also won extraordinary acclaim including Keyboard magazine’s Key Buy award,
Electronic Musician’s Editors’ Choice award (three times), MacWorld’s 5 Star rating (twice), and an
unbeatable 10/10 score from Computer Music magazine. Sibelius 5 picked up an unprecedented
four Editor’s Choice awards from the specialist press.
Start here
8
About this Handbook
Warning!
However much you may dislike manuals, you must read the whole of this Start here section in
order to get started with the program.
You are then very strongly advised to work through at least the first three of the five projects
contained in this Handbook before embarking on any serious work of your own with Sibelius.
Sibelius is easy to learn and mostly self-explanatory, but if you don’t work through these projects
you will run a risk of never discovering some basic features, particularly if you are used to notation
programs that work in different ways. By the time you have completed the projects – which will
take you only a few hours – you will be able to input, edit, play back and print out straightforward
music, and you’ll know how to get going on more complicated music too.
This Handbook assumes a basic understanding of how to use your computer (such as the mouse,
keyboard, menus and files).
On-screen Reference
More advanced topics are covered one by one in the Sibelius Reference, which explains
every feature in complete detail (with a Glossary of special terms). To start the on-
screen Reference, click the toolbar button shown on the right, or choose Help >
Documentation > Sibelius Reference (shortcut F1 or X?).
The Reference is not meant to be read from start to finish, because most people only use quite a
small proportion of music notation anyway. You can browse through relevant parts of Reference at
your leisure.
The Reference is also available as a printed book as an optional extra; to buy this if you don’t
already have it, go to www.sibelius.com/buy.
Typography and cross-references
Names of computer keys, menus and dialogs are written like this.
Items in menus and sub-menus are denoted with >, so “choose File > Open”
means “choose Open from the File menu.”
b2.1 Accidentals means “see the Accidentals topic (within Reference)”
(either on-screen by choosing Help > Documentation > Sibelius
Reference, or by looking in the optional Reference book).
Boxes in Reference
You’ll find boxes like these
scattered throughout the
Reference, explaining vari-
ous notation and music
engraving rules.
About this Handbook
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Basic terminology
Most of the computer terminology that follows will be understood by almost all readers, but has
been included in case one or two of the terms is unfamiliar:
* Some keys are labeled differently on different keyboards, particularly on Mac. For the purposes
of this Handbook, these are the conventions:
Mac symbol Mac name Windows equivalent
X Command Ctrl (“Control”)
x Shift Shift
z Option Alt
R Return Return (on main keyboard)
E Enter Enter (on numeric keypad)
* Sibelius is almost identical on Windows and Mac, but where there are differences, mainly in
keyboard shortcuts, the Windows convention is listed first. For more information on the
differences between Mac and Windows keyboard shortcuts, b5.12 Menus and shortcuts
in Reference, which lists all keyboard shortcuts available. Shortcuts are also shown in menus.
* “Type Ctrl+A or XA” means hold down the Ctrl (Windows) or X (Mac) key and type A. Even
though A is written as a capital letter, don’t type Shift unless explicitly told to do so. Similarly, for
standard shortcuts like Ctrl+? or X? where both / and ? exist on the same key, you actually type
Ctrl+/ or X/ without using Shift.
* Similarly, “Alt+click or z-click” means hold down the Alt (Windows) or z (Mac) key and click.
* On Windows, to click something means to move the mouse arrow over it and click the left mouse
button. To right-click something means to point at it with the mouse and click the right mouse
button.
* On Mac, to click something means to move the mouse arrow over it and click the left mouse but-
ton, if you have one; if you are using one of the older models of mouse that has only one button,
then click the mouse’s only button. To Control-click means to hold down the Control key on
your keyboard (sometimes labeled Ctrl) and click the left or only mouse button; if, however, you
have a mouse with a right mouse button, you can simply click the right mouse button instead.
* To drag something means to point at it with the mouse, and then click and hold the left mouse
button (or the only mouse button on Mac) while moving the mouse. To finish dragging, just let
go of the mouse button.
* A dialog is a window with buttons on. Some dialogs are divided into several pages and have a
pop-up combo box (Mac), labeled tabs at the top, or a list box, which you can click to switch
between pages of the dialog.
* The numeric keypad is the rectangle of numbers and other characters at the very right-hand side
of your computer keyboard. (Notebook (laptop) computers usually don’t have a separate
numeric keypad – b5.12 Menus and shortcuts in Reference for more information.)
* “Return” is the large key to the right of the letter keys. On some keyboards it is labeled with
“Enter” or a special arrow symbol, but we always call it Return.
* “Enter” is the large key at the bottom right of the numeric keypad. On some keyboards it is unla-
beled, but it still means Enter.
Less well-known terminology is in the Glossary at the end of Reference.
Start here
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American and British English
Sibelius and this Handbook use American English, but for the benefit of readers in other countries,
some non-American terms such as “crotchet” are included in parentheses.
British readers may be interested to know that in America, both “bar” and “measure” are used (so
for universality we’ve opted for “bar”), and “staff ” means British “stave.” Any British readers who
are offended by the American spelling of “center,” “color” and so on will just have to use a pen to
amend the spelling in the Handbook or (less effectively) on the screen.
Suggestions
We are always happy to receive reports of errors or misprints, and suggested improvements to the
Handbook and Reference. Please email them to docs@sibelius.com.
We would also like to hear your suggestions for improvements to the Sibelius program itself; please
post these suggestions to the chat page on the Sibelius web site, or contact technical help.
Before you install
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Before you install
What’s in the box
Unless you have X-ray vision, you’ve already managed to open the box to get at this Handbook. You
should also find:
* Installation DVD-ROM in a plastic case. Your program’s serial number is on the back of the case,
so don’t lose it!
* A sheet entitled Latest information and technical help, with details of how to get help if
you get stuck
* Form for faxing your registration information to us – but it’s easiest to provide this information
by the Internet, explained later
* If you’ve purchased a network site license, you’ll also find a CD-ROM (in the same case as the
Sibelius DVD-ROM) and a separate booklet entitled Sibelius 6 Licence Server User Guide.
Single copies
If you have bought just a single copy of Sibelius (as opposed to a 5-pack or educational site license),
skip to Installing Sibelius for Windows (page 12) or Installing Sibelius for Mac (page 17)
as appropriate.
5-packs and stand-alone site licenses
Stand-alone site licenses let you run Sibelius on five or more non-networked computers at the
same time. If you’ve bought five copies, you will have received one installation DVD-ROM. If
you’ve bought more than five copies, you may have been sent a combination of “5-packs” (each
containing a single DVD-ROM) and single copies, or a single DVD-ROM that you can install on a
specified number of computers. If you have two or more 5-packs, use each DVD-ROM and serial
number to install on five of your computers.
Whatever size of site license you have purchased, you must install and register Sibelius on each
stand-alone machine separately, following the instructions in Installing Sibelius for Win-
dows (page 12) or Installing Sibelius for Mac (page 17). You cannot install stand-alone copies
of Sibelius onto a network or virtual disk – it must be installed on each client machine’s local hard
disk.
All copies of the site license must be installed on a single geographical site of an educational
institution. You may not install site license copies on notebooks (laptops), teachers’ home
computers or elsewhere, unless authorized by Sibelius.
If you want to use Sibelius on a network but you have bought a stand-alone site license, please con-
tact technical help.
Network licenses
If you have bought a network site license, please refer to the enclosed Sibelius 6 Licence Server
User Guide booklet for details on installing and registering Sibelius.
Start here
12
Installing Sibelius for Windows
Minimum hardware requirements
Minimum requirements for Sibelius 6 alone:
Windows XP 32-bit SP2 or later, Windows Vista 32-bit SP1 or later, Windows 7 32-bit or 64-bit,
512MB+ RAM, 550MB hard disk space, DVD-ROM drive
Additional recommendations for using the included Sibelius Sounds Essentials sound library:
Intel Core Duo or AMD Turion or better, 1GB+ total physical RAM (2GB recommended), 3.5GB
total hard disk space, ASIO-compatible soundcard
You can use Sibelius Sounds Essentials if your computer doesn’t meet the recommended
requirements, but you may find that you cannot use as many sounds simultaneously.
You must be running Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later to install and run Sibelius 6. If you have
Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.x, you need to purchase
an upgrade to a more recent version of the Windows operating system.
How to determine if you are running Windows XP SP2 or SP3
If you have Windows XP but are unsure whether or not you have Windows XP SP2 or SP3:
* Click the Start button, then choose Run...
* Type winver in the Open box, and hit Return (on the main keyboard)
* You will see a simple window, like this:
You should see Service Pack 2 or Service Pack 3 at the end of the second line of text. If you don’t,
then you need to update: the simplest way of doing this is to download it automatically by choosing
Windows Update from the Start menu. If the computer on which you want to run Sibelius isn’t
connected to the Internet, you can obtain Windows XP Service Pack 2 on CD-ROM or via a special
download that can be burned to CD and deployed on another computer. See http://www.micro-
soft.com/windowsxp/sp2/default.mspx for more details.
Connecting MIDI devices
Before you install Sibelius, you might want to connect any external MIDI devices you plan to use –
or see b MIDI setup for Windows on page 26.
Installing Sibelius for Windows
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However, you can do this at any time, so if you don’t feel like grappling with MIDI cables at the
moment, go ahead and install Sibelius now.
Administrator privileges
You must install Sibelius using a user account on your computer with administrator privileges. In
order to register Sibelius after installing it, you must either be using an administrator user account,
or be able to provide an administrator username and password when prompted.
Therefore we recommend that you install Sibelius, then after installing it, launch it and register it
as an administrator user.
After having registered the software, we recommend that you run Sibelius (like all other
applications) as a non-privileged user, to increase the security of your system.
If you’re the only person who uses your computer, or you don’t know anything about user accounts
or administrator privileges on your computer, you can safely ignore the above and install the
software as usual.
Installing Sibelius
It is traditional for software manuals to gloss over the crucial installation process, and say some-
thing like: “follow the instructions on the screen.” What this really means is that the author isn’t
quite sure what will happen next. For all he knows, the programmers might have changed the
installation procedure at the last minute.
However, we’ll go out on a limb and tell you what actually happens when installing Sibelius:
* Exit any programs that are running. It’s a particularly good idea to exit any anti-virus or anti-
spyware programs loaded automatically at start-up.
* Take the Sibelius DVD-ROM out of its case, put it (labeled side up) in the DVD-ROM drive of the
computer, and close the drive slot
* Wait for a few seconds. The DVD-ROM drive should start up and a dialog will appear on the
screen. (If there’s no sign of activity after a while, click the Start menu, choose Run and type
D:\autorun, where D is the letter of your DVD-ROM drive, then hit Return on the main key-
board.)
* On Windows Vista or Windows 7, you may see a small window called AutoPlay appear. Under
Install or run program, click Run autorun.exe.
* In the main installation window, click Install Sibelius 6 to start upgrading Sibelius
* On Windows Vista or Windows 7, your screen may now go dark and a window titled User
Account Control will appear. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the
installation to proceed.
* On Windows XP, if you do not have the Microsoft Windows Installer installed, you will be told
that it must be installed. Click Install, and wait while the Windows Installer kit is installed. This
may take a couple of minutes.
* Similarly, if you are running Windows XP and do not have the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0
installed, you will be told that it must be installed. Click Install, then if you are prompted to read a
license agreement, click Accept to accept the terms of the license agreement you are shown, and
then wait patiently while the .NET Framework is installed. This may take a couple of minutes.
Start here
14
* After a few more seconds, a window appears that says Welcome to the Sibelius 6 Installation
Wizard. Click Next.
* You are given the opportunity to read the Sibelius license agreement, which is also at the end of
Reference. Choose the I accept the license agreement radio button, then click Next.
* The installer suggests a folder to install Sibelius into. Unless you have strong feelings about
where you want Sibelius to go and you know how to alter it, leave this set to the default. You’re
asked if you want to install Sibelius for Anyone who uses this computer or Only for me,
which determines whether everybody who uses your computer will see a shortcut to Sibelius on
the Desktop, or just you. We recommend you leave it on Anyone who uses this computer.
Click Next.
* It tells you you’re now ready to install Sibelius. Click Next.
* Things flash and zoom past on the screen as Sibelius is installed. This may take several minutes.
* When the installer has completed, click Finish to return to the window that first appeared when
you inserted the DVD-ROM.
Before you run Sibelius 6 for the first time, you should now consider whether to install any other
applications from the Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM.
Installing Sibelius Sounds Essentials
Sibelius Sounds Essentials is a high-quality library of sounds for use with Sibelius. To install it:
* In the main installation window, click Install Sibelius Sounds Essentials
* After a few moments, the installer will start.
* On Windows Vista or Windows 7, your screen may now go dark and a window titled User
Account Control will appear. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the
installation to proceed.
* A window appears that says Welcome to the Sibelius Sounds Essentials for Sibelius 6
Installation Wizard. Click Next.
* You are given the opportunity to read the license agreement. Choose the I accept the
agreement radio button, then click Next.
* The installer suggests a folder to install the sounds into. Unless you have strong feelings about
where you want the sounds to go and you know how to alter the location, leave this set to the
default. Click Next.
* It tells you you’re now ready to install Sibelius Sounds Essentials. Click Install.
* Things flash and zoom past on the screen as the sounds are installed. This will take several
minutes, so please be patient.
* When the installer has completed, click Finish.
Installing PhotoScore Lite
PhotoScore Lite is an application from Neuratron that allows you to scan printed music, or PDF
files downloaded from the Internet, into Sibelius and edit, transpose and print them as if you had
inputted them yourself.
Unless you have purchased PhotoScore Ultimate, you should now install PhotoScore Lite from
your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM:
Installing Sibelius for Windows
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* In the main installation window, click Install PhotoScore Lite
* On Windows Vista, your screen may now go dark and a window titled User Account Control
will appear. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the installation to proceed.
* Click Next to see the license agreement for PhotoScore Lite. Read it and click Next
* You’re asked to fill in a few details: type in your Name; the Product ID field is filled in for you.
When you’ve filled in the form, click Next.
* PhotoScore Lite tells you where it will be installed; again, you can change this if you have strong
feelings about it. Otherwise, click Next.
* Click Next once more and PhotoScore Lite will be installed, then click Finish.
Installing AudioScore Lite
AudioScore Lite is an application that automatically transcribes music that you sing or play an
acoustic instrument into a microphone, so that you can send it to Sibelius for further editing.
Unless you have purchased AudioScore Ultimate, you should now install AudioScore Lite from
your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM:
* In the main installation window, click Install AudioScore Lite
* On Windows Vista or Windows 7, your screen may now go dark and a window titled User
Account Control will appear. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the
installation to proceed.
* Click Next to see the license agreement for AudioScore Lite. Read it and click Next
* You’re asked to fill in a few details: type in your Name; the Product ID field is filled in for you.
When you’ve filled in the form, click Next.
* AudioScore Lite tells you where it will be installed; again, you can change this if you have strong
feelings about it. Otherwise, click Next.
* Click Next once more and AudioScore Lite will be installed, then click Finish.
Installing Sibelius Scorch
You should now install Scorch, the free web browser plug-in for viewing, playing, transposing and
printing Sibelius scores on the Internet:
* First, quit any web browsers that are running.
* In the main installation window, click Install Scorch
* It may take up to a minute or longer for the Scorch installer to start: please be patient. Eventually, a
window appears that says Welcome to the Sibelius Scorch (all browsers) Setup Wizard.
Click Next.
* You are given the opportunity to read the Scorch license agreement. Read it, choose the I Agree
radio button, then click Next.
* You are prompted to choose an installation folder for Scorch. Again, simply click Next.
* It tells you you’re now ready to install Scorch. Click Next.
* On Windows Vista or Windows 7, your screen may now go dark and a window titled User
Account Control will appear. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the instal-
lation to proceed.
Start here
16
* Things flash and whizz across the screen as Scorch is installed. This only takes a few moments.
* When the installer has completed, click Close.
Reinstalling Sibelius
If you need to reinstall Sibelius, simply insert the DVD-ROM into your computer and proceed as if
you were installing Sibelius for the first time. The installer will detect that Sibelius is already
installed on your computer and show a dialog with three options: choose Repair and click Next,
then Next again to confirm your choice. Wait while the application is reinstalled, then click Finish.
Uninstalling Sibelius
Uninstalling means taking your copy of Sibelius off your computer, probably so that you can install
it on another computer. If your copy of Sibelius becomes corrupted for some reason, you can nor-
mally just install it again in the same place without uninstalling it first – see Reinstalling
Sibelius above.
Do not attempt to move or rename the Sibelius program folder or the folder of any other program,
as the operating system doesn’t like this.
* Open Control Panel from the Start menu. Double-click Add/Remove Programs (Windows XP)
or Programs and Features (Windows Vista or Windows 7).
* If you have installed PhotoScore Lite, uninstall it first. It’s listed as Neuratron PhotoScore Lite;
select it, click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or Uninstall (Windows Vista or Windows 7), then
follow the instructions on the screen.
* If you have installed AudioScore Lite, uninstall it next. It’s listed as Neuratron AudioScore Lite;
select it, click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or Uninstall (Windows Vista or Windows 7), then
follow the instructions on the screen.
* If you have installed Sibelius Sounds Essentials, uninstall it next. It’s listed as Sibelius Sounds
Essentials for Sibelius 6; select it, click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or Uninstall (Windows
Vista or Windows 7), then follow the instructions on the screen.
* You don’t need to uninstall Scorch.
* To uninstall Sibelius itself, select Sibelius 6 in the list, and click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or
Uninstall (Windows Vista or Windows 7). Then follow the instructions on the screen.
Installing Sibelius for Mac
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Installing Sibelius for Mac
Minimum hardware requirements
Minimum requirements for Sibelius 6 alone:
Mac OS X 10.4.11 or later, Mac OS X 10.5.7 or later, or Mac OS X 10.6, 512MB+ RAM, 550MB
hard disk space, DVD-ROM drive
Additional recommendations for using the included Sibelius Sounds Essentials sample library:
Intel Core Duo or better, 1GB+ total physical RAM (2GB recommended), 3.5GB total hard disk
space
You can use Sibelius Sounds Essentials if your computer doesn’t meet the recommended
requirements, but you may find that you cannot use as many sounds simultaneously.
If you are running a version of Mac OS X earlier than Mac OS X 10.4, you cannot install and run
Sibelius. You should upgrade Mac OS X now, although this normally incurs an upgrade fee. See
www.apple.com for details.
It is recommended that you are running the most up-to-date version of Mac OS X to use Sibelius.
Choose the Software Update pane from System Preferences to check that you are using the
latest version.
How to determine if you are running Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger or later
Choose About This Mac from the Apple menu. You will see a simple window, like this:
Just below the large text that reads Mac OS X you will see text that reads something like Version
10.4.10. Provided the first part of this number is 10.4 or greater, you are running Mac OS X 10.4
Tiger or a newer version of Mac OS X, and you can install and run Sibelius 5.
Connecting MIDI devices
Before you install Sibelius, you might want to connect any external MIDI devices you plan to use –
see MIDI setup for Mac on page 29.
However, you can do this at any time, so if you don’t feel like grappling with MIDI cables at the
moment, go ahead and install Sibelius now.
Start here
18
Administrator privileges
In order to correctly install and register Sibelius, you must be able to provide an administrator
password when prompted.
After having registered the software, we recommend that you run Sibelius (like all other applica-
tions) as a non-privileged user, to increase the security of your system.
If you’re the only person who uses your computer, or you don’t know anything about user accounts
or administrator privileges on your computer, you can safely ignore the above and install the soft-
ware as usual.
Installing Sibelius
* Take the Sibelius DVD-ROM out of its case, put it (labeled side up) in the DVD-ROM drive of the
computer, and close the drive slot.
* Wait for a few seconds. An icon for the DVD, labeled Sibelius 6, should appear on your desktop,
and a window should open automatically; if it doesn’t, double-click the Sibelius 6 icon.
* To install your upgrade, double-click the Install Sibelius 6 icon, which will start the installation
process.
* A window appears, titled Welcome to the Sibelius 6 Installer. Click Continue.
* You are given the opportunity to read the Sibelius license agreement, which is also at the end of
Reference. Read it, click Continue, then Agree.
* You are told how much space on your computer will be used by installing Sibelius 6. (If you are
reinstalling Sibelius 6, you may be told that the installation will take up almost no space on your
computer.) You have to install Sibelius on your Mac’s boot disk, so don’t click Change Install
Location: simply click Install.
* You are prompted for your administrator password: type it and click OK.
* A progress bar appears as the software is installed. This may take several minutes.
* Eventually, you will be informed that installation was successful. Click Close.
Before you run Sibelius 6 for the first time, you should now consider whether to install any other
applications from the Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM.
Installing Sibelius Sounds Essentials
Sibelius Sounds Essentials is a high-quality library of sounds for use with Sibelius. To install it:
* Double-click Install Sibelius Sounds Essentials to start the installation.
* A window appears, titled Welcome to the Sibelius Sounds Essentials for Sibelius 6
Installer. Click Continue.
* You are given the opportunity to read the license agreement. Read it, click Continue, then
Agree.
* Sibelius Sounds Essentials must be installed on your Mac’s boot disk (you can move it later, if
you want – see Moving Sibelius Sounds Essentials below), so don’t click Change Install
Location: simply click Install.
* You are prompted for your administrator password: type it and click OK.
Installing Sibelius for Mac
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* A progress bar appears as the software is installed. This will take several minutes, so please be
patient!
* After a few minutes, you will be informed that installation was successful. Click Close.
Installing Scorch
You should now install Sibelius Scorch (which allows you to view, play, transpose and print Sibelius
scores on the Internet):
* First, quit any web browsers that are running.
* Double-click Install Sibelius Scorch to start the installation.
* A window appears, titled Welcome to the Sibelius Scorch Installer. Click Continue.
* You are given the opportunity to read the license agreement. Read it, click Continue, then
Agree.
* Scorch must be installed on your Mac’s boot disk, so don’t click Change Install Location:
simply click Install.
* You are prompted to type your computer’s administrator password. Type it, and click OK.
* You are given the opportunity to read Scorch’s license agreement; read it, and click Accept
* On the next screen, simply click Install
* A progress bar zooms across the screen, and you’re then told that installation was successful.
Click Close.
Installing PhotoScore Lite
PhotoScore Lite is an application from Neuratron that allows you to scan printed music, or PDF
files downloaded from the Internet, into Sibelius and edit, transpose and print them as if you had
inputted them yourself.
Unless you have purchased PhotoScore Ultimate, you should now install PhotoScore Lite from
your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM:
* Double-click Install PhotoScore Lite to start the installation.
* A window appears, titled Welcome to the PhotoScore Lite Installer. Click Continue.
* You are shown PhotoScore Lite’s license agreement; read it, click Continue, then Agree
* On the next screen, simply click Install
* You are prompted to type your computer’s administrator password. Type it, and click OK.
* A progress bar zooms across the screen, and you’re then told that installation was successful.
Click Close.
Installing AudioScore Lite
AudioScore Lite is an application that automatically transcribes music that you sing or play an
acoustic instrument into a microphone, so that you can send it to Sibelius for further editing.
Unless you have purchased AudioScore Ultimate, you should now install AudioScore Lite from
your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM:
* Double-click Install AudioScore Lite to start the installation.
* A window appears, titled Welcome to the AudioScore Lite Installer. Click Continue.
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* You are shown AudioScore Lite’s license agreement; read it, click Continue, then Agree
* On the next screen, choose your Mac’s boot disk, then click Continue
* You are told how much disk space the installation will use: click Install.
* You are prompted to type your computer’s administrator password. Type it, and click OK.
* A progress bar zooms across the screen, and you’re then told that installation was successful.
Click Close.
Reinstalling Sibelius
If you need to reinstall Sibelius for any reason:
* First, drag the existing Sibelius 6 application icon from your Applications folder to the Trash
* You may also want to trash the Sibelius 6 preferences file, which is in both Users/username/
Library/Preferences and /Library/Preferences, called com.sibelius.sibelius6.plist
* Insert the Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM into your computer, then follow the instructions for Installing
Sibelius above.
Uninstalling Sibelius
Uninstalling means taking your copy of Sibelius off your computer, probably so that you can install
it on another computer. If your copy of Sibelius becomes corrupted for some reason, you can nor-
mally just install it again in the same place – see Reinstalling Sibelius above.
To uninstall Sibelius for Mac, simply drag the Sibelius 6 icon from your Applications folder to
the trash. Likewise, to uninstall PhotoScore Lite or AudioScore Lite, just drag the PhotoScore Lite
or AudioScore Lite icon to the trash.
What next?
Now turn to Registering Sibelius on page 21.
Moving Sibelius Sounds Essentials
To move Sibelius Sounds Essentials to another volume, e.g. an external hard disk, after installation:
* Quit Sibelius, if it is running.
* In the Finder, go to /Library/Application Support/Sibelius Software/Sibelius Sounds.
* You will see at least two folders: Essentials for Sibelius 6 and Libraries.
* Drag the Essentials for Sibelius 6 folder to your preferred location. Do not move the Libraries
folder.
* Run Sibelius again: you will be told that Sibelius is unable to find the Essentials sound library.
Click Yes to choose the new location, then click Choose. You will be prompted for your
administrator password, so provide it and click OK.
Registering Sibelius
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Registering Sibelius
You should register your copy of Sibelius in the first week or two of using it. This is quick and easy
to do, and once you have registered, you will be eligible for technical help, future upgrades, and
access to online support via the Sibelius web site (www.sibelius.com).
To protect us against piracy, and to protect you against having your software stolen, unregistered
copies of Sibelius will not save. But so you can use Sibelius before you get around to registering it,
you will be able to save for the first 15 days without registering.
If you don’t register Sibelius in the first 15 days, saving will be temporarily disabled. When you
subsequently get round to registering, it will be re-enabled. (Please don’t try altering your com-
puter’s date or reinstalling Sibelius in order to extend the 15 days; this will not work and will
instead cause saving to be disabled until you register.)
Running Sibelius on more than one computer
If (and only if) you have a single-user copy of Sibelius, you can install and register Sibelius on two
computers for your own personal and exclusive use. Both copies of Sibelius must be used only by
you, and they may not be used simultaneously. To register Sibelius on a second computer, simply
follow the instructions under Registering on the Internet below.
If you later need to install Sibelius on a new computer, you can move one of your copies to your
new machine, as long as you never have more than two registered copies of Sibelius at any given
time. To do this, see Moving Sibelius to another computer below.
Registering 5-pack and site licenses
You can register educational 5-pack and site license copies of Sibelius in exactly the same way as a
single copy, so follow the instructions in Registering on the Internet below. You will only
need to fill in your details when you register the first copy (unless you have more than one Sibelius
installation DVD-ROM and serial number).
Registering network licenses
You cannot register network copies of Sibelius over the Internet; you must contact Sibelius by
phone, fax or email to register. Consult the separate Sibelius 6 Licence Server User Guide booklet
for further details.
Registering on the Internet
Sibelius will prompt you to register each time you run it, but you might as well get it out of the way
now. Run Sibelius 6 either by double-clicking the Sibelius 6 icon on your desktop (Windows) or in
your Applications folder (Mac). Then the following will happen:
* You are told that Sibelius 6 must be run for the first time using an administrator account; click OK:
% On Windows Vista, your screen may now go dark and a window titled User Account
Control will appear. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy to proceed, or enter
an administrator password if prompted.
% On Windows XP, you may be prompted for an administrator password, in which case enter it.
% On Mac, you will be prompted for your administrator password: type it and click OK.
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* Now you are asked to enter your Sibelius serial number. You will find this printed on a label on
the CD case that your copy of Sibelius came in; it’s the number beginning with S. Type it in, then
click OK.
* You will then be prompted to register Sibelius. You can either use the Internet connection on the
computer on which Sibelius is installed (the quickest and easiest of all), or a web browser on
another computer (see Registering using a web browser below).
* Choose the Register using this computer’s Internet connection radio button and click Next.
* If your computer isn’t already connected to the Internet, Sibelius will now prompt you to
connect; click Connect
* If you are using a firewall, make sure that you allow Sibelius access to the Internet, otherwise
registration will fail. Most firewalls will warn you when a program is trying to access the Internet
for the first time. The precise message that appears will depend on the firewall (if any) you are
using, but when asked if you want to give Sibelius access to the Internet, choose the appropriate
option to allow it.
* Once it has established a connection, Sibelius will check the registration status of your copy; if it
has been registered before (e.g. if you are registering further copies of a multi-user license, or
installing a second copy for your own personal use, or reinstalling an existing copy) it will give
you a further message. Click Yes to proceed.
* You will next be prompted to enter your contact details. We need your name and address details
to enable you to get technical help, future upgrades, etc. We are committed to your privacy – see
Privacy policy below.
* If this copy of Sibelius is owned by you personally, enter your home address and leave
Organization blank. If it’s owned by your school, college, university, church, business or other
organization, enter the organization’s address (including the Organization field). Then type in
your details, making sure to fill in all required fields; click Next.
* Next you’re asked to fill in some details about your musical interests, how you heard about
Sibelius, and so on. When choosing from the Activity list, if you are a professor, school, college
or university, choose one of the Teacher options. If you are a student yourself, choose one of the
Student options.
* You are also shown some basic information about your computer setup that you can choose to
send to us so that we can more easily assist you if you require technical help; you are not obliged
to send this information, but it may save you time later if you send it now.
Fill out all the fields, and click Finish.
* If you are registering an educational copy bought in North/South/Central America, you may be
asked to confirm your eligibility. See Educational copies in North/Central/South
America below for eligibility requirements.
* Click Finish. A few seconds later you will be told that Sibelius has been successfully registered.
Registering using a web browser
If the computer on which Sibelius is installed does not have an Internet connection, choose Help >
Register Sibelius, choose the Register using a web browser on this or another computer
radio button, and click Next.
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You will be instructed to visit a page on the Sibelius web site in order to provide your registration
information. At the end of the process, you will be given a Registration Number to type into the
Register Sibelius dialog in order to complete your registration.
If you have no access whatsoever to an Internet connection, you can register by fax or phone.
Registering by fax
We recommend you register on the Internet instead if possible. But to register by fax, please fill in
and fax the form included in the Sibelius box to the fax number given on the form. To obtain your
Computer Number (which you need to write on the form you fax to us):
* Choose Help > Register Sibelius
* Choose the Register using a web browser on this or another computer radio button, and
click Next
* Write down your Serial Number and Computer Number, then click Register Later.
When you receive a reply (normally within one working day), you need to enter the Registration
Number in the same way via Help > Register Sibelius: this time, fill in your name and organiza-
tion (if applicable), type in the Registration Number, then click Finish. You will be told that
Sibelius has been successfully registered.
There’s no need to keep a record of the Computer Number or Registration Number after you have
registered.
Registering by phone
We recommend you to register on the Internet instead if possible. But to register by phone:
* Choose Help > Register Sibelius
* Choose Register using a web browser on this or another computer, and click Next.
* Call the number below, and ensure you can see your computer screen while you are on the phone
* You will be given a Registration Number (beginning with the letter R) to type into the box on the
screen. When you have typed in the Registration Number and click Finish, your program will be
registered (and will continue to be able to save).
There’s no need to keep a record of the Computer Number or Registration Number after you have
registered.
Users who purchased in North, Central & South America:
Monday to Friday 7am–4.30pm PST, except holidays. Call 1-888-280-9995 toll-free (outside
the USA, call 1-650-731-6106). See below for eligibility requirements for educational copies.
Users who purchased in Australia:
To register or re-register, call 1300 652 172, Monday–Friday (except public holidays) between
9am–5pm.
Users who purchased in the UK or any other country:
To register or re-register, call 020 7561 7995 (+44 20 7561 7995), Monday–Friday (except
public holidays) between 10am–6pm
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Educational copies in North/Central/South America
If you purchased an educational copy of Sibelius in North/South/Central America, you may only
use it if you are eligible to do so. When you register Sibelius, you will be asked whether you are
eligible; we may require you to provide proof of status.
To be eligible, you must live in North/South/Central America, and also one of the following must
be true:
* You are currently an educator or full-time student at a fully accredited, non-profit educational
institution, or
* This copy is installed for staff/student use in a fully accredited, non-profit educational
institution, or
* You are currently an official music ministry representative of a church or other religious
institution, or
* You are a private music teacher and also a current member of MTNA, MENC or an MTNA/
MENC allied group.
If you are not eligible, then do not register or use Sibelius, but instead please return it to the dealer
you bought it from within 14 days of purchase for a refund. You can instead purchase a profes-
sional copy of Sibelius, or if you live outside North/South/Central America, you may be eligible to
purchase an educational copy from a dealer in your country.
Reinstalling and re-registering Sibelius
If, for any reason, you need to reinstall Sibelius and you find it is no longer registered, you can re-
register it automatically over the Internet provided you are reinstalling on the same computer on
which you previously had Sibelius installed.
To re-register, simply use the Help > Register Sibelius dialog, in exactly the same way as
registering for the first time. Sibelius will know that this copy has been registered before.
If you have a single-user license and are reinstalling Sibelius on a different computer, then it will be
assumed that you are in fact installing a second copy of Sibelius (see Running Sibelius on more
than one computer above).
Moving Sibelius to another computer
If you need to move a registered copy of Sibelius from one computer to another, you can use Help >
Unregister Sibelius, provided both computers can connect to the Internet.
When you choose this option, your copy of Sibelius contacts our server and informs it that the
copy running on that machine is no longer registered, and disables the saving feature. You can
then install Sibelius on another computer and use Help > Register Sibelius to register Sibelius
over the Internet in the normal way.
This method requires that both computers (the one on which you are unregistering Sibelius, and
the one on which you are subsequently registering Sibelius) be able to connect to the Internet. If
either or both of the computers are unable to connect to the Internet, you should contact technical
help for assistance.
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Problems registering Sibelius?
If you have technical problems while registering Sibelius, contact technical help (see the separate
Latest information and technical help sheet); it doesn’t matter if your free entitlement to
technical help by telephone has expired.
Privacy policy
We are committed to protecting your privacy, and are registered under the Data Protection Act.
By registering or upgrading Sibelius, you agree to our privacy policy – see www.sibelius.com/
privacy or contact us for the full policy, but a summary is as follows:
We may use personal information you provide us with (e.g. when registering) to verify your
identity or send you information so you can get technical help, upgrades, special offers, other
products, etc. We will not give personal information about you to anyone else without your per-
mission, except for sharing it with other Avid companies, with your country’s distributor or with
manufacturers of other products we provide you with (e.g. PhotoScore) so they can provide you
with technical help, upgrades, information etc. on our behalf.
If you don’t want to receive information from us by email, just use the unsubscribe link which we
include in our email mailings and on www.sibelius.com. If you don’t want us to send you
information (including information about Sibelius upgrades) by post or email, or to share your
information with partner companies as detailed above, please contact us.
Piracy
Thank you for buying your copy of Sibelius legitimately. Please respect our efforts in developing
Sibelius by ensuring that no-one attempts to make illegal copies of it.
Piracy deprives software companies of the revenue needed to improve their programs and develop
new products. In some countries, piracy is so widespread that some companies are unable to
justify distributing software at all.
If you know of anyone copying Sibelius, please email piracy@sibelius.com with full details.
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MIDI setup for Windows
If you are using Sibelius Sounds Essentials for playback, b4.4 Sibelius Sounds Essentials in
Reference for how to set it up.
There are three steps to setting up your MIDI devices: connecting the hardware, installing the nec-
essary software, and then setting up MIDI in Sibelius. This topic takes you through the first two
steps; if you need more information, see b1.10 Input Devices in Reference.
Connecting MIDI devices to your computer
MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. It is a standard, not a thing – the universal
standard for connecting electronic musical instruments together. MIDI keyboards, synthesizers,
sound modules, samplers and other electronic music gadgets can all be plugged into one another
with MIDI cables, and can also be plugged into your computer. Soundcards and software synthe-
sizers are also MIDI compatible, and as they’re already in your computer you don’t need to attach
cables at all in order to play music back.
How your MIDI devices connect to your computer depends on a number of factors, including the
model of your computer, the model of your MIDI devices, and which other hardware you already
have connected; but in general there are three kinds of connection:
* Many MIDI devices such as keyboards have USB connections, enabling you to connect your
MIDI keyboard directly to your computer using only one USB cable
* You can connect a separate MIDI interface to a USB port on the back of your computer, and plug
your MIDI controller into the MIDI interface using MIDI cables
* You can connect an external MIDI device directly to the “gameport” (or joystick port) on your
computer’s soundcard with a special cable.
Most Windows computers are supplied with a soundcard that is capable both of General MIDI
playback, and also of connecting your computer to external MIDI devices via the gameport. Many
computers have both a gameport and a USB port – neither option is more preferable than the
other, however if you want to upgrade your system in the future, you should probably opt for a
MIDI interface or a keyboard that can connect directly to one of your system’s USB sockets.
Connecting MIDI devices directly via USB
Most new MIDI keyboards and other devices can connect directly to your computer’s USB sockets
without the need for a separate MIDI interface. To install one of these devices, simply connect a
USB cable (which may be provided with your device) to your computer, and follow the on-screen
instructions to install the necessary driver software.
Once the drivers are correctly installed, you can set up input and playback in Sibelius – b1.10
Input devices in Reference.
You should switch on the power on your USB-connected MIDI devices before running Sibelius.
Failure to do so may result in Sibelius not correctly detecting your MIDI device when it loads.
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Connecting MIDI devices via a MIDI interface
A MIDI interface is a small box that sits between your computer and your external MIDI devices,
sending MIDI data back and forth. MIDI interfaces usually connect to a USB port on your com-
puter. You might need a separate MIDI interface if:
* your external MIDI device doesn’t have its own USB connection; or if
* your soundcard doesn’t support “full duplex” operation (e.g. if you find that Sibelius plays back
through your external MIDI device, but you’re unable to play music into Sibelius from your
external device); or if
* your computer doesn’t have a gameport, because it’s a notebook (laptop).
MIDI interfaces usually require additional driver software, which will be supplied by your device’s
manufacturer.
We’ll assume your MIDI interface connects via USB, and show
you some common MIDI setups. Connections between MIDI
devices all use standard MIDI cables, pictured on the right.
To plug in just a MIDI keyboard, connect its “Out” socket to the MIDI interface’s “In” socket. This
means that music played on the keyboard will go out of the keyboard, along the cable and in to the
computer.
To make the computer play back music into the keyboard (e.g. if the keyboard has sounds built
into it), also connect the MIDI interface’s “Out” to the keyboard’s “In.”
If your keyboard has two “In” or “Out” sockets, it usually doesn’t matter which you use – they’re
just convenient duplicates of each other.
So connecting up a keyboard alone looks like this:
If you want to connect just, say, a sound module, rather than a keyboard, simply connect the MIDI
interface’s “Out” to the sound module’s “In.”
Once you’ve connected your MIDI devices to your computer, you can set up input in Sibelius –
b1.7 Input Devices in Reference.
Connecting MIDI devices via the gameport
In general, you won’t need to buy a separate MIDI interface for your computer, provided you have a
soundcard that supports “full duplex” operation (check with the manufacturer), or if you can use a
direct USB connection instead.
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Using your soundcard’s gameport also has the advantage of not requiring any further driver soft-
ware – you can just plug in your MIDI device, and away you go.
The gameport is usually found next to the sockets used to connect speakers and microphones to
your computer. Typically, it will be on the soundcard, which looks something like this:
The gameport is the rectangular-ish connector, shown here at the far left. To connect this to an
external MIDI device, you’ll need a “Y-shaped” MIDI-to-gameport cable, which looks something
like this:
Note how the two MIDI plugs are labeled “In” and “Out.” To connect this cable to, say, a MIDI key-
board, you should connect the plug labeled “In” to the socket on the back of the keyboard marked
“Out,” and the plug labeled “Out” to the socket on the keyboard marked “In.”
That’s all there is to it. Provided you have the “In” and “Out” plugs in the right sockets on your
MIDI keyboard (or sound module), you can now finish setting things up – b1.10 Input
Devices in Reference.
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MIDI setup for Mac
If you are using Sibelius Sounds Essentials for playback, bSibelius Sounds Essentials in Ref-
erence.
To set up MIDI on Mac, simply connect your MIDI devices as described below, use Mac OS X’s
Audio MIDI Setup utility, then bInput Devices in Reference to find out how to set up MIDI
input in Sibelius.
Connecting MIDI devices to your Mac
MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. It is a standard, not a thing – the universal
standard for connecting electronic musical instruments together. MIDI keyboards, synthesizers,
sound modules, samplers and other electronic music gadgets can all be plugged into one another
with MIDI cables, and can also be plugged into your computer. Soundcards and software synthe-
sizers are also MIDI compatible, and as they’re already in your computer you don’t need to attach
cables at all in order to play music back.
On Mac, MIDI devices connect via USB or Firewire ports. In both cases, you often have the choice
of connecting a MIDI device either directly (to the computer’s USB or Firewire ports), or via a
MIDI interface.
For example, to connect a Roland SC-88 Pro sound module to a new iMac or G4 with USB, you’ll
need to use an external MIDI interface, because it’s a fairly old model. However, the newer Roland
SC-8820 connects directly via USB connection, so no MIDI interface is required.
Connecting MIDI devices directly
This diagram shows how to connect a sound mod-
ule (shown) or MIDI keyboard directly.
There is normally a switch on the back of the key-
board or sound module that determines which of
the connections it should send and receive data
through, so ensure that this is set correctly (in this
case, it should be set to USB). You may have to switch your sound module or keyboard off and on
again to make it take notice of changing this setting.
Check your module or keyboard’s manual for precise connection details. Direct connections often
require additional driver software, which will be supplied by your device’s manufacturer.
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Connecting MIDI devices via a MIDI interface
A MIDI interface is a small box that connects MIDI devices to your Mac via its USB port.
Connect a sound module using a MIDI interface like this:
The MIDI cable is connected from the “Out” socket on the MIDI interface to the “In” socket on the
sound module.
To add a MIDI keyboard or other input device, you should connect your devices as shown below:
The second MIDI cable goes from the “Out” socket on the keyboard to the “In” socket on the MIDI
interface.
MIDI interfaces often require additional driver software, which will be supplied by your device’s
manufacturer.
Audio MIDI Setup
Once you have connected up your external MIDI equipment, you need to use the Mac OS X utility
Audio MIDI Setup to tell the operating system what each of the devices are:
* Run Audio MIDI Setup by double-clicking its icon, which is in the Utilities folder inside the
Applications folder
* Click the MIDI Devices tab
* Provided your MIDI device is correctly installed, it should appear in the large white window
* If the attached MIDI device is a sound module, you don’t need to do anything else – just quit
Audio MIDI Setup and refer to b4.11 Playback Devices in Reference for what to do next
* If the attached device is a MIDI interface, you should click the Add Device button to add a new
external device
* Double-click the new external device icon. In the dialog that appears, change its Name (to
match the name of the device, e.g. Roland JV-1080), then choose the most appropriate avail-
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able options from the Manufacturer and Model lists. (Advanced users with complex MIDI set-
ups may need to click the More Properties button to control additional parameters such as on
which MIDI channels the device can send and receive data.
* Now you need to tell your Mac that your new device is connected to your MIDI interface. Drag
from the arrows on the icon representing each device to draw “wires” between their inputs and
outputs.
* When you’re done, simply quit Audio MIDI Setup, then b1.10 Input Devices in Reference
for what to do next.
Further information on using the Audio MIDI Setup utility can be found on the Web here:
http://www.sonosphere.com/MusicSoftware/MacOSX/AudioMIDISetup/
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About the projects
The remainder of this Handbook is taken up with five projects, which will take you roughly eight
hours to work through from start to finish. You are recommended to work through at least the first
three projects, as these explain all of the key concepts and features that you will use every day in
Sibelius. The fourth and fifth projects are more tightly focused on specific features, but you should
work through them as well if you can make the time.
Project 1 (2 hours)
This project shows you how to open a score, introduces the concepts of navigating around them
using both the Navigator window and various keyboard and mouse shortcuts, making selections,
and copying and pasting. Using an arrangement of the folk song Scarborough Fair, you will learn
how to edit and input notes using your mouse, computer keyboard and MIDI keyboard, and how
to input lyrics. You will be introduced to playback, and to marking up your score with text and
dynamics.
Project 2 (2 hours)
In this project, you will learn to recreate an excerpt from Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor, Op. 83
by scanning the four instrumental parts using PhotoScore Lite, then copying and pasting them
into a newly-created score. You will learn how to create clef and key signature changes, more
advanced note input including tuplets, and explore the different kinds of objects – including artic-
ulations, lines, ties, slurs and text – commonly used to mark up scores. You will also be introduced
to dynamic parts, and exporting graphics from Sibelius.
Project 3 (2 hours)
This project teaches you the basics of writing for keyboard, guitar and drums, together with an
introduction to creating chord symbols and repeat structures (including 1st and 2nd ending lines,
and D.S. al Coda). You will also explore adjusting playback using the Mixer window, and learn how
to use Sibelius’s Ideas window to store and re-use snippets of music.
Project 4 (1 hour)
This project is especially useful if you are planning to produce learning materials for students or
teach with Sibelius in the classroom, but it should also be of interest if you want to learn some of the
more advanced techniques for laying out and formatting music. In this project you will create a
worksheet of scales, and learn how to indent staves, hide empty staves, change text fonts, and more.
Project 5 (1 hour)
This project introduces the Video window, and explores techniques for writing to picture,
including working with timecode, hit points, and a plug-in for adujsting the duration of a section
of music. Using a video from the animated series Mr. Bean, you will also learn how to export an
audio track from Sibelius in order to add it as a soundtrack to a video in an editing package such as
Pinnacle Studio.
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Project 1
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1.1 Opening a score
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1.1 Opening a score
The first chapter of this project shows you how to open a score in Sibelius and navigate around;
you’ll also learn how to print a copy of the arrangement we’re going to create in the subsequent
chapters.
Opening a file
Sibelius comes with some example scores that demonstrate various aspects of the program. You
can modify these without fear of retribution, as the originals remain unaltered on your installation
DVD-ROM. Let’s open one now.
Choose Open recent file on the Quick Start dialog and make sure that Project 1.sib is shown in
the drop-down list, then click OK.
Alternatively, you can open the file the old-fashioned way: click the toolbar button shown
to the left, or choose File > Open (shortcut Ctrl+O or XO). A standard Open dialog
appears.
On Windows, you should find that you are inside a folder called Scores, which will contain a
shortcut to a folder called Example Scores. On Mac, you should find an alias called Sibelius
Example Scores. Double-click this, then go into the Project Files folder, select the score called
Project 1, and then click Open. This is an arrangement of a traditional ballad called Scarborough
Fair.
As an aside, you can also open scores when Sibelius isn’t running – just find the file on
your computer and double-click it to open it in Sibelius (which automatically starts
Sibelius if it isn’t already running). Sibelius scores have icons that look like the one
pictured on the right.
When you’ve opened the Scarborough Fair score, the music appears, looking somewhat like this:
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Moving around the score
There are a number of ways to move around the score, but the simplest of these is by dragging the
paper on the screen with your mouse. To do this, click a blank part of the paper and drag the page.
As you do so, you should notice that the display on the gray rectangle in the bottom left-hand cor-
ner of the screen moves around too. This rectangle is called the Navigator; it shows a miniature
view of some of the pages. The white rectangle on the Navigator shows which portion of the music
is shown on the screen.
If the Navigator isn’t open, switch it on by choosing Window> Navigator (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+N
or zXN) – see Hiding and showing tool windows below.
Click anywhere on the Navigator, and the view will instantly jump to that part of the score.
Alternatively, click the Navigator’s white rectangle and drag it around, which pans the window
smoothly around the score. This effect is very striking and enhances the disconcerting impression
that you are moving a video camera around a real score.
In long scores, if you drag the white rectangle towards the left-hand or right-hand side of the
Navigator, the view of the score will continue to move leftwards or rightwards. The further you
drag, the faster it moves through the score. This allows you to move continuously across any
number of pages.
By moving around the score with the Navigator, you can see that pages are laid side-by-side on a
blue desk. With long scores, pages are joined in pairs as if in a score opened flat, so you can see
where page-turns will occur. You can change the way pages of the score are laid out, so that they
appear top-to-bottom or side-by-side, and as single pages or spreads – see b5.23 View menu
in Reference.
You can’t drag the white rectangle off the top or bottom edges of the page displayed in the Naviga-
tor, or off the left edge of the first page or the right edge of the last page. However, it is possible to
click on the paper and drag the score off the edge of the screen. If you do this, click anywhere on
the Navigator to show the score again.
If moving around the score is slow, try setting the paper and/or background textures of the full
score and parts to plain colors. For tips on changing Sibelius’s display, b5.6 Display settings
in Reference.
If you have a mouse with a wheel button, you can also use the wheel to scroll around the score:
* Scroll the wheel up and down to move the page up and down; hold down Alt or z to move a
screenful at a time
* Hold Shift and scroll the wheel to move the page left and right; hold down Alt or z as well to
move a screenful at a time
* You can also use the wheel to zoom by holding down Ctrl or X – see Zooming below.
You can also move around the score using keyboard shortcuts. Sibelius is full of shortcuts that let
you perform an action by typing a key rather than using the mouse. It’s a good idea to learn key-
board shortcuts at least for the most common operations – these are listed on the back cover of this
Handbook, and in full detail in b5.12 Menus and shortcuts in Reference.
Try experimenting with the following shortcuts, which are for moving around the score:
1.1 Opening a score
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* Page Up (8 on some Mac keyboards) and Page Down (9 on Mac) move up or down a screenful
* Home (4 on Mac) and End (7 on Mac) move left or right a screenful, or a whole page if the
whole width of the page is in view.
* Ctrl+Home or X4 and Ctrl+End or X7 go to the first or last page. (Some Mac keyboards do
not have a 7 (End) key, in which case you can use x4 instead to go right a screenful, and xX4
to go to the last page.)
In Sibelius, typing the Ctrl or X key with another key generally means “do this, but bigger” – in
other words hitting the other key without Ctrl or X would perform the operation normally; adding
the Ctrl or X key performs a bigger version of the operation. Various operations in Sibelius use
Ctrl or X to do things in big steps, such as moving notes or other objects (such as text), increasing
or decreasing note spacing, and so on.
Possibly the most important key you need when using Sibelius is the Esc key. Esc is your get-out-
of-jail-free card in all eventualities! If you click on a note (or any other object in a score) and select
it without meaning to, hit Esc to deselect everything; if you want to cancel or stop an operation in
Sibelius, hit Esc.
Panorama
Sibelius has a wide range of tools to help make it easier for you to work on a score. For a more
convenient way of viewing a score while you work on it, you can use Panorama.
To switch to Panorama, choose View> Panorama (shortcut Shift-P), or click the toolbar
button shown on the right. Your score is instantly laid out as a single system on an
infinitely wide page:
Using Panorama allows you to input your music without Sibelius moving the page up and down,
which can be distracting; instead, the score only scrolls left to right. All the navigation methods
we’ve already discussed work the same way in Panorama as they do in normal view, with the
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exception of the Navigator, which doesn’t appear in Panorama (because your score isn’t laid out on
pages any longer).
This kind of view is sometimes called scroll view or gallery view in other programs. Switch
Panorama off again by choosing View> Panorama, or clicking the toolbar button again. You may
have noticed the blue magic margin, which always displays the clef, key signature and instrument
name for each staff, superimposed over the left-hand margin in Panorama view.
For more information about Panorama, b5.13 Panorama in Reference.
Zooming
There are several ways to adjust the magnification of the score, but the quickest of these is by using
the keyboard shortcuts for zooming: type Ctrl++ or X+ to zoom in, or Ctrl+– or X– to zoom out.
If you have a note or other object selected then Sibelius zooms in on the thing you select. Try click-
ing on the first note of the vocal staff in the Scarborough Fair score and zooming in. Notice as you
do this how the percentage zoom factor shown in the drop-down list on the toolbar changes. You
can select a particular zoom factor preset from the list, or type in your own.
If you have a mouse with a wheel button, you can zoom in and out smoothly by holding Ctrl or X
and scrolling the wheel up and down.
Try zooming out so that you can see the whole page of music on your screen. Then zoom back in to
100%, which is a convenient size for doing most things in Sibelius.
Hiding and showing tool windows
If your screen starts to get cluttered, then you can click the buttons on the toolbar to hide any of
Sibelius’s tool windows, including the Navigator, which we’ve already discussed.
The Keypad at the bottom right of the screen is an indispensible tool for inputting notes,
accidentals, articulations, ties and other markings, and can be shown or hidden by switch-
ing Window> Keypad on or off, or by clicking on the toolbar button (shown on the right).
You can also hide all of Sibelius’s tool windows by clicking the Hide Tool Windows button
on the toolbar, shown on the left. Click the button again to show the windows you had open
previously.
Versions
While you work on a piece of music, it can be very useful to save different versions of the same
score – especially if you’re going to experiment, or you want to produce different arrangements of
the same piece. Sibelius allows you to store all of these different versions in the same file, so that
you can go backwards (or forwards) in time through the life of your score.
All of the project files you’ll be working on in this Handbook have a
number of different versions, corresponding to the chapter headings, so you
can easily see where to start working from.
You can quickly see which version you’re viewing – and view other
versions in the file – from the drop-down list on the toolbar, shown on the
right.
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All versions except the Current version are non-editable, so you won’t be able to change anything
in the score, although you can play them, print them, select notes and other objects, and copy
music from them. To view another version, simply click in the drop-down list on the name of the
version you want to see.
You’ll need a printout of the finished arrangement of Scarborough Fair to refer to while completing
the rest of this project, so let’s print one now. Choose File > Versions > Edit Versions or click the
Edit Versions button on the toolbar (to the left of the versions drop-down menu), which opens the
Edit Versions dialog. From the list of versions, select 1 Opening a file, and click Make Current.
Sibelius will ask you if you want to make this version the current one, and make a new non-edit-
able version of the existing one. Click Yes. You should now see a completed arrangement of
Scarborough Fair without the string staves visible.
See b5.22 Versions in Reference for more details.
Focus on Staves
The score you’ve just made into the current version uses Sibelius’s Focus on Staves feature to hide
the staves that you’re not currently working on. You won’t need to work on any of the string parts at
any point in this project, so we’ll save paper by hiding them in our printout!
Click the toolbar button shown on the right, or choose View> Focus on Staves (shortcut
Ctrl+Alt+F or zXF) to switch Focus on Staves off.
Instantly the string parts that were hidden are shown; because we don’t need to work on them,
switch Focus on Staves back on by clicking the toolbar button again, or by choosing View> Focus
on Staves.
For more information, b5.8 Focus on Staves in Reference.
Printing a score
Choose File > Print (shortcut Ctrl+P or XP) to open a standard Print dialog. Don’t worry about all
the options: just click OK on Windows or Print on Mac to print your score.
Within a few moments, a high-quality printout of the Scarborough Fair score should emerge from
your printer. Hold on to this printout, because you’ll be reading music from it when we cover note
input shortly.
If you ran into any problems, b5.16 Printing in Reference for help.
For the next chapter of this project, we need to be able to edit another version. Choose File >
Versions > Edit Versions again. From the list of versions, select 2 Editing and inputting notes,
and click Make Current. Sibelius will ask you if you want to make this version the current one,
and make a new non-editable version of the existing one. Click Yes. You should now see an
incomplete arrangement of Scarborough Fair.
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1.2 Editing and inputting notes
In order to complete this section of the project, you should have already made the 2 Editing and
inputting notes version into the Current version (see above). If you haven’t already done so,
choose File > Versions > Edit Versions, select this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
Most of the actions you will perform in Sibelius are related to inputting notes and editing what
you’ve inputted. Sibelius allows you to input music in a number of ways – by scanning sheet music,
playing a MIDI keyboard or guitar, placing notes with the mouse, opening files from other pro-
grams – but the fastest way of all is by typing using your computer keyboard and editing as you go.
Escape is your best friend
Before we learn how to enter and edit notes in a score, do you remember that we looked at using
the Esc key as a get-out-of-jail-free card? Well, when you’re inputting or editing your music in any
of the ways Sibelius allows, Esc is of the utmost importance. It can be used in any of the following
situations:
* When adding notes with the mouse, hitting Esc will stop you placing any more notes
* When typing notes with your computer keyboard, hitting Esc will stop you adding any more
notes and leave the most recently-added note selected
* If you’re editing a piece of text, hitting Esc will stop you typing or deleting any text and leave the
object selected
* If you have something selected, hitting Esc will deselect it
* When Sibelius is playing back your score, hitting Esc will stop it playing back.
You can also click the top left button on any Keypad layout – the one with the picture of the mouse
pointer on it – to perform the same function (see The Keypad, below).
Moving between notes
While Sibelius lets you click on a note to select it (that’s why it turns blue, so that you can edit or
change it), the fastest way to move between notes in Sibelius is to use your computer keyboard. You
can move forwards and backwards from one note or rest to the next one by using the 0 and 1 keys;
to move to the first note or rest in a bar, simply type Ctrl+0 or Ctrl+1. Did you notice? This is
another example of “do this, but bigger.”
You can also use the Tab key (above Caps Lock on your computer keyboard) to move forward
through every object attached to a particular stave. Tab selects the first object on the page, so you
don’t need to use your mouse at all. Try this out in the Scarborough Fair score: make sure you have
nothing selected (by hitting Esc) and then hit Tab. You should see the first note on the vocal staff of
the score turn blue. Keep hitting Tab and you’ll advance through the notes, rests, dynamic mark-
ings, lyrics and so on. To go backward in this way, simply type Shift-Tab.
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The Keypad
The Keypad at the bottom right of the screen is where you choose note
values, accidentals, articulations, ties and other markings for creating and edit-
ing notes. (Articulations are symbols above or below a note such as staccato,
tenuto and accent. Note value means the length of a note. These words and
other musical and technical terminology are explained in the Glossary in Ref-
erence.)
The numeric keys at the right of your computer keyboard correspond to the
buttons on the Keypad. Typing these keys does exactly the same as clicking the
buttons with the mouse, and is quicker. If you use a notebook (laptop)
computer, see Notebook (laptop) shortcuts below.
The six little tabs just below the bar that says Keypad choose between six different layouts of
musical symbols on the Keypad, which we’ll call the first layout, second layout, etc. To change lay-
out, you can either click the tabs with the mouse, hit F7–F12, or click the button (shortcut +) to
cycle through the layouts; the button (shortcut F7 on Windows, – on the numeric keypad on
Mac) goes back to the first layout.
Have a quick look to see what’s in the other layouts – fairly obscure stuff. The first layout is the one
you’ll be using most of the time.
The row of numbers at the bottom of the Keypad are for setting the “voice” of the note you’re
inputting or editing. This is so that you can have multiple rhythms played simultaneously on the
same staff. We’ll talk about this more later on.
Beware that because the numeric keypad is used for specific functions in Sibelius, you can’t switch
off Num Lock to use the number keys as alternative arrow keys etc. while using Sibelius, as you
can with other programs.
The button at the top left-hand corner of each Keypad layout (shown at the left) can be
used as a substitute for the Esc key – this is particularly useful if you are using Sibelius on
an interactive whiteboard in a classroom, since you don’t have to carry a keyboard under
your arm the whole time!
Notebook (laptop) shortcuts
If you use a notebook (laptop) computer without a separate numeric keypad, you may already be
wondering how you’ll input any notes at all. Thankfully you don’t need to resort to laboriously
entering every note individually with the mouse; nor do you need to find a friend to hold down the
Fn key while you type!
Sibelius has some alternative single-key shortcuts built in, which allow you the same freedom and
speed when inputting notes. To use these, choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on
Mac, shortcut Ctrl+, or X,), then select the Menus and Shortcuts page. Select Notebook
(laptop) shortcuts from the menu at the top of the dialog, then click OK.
Instead of using the numbers on the keypad, you can use the standard numbers along the top of
your keyboard which will correspond to the same numbers on the Keypad. When this feature set is
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in use, use Shift-1 to Shift-9 to enter intervals above a note – b5.12 Menus and shortcuts
in Reference.
You can also purchase a separate numeric keypad to connect to your computer via USB that will
allow you to use Sibelius’s standard shortcuts.
Save your work!
Before we get down to the real business of learning how to edit and input notes, let’s take a moment
to save the score. You should always save your work regularly, and keep backups, preferably on a
removable device like a USB flash memory stick (sometimes called a “pen drive”) or by burning
onto CD-R.
To save a score for the first time, choose File > Save (shortcut Ctrl+S or XS) or click the
toolbar button shown here, find a suitable location (e.g. your Scores folder), give your
score a name, then click Save. On Windows the Scores folder is inside your My
Documents folder; on Mac, the Scores folder is inside your user Documents folder.
However, because we’re working on an existing score that already has a name, we should use File >
Save As (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+S or xXS) to save a copy of the score under a new name. Call it e.g.
Scarborough and save it to your Desktop.
Sibelius also automatically saves a copy of your score into a special folder every few minutes. If
your computer should suffer a power failure or crash, the next time you start Sibelius you will be
given the opportunity to restore any lost work.
You can save a version of your score at any point, which you can then use to save and
review drafts, to keep track of arrangements, to save a pristine copy before you make a
major change or to export a log showing the development of your score. Choose File >
Save Version or click the toolbar button shown here.
Furthermore, every time you save your score using File > Save, Sibelius makes a numbered backup
and puts it into the Backup Scores folder inside your Scores folder. If, say, your score gets deleted
by accident, or if you make a major change that you later decide you don’t want, check inside the
Backup Scores folder for a recent backup.
For more information on these useful features, b5.22 Versions and b9. Files in Reference.
Editing notes with the Keypad
All of the Keypad keys instantly modify the currently-selected note. So to change the duration or
add accidentals to a note, simply click on it to select it and choose the corresponding Keypad but-
ton. You will find that if you learn to use the numeric keys and navigate with the arrow keys, you
can work much faster than by clicking on the buttons with your mouse.
Let’s try it:
* In the Scarborough Fair score, select the second note of the vocal part in bar 11, a B natural
quarter note (crotchet)
* Hit 3 (on the numeric Keypad) to change this to an eighth note (quaver) – notice how Sibelius
has helpfully padded out the bar with an eighth note rest after the note to ensure that the bar
remains the correct length
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* Change it back to a quarter note duration, and hit 9 (on the numeric Keypad) to change the
natural to a flat. If you hit 9 again, Sibelius then removes the redundant accidental – but the note
will play back as a Bb (there’s a Bb in the key signature). To test this, hit Esc to deselect the note,
then click it to select it again – you should hear Sibelius play a Bb. Hit 7 once more to put the
natural back on the note.
If none of this seems to work properly then you probably weren’t in the first Keypad layout, in
which case just click the first layout tab (or hit F7) and try again.
You can also use the arrow keys on your keyboard to change the pitch of selected notes. With the B
natural selected, hit 2 until the pitch changes to a D below the staff. Typing Ctrl+3/2 or X3/2
moves the selected pitch up and down by an octave; try moving the D up an octave by typing
Ctrl+3 or X3.
You should end up with:
Undo and Redo
If you make a mistake, or you are unhappy with changes you’ve made, you can save
yourself the trouble of going back and correcting your score manually. For example,
select the quarter note (crotchet) D and hit 5 on the numeric keypad to change it to a
half note (minim). Notice how the next note in the bar is overwritten. Try clicking the left-arrow
toolbar button shown here or choose Edit > Undo (shortcut Ctrl+Z or XZ). This undoes the last
operation you did, and you should see the deleted note miraculously reappear. Sibelius supports
multi-level undo – try typing Ctrl+Z or XZ a number of times to see your score restore itself to
how it was before you began to edit it. Keep undoing until the note is a B natural again.
Click the right-arrow toolbar button or choose Edit > Redo (shortcut Ctrl+Y or XY) to redo what-
ever you just undid.
Sibelius even includes an “undo history” that lists all the operations you’ve recently done, and lets you
jump back to any earlier point in time. More details are in b5.21 Undo and Redo in Reference.
Sadly, this only works for actions you’ve performed in Sibelius, so if you spill your coffee all over
the computer keyboard, it can’t help you at all.
Mouse input and the Keyboard window
Inputting notes with a mouse is simple in Sibelius, but it can be quite time-consuming, so you
should try to use the shortcuts we’ve just discussed to speed things up.
Before we begin inputting notes, choose Window> Keyboard or click the Keyboard button on the
toolbar to open the Keyboard window. This is a virtual, on-screen piano keyboard which can
display over seven octaves of keys at three different sizes (just drag the bottom right-hand corner
of the window and drag it to resize). Click on a key with your mouse to hear the note played back:
,
,
,
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We’re going to input a section of the countermelody from the start of the clarinet staff, to
complement the vocal melody. We’ll begin by choosing our first note from the Keypad. First,
ensure nothing in your score is selected by hitting Esc (or clicking the top left button on the Key-
pad). Now hit 4 (on the numeric keypad) to choose a quarter note (crotchet). The mouse pointer
turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying” a note. Hit . (on the numeric keypad) to make the
quarter note dotted. As you move the mouse pointer over the score, a gray shadow note is drawn,
showing you where the dotted quarter note will be created when you click. Notice how it even
draws leger lines above and below the staff, so you can position high and low notes accurately.
Now click the mouse pointer near the start of the clarinet staff, pointing at the A space, second
space up:
If you clicked in the wrong place, you can use 3 and 2 to adjust the pitch of the note after you’ve
inputted it.
Notice that the note you just added is dark blue, showing that it’s selected, and a vertical dark blue
line – called the caret – is just to the right of it.
The caret means that Sibelius is ready for you to input more notes. You should think of the caret
like the familiar line you find in word processing software. The caret is especially useful for alpha-
betic input, which we’ll come on to a little later, so we’ll explain exactly what it does then.
Hit 3 to select the eighth note (quaver) on the Keypad and click with the mouse to add a G on the
second line up, then hit 4 to select the quarter note again and click to add a note in the F space.
The quarter note button on the Keypad stays selected, so you can carry on creating more notes by
clicking with the mouse – you don’t need to re-choose the quarter note button. Add another three
quarter notes to fill the next bar, clicking the mouse pointer to add a G, F and E:
The next bar begins with a quarter note rest, so hit 0 on the numeric keypad to create a rest (the
quarter note should still be selected).
¸
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Let’s continue inputting the countermelody using the Keyboard window, clicking on the keys and
using the numeric keypad to change the note values. Begin by hitting 3 to select eighth notes (qua-
vers) and enter the melody below, using the Keyboard window; when you need to add the quarter
note, simply hit 4 on the numeric keypad before you click the key on the Keyboard window (or
click in the score) to add the note. You should end up with:
You can also use your computer keyboard to “play” the Keyboard window – see b1.3 Keyboard
window in Reference.
Adding articulation and ties with the Keypad
To finish our countermelody, we’re going to add some articulation instructions for the benefit of
performers – you’ll see later on that Sibelius will also obey these articulations when playing back
your score!
In the same way as we learned how to change the selected note’s duration or accidentals, the Key-
pad buttons instantly add or remove articulations and ties. Just click a note, then choose a Keypad
button to add one of these objects to the note, or remove it again.
Let’s try it:
* Select the quarter note (crotchet) D in the third bar of the clarinet staff
* Hit the key on your numeric keypad that corresponds to the . (staccato dot) on the top row of
buttons on the Keypad. This adds a staccato mark to the note.
* Repeat this for the quarter note D in the next bar
Now navigate to the start of the second system to add a tie:
* Select the half note (minim) A in the ninth bar of the clarinet staff
* Hit Enter (on the numeric keypad) to put a tie after the note:
* Now use the arrow keys and the numeric keypad to add articulations and ties to the rest of the
clarinet countermelody.
¸
, /
,
,
,
.
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
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,
,
,
.
,
,
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,

,
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1.3 Selections and copying music
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Project
1 and make the 3 Selections and copying music version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
Now that we’ve discussed how to edit existing notes, and use the keyboard shortcuts to make those
edits faster, we’re ready to look at selecting passages of music to manipulate, copy or delete notes
and other objects en masse.
Selections and passages
When objects in the score are selected, they go colored, which shows that you can do things to
them using the mouse and keyboard. Almost everything you will do to change your score in
Sibelius involves selections.
There are three main kinds of selection:
* Single selections, where just one object is selected
* Multiple selections, where several separate objects are selected
* Selected passages, where continuous stretches of music are selected, shown with a light blue box
(“staff passage”) or purple double-box (“system passage”) round them.
You can do pretty much the same things to all three kinds of selection. The main difference is how
you select the objects in the first place.
We’ll look at how to make and use different kinds of selection in the Scarborough Fair score. Select-
ing single objects is simple enough, we’ve already looked at how to select notes by clicking them
with the mouse, or by hitting the Tab key.
To select multiple objects, select a single object, then Ctrl+click or X-click (i.e. hold down the Ctrl
or X key and click the left mouse button) one or more other objects to add them to the selection.
Try this by selecting the first note of the clarinet staff in the first bar of the Scarborough Fair score.
Now carefully Ctrl+click or X-click the next note. You can select text and other objects this way, so
try Ctrl+clicking or X-clicking on the title. If you accidentally add an object to the selection in this
way, you can remove it by Ctrl+clicking or X-clicking the object again. Try removing the title from
the selection.
Multiple selections let you perform edits to specific objects: try using the 3 and 2 keys to move
the selected notes up and down. This is mainly useful for objects other than notes, chords and rests
– e.g. selecting multiple articulations or several bits of text.
Before we learn how to make a passage selection, you should deselect the current objects by hitting
Esc (or clicking the top left button on the Keypad).
A passage is a continuous chunk of music, maybe running over many pages. It can run along one
staff or several. You’ll most often select a passage in order to copy music from one instrument to
another, e.g. because they’re doubling each other. Passages allow you to edit, copy or delete lots of
notes at once.
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To make a staff passage selection, begin by clicking on the first note of the clarinet staff in the first
bar. Now carefully Shift-click on an empty part of the staff in the fourth bar of the acoustic guitar
staff. You should see a single light blue box surrounding all the intervening notes:
Notice how every object attached to the staff is selected in the range of the passage. This is really
useful for copying music, because all articulations, dynamic markings, text and other objects
attached to the staff get copied too! Again, you can use the 3 and 2 keys to move the selected notes
up and down. You can also see the selection in miniature on the Navigator.
There are various ways to select certain types of staff passage quickly:
* Clicking an empty part of a bar selects that bar on one staff (e.g. to copy a bar)
* Double-clicking an empty part of a bar selects that staff for the duration of the system
* Triple-clicking an empty part of a bar selects that staff throughout the score
* After single-, double- or triple-clicking, you can Shift-click another staff to add all staves in
between to the selection, or add or remove individual staves using Ctrl+click or X-click.
To make a system passage selection, Ctrl+click or X-click on an empty part of the first bar of the
vocal staff. You should see a purple double-box appear around all the staves for that bar:
* You can hold Ctrl or X while single-, double- or triple-clicking to select system passages for a
bar, the duration of the system, or the whole score, respectively
* You can even select the entire score at once by choosing Edit > Select > Select All (shortcut
Ctrl+A or XA). This is particularly useful for transposing the whole score, altering the format of
the whole score, or for selecting particular types of object throughout the score.
More details on selections are in b1.9 Selections and passages in Reference.
Deleting notes and other objects
Try selecting various objects, then deleting them with the Delete key:
* Delete a piece of text, e.g. the Arranger text (from the top of the first page)
* Delete a note: it turns into a rest, to ensure that the rhythm still adds up.
You can delete a rest, which hides it, and leaves the rest of the rhythm still aligned as if the rest
were still there. When you first delete a rest, its color changes to a lighter shade to show that it’s
been hidden; when you deselect it, it’ll disappear altogether. You shouldn’t normally hide rests, but
it can sometimes be useful for special notations. Other objects can also be hidden for special pur-
poses. To see where hidden objects are, they will be shown in gray if you switch on View> Hidden
Objects (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+H or zXH).
You can also use Backspace to delete objects, or choose Edit > Delete.
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Edit > Cut (shortcut Ctrl+X or XX) is similar to Delete, but cuts objects to the clipboard so that
you can paste them elsewhere with Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV). This is not used much in
Sibelius, so there’s no need to try it now.
Remember that you can use Undo and Redo to restore anything you delete.
Deleting bars
Often you’ll find that you want to remove one or more bars – empty or not – from your score, so
this is a very important function to learn. There are two ways to delete bars in Sibelius.
The easiest way is to make a passage selection containing the bars you want to remove from the
score (see Selections and passages above), then choose Edit > Delete Bars (shortcut
Ctrl+Backspace or XBackspace). You’ll be asked if you’re sure you want to continue: click Yes,
and notice that you can switch on a checkbox labeled Don’t say this again if you want Sibelius to
stop mollycoddling you (after all, there’s always Undo!). If you feel like living dangerously and
switching this option on, but later come to regret your rashness, you can make this and other simi-
larly dismissed warning messages appear again by clicking Show All Messages on the Other page
of File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac).
Another way to delete bars is to make a system passage selection, then hit Delete.
Try deleting the last three bars of the Scarborough Fair score, then use Undo to restore them again.
Copying
Copying music between bars, staves, and even different files is very easy in Sibelius. Let’s try it;
click on the staccato quarter note (crotchet) in the fifth bar of the clarinet staff and then Alt+click
or z-click onto a space in the empty sixth bar of the acoustic guitar staff. The note is copied
exactly, but ends up at the pitch corresponding to the staff line or space where your mouse pointer
was when you clicked. Notice that the staccato dot is copied too; any articulations on a note will be
copied in this way.
This method works well for copying large chunks of music. Begin by selecting the fifth bar of the
acoustic guitar staff:
Now Alt+click or z-click onto the space at the start of the bar before the note you just placed in
the sixth bar, and you’ll see this:
Sibelius overwrites the note you’d previously placed there with the newly-copied music. You can
use Alt+click or z-click to copy any combination of objects in a score, by making single, multiple
or passage selections.
On Windows, if you have a third (i.e. middle) mouse button or a clickable scroll wheel, you can use
it instead of Alt+click to do a copy and paste in a single action. If you only have a two-button
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mouse, you can do this by performing a chord-click, that is, clicking the left and right mouse but-
tons simultaneously, to duplicate the function of the middle mouse button.
Sibelius also allows you to duplicate notes or other objects in your score so that an exact copy
appears immediately after the original by choosing Edit > Repeat (shortcut R). Select the four bars
of the bass line you just entered using Alt+click or z-click, and hit R to see the bars repeated
immediately after themselves. You can use this to quickly repeat any note, chord, text, passage of
music or various other objects after itself.
You can also use the traditional way of copying music to clipboard by choosing Edit > Copy (shortcut
Ctrl+C or XC), followed by Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to paste it elsewhere. This
method is slower than the previous ones and so is not particularly recommended, except for copying
music between different scores (because Alt+click or z-click only copies within the same score).
Both Edit > Copy and Edit > Paste functions are available on the context-sensitive menu you get by
right-clicking (Windows) or Control-clicking (Mac) when one or more objects is selected.
Using the different methods we’ve discussed for copying music, complete the missing bars in the
guitar part by copying the preceding bar (or bars) into any remaining empty bars on the acoustic
guitar staff.
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1.4 Flexi-time™ input
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 1 and make the 4 Flexi-time input version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
We’ve already looked at note entry by clicking on a staff with the mouse, and by inputting notes
using the Keyboard window. There are, however, much faster ways to input notes, which you
should try and see which one feels most comfortable for you – or mix and match; you don’t need to
tell Sibelius that you’re changing input method. We’re going to look now at Sibelius’s unique real-
time note input system, which is called Flexi-time.
“Real-time” input simply means that you can play into a computer program and it will write down
both the pitches and the rhythm you play. That’s the theory, anyway. In practice, it is very difficult
for any program to understand what rhythm you are playing without either analyzing the music
after your performance, or being given a lot of help. This usually means you have to play along as
exactly as possible with a metronome click, and then “quantize” the music afterwards in an
attempt to clean up any inaccuracies in your rhythm.
However, Sibelius takes a unique approach that enables you to play in a rather freer style, and still
get good results.
If you don’t have a MIDI keyboard or MIDI guitar, skip on to b1.5 Alphabetic and step-
time input on page 53.
Using a MIDI device
To use Flexi-time, you must have a MIDI keyboard or MIDI guitar connected to your computer –
see 1.1 MIDI setup for Windows on page 26 or 1.1 MIDI setup for Mac on page 29.
Once your MIDI device is correctly installed, you can set up input and playback in Sibelius. To do
this, you should choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and go to the Input
Devices page:
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You should find your device’s name in the table at the top of the page (e.g. M-Audio Oxygen 8) and
check that the Use checkbox is switched on. If you are using a MIDI guitar, you will need to change
the Type value by clicking the drop-down menu and choosing Guitar, rather than Keyboard.
For this chapter, we’re going to be using a MIDI keyboard. To learn more about setting up input
and playback with MIDI devices, b1.10 Input Devices in Reference.
Flexi-time options
The easiest thing to do is to try playing in a single melodic line. Let’s do this first – you should be
looking at the Scarborough Fair score we’ve been working on.
We’re going to record one verse of the clarinet part, so to ensure that we get the best results, choose
Notes > Flexi-time Options (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+O or xXO).
Because we’re recording in time with other instruments – and we’re only recording one line of
music – you should choose None (non rubato) from the Flexibility of tempo drop-down list,
and switch off the Record into multiple voices checkbox.
Click OK to return to the score.
Trying it out
You’ll need the printout of the score that we made at the start of this project in order to read the
music from it.
The Playback window allows you to view and control Sibelius’s playback. If you can’t see the
Playback window, switch it on by choosing Window> Playback (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+Y or zXY):
We’ll start playing in notes using Flexi-time from bar 43 until the end of the verse in bar 61: select
bar 43 in the clarinet staff so that it is enclosed in a single light blue box (or select the little bar rest
rectangle itself); this tells Sibelius where to start recording from
Now brace yourself, because as soon as you choose Notes > Flexi-time Input (shortcut
Ctrl+Shift+F or xXF) or click the circular record button on the Playback window,
Sibelius will give you one bar count-in, then start recording what you play. Try it now:
* Flexi-time gives you a single bar’s count-in by default – so in this case you should hear three
clicks count-in. (If you do not hear a metronome click, check your playback device is switched
on, then b1.4 Flexi-time or b4.1 Working with playback in Reference.)
Timecode
readout
Rewind
Current
tempo
Flexi-time
Tempo slider
Move Playback
Line to Start
Play Fast-forward
Stop
Move Playback
Line to End
Live
Playback
Click (on/off )
Timeline slider
MIDI in & out
indicators
Record Live
Tempo
Play Live
Tempo
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* At the end of the count-in, try playing the next few bars smoothly, following the speed of the
clicks
* Keep going for as long as you like, and notice how Sibelius displays the notes on the screen (it
will usually be several notes behind you). It may be easiest not to watch the screen while you’re
recording!
* When you want to stop recording, click the square stop button on the Playback window or hit
Space.
Take a look at what Sibelius has transcribed – if you’re not happy with the result, then simply select
the bars you’ve just inputted, hit Delete and select bar 43 again. Take as many attempts as you
need, until you’re happy with the result. If you want Sibelius to slow down your score while you
record, see Adjusting the recording tempo, below.
In Project 3 of this Handbook, we’ll learn how to input onto two staves simultaneously. You can
also change other options such as rubato (the flexibility of your tempo), the sound and count-in of
the metronome click, and the way in which triplets and other tuplets are recognized – b1.4
Flexi-time in Reference.
Adjusting the recording tempo
Don’t worry if you’re having difficulty or your keyboard skills are a bit rusty – Sibelius doesn’t
expect you to be a virtuoso! In a moment we’ll look at tidying up the transcription, but first we’ll
learn how to make Flexi-time recording a bit easier.
The tempo slider on the Playback window allows you to speed up or (more importantly in this
case) slow down playback of your score. This applies to recording Flexi-time input too – set the
slider to the left-hand side and the click will slow down, allowing you to play more carefully.
You should only use the tempo slider to change the speed of playback for your whole score; for
changes in tempo you should use tempo text and metronome markings added to the score – see
b1.7 Text and dynamics on page 60.
Renotate Performance
If you find that you end up with unwanted rests, overlapping notes or incorrect note durations, you
can use one of Sibelius’s plug-ins (powerful extra features) to make these more legible. Select the
passage and choose Plug-ins > Simplify Notation > Renotate Performance, which opens a sim-
ple dialog. Since the music we recorded doesn’t use any note value smaller than an eighth note
(quaver), set the Quantization unit (minimum duration) drop-down to Longer: 1/8 note
(quaver). Make sure that the Overwrite selected passage checkbox is switched on, and click
OK. Sibelius will recalculate the Flexi-time transcription and produce a rhythmically and visually
simpler version.
If there are still any mistakes, you can use the editing techniques you have already learned to cor-
rect the note values and pitches. You may also like to experiment with the other plug-ins in the
Plug-ins > Simplify Notation menu.
To learn more about plug-ins, b6.1 Working with plug-ins in Reference.
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1.5 Alphabetic and step-time input
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Project
1 and make the 5 Alphabetic and step-time input version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
Now let’s finish inputting the notes into the clarinet staff; we’re going to learn two more ways of
creating notes in Sibelius. You’ll need the printout of the score that we made at the start of this
project in order to read the music from it.
Alphabetic input
You can input notes into Sibelius by typing the pitches using the letters A–G directly from the
computer keyboard, and make chords using the numbers 1–9 on the main keyboard (not the
numeric keypad). This is much quicker than mouse input once you’re used to it.
Try adding the music to the clarinet part from bar 66 to bar 68:
* Click the little bar rest rectangle in bar 66 of the clarinet staff, so that it goes dark blue – this tells
Sibelius where to begin. From now on, do not touch the mouse – however tempted you are!
* Hit N (the shortcut for Notes > Input Notes), which makes the caret appear
* Hit F7 to see the first Keypad layout (if it isn’t showing), then type 3 on the numeric keypad to
choose an eighth note (quaver). You must choose a note value, so that Sibelius knows how long
you want the notes to be.
* Type F C A. Notice that Sibelius has input the A an octave too low, so type Ctrl+3 or X3 to
move the note up an octave. Notice that the caret moves after every note you input, showing you
where the next note will be added.
* Type F C and then Ctrl+3 or X3 to move the C up an octave
* Type A to add another eighth note
* Type 5 on the keypad to select a half note (minim)
* Type D 4 (on the numeric keypad) C A. This inputs a D half note, C and A quarter notes
* Now, to input a B natural, type 7 (on the numeric keypad) to select the natural
* Type B G to input the B natural and a G quarter note
* Hit Esc twice to stop creating notes and deselect the last note, as we’ve stopped adding notes for
the moment.
You should end up with this:
Just as notes are only created by the mouse when you actually click in the score, with alphabetic
input, a note is only actually created in the score when you type the letters A–G. Any buttons cho-
sen on the keypad are merely preparing what will happen when you type A–G or click the mouse.
So, as with mouse input, you need to type any accidentals, articulations, or other Keypad markings
before typing the letter. (If you forget, you can always go back afterwards and edit the note.) The
,
,
,
,
,
,
.
,
,
, ,
,
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only exception is adding ties (by hitting Enter) which is done after creating the note (just because
it feels more natural as the tie is after the note).
Once you get used to changing the durations with one hand, using the numeric keypad, and input-
ting the pitches with the other hand, using the letters A–G and R, you’ll find this a very fast
method of creating notes.
Remember, you can edit an existing note’s articulations, accidentals and other attributes just by
selecting the note and choosing the appropriate button on the Keypad. Changing the pitch of a note
is just as simple: select the note and type the new pitch using the letters A–G. We’ve already seen how
to change the length of a note by selecting it and choosing different note values from the Keypad.
Use alphabetic input to enter the rest of the missing music from the clarinet part into your score
from bar 69.
For more details b1.1 Note input in Reference.
Chords in alphabetic input
There are two simple ways to build chords in alphabetic input. Input one of the notes in the chord
as normal, then:
* on a regular keyboard, type a number 1–9 on the main keyboard (not the numeric keypad) to
add a note an interval above, or type Shift-1–9 to add a note below; e.g. 1 adds a unison note, 3
adds a note a third above, Shift-6 adds a note a sixth below
* on a notebook (laptop) computer’s keyboard (see Notebook (laptop) shortcuts on page
41), type Shift-1–9 to add an interval above, e.g. Shift-4 adds a note a third above
* on either kind of keyboard, type Shift-A–G to add a note of that pitch above the current note.
(There aren’t shortcuts for adding notes below by letter-name.)
You can keep adding further notes to a chord in the same way.
Especially useful, you can select passages of notes and add notes above/below all of them at once
using 1–9 or Shift-1–9.
Step-time input
We’ve already looked at how to use a MIDI device to input music into Sibelius by recording in a
real-time performance. You can also use your MIDI keyboard (or MIDI guitar) to play in pitches in
a similar way to the alphabetic input.
If you don’t have a MIDI device connected to your computer, complete this section using the
alphabetic input method we just learned – or use the Keyboard window as a virtual MIDI
keyboard! (b1.3 Keyboard window in Reference.)
Step-time input is like alphabetic input using a MIDI input device, and is faster still. All you do is:
* Select a rest to start creating notes from, and type N to make the caret appear
* Choose a note value on the Keypad (you must remember to do this, or Sibelius has to guess)
* Start playing notes on the MIDI keyboard. As with alphabetic input, choose any articulations or
other markings on the Keypad before creating a note. These Keypad keys remain on until you re-
choose them.
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* To change note value, choose a new note value from the Keypad before creating the note
* To input a rest, hit 0 on the keypad, which inputs a rest of the value selected on the Keypad.
The only differences from alphabetic input are:
* You don’t need to input accidentals, as Sibelius can of course tell when you’re playing a black
note. Sibelius makes an intelligent guess as to how you want black notes “spelled” – e.g. as F# or
Gb – on the basis of the key signature and the musical context. However, you can ask Sibelius to
“respell” a note after creating it just by hitting Return (on the main keyboard).
* Similarly, Sibelius always knows which octave you want
* You can input chords instantly just by playing them (you don’t have to input one note and then
add further notes to it, as you would with alphabetic input).
These differences make step-time input somewhat faster than alphabetic input. Try inputting the
rest of the missing music onto the acoustic guitar staff from bar 69, using step-time input:
* First, select the bar rest in bar 69 in the acoustic guitar staff (so it goes dark blue)
* Next, choose eighth notes (quavers) from the Keypad
* Now begin playing in the notes, changing the note lengths from the Keypad as you go.
You can always go back with the arrow keys if you made a mistake, or want to change something.
As with alphabetic input, to correct a note or chord’s pitch you can just select it and re-play it on
your MIDI keyboard. Or there’s always Undo!
It is much faster to use your MIDI keyboard (or MIDI guitar) to create chords than by clicking
notes with the mouse or typing using your computer keyboard. For more details, b1.1 Note
input in Reference.
Don’t forget that you can use Alt-click or z-click to copy music, and R to repeat notes or bars.
Transposing scores
By default, your score is shown at sounding (concert) pitch. To switch to transposing pitch
and show the clarinet staff at the correct pitch for the performer to read, simply choose
Notes > Transposing Score (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+T or xXT) or click the button on the
toolbar (shown above left) – try this now. Notice how all of the music and key signatures on the
clarinet staff are instantly changed to the clarinet’s transposing pitch. Sibelius automatically han-
dles all other complications produced by transposing instruments.
When playing back a transposing score, Sibelius reads transposing instruments correctly to pro-
duce the correct pitch. Sibelius transposes music when you copy it between transposing instru-
ments so that it always sounds the same. (When viewing instrumental parts from a sounding pitch
score, Sibelius automatically transposes transposing instruments for you – see below.)
Sibelius’s note input methods allow you to enter notes into a score with Notes > Transposing
Score switched on. If you type notes using the letters A–G, then the corresponding written pitches
will appear on the staff:
* Choose Notes > Transposing Score or click the toolbar button to switch to transposing score
* Select the first two bars of the clarinet staff and hit Delete to clear the notes
* Type N to make the caret appear and choose a note value from the Keypad
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* Type A B C D, which inputs the pitches A, B, C and D on the staff
* Choose Notes > Transposing Score or click the toolbar button again to switch to sounding
pitches – notice how the pitches transpose automatically to become G, A, Bb and C.
However, when you play pitches in step-time using a MIDI input device, then the sounding pitches
will appear on the staff:
* Choose Notes > Transposing Score or click the toolbar button to switch to transposing score
* Select the first two bars of the clarinet staff and hit Delete to clear the notes
* Type N to make the caret appear and choose a note value from the Keypad
* play the notes A, B, C and D on your MIDI input device.
Notice how this inputs the pitches B, C#, D and E on the staff. b2.18 Instruments in Reference
for more details.
Undo the changes you made and restore the clarinet countermelody by choosing Edit > Undo.
Working with parts
As well as automatically transposing instruments in a score, Sibelius creates a set of instrumental
parts – one for each instrument in your score. These only contain notation relevant to the
instrument and Sibelius takes care of all the formatting, transposing and laying out.
Sibelius uses a revolutionary approach by which any change made in the score is automatically
made in the part, and vice versa. These magical creations are known as dynamic parts™.
You can edit dynamic parts in exactly the same way as you would a score. You can move, add and
delete notes, add slurs, expression markings etc. just as you would normally. But whenever you
change something in the score, the parts are instantly updated, and vice versa. You don’t need to
extract dynamic parts, and in fact, they’re all kept in the same file as the full score – so they’re
easier to organize, too.
Because parts are created automatically when you start a score, you don’t need to do anything. Let’s
look at the parts for the instruments in the Scarborough Fair score:
* Click on the drop-down menu on the toolbar that says Full Score; this is the parts menu
* Choose Clarinet in Bb from the list – the view changes to display one instrument, laid out on
cream-colored paper to help you quickly differentiate between a score and a part.
This part is ready for you to give to a performer; it has the same title, the same notes as the score
(but at the correct written transposition) – in fact, it has everything the instrumentalist needs to
perform this part, and nothing that they don’t!
Try selecting a bar and transposing it up an octave by typing Ctrl+3 or X3, then choose
Window> Switch to Full Score (shortcut W) or click the toolbar button on the left.
Sibelius has transposed the same passage up an octave in the full score. Type Ctrl+2 or X2, to
move the passage back to the original octave.
We’ll learn more about how to work with dynamic parts in the other projects in this Handbook –
for more details, b7.1 Working with parts in Reference.
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1.6 Playback
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 1 and make the 6 Playback version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
One of the most powerful features of Sibelius – which we’ve not really seen yet – is the ability to
play your score back.
Playback controls
Click the Play button on the Playback window, or hit Space to start the music, which should begin
to play back (if it doesn’t, then see below). You can also find this function in the Play menu, but
who needs menus?
Sibelius automatically hides the Keypad (and the Properties window, if it’s open) and zooms to show
you a full page of music. You’ll see a vertical green line (called the playback line) passing through the
music to indicate the position as it plays, and the score moves around to follow the music.
Why not listen to the arrangement of Scarborough Fair all the way through? When you want to
stop, just click the Stop button on the Playback window, or hit Space again.
You can rewind and fast-forward through a score using the appropriate buttons on the Playback
window or by using the keyboard shortcuts [ (rewind) and ] (fast-forward).
Clicking the Play button or typing Space will tell Sibelius to play again from the point where it left
off, i.e. wherever you stopped it playing before, so to play a piece from the start again, you should
rewind to the beginning of the score – to quickly rewind or fast-forward to the start and end of the
score, use Ctrl+[/] or X[/].
To play from a particular point, you can alternatively click on a note to select it, and hit P. So an even
quicker way to play from the start of the score is to hit Esc to deselect everything, then hit P to play.
If you have problems with playback, see I can’t hear anything! below.
The Mixer window
As you play back Scarborough Fair, you may have noticed that the instruments sound like they
are at different stereo positions – this is Sibelius’s SoundStage™ feature at work, which positions
instruments in 3D space as if set out on a concert stage.
You can adjust the position and volume (as well as applying reverb and other effects) for
each instrument yourself from Sibelius’s powerful Mixer window. To show the Mixer, click
the toolbar button (shown here), choose Window> Mixer, or hit the shortcut Ctrl+Alt+M
or M.
The Mixer is divided into color-coded strips. In the picture above, you can see that each staff in
your score gets its own light blue staff strip. Find the acoustic guitar staff strip, and click and drag
the volume fader to the right-hand side, to make the guitar sound louder during playback. Drag
the volume fader up to 118.
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Now, let’s change the stereo position of the drums. Find the drum set staff strip and click the
arrowhead to the left of the instrument name, which expands the staff strip:
You will see lots more controls, including another slider above the Reverb and Chorus knobs. Hit
Space, and while Sibelius plays back the score, click and drag this slider all the way to the left-
hand side. Can you hear how the drum sounds seem to “move” to your left?
Let’s look at how to use the Mixer to add effects such as reverb and chorus to instruments in a
score:
* Find the guitar staff strip and expand it by clicking the arrowhead
* Click on the knob labeled Reverb
* Drag with the mouse to turn the knob and adjust the amount of effect applied to the guitar –
listen to how the sound changes. The Scarborough Fair score uses the powerful built-in Sibelius
Player and the Sibelius Sounds Essentials sound library to create incredibly realistic sounds. As
you mix more reverb into the guitar sound, can you hear how it starts to sound like the guitarist
is playing in a big concert hall?
Any changes to volume, effects, stereo position (pan) and so on that you make in the Mixer are
saved when you save your score (or save a version of your score) so that everything is just as you
left it when you open it again.
To learn all about Sibelius’s playback and the Mixer, b4. Playback & video in Reference.
1.6 Playback
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I can’t hear anything!
If you press Play but can’t hear any noise, there are a number of things you should try before throw-
ing your computer out of the window.
First, check that your computer speakers, MIDI keyboard or other playback equipment are
plugged in, switched on and have the volume turned up. Next, check to see if your computer oper-
ating system is configured to play audio produced by Sibelius. Find your operating system from the
list below and follow the instructions.
Windows XP:
* Go to the Start menu and choose Control Panel, then double-click Sounds and Audio Devices
* Click the Audio tab at the top, then click the Volume button
* Make sure the main Volume Control and MIDI Synth/SW Synth are turned up and Mute is
not selected.
Windows Vista:
* Go to the Start menu and choose Control Panel, then Hardware and Sound
* Select the Adjust system volume link immediately underneath the Sound heading
* Make sure the Sibelius volume (under Applications) and the main Device volume are not
muted and are turned up
Mac OS X:
* Go to the Apple menu and choose System Preferences
* Select Sound and then click on the Output tab
* Make sure the Output volume is turned up and Mute is not selected.
If you still can’t hear anything during playback, check that Sibelius is correctly configured:
* Choose Play > Playback Devices
* Select Sibelius Sounds from the Configuration drop-down menu
* Select Sibelius Player in the right-hand column, then click the Test button
* If you still can’t hear any sound, click Audio Engine Options at the bottom of the dialog
* Check that your preferred interface is selected (on Windows, choose ASIO if available; otherwise
choose Primary Sound Driver) and click Close
* Select the Sibelius Player entry in the right-hand column, then click the Test button again.
If you are still unable to hear Sibelius play your score, please contact technical help.
See b4.12 Playback Devices in Reference for more information.
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1.7 Text and dynamics
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 1 and make the 7 Text and dynamics version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
Other than the notes, many instructions for musicians playing from a score take the form of text. A
lot of the text in a Sibelius score is entirely automatic so you don’t have to think about adding it, e.g.
page numbers, bar numbers and instrument names. But you’ll also want to add all kinds of other
text yourself, from dynamics and lyrics to metronome marks and tempo text. Most text instruc-
tions play back, so when you create dynamics or tempo markings, Sibelius understands them and
plays back accordingly.
A word about text
Each type of text you can create in Sibelius has its own so-called text style, which specifies its font,
size, position and other characteristics. Text styles are called obvious things like Title, Lyrics and
Tempo. If you want to change the font or size, you can change pieces of text individually, but it’s
usually best to do so by editing the text style, as this will instantly change all similar text
throughout the score – b3.9 Edit Text Styles in Reference.
There are a few things you should remember when editing text:
* If you just want to change the characteristics of a small amount of text, you should use the options
on the Text panel of the Properties window. By default, the Properties window is not shown on
the screen, because you won’t often need to adjust settings in there. Switch it on by choosing
Window> Properties (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+P or zXP). b5.17 Properties in Reference.
* If you want to change all of the text in your score to use another font (e.g. to change the title,
instrument names, lyrics, technique instructions etc. to another font in a single operation),
choose House Style > Edit All Fonts, and choose a new Main Text Font.
* If you want to change all the text throughout the score in just one particular text style, you
should edit the text style itself instead (b3.9 Edit Text Styles), because this will automati-
cally change all existing text and also all new text you create in that style thereafter. For example,
if you decide you want your lyrics in a different font, you should edit the text style rather than
changing all the existing words manually.
Adding lyrics
The vocal staff in the Scarborough Fair score has no lyrics, which isn’t very helpful for any singer
wanting to perform our arrangement!
Let’s add the lyrics:
* Click on bar 5 of the vocal staff to select it
* Choose Create > Text > Lyrics > Lyrics line 1 (shortcut Ctrl+L or XL)
* A flashing caret appears below the first note
* Now type the first line of lyrics.
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To add a break between syllables, type – (hyphen) and Sibelius will automatically position the text
cursor at the next note. If the syllable spans more than one note, hit hyphen repeatedly (once for
each note) until the cursor appears under the note where you want to enter the next syllable. To
add a break between words, type Space. If the last syllable of the word you entered spans more
than one note, repeatedly type Space until the cursor appears under the note where you want to
start the next word. Sibelius will indicate that the word is supposed to continue melismatically by
drawing a line up to the point at which the syllable ends.
You should now see:
Importing lyrics from a text file
Typing in lyrics by hand can be quite a laborious task – especially if you have to work out where to
syllabify words. Sibelius can import a text file containing the lyrics to your song and automatically
syllabify them for you. A text file containing the words to Scarborough Fair is included in the
Project Files folder of example scores.
Let’s import the lyrics:
* Triple-click the vocal staff to make a passage selection around the entire staff
* Choose Create > Text > Lyrics > From Text File
* Click Browse to see a standard Open dialog. On Windows, you should find that you are inside a
folder called Scores, which will contain a shortcut to a folder called Example Scores. On Mac,
you should find an alias called Sibelius Example Scores. Double-click this, then go into the
Project Files folder, select the text file called Project 1 Lyrics, and then click Open.
* Click OK to import the lyrics (they will automatically overwrite the first line of lyrics you just
typed in).
You can also copy lyrics from other programs (such as word processors), create multiple verses of
lyrics, and control every aspect of their appearance and formatting – b3.3 Lyrics in Reference.
Dynamics
The term dynamics is used to mean both text instructions like mp and hairpins (wedge-shaped
cresc./dim. lines), which Sibelius will respect when playing back your score – just as you’d expect a
performer to do. Text dynamics are written in a text style called Expression.
Let’s create a text dynamic at the start of the piece:
* Select the first note of the clarinet staff
* Choose Create > Text > Expression (shortcut Ctrl+E or XE)
* A flashing caret appears below the first note
* Hold down Ctrl or X and type F – holding down Ctrl or X tells Sibelius to write the letters using
the special bold characters which should be used for dynamics – you could instead right-click
(Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a menu of useful words appear. This menu is,
appropriately enough, called a word menu.
Are
mf
you go ing - to Scar bo - rough - Fair?
5
/
,
. ,
, , ,
.
,
 ,
.
,
.
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* Hit Esc to stop creating text.
You should now see:
Now add the rest of the missing text dynamics to the vocal, clarinet and acoustic guitar staves in
the score, referring to the printout of Scarborough Fair that we made at the start of this project. You
can write all the dynamics in this arrangement either by holding down Ctrl or X as you type them
to tell Sibelius to use the special bold characters, or by using the word menu.
Tempo text
Tempo text is used at the start of a score and at sections where the tempo of the music changes dra-
matically. Sibelius follows tempo text during playback and changes the speed accordingly. You may
have noticed when playing back the score during the previous chapter that it sounds a little too
slow. If you didn’t notice, hit Space now to play back your score and listen again!
Let’s change the tempo by adding some Tempo text:
* Type Ctrl+Home or X4 to go back to the start of the score, and select the first bar (this tells
Sibelius where to put the tempo marking)
* Choose Create > Text > Tempo (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T or zXT)
* A flashing caret appears above the bar – Sibelius knows that this type of text should go above the
staff, so it automatically puts it there
* Now right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to display the tempo markings word menu
* Choose Allegro from the menu and click it. The menu disappears and the word Allegro
appears in your score.
* Hit Esc to stop creating text.
You should now see:
Now, rewind the score to the beginning and hit Space to play back your score (make sure that the
tempo slider on the Playback window is set to its middle position to hear exactly the right speed).
You could try experimenting with a few of the different tempo suggestions available in the word
menu by deleting the Allegro marking and choosing Create > Text > Tempo again – see how the
score would sound using Prestissimo or Maestoso.
Technique text
To tell a performer to change the sound of an instrument, or to employ a particular instrumental
technique or device, use Technique text. Sibelius understands your instructions too, and will play
them back (depending on your playback device), so that you can use mutes, pizzicato, tremolo,
distortion, and other effects in your score.
f
¸
, /
,
,
,
.
,
Voice
Allegro
¸
, /
, -
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Technique text is like Expression text, but it appears above the staff and non-italicized by default.
To create a technique marking, choose Create > Text > Technique (shortcut Ctrl+T or XT).
For more about Expression, Tempo and Technique text and other common text styles, b3.2
Common text styles in Reference.
Editing existing text
To edit text that’s already in your score, you can double-click it, or select it and hit Return (on the
main keyboard). Let’s change the name of an instrument in this way:
* select the instrument name Drum Set at the start of the first system
* double-click the text to edit it
* delete the existing text and type Drum Kit
* hit Esc once to stop editing text, then again to deselect.
You can do this to any piece of text in your score, so it’s easy to change titles, lyrics, dynamics and
other instructions.
Magnetic Layout
As we’ve been editing, you may have noticed that text and other objects in your score move around
as the notes move. Or, you may have seen that some objects, when they’re selected, have a shadow
object appearing underneath them.
What you’re seeing are the effects of Magnetic Layout, Sibelius’s revolutionary collision avoidance
and detection feature. No other notation software does the work of automatically laying-out your
score beautifully for you as you create and edit the music! Magnetic Layout constantly adjusts the
position of objects on the staves so that they don’t overlap each other or obscure the notes.
We’ll learn more about how it works in Project 2, or b8.2 Magnetic Layout in Reference.
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Project 2
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2.1 Creating a new score
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2.1 Creating a new score
In this project, you will learn how to create a new score from scratch, how to scan music into Sibel-
ius and how to present your score beautifully and clearly for the benefit of performers.
The first chapter of this project shows you how to create a string quartet score ready for you to
input notes; you’ll learn how to quickly set up a “manuscript paper” containing everything you
need to start writing music.
Printout
Before we start creating a string quartet score, you’ll need a printout of the finished score of the
music we’ll be creating, to refer to whilst completing the rest of this project. Choose File > Open
(shortcut Ctrl+O or XO) and find the example score called Project 2 in the Project Files folder
inside the example scores folder. Open this score and choose 1 Creating a new score from the
versions drop-down list on the toolbar.
You should now see a completed string quartet arrangement of an excerpt from Edward Elgar’s
String Quartet in E minor, Op.83, III. Finale: Allegro molto.
Choose File > Print (shortcut Ctrl+P or XP) and click OK on Windows or Print on Mac to print
your score. Within a few moments, a printout of the String Quartet in E minor score should
emerge from your printer. Hold on to this, because you’ll be reading music from it when we edit
our arrangement shortly.
Starting a new score
To start a new score, click the icon on the toolbar shown on the left, or choose File > New
(shortcut Ctrl+N or XN). A dialog captioned New Score appears, which guides you
through the creation of your score in five easy steps:
* Choose the instruments from a list of pre-defined “manuscript papers,” or create your own
instrumentation, and choose the page size and orientation
* Decide the appearance of the score, e.g. whether to use a traditional or handwritten music
design
* Set the initial time signature and tempo
* Set the initial key signature
* Finally, give your score a title, enter the composer’s name, etc., and create a title page, if you want
one.
You can click Finish after any step, so you don’t have to make all of these decisions at the very
beginning if you don’t want to.
The dialog is so simple to use that you probably don’t need any help getting from one end to the
other, but since we want to set up a particular kind of score, let’s work through it together.
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Manuscript paper
The first page of the dialog lists many types of instrumentation in alphabetical order. Just like
selecting real manuscript paper in a store, you can choose between different shapes and sizes (at
the bottom), or pick paper that is pre-printed with standard groups of instruments.
If you’re writing for a standard ensemble, it’s a good idea to use one of Sibelius’s built-in
manuscript papers rather than defining your own, because the supplied ones have numerous help-
ful defaults, such as special instrument name formats, suitable staff sizes and so on, already set up
for you. (Later you can learn how to create your own manuscript papers.)
To start a string quartet score (which is what we want) it’s quickest to use the String quartet man-
uscript paper, but for the moment just choose Blank (which is, as the name suggests, completely
blank manuscript paper), because we want to learn how to create instruments.
When you click Next, Sibelius will ask you if you want to add instruments to your score. Click Yes.
Creating instruments
You can create new instruments whenever you like – you don’t need to decide them all at the start –
but you should pick at least one instrument initially otherwise you’ll have nothing to write music for!
Because Sibelius knows about so many instruments (more than 600), the Choose from list at the
top left of the dialog shows you more convenient selections from the whole set. By default, Sibelius
shows you the Common instruments, which number around 90; however, if you’re itching to
write for more obscure instruments such as Quint Bassoon, Ondes Martenot or Hurdy-Gurdy, click
All instruments to display the complete set. If you’re writing specifically for band, jazz or
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orchestral ensembles, choose the appropriate option from the list to see standard instruments used
in those ensembles. Don’t worry if you can’t find a particularly unusual instrument – Sibelius also
lets you design your own (b8.14 Edit Instruments in Reference).
The instruments are listed in the standard order in which they would appear in a score, but again
you can customize the order if you want to.
We’re going to input an excerpt from Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor, so we’ll need to add two
violin instruments, a viola and a cello. Choose Strings in the Family list, then Violin (solo) in the
Instruments list, and click Add twice to put two solo violin staves into the rightmost Staves in
Score list. Add the Viola (solo) and Violoncello (solo) instruments in the same manner and
then click OK. The instrument names for the violins aren’t correct, but you can fix that later on.
(You can see this dialog again at any time by choosing Create > Instruments, or by typing the
single key shortcut I. It’s very useful, as it allows you not only to add and remove instruments from
your score, but also to change their order at any time.)
House style
You’re now returned to the second page of the New Score dialog, which allows you to set the house
style of the score you’re about to create. You can think of the house style as the “look” or appearance
of your score; different publishers have different house styles, and Sibelius allows you to tweak the
look of your score in just about every imaginable way, from the fonts you use, to the size of the
staves and notes, to the most intricate details, such as the thickness of final double barlines!
We don’t need to worry about these details at the moment though, so you can leave (Unchanged)
selected in the list. If you want, take a look at the list of pre-defined house styles shown on the
screen; clicking on them in the list updates the preview display of your score. The names indicate
the music font (i.e. the design of the notes and other symbols) used in the house style, e.g. Opus,
and the main text font, e.g. Times. (You may like to experiment in future with different house
styles. The ones using the Reprise and Inkpen2 music fonts look handwritten – particularly suit-
able for jazz. And the Helsinki music font has a traditional engraved look.)
Leave the main text font at the default setting (Unchanged), and click Next.
Time signatures and tempo
The third page of the dialog allows you to choose a time signature and set the tempo of your score.
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Leave the time signature at the default choice, 4/4, and because we want a pick-up (upbeat) bar,
switch on Start with bar of length. Our pick-up bar is one sixteenth note (semiquaver) long, so
choose that from the menu. You can, of course, change time signature (and just about everything
else) at any point while working on your score, so we’re just setting the initial time signature here.
We need to add a tempo marking, so for Tempo text, type Allegro molto and switch on
Metronome mark to add a specific tempo. Our tempo is 132 quarter notes (crotchet) per minute,
so choose a quarter note from the menu and type 132. Now click Next.
Key signatures
The fourth page of the dialog allows you to choose a key signature. Choose Minor keys, then select
E minor from the left-hand list, and click Next.
Score info
The fifth and final page of the dialog allows you to enter some text, such as the title of the score, the
name of the composer/lyricist, and copyright information. The text is automatically added to the
first page of music, and if you switch on Create title page, Sibelius will add the title and
composer to an extra title page it creates for you, too – for now, leave this switched off, since we’ll
learn how to add a title page later on.
For now, enter Quartet for Strings as the Title, Edward Elgar, Op.83 as the Composer, and
click Finish. (As we mentioned earlier, you can in fact skip some of the steps when starting a score
by clicking Finish at any earlier point.)
A mere blink of an eye later, Sibelius has created your score, ready for you to start adding notes:
One detail to take care of: double-click the “Violin” instrument name on the first violin staff and
edit it to “Violin I”, then do the same for the second violin staff, changing it to “Violin II.” There!
Save your score
Don’t forget to save the score at this point! We’re going to need to input some scanned music into it
in the next chapter, so choose File > Save (shortcut Ctrl+S or XS), find a suitable location (e.g.
your Scores folder or the Desktop), give your score a name – such as Elgar – then click Save. On
Windows, the Scores folder is inside your My Documents folder; on Mac, the Scores folder is
inside your user Documents folder.
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2.2 Scanning
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 2 and make the 2 Scanning version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
Sibelius comes with a free scanning program called PhotoScore Lite, which scans and reads
printed music. If you have existing printed sheet music, or PDF files, you can scan and read the
music directly into Sibelius, ready to edit or transpose, play back, create parts and print – just as if
you’d inputted it yourself.
This chapter shows you how to turn the new score you just created into a full conductor’s score
from a set of string quartet parts. (If you don’t have a scanner attached to your computer, you can
still complete this chapter, since we’ll be scanning PDF files.)
Scanning in PhotoScore Lite
Before we go any further, you should make sure that you’ve installed PhotoScore Lite from your
Sibelius DVD-ROM.
In Sibelius, choose File > Scan with PhotoScore or click the Scan button on the toolbar
(shown here) to launch PhotoScore. When PhotoScore has opened, click the Open PDFs
button on the toolbar.
A standard Open dialog appears. Find the folder named Project Files in the example scores
folder, select the String Quartet - Violin I.pdf file and click Open.
Before PhotoScore scans and processes the PDF file, it allows you to choose the resolution (in dpi)
to scan at. Higher resolutions are scanned in greater detail, but take longer to process. Set your
own resolution by typing 600 into the text field then click OK.
PhotoScore now processes the file and automatically “reads” the scanned pages to work out what
the notes and other markings are.
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Editing scanned music
Once the music has been read by PhotoScore Lite, its interpretation of the first page of the violin
part pops up in the main window. Here you can edit any mistakes PhotoScore Lite has made.
The top part of the window (with a buff-colored background) shows you the original page. The
Full detail view window at the top right-hand corner shows a zoomed-in portion of the original
page, according to where you point your mouse.
The large bottom part of the window (with a light gray background) shows PhotoScore Lite’s
interpretation of the first scan – that is, what PhotoScore thinks the first page of the original says.
Hence this part of the window is where PhotoScore Lite’s mistakes can occur.
Notice that PhotoScore Lite has a Keypad in the bottom right-hand corner and a Create menu at
the top of the window. Both of these are similar in function to the Keypad and Create menu in
Sibelius, though features not appropriate for PhotoScore Lite have been omitted.
Let’s correct some of the mistakes by comparing the bottom part of the window with the original
scan at the top.
The pick-up (upbeat) bar at the start of the part has dotted red lines above and below the staff, fol-
lowed by a series of blue notes over the barline, showing the number of missing or extra beats. This
is because PhotoScore Lite has read the time signature as 4/4 and can’t understand why the bar is
only one sixteenth note (semiquaver) long.
Select the time signature in the output window (so that it turns light blue) and choose Create >
Time Signature (shortcut T) to choose a different time signature. Click Other and choose 1/16
from the drop-down lists. Make sure you switch on Invisible (for pick-up and irregular bars) so
that PhotoScore hides the time signature.
Notice how the rest of the bars in the piece turn red and show blue notes over the barlines. To
correct this, add a second time signature to the start of the first full bar of the part:
* Hit T again to create a time signature and choose 4/4, make sure Invisible (for pick-up and
irregular bars) is switched off, then click OK
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* The mouse pointer turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying” an object
* Click at the start of the first full bar to place the time signature there; the red dotted lines will
disappear.
Mistakes such as pitch can be corrected in Sibelius, but correcting key signatures and time
signatures is much easier in PhotoScore Lite, so we recommend that you do that before sending
the output score to Sibelius.
For more details on editing PhotoScore’s output, b1.5 Scanning in Reference.
Sending to Sibelius
Once you have edited all the pages in a score, you should send them to Sibelius. Choose File > Send
to > Sibelius (shortcut Ctrl+D or XD), or simply click the little Sibelius icon ( ) next to the
Save score button at the top of the output window.
The Open PhotoScore or AudioScore File dialog will appear in Sibelius – don’t worry about the
options here, just click OK and let Sibelius open the file for you. The violin part now appears in a
new score in Sibelius. We’re going to transfer it to the score we prepared in the first chapter of this
project:
* triple-click in the first bar of the violin part we just imported from PhotoScore Lite to select all
the music on the staff
* choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the music to the clipboard
* switch to the score we prepared earlier by selecting it from the Window menu, or by typing
Ctrl+Tab (Windows) or X~ (Mac)
* select the sixteenth note (semiquaver) rest in the pick-up (upbeat) bar of the Violin I staff
* choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to paste the music from the imported score into
the prepared score.
Instantly your score is filled with beautifully-written music including all appropriate accidentals,
slurs and ties; notice that Sibelius automatically adds bars into your score to fill with the copied
music. You may also have noticed that PhotoScore has shortened some of the slurs over notes –
don’t worry for now, we’ll correct this later.
Adding the remaining music
Now, you should use PhotoScore Lite to scan, read and send to Sibelius the remaining string parts:
String Quartet – Violin II.pdf, String Quartet - Viola.pdf and String Quartet - Violoncello.pdf.
The PDF files for each of these parts are located in the same folder as the part we already scanned.
Once you’ve sent them to Sibelius, copy and paste them onto the appropriate staff in the score we
created, just as we did for the music on the Violin I staff.
Save a version
At this point, you should choose File > Save Version or click on the toolbar button. Sibelius will
ask you to name your version and you can optionally add a comment to identify it later. Give this
version a memorable name, for example Version 1 - scanned input, then click OK.
We’ll be using this version later on to show how you can compare scores or versions quickly.
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2.3 Clefs, key signatures and tuplets
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Project
2 and make the 3 Clefs, key signatures and tuplets version into the Current version, by choos-
ing File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
The score we’ve just assembled is ready to be turned into an arrangement. We’ve already seen how
to use the New Score dialog to set up a score in Sibelius, but you can add the same information
after you’ve inputted music into a score and change it retrospectively. This chapter shows you how
to add clef changes, key signatures and tuplets (triplets, in this case) to an existing score.
Clef changes
When you create a score using Sibelius, the clefs are automatically added to the start of every sys-
tem so you don’t have to think about them. However, in certain situations, you may want to add a
change of clef to a staff. This can make it easier for a performer to read if the music strays too far
above or below the staff in the normal clef. Sometimes clef changes are for a short passage, maybe
a bar or less; at other times you may want the clef change to apply permanently from that point on.
In bar 15, the cello part suddenly has two very high notes, the Ab and G eighth notes (quavers) in
the second half of the bar. Let’s put a clef change before them to make the notes easier for the cellist
to read:
* Select the Ab eighth note (quaver)
* Shift-click the G eighth note (quaver) immediately after it to make a passage selection
* Choose Create > Clef (shortcut Q for “qlef ”)
* Select the tenor clef (fourth from the top) in the left-hand list and click OK
* Sibelius adds a small tenor clef and then automatically changes the clef back again after the
passage you selected. Notice how the notes are spaced further apart to allow room for the clefs.
Let’s add another tenor clef change for the cellist at bar 26; this time we’ll place it using the mouse:
* Hit Esc to make sure you have nothing selected
* Choose Create > Clef
* Select the tenor clef in the left-hand list and click OK
* The mouse pointer turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying” an object
* Click in the empty space at the start of bar 26 in the Violoncello staff
* Again, Sibelius adds a small tenor clef – this time, however, it’s been added to the very end of bar
25 on the previous system. Notice how the normal clef at the start of every system after this point
has changed into a tenor clef.
Change the staff back to a bass clef after the first quarter note (crotchet) in bar 28 in the same way.
Now add the remaining clef changes to the Viola and Violoncello staves in bars 43–44, referring to
the printout of the full arrangement that we made.
For more information, b2.11 Clefs in Reference.
2.3 Clefs, key signatures and tuplets
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Key signatures
You may have already noticed that towards the end of this excerpt, the music changes key,
modulating to A major; notice the increased occurrence of sharp accidentals on notes. We’re going
to add a key signature to bar 53, to show the key change.
* Hit Esc to make sure you have nothing selected.
* Choose Create > Key Signature (shortcut K)
* Select A major in the left-hand list and click OK
* The mouse pointer turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying” an object
* Click at the start of bar 53
* Sibelius creates a double barline and a key signature of three sharps. See that the sharp accidentals
in the following bars rendered unnecessary by the new key signature are automatically removed.
Clef changes and key signatures can be selected and copied, deleted or moved. If you drag a clef
change or key signature, you’ll see the Sibelius automatically shifts the music up or down, remov-
ing or adding accidentals as appropriate, so that the notes sound the same.
For more information, b2.20 Key signatures in Reference.
Triplets and other tuplets
Tuplets are rhythms which are played at some fraction of their normal speed – most commonly
they are triplets. We’re going to create some triplets in bar 30 of the Violin II staff, which were
missing in the scanned part:
* Select the bar rest and hit 3 (on the numeric keypad) to choose an eighth note (quaver)
* Type 8 G Shift-6 (use the 6 on the main keyboard, not the numeric keypad). This inputs a G#
eighth note, then adds a note a sixth below it, to make a two-note chord. (You could instead have
inputted the B below the staff, then typed 8 (on the numeric keypad) G to choose a sharp and
add the G above the B.)
* Now type Ctrl+3 or X3; a triplet bracket and number appear:
* Input two more notes to complete the triplet (a high E, top space of the staff, and another G#).
Notice how the bracket disappears automatically, which is the conventional notation for this case:
As you might expect, tuplets in Sibelius are intelligent: brackets are automatically hidden if the
notes within the tuplet are joined by a continuous beam, and the tuplet brackets (when they are
shown) are “magnetic,” sticking to the notes if they change pitch.
Finish adding the rest of the notes in this bar. You can type Ctrl or X with any number, e.g. 5 for a
quintuplet or 6 for a sextuplet; or for more complex tuplets such as 73:51 you can use the Create >
Tuplet dialog. For more information, b2.35 Triplets and other tuplets in Reference.
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2.4 Marking up a score
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Proj-
ect 2 and make the 4 Marking up a score version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
So far, we’ve assembled an excerpt from Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor, Op.83, III. Finale:
Allegro molto by creating an empty score, scanning the individual parts from PDF files and copy-
ing them into the score. Now we’re going to add some color and life to it, by marking the music
with dynamics, technique text, tempo markings, slurs and articulations.
This chapter shows you how to add these various markings, and we’ll observe how they interact
with Sibelius’s revolutionary collision avoidance system, called Magnetic Layout™.
Expression text
In the first project of this Handbook we learned how to add text dynamics, technique and tempo
markings. Using the printout of the score that we made earlier, let’s add the missing text dynamic
marks. As before, remember the following:
* Choose Create > Text > Expression (shortcut Ctrl+E or XE) to add text dynamics
* Hold down Ctrl or X as you type to produce bold text dynamics such as f, p, sf or rfz – holding
down Ctrl or X tells Sibelius to write the letters using the special bold characters which should
be used for dynamics
* Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a word menu of useful dynamic terms
appear (this is where you’ll find espress., dolce, poco, cresc. and dim.)
* Type any terms not shown in the word menu (e.g. risoluto, rubato, brilliante and appassionato)
straight into Sibelius to appear in normal italicized text.
By copying text dynamics from one staff to another, you’ll find that the process of marking up a
score becomes much quicker – you can use any of the copying methods we learned in the first
project of this Handbook. The fastest way is to select the text you want to copy, then Alt+click or
z-click where you want it to appear. If you want to copy a text object to its default position (i.e.
where it appears at when you create it with a note selected) rather than the exact place that your
mouse pointer is, then use Shift+Alt-click or xz-click.
Multicopying an object
Where all the staves in your score have the same dynamic marks (e.g. the ff at the start of bar 43, or
the sf at bar 53), you can save time by multicopying the dynamic across all the staves:
* Create the dynamic mark using Expression text (as above) on the Violin I staff
* Select the dynamic and choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy it to the clipboard
* Hit Esc to deselect
* Make a passage selection around the same bar in the remaining three staves
* Choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to copy the item to the start of the passage, one
copy on each staff.
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You can also multicopy several objects and paste them vertically across any number of staves –
doing this can save you a lot of time when marking up your scores.
Technique text
Now that we’ve added all the missing text dynamics, let’s add the technique instructions from the
printout:
* Choose Create > Text > Technique (shortcut Ctrl+T or XT) to add technique instructions
* Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a word menu of useful technique terms
appear (this is where you’ll find senza sord.)
* Type any terms not shown in the word menu (e.g. colla parte and ten.) straight into Sibelius to
appear in normal non-italicized text.
Tempo text
Once all the missing technique terms are added to your score, we can add the tempo markings. But
before we do, it’s important that we understand the differences between staff text and system text.
Expression and Technique text styles are both examples of staff text. This means that they apply
only to a single staff, and you should duplicate them on another staff if you want the same effect to
apply to any other instruments in a score.
System text, on the other hand, applies to all staves in the score. Tempo markings are examples of
this kind of text: if we add Tempo text to our score, it appears once above the system (and in scores
with many instruments it may also appear above another staff further down the score), but it
appears in each instrumental part.
Let’s add the missing tempo markings. First, the A tempo marking in bar seven:
* Select the seventh bar of the Violin I staff
* Choose Create > Text > Tempo (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T or zXT) to add tempo markings
* Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a word menu of useful tempo terms appear
* Click A tempo to add it to your score
* Hit Esc twice to stop editing and deselect the text.
In the same way, add the A tempo markings to bars 20, 56 and 60.
Hairpins and other lines
There are still dynamic markings and tempo instructions that appear on the printout that we
haven’t yet added to our score. These are different types of lines: hairpins (crescendo and diminu-
endo marks), slurs and ritardandos.
To add lines, simply select a note or other object in your score to tell Sibelius where you want the
line to start, then type L (or choose Create > Line) to open a dialog of different lines available.
In the excerpt we’re marking up, we’ll be creating hairpins and slurs, which have their own
shortcuts: H for a crescendo hairpin, Shift-H for a diminuendo hairpin and S for a slur.
Let’s start by adding the crescendo hairpin to the Violin I staff in the second full bar of the excerpt:
* Select the second note of the Violin I staff in the second bar after the pick-up (upbeat) bar
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* Type H to add a crescendo hairpin beneath the note
* Hit Space four times, to extend the hairpin a note at a time, until you reach the middle of the
bar, a sixteenth note (semiquaver) E. If you go too far, use Shift-Space to retract it again.
* Now select the ninth note in the same bar – also a sixteenth note (semiquaver) E – and Shift-
click the last note of the bar, to extend the selection to the end of the bar
* Type Shift-H to add a diminuendo: notice that it is automatically created to the same length as
the selection you just made. This is another time-saving tip.
Now you can go through the rest of the score, adding missing hairpins – you can multicopy hair-
pins onto multiple staves, in the same way as we did for text dynamics.
Let’s add the missing tempo lines:
* Select bar 19 of the Violin I staff by clicking on an empty part of the bar
* Hit L to open the Line dialog
* Scroll down the right-hand list of System lines until you reach poco rit.
* Choose the second instance of poco rit. (this line doesn’t display a dashed duration line after
the text)
* click OK to add the line to bar 19.
Add an identical poco rit. line to bar 59 in the same way, only this time select an eighth note
(quaver) halfway through the bar and hit L.
Finally, add a rit. line to the last bar of the excerpt – again, choose the second instance of rit. in
the System lines list so that a dashed duration line isn’t shown after the text.
For more on lines, b2.21 Lines in Reference.
Slurs
Slurs and phrase-marks are a special kind of line and – like hairpins – are so commonly-used that
they have their own easy-to-remember shortcut: S. Sibelius treats these identically, and calls them
all “slurs,” since a phrase-mark is actually just drawn as a big slur.
When we scanned the PDF files of the string quartet parts, PhotoScore Lite didn’t recognise the
slurs on the part (although the full version, PhotoScore Ultimate, can do this for you), so you’ll
need to add the missing slurs.
To place a slur, select the note you want it to start from and hit S. If you create a slur in the wrong
place, simply select it and hit Delete, then select the note or rest where you want the slur to begin
and hit S. As with extending hairpins, use Space to extend the slur a note at a time and Shift-
Space to retract it if you go too far.
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Try selecting a note at either end of a slur and moving it up and down – notice how the slur is mag-
netic, sticking as neatly as possible to the notes at either end. When you select a slur, notice how a
faint outline with six boxes appears around the slur. These boxes are called handles, and they give
you an enormous amount of control over the shape of a slur. Clicking on any of these points and
dragging it changes the shape in a particular direction.
You should be very careful to distinguish between slurs and ties between notes in your scores – ties
are added from the Keypad (see below) and behave very differently than slurs.
For more on slurs, b2.28 Slurs in Reference.
Articulations
In the first project in this Handbook, we learned how to add articulations to notes from the
Keypad, including staccato and tenuto marks, accents and ties. Hit F10 (or click on the
Articulations tab on the Keypad) to find more articulation marks on the fourth Keypad layout.
Here you can add wedges, bowing marks, marcato and staccatissimo marks and fermatas of
varying duration.
You can add articulations to notes in a multiple or passage selection, which can speed up the mark-
ing-up process considerably. For example, every note in bar three of the Violin I and Violin II
staves is played staccato:
* Click in an empty part of the third bar of the Violin I staff and Shift-click on the third bar of the
Violin II staff to make a passage selection
* Make sure that the first Keypad layout is displayed by hitting F7
* Hit the key on your numeric keypad that corresponds to the . (staccato dot) on the top row of
buttons on the Keypad. This adds a staccato mark to every note in the bar for both staves.
Now go through the excerpt, adding the missing articulations from the printout we made earlier.
You should find that most articulations you need are on the first Keypad layout, but you’ll need the
fourth Keypad layout to add these additional marks:
* Marcato markings in bars 8 and 38 of the Violin I staff;
* Marcato markings in bars 20, 22, 29 and 40 of the Violin II staff;
* Marcato markings in bars 9, 10, 21, 23, 40, and 49–52 of the Viola staff;
* Marcato markings in bars 49–52 of the Violoncello staff;
* Staccatissimo marks in bar 48 on all staves;
* A staccatissimo mark in bar 49 of the Violin II staff.
For more on articulations, b2.3 Articulations in Reference.
Comparing versions
Whether you’re a composer, arranger or music copyist, you may find it very helpful to be able to
compare the newly-marked up score with a previous version, in order to highlight any differences
once you’ve added detail to a score in this manner. Sibelius’s Compare window allows you to com-
pare two different scores – or two versions of the same score – and produce a summary of the dif-
ferences between them; if you like, you can also produce a very detailed comparison of every
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difference – very useful for proof-reading, or for documenting the development of a piece of
music.
To show the Compare window, choose Window> Compare, or click the button on the
toolbar (shown on the right).
At the top of the Compare window are two drop-down menus, from which you can select any
scores that you have open and the versions they contain. Let’s compare the score in its current state
with the version that you saved earlier:
* select the score title, e.g. Elgar (or whatever name you gave to your score when you saved it),
from the first drop-down menu (this compares the current version of the score)
* select – Version 1 – scanned input (or whatever name you gave to your saved version) from
the second drop-down menu:
(If you skipped the preceding chapters and opened the project file at this point, you should select
the 3 Clefs, key signatures and tuplets version in the second list.)
* Click the Compare button ( ) next to the drop-down menus
* Sibelius will analyze the versions and show dialog containing a brief summary of the differences
between the scores
* Click Close to view the detailed differences in the Compare window.
Notice how Sibelius displays the two versions you asked it to compare side-by-side. Double-
clicking in the Compare window on any of the differences found will move the view to that differ-
ence in both windows. Sibelius also adds a colored background to objects that have been added
(green), removed (red) or altered (orange).
Try comparing some of the other versions in the project scores to see how comprehensive the
comparison can be.
With this powerful tool you can even generate a detailed report of the differences Sibelius finds –
complete with screenshots of the scores – to open in your word processing software. For more on
versions and comparing scores, b5.22 Versions in Reference.
2.5 Layout and formatting
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2.5 Layout and formatting
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 2 and make the 5 Layout and formatting version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
Once you’ve inputted the notes in a score and finished marking it up, you’ll want to ensure that
your music is flawlessly presented. Since Sibelius adjusts the score layout as you add more music,
instruments, text and other objects, it’s best to wait until the score is fairly complete. Otherwise
your adjustments may have to be undone.
We’ve already noted some of the effects of Magnetic Layout, Sibelius’s collision avoidance and
detection feature, adjusting your score for you as you create and edit the music. Sibelius has a wide
array of tools and features to help you with formatting your music (formatting is the process of
laying it out onto pages).
In this chapter, we’ll learn how to create breaks, manipulate the page orientation and staff size,
change staff spacing and create title pages, all in order to produce a beautiful and elegant score.
Magnetic Layout
First, we’ll look at Magnetic Layout in action and show how Sibelius is able to recalculate the
positions of objects on the staff to prevent them overlapping each other or obscuring the notes.
Let’s see how this works:
* Select the F# sixteenth note (semiquaver), the penultimate note at the end of the first full bar of
the Violoncello staff
* Use 2 to lower the pitch
* As you move the pitch down, the dynamics below the staff move down to avoid the note.
Notice how Sibelius cleverly moves the whole line of dynamics together below the system, preserv-
ing their relative positions horizontally. Now, if you click on one of the dynamic marks (e.g. the
hairpin) to select it, you’ll see a dashed light blue line indicating that the dynamics are grouped
together, meaning Sibelius will move them together if any one of them needs to move to avoid a
collision. You’ll also see a set of gray shadow dynamics appearing across the system in the place
where the dynamics would normally be.
This works for all text objects, symbols, lines and other objects (e.g. chord symbols).
You can drag objects around on the staff and Sibelius will use the space available to ensure that they
don’t overlap or obscure each other. This is done intelligently, so that less important objects (such
as text, lines and symbols) move out of the way of more important objects (e.g. notes, accidentals,
rests, articulations etc.) which need to remain in fixed positions, usually closer to the staff.
You can also switch Magnetic Layout on or off for individual objects, so that they aren’t moved or
avoided, and “freeze” the positions in a score when you’re happy with the layout and want to prevent
objects from moving around magnetically. To learn how, b8.2 Magnetic Layout in Reference.
Now let’s look at the various formatting controls which are available in Sibelius.
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Breaks
Whether you’re composing, arranging or just copying out music, you will always want to go back
and change things, such as adding bars in the middle of music you’ve already written. Sibelius has
to react properly by reformatting the music that follows – which it does instantly.
One advantage of this instant reformatting is that there’s no command to add a new system or page
– this just happens as you go along.
Sometimes, however, you need a system or a page to end at a particular point – for example, in the
Elgar String Quartet excerpt, the A tempo marking at bar 7 marks the start of a new system,
because a system break has been added there.
To add a system break, select a barline and choose Layout > Break > System Break, or use the
shortcut Return (on the main keyboard). You should use this to open up the spacing if you think
the music on one system is too crowded, or conversely if you think that a system is too widely-
spaced relative to the system above (in which case you can add a system break to the previous
systemto move one of its bars onto the next system). Try adding system breaks to the score we’ve
been working on.
Sibelius also lets you add page breaks, which you should normally use only at the end of sections,
e.g. in a piece with several movements, or when the next section has a new title at the start. To find
out more, and to learn how to “lock” passages of music to stop them reformatting, b8.1 Layout
and formatting in Reference. In parts, Sibelius can even add breaks automatically in helpful
places – b8.4 Auto Breaks in Reference.
Document Setup
Another advantage of Sibelius’s instant reformatting is that you can make massive changes to
music you’ve already inputted – such as changing the page shape – and the layout of the whole
score is instantly updated accordingly.
To show an extreme example of the kind of formatting that happens all the time, let’s change the
orientation of the paper the score is shown on from portrait (taller than it is wide) to landscape
(wider than it is tall) format. Choose Layout > Document Setup (shortcut Ctrl+D or XD):
2.5 Layout and formatting
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Switch the orientation from Portrait to Landscape, see how it changes in the score preview on the
right of the dialog, and click OK. The score now looks like this:
Try decreasing the Staff size option to 4mm, and see how the music is reduced in size to fit onto
fewer pages.
You can also adjust the page size and margins from here. For full details about this dialog, b8.6
Document Setup in Reference.
Staff spacing
As you add more music to a score, you’ll quickly find that the page gets very busy and you need to
space staves further apart to give notes and other objects more room to move around in. There are
a number of ways to do this; try experimenting with these on your own scores.
The default distances between staves and systems are controlled by settings in House Style >
Engraving Rules, a dialog that allows you to change the appearance of most aspects of your score
in a single operation. Take a quick look at each page to get an idea of just how comprehensive the
options are, most of which you’ll probably never have to worry about. However, the Staves page
contains the staff and system spacing options, and you should always try adjusting these values
before making individual adjustments directly in the score.
Sometimes, however, it is useful to be able to increase the distance between staves within a single
system in order to avoid collisions involving very high or low notes. You can ask Sibelius to make
the best use of the space you’ve chosen between staves and systems by choosing Layout >
Optimize Staff Spacing. Sibelius now calculates the smallest distance to move the staves so that
objects on one staff no longer collide with those on another. Let’s try this out on the first page of
our score:
* Click on the pick-up (upbeat) bar of the Violin I staff to select it
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* Shift-click the Violoncello staff in the last bar of the bottom system of the first page
* Choose Layout > Optimize Staff Spacing
* Sibelius works out the best way to stop the music on one staff colliding with any other staves.
As a last resort, you may find that you need to manually resolve a collision on a single system,
which you can do by dragging the staves. Try this out: select a bar in the Violin II staff by clicking
on a blank bit of staff and drag it up and down – or use the shortcuts Alt+3/2 or z3/2 (hold Ctrl
or X for larger steps). Notice how Sibelius reformats the music as you move the staff.
You can change the spacing in this way between staves throughout your score, or for a single
system, or indeed for any other passage you select. If you make a mistake, you can use the Layout >
Reset Space Above/Below Staff options to reset the spacing to its default.
For further details on these and other sophisticated tools for altering staff spacing, b8.10 Staff
spacing in Reference.
Creating title pages
You can create a title page when you first create your score (as we saw in the first chapter of this
project) by switching on the Create title page option on the final page of the File > New dialog.
However, you can also create a title page at any point, so let’s do that now. Choose Create > Title
Page to see a dialog with options to choose how many blank pages to add at the start of your score
and other details you may wish to add. (Since we added title and composer credits in the File >
New dialog, Sibelius will automatically fill these in here, ready for you to add to the title page.)
Switch on the Include part name option to display “Full Score” at the top of the page, then click
OK to create a single title page with the title and composer text added.
Deleting title pages
When you create a title page – whether you choose Create > Title Page or add one from
the File > New dialog – a special layout mark appears at the start of the score (shown on
the left). If you can’t see this, check that View> Layout Marks is switched on.
To delete a title page the title page you just created, simply click on this layout mark to select it and
hit Delete. (Doing this will remove all blank pages from the start of your score, so if you want to
remove one of a number of blank pages, you should refer to b8.5 Breaks in Reference.)
As with all other editing functions in Sibelius, you can always undo any changes you make to title
pages – click Undo now to restore the title page we just deleted.
2.6 Dynamic parts™
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2.6 Dynamic parts™
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 2 and make the 6 Dynamic Parts version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
In the first project we learned about dynamic parts – the set of instrumental parts Sibelius creates
for every score, showing notation relevant to one instrument and automatically updating to match
the full score. It’s important to remember that if you edit or move anything in the full score, it also
changes in the part. However, if you move something other than a note or chord in a part, it doesn’t
move in the score; and it goes orange, to show that it’s now different in the part and score. This is
so you can tweak the position of markings in parts without affecting the layout of your score.
This chapter shows you how to create cues, edit the layout of parts, create new instrumental parts
and produce a simple piano reduction of the string quartet arrangement.
Parts window
The Parts window (choose Window> Parts, shortcut Ctrl+Alt+R or zXR) allows you to make
various changes to your parts individually, altogether, or to a specific selection of parts. You can
print multiple parts, adjust the automatic layout of parts, create new parts, remove or add staves
from existing parts, and so on, all from the Parts window. You can also view any part by double-
clicking on it in the Parts window.
Under normal circumstances, you should not need to worry too much about the existence of the
Parts window, so you can usually leave it switched off. However, to adjust the automatic layout of
parts or to cater for situations where a part needs to contain more than one instrument (e.g.
instrumental doubling or choral music), it is very useful. For full details, b7. Parts in Reference.
Cues
Cue notes are small notes included to help the player keep track of where they are, and are not
meant to be played. Cue passages can also indicate optional music, for example a harmonica solo
might be cued in a clarinet part with an indication to “play if no harmonica is available.”
Sibelius makes it simple to add cues to your parts; let’s try adding a cue:
* Make sure you are viewing the full score
* Select bar 8 of the Violin I staff by clicking on an empty part of the staff
* Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the music to the clipboard
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* Now select the corresponding empty bar of the Violin II staff
* Choose Edit > Paste As Cue (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+V or xzXV) to create a cue.
Hit W with the cue selected to view the Violin II part; hit Esc to deselect the cue and notice how
Sibelius has created small, cue-sized notes and other markings, added a bar rest in a separate voice
(but, as we’ll see, has hidden the cue in the full score) and indicated the cued instrument above the
staff. If necessary, Sibelius will also add automatic clef changes or octave transpositions, change the
staff type (to e.g. a guitar tab staff ) and copy lyrics.
Hit W again to return to the full score; the same bar on the Violin II staff appears to be empty but
the cue is simply hidden.
Layout of parts
In general, when editing a score you should first input music into the full score, rather than the
parts; and then tweak the position and design of things in the parts in the course of making final
adjustments.
Note though, that you can make layout changes such as moving staves, adjusting system and page
breaks and changing note spacing quite freely in parts – this doesn’t count as moving objects
around, because it doesn’t matter that the score and part end up with a quite different layout.
Sibelius will intelligently lay out your parts so that mundane tasks such as making suitable page
turns for players, adding system breaks at changes of tempo and section and the general justifica-
tion (spreading the music out horizontally or vertically to fill up a page to the margins) of your
parts are all handled without you having to do anything. This is all achieved by Sibelius’s Layout >
Auto Breaks feature. You have control over every automated aspect applied to the layout of your
parts, and if you are feeling particularly imperious, you can switch it off completely.
For more information, b8.4 Auto Breaks in Reference.
Create a new part
In situations where you need to rearrange a piece of music to incorporate different instruments,
the ability to create a new part from existing music is a huge time-saver. We’re going to create an
alternative bassoon part from the cello staff. Make sure the Parts window is open, then:
* First, click the New Part button ( ) in the Parts window.
* A dialog appears, which allows you to choose which staves the new part should contain
* Select Violoncello from the left-hand list and click Add to Part, then click OK
* you should now see a second part called Violoncello appearing in the Parts window; double-
click this to open it.
To turn this into a bassoon part, we need to add an instrument change; instrument changes can be
added to part of a score (for instrumental doubling) or can replace one instrument with another,
preserving the existing music:
* Choose Create > Other > Instrument Change (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+I or xzXI)
* The Choose from list shows convenient selections from the whole set of instruments (as in the
Create > Instruments dialog); choose Common Instruments, then from the Woodwind
family choose Bassoon and click OK
2.6 Dynamic parts™
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* The mouse pointer turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying” an object
* Click to the left of the initial barline, before the very start of the first system of music in the part.
The part is changed into a bassoon part automatically – notice how the instrument name appear-
ing at the top left-hand corner of the page is updated, as is the part name in the Parts window.
Creating a piano reduction
Sibelius comes supplied with over 100 useful plug-ins – extra features written in Sibelius’s built-in
programming language, ManuScript – designed to make repetitive tasks quicker by automatically
doing things which might otherwise be quite time-consuming. These automate all kinds of proce-
dures, such as adding chord symbols, harmonizing tunes, working out harp pedal changes or
proof-reading your music. If you’re that way inclined, you can even write your own plug-ins.
We’re going to use one of these plug-ins to create a simple piano reduction of our Elgar excerpt:
* Hit W to look at the full score.
* Choose Create > Instruments (shortcut I), and add a Piano instrument to the score.
* Triple-click on the Violin I staff to make a passage selection around the whole staff, then Shift-
click on the Violin II staff to select all bars on both staves.
* Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Reduce.
* In the dialog that appears, choose Use existing staff as destination, and choose Piano from
the drop-down list.
* Click OK, and the Reduce plug-in will condense the music from the two violin staves onto the
right-hand piano staff.
* Now triple-click on the Viola staff to make a passage selection around the whole staff, then
Shift-click on the Violoncello staff to select all bars on both staves.
* Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Reduce again.
* This time, in the dialog choose Piano~(2) from the drop-down list.
* Click OK, and the Reduce plug-in will condense the music from the Viola and Violoncello
staves onto the left-hand piano staff.
If you like, you can tidy up the piano part using the editing skills you’ve learned so far, or use Plug-
ins > Simplify Notation > Renotate Performance to simplify untidy passages.
Notice that Sibelius has already created a new Piano part, with the music from both piano staves
included in it.
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2.7 Exporting
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 2 and make the 7 Exporting version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
In Sibelius, you can export files, pages or smaller sections of your score into other programs, either
as a PDF or a graphics files in various formats. You can also copy and paste graphics directly from
Sibelius. In addition, Sibelius helps you publish music on the Internet, so other people can view it,
play it back, change key and instruments, and print it out, using Sibelius’s free Scorch plug-in.
This chapter shows you how to copy a graphic from Sibelius into another program (e.g. Microsoft
Word), and how to publish your music on SibeliusMusic.com.
Copying graphics to other programs
Let’s learn how to export snippets of music as graphics, using simple copy and paste.
* Make a passage selection around the whole of the first system of music
* Choose Edit > Select > Select Graphic (shortcut Alt+G or XG): a dashed box with handles
appears around the music
* Move the handles at the edges of the box to adjust its size, if necessary, by clicking and dragging
* Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the contents of the box to the clipboard
* Hit Esc to clear the selection
* Open the application into which you wish to paste the graphic (e.g. Microsoft Word)
* Choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV).
Et voila! If you find that the resulting graphic is not detailed enough, adjust Dots per inch on the
Other page of File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and redo the steps above.
Sibelius also allows you to export graphics as files in EPS, PNG, TIFF, BMP, EMF (Windows only)
and PICT (Mac only) formats. For details, b9.8 Exporting graphics in Reference.
Publishing music on SibeliusMusic.com
Once you have completed your score, make sure you have saved it. Now let’s publish it online:
* Choose File > Publish on SibeliusMusic.com
* You are shown a web page in your browser, into which you can enter all the various details about
your piece. You may be asked for your username and password, or be prompted to create an
account (see below).
* Once you have supplied all the information about your score, click Next
* Your score should appear in the SibeliusMusic.com site for all the world to see within 24 hours!
If you have not previously created an account with SibeliusMusic.com, click Join at the top left of
the web page and enter your details to create a new account.
With SibeliusMusic you can also sell your own music, upload and listen to live recordings, create
your own member pages, review scores, view bestseller charts and create your own online stores.
For more details, b5.19 SibeliusMusic.com in Reference.
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Project 3
Project 3
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3.1 Writing for keyboard
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3.1 Writing for keyboard
In this project, you will learn some of the important features to help you produce jazz and
commercial music: inputting complex keyboard music and writing for guitar; storing and re-using
snippets of music using the Ideas window; how to create chord symbols using text and MIDI input;
using repeat structures and producing horn arrangements; as well as how to make your scores
sound more realistic for making audio recordings.
The first chapter of this project builds on the note input skills we learned in the first project of this
Handbook, and shows you how to input more complex keyboard music with your MIDI keyboard
using Sibelius’s Flexi-time input.
Printout
First, choose File > Open (shortcut Ctrl+O or XO) and find the example score called Project 3 in
the Project Files folder in the example scores folder. Open this score. You should now see a com-
pleted arrangement of a funk tune called Urbane Filigree.
Since we’ll need to refer to a printout of this arrangement throughout this project, choose File >
Print (shortcut Ctrl+P or XP) and click OK on Windows or Print on Mac to print the score.
Within a few moments, a printout of Urbane Filigree should emerge from your printer. Hold on to
this printout, because you’ll be reading music from it when we edit our arrangement shortly.
Now, in order to carry on with the project, choose File > Versions > Edit Versions, then select the 1
Writing for keyboard version from the list and click Make Current. Click Yes to make this into
the current version and then click Close. You should now see an arrangement which is missing
music from the Electric Stage Piano and Electric Guitar parts.
Using a MIDI keyboard
To use Flexi-time you must have a MIDI device connected to your computer. To set up input and
playback in Sibelius, choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and go to the Input
Devices page.
For this chapter, we’re going to be using a MIDI keyboard. To learn more about setting up input
and playback with MIDI devices, b1.10 Input Devices in Reference.
Flexi-time Options
We’re going to learn how to play complex music into Sibelius using a MIDI keyboard using Flexi-
time input. If you would prefer not to record music into Sibelius in real-time, you can still input the
missing music using the step-time input method we learned in the first project of this Handbook.
If you don’t have a MIDI keyboard, skip on to 3.2 Writing for guitar on page 91.
We’re going to record the missing Electric Stage Piano part, so to ensure we get the best results,
choose Notes > Flexi-time Options (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+O or xXO). Choose None (non
rubato) from the Flexibility of tempo drop-down list, and switch off the Record into multiple
voices checkbox. Click OK to return to the score. If you want to slow the tempo down to make it
easier for you to record, drag the tempo slider on the Playback window to the left-hand side.
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Two-handed Flexi-time input
Place the printout so that you can clearly read the music on the Electric Stage Piano staves (or, if
you prefer, improvise your own part following the chord symbols above the staves on the printout).
Then select the first bar of the two adjacent Electric Stage Piano staves in the score: click the upper
staff, then Shift-click the lower staff so that both are selected; this tells Sibelius where to start from
and which instrument you want to record into. Now:
* Click the red button on the Playback window, or choose Notes > Flexi-time (shortcut
Ctrl+Shift+F or xXF).
* Flexi-time gives you at least a whole bar’s count-in by default – so in this case you should hear
one bar and three beats count-in to the pick-up.
* At the end of the count-in, try playing the next few bars smoothly, following the speed of the
clicks. As you play, the music you’re playing will appear in notation on the screen.
* When you reach the existing music in the upper staff at bar 9, simply stop playing with your
right hand.
* At bar 17, resume playing the right hand Electric Stage Piano part.
* When you want to stop recording, click the square stop button on the Playback window or hit
Space or Esc.
For more about recording Flexi-time input, b1.4 Flexi-time in Reference.
Simplify notation plug-ins
If you find that Flexi-time produces complicated notation and you want to simplify it, there are
two plug-ins you should try:
* Plug-ins > Simplify Notation > Change Split Point allows you to change the point at which
notes are split between the right-hand and left-hand staves of a keyboard instrument. If you
have passages in your recorded input where notes would be better suited to being on a different
staff, select the music on both staves and run the plug-in.
* Plug-ins > Simplify Notation > Renotate Performance allows you to tidy up unwanted rests,
overlapping notes or incorrect note durations. As we saw in Project 1, by selecting a passage in
both staves and running the plug-in, you can tell Sibelius to recalculate the Flexi-time
transcription and produce a rhythmically and visually simpler version.
If there are still any mistakes, you can use the editing techniques you have already learned to
correct the note values and pitches. You may also like to experiment with the other plug-ins in the
Plug-ins > Simplify Notation menu.
To learn more about plug-ins, b6. Plug-ins in Reference.
3.2 Writing for guitar
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3.2 Writing for guitar
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 3 and make the 2 Writing for guitar version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
Sibelius has a number of tools and features specifically designed to make it easier to write for
guitar. Among these is the ability to notate music using guitar tablature. Sibelius contains informa-
tion about all kinds of stringed instruments which can be notated using “tab” and displays the
correct number of strings and appropriate tuning, whether you want to write for a standard guitar,
four, five or six string bass guitar, lute or the more familiar bass balalaika! You can copy music
from notation staves onto a guitar tab staff – and vice versa; you can even change from a standard
notation staff to a tab staff in the middle of a system.
In this chapter, we’ll learn how to record music into Sibelius as standard notation and change it
into guitar tab, and how to input guitar tab.
(If you have a MIDI guitar, you should try to complete this chapter by using it to input notes into
Sibelius. Otherwise, you can use a MIDI keyboard or the alphabetic note input method we learned
in Project 1.)
Using a MIDI guitar
If you have a MIDI guitar (or a guitar with a hexaphonic pick-up and guitar MIDI interface)
connected to your computer that you want to use for this chapter, you should set up the input and
playback in Sibelius. To do this, choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and go
to the Input Devices page.
You should find your device’s name in the table at the top of the page and check that the Use
checkbox is switched on. You will need to change the Type value by clicking the drop-down menu
and choosing Guitar, rather than Keyboard; then select the number of strings.
To learn more about setting up input and playback with a MIDI guitar, b1.10 Input Devices in
Reference.
Input the guitar part
You should refer to the printout we made earlier to see the music we’re going to input.
If you have a MIDI device connected to your computer, record the guitar part as far as bar 20 using
Flexi-time input by selecting the first bar of the staff and choosing Notes > Flexi-time Input
(shortcut Ctrl+Shift+F or xXF) or clicking the red button on the Playback window.
Otherwise, use a combination of your preferred note input methods to enter the music up to bar
20: mouse input, alphabetic input, step-time input and the Keyboard/Fretboard windows. These
are not alternative “modes” of writing music that you have to switch on or off – you can change
input methods whenever you like.
Once you have inputted the guitar part, you’ll see that you need to change some of the notes and
chords to use a muted (cross) notehead. To do this, select the note or chord (hint: you can double-
click on a chord to select all the notes it contains) and type the shortcut Shift+Alt+1 or xz1 to
Project 3
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change the notehead to a cross. We’ll learn more about changing noteheads later in this project;
also b2.25 Noteheads in Reference.
Convert to tab
Sibelius can instantly turn standard notation into tab, using an instrument change:
* Choose Create > Other > Instrument Change (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+I or xzXI)
* Select Common Instruments from the Choose from list
* From the Guitars family, choose Electric Guitar, standard tuning [tab] and click OK
* The mouse pointer turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying” an object
* Click on the Electric Guitar staff at the very start of the first system of music, to the left of its
initial barline.
The notation staff is changed into a six-string tab staff automatically – notice how all the music is
converted into tab notation. You can still copy music to and from this tab staff using Alt+click or
z-click – Sibelius will transform copied music into the appropriate notation for the staff type.
Writing tab notation
Now we’ve seen how Sibelius can switch between standard and tab notation, let’s try inputting
some music from scratch:
* Select the bar rest in bar 21 of the guitar staff
* Hit N to start note input – make sure you have the first Keypad layout showing (hit F7 to be sure)
* Type 3 0 (on the numeric keypad) to input an eighth note (quaver) rest
* Hit 3 once to move up to the fourth string and type 4 (on the main keyboard this time)
* Add a staccato articulation from the Keypad
* Advance to the next position by typing 1 then type 4 (on the numeric keypad) to change to a
quarter note (crotchet)
* Hit 3 twice to move up to the second string and type 1 (on the main keyboard)
* Move up to the first string and type 1 again.
You should see the following:
Now input the remainder of the last four bars as tab, as shown below:
Let’s turn the guitar staff back to conventional notation – use an instrument change to turn the
staff back to Electric Guitar [notation].
.
4
.
.
4
1
1
.
.
4
.
.
4
1
1
3
0
0
4
1
1
. .
X
X
X
.
.
,
X
X
X
,
.
4
1
1
3
0
0
4
1
1
. ,
X
X
4
5
5
7
.
0
.
.
4
6
6
3
5
5
4
6
6
. .
X
X
X
.
.
,
X
X
X
,
.
4
6
6
3
5
5
4
6
6
. ,
5
6
7
7
4
5
6
6
s
3.3 Ideas and drum notation
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3.3 Ideas and drum notation
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 3 and make the 3 Ideas and drum notation version into the Current version, by choos-
ing File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
In this chapter we’ll explore one of Sibelius’s most powerful creative tools, the Ideas window, with
which you can save snippets of music of any length, called ideas, for later retrieval and re-use. You
can provide tags (or keywords) for each idea, making it easy to find them later on.
Not only does Sibelius allow you to capture your own creativity so quickly, but it also comes with
more than 1500 built-in ideas covering a variety of musical genres and many different instru-
ments, so if you’re stuck for inspiration or looking for something stylish to kickstart your creative
process, you’ll find something suitable in seconds.
Having already looked at writing for keyboard and guitar, we’ll also learn how to create drum
notation in this chapter. Using the Ideas window to help with writing for percussion can save you a
lot of time, as we’ll see.
Add a drum staff to the score
The score we’ve been working on so far has no drum staff in it, so let’s add one:
* Choose Create > Instruments, or hit the shortcut I
* From the Choose from list, select Common Instruments
* Choose the Percussion and Drums family and then select Drum Set (Rock)
* Click Add to Score, and Drum Set (Rock) will appear in the Staves in score list; click on it
there to select it
* Use the Down button to re-order Drum Set (Rock) so that it appears between 5-string Bass
Guitar and Synthesizer (a)
* Click OK to return to the score.
Now you should see a percussion staff added to your score, ready for you to write a drum part.
Auditioning drum ideas
Show the Ideas window, if it’s not already shown, by choosing Window> Ideas (shortcut
Ctrl+Alt+I or zXI). The Ideas window has two views, compact and detailed. By default it opens
in compact view, which looks like this:
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Try switching between Library, Score and All. When the Library button is switched on, you have
access to the more than 2000 built-in ideas. Try scrolling up and down the list.
Each idea shows a small preview of the music or other objects contained within it; normally you
will see two or three bars of one staff (although ideas can contain any number of bars or instru-
ments). Important tags are shown in the four corners around the notation preview: at the top left,
the idea’s name; at the top right the letter L appears if the idea is located in the library rather than
the current score; at the bottom left, the time signature of the idea; and at the bottom right, the
tempo of the idea.
To check how an idea sounds, simply click and hold the mouse button on it: the idea will play in a
loop repeatedly until you release the mouse button.
You can search for ideas that correspond to a particular style or genre by typing different tags at
the top of the window. This way you can quickly narrow the list of ideas down to ones that might
be suitable.
Try typing a few tags to get an inkling of just how many different ideas in a variety of styles and
genres are included with Sibelius: motown, funk, happy, melody, slow. Now, let’s use some ideas
suitable for the score we’ve just created; clear any tags you have typed from the top of the window
and click on the Score button. Near the top of the list you will see Urbane Funky Drum Loop 1.
Pasting an idea
So let’s use this idea for ourselves. First, select Urbane Funky Drum Loop 1 in the Ideas window;
notice how a border appears around it to show that it’s selected. Now copy it to the clipboard,
either by typing Ctrl+C or XC, or by clicking the Copy button at the bottom of the window. (You
can also right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) and choose Copy from the context menu.)
Pasting an idea into a score is just like any other kind of pasting: either select the place in the score
where you want the idea to appear, then choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV); or make
sure you have nothing selected, then choose Edit > Paste, and click in the score where you want the
idea to go. You could also click the Paste button at the bottom of the Ideas window. Select the first
full bar of the Drum Set staff in the score, and type Ctrl+V or XV to paste it in.
You should see that the idea we just pasted in matches the first four bars of drum notation after the
pick-up (upbeat) on your printout.
You can add the next bar of music by pasting the Urbane Funky Drums 2 idea into bar 5 in the
same manner.
Inputting drum notation
When inputting into percussion staves, you can use any of the note input methods we’ve already
learned, but for drum notation – which uses different types of noteheads – it is much quicker to
use step-time or Flexi-time input.
If you have a MIDI keyboard connected to your computer, you can simply play the pitch that
corresponds to the line or space on the staff (as if it’s a treble clef staff) and Sibelius automatically
chooses the correct notehead. (If you don’t have a MIDI keyboard connected, input the notes using
alphabetic input and see Changing noteheads below to change them manually.)
Let’s input the drum pattern in bar 6:
3.3 Ideas and drum notation
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* Select the bar rest in bar 6 and hit N to begin note input
* Hit 3 on the numeric keypad to choose an eighth note (quaver)
* On your MIDI keyboard, play the G above the staff; this corresponds to a closed hi-hat
* Notice how Sibelius changes the notehead to a cross:
* Input another three eighth note hi-hats
* Hit 2 on the numeric keypad to choose a sixteenth note (semiquaver)
* Play G on your MIDI keyboard twice to input two sixteenth note hi-hats.
In this way, continue to input the hi-hat notes for the rest of the bar; to add the circle symbol to the
open hi-hat note, simply hit F10 to choose the fourth Keypad layout, then hit . (on the numeric
keypad), which corresponds to the Harmonic/Open button. You can hit . again to remove the
circle symbol if you need to; make sure you hit F7 to return to the first Keypad layout to continue
inputting notes.
Sibelius can write up to four independent voices, or lines of notes and chords, on a single staff. The
voices are color-coded: voice 1 (which we’ve used so far) is dark blue, voice 2 is green, voice 3 is
orange, and voice 4 is pink; you’ll rarely need to use more than two voices at a time.
In order to add the bass drum and snare pattern so that their stems always point down while the
hi-hat note stems point up, we’ll be using voice two:
* First, hit Esc to make sure you have nothing selected
* Now type Alt+2 or z2 to switch voices, or click 2 on the row of buttons at the bottom of the
Keypad
* Choose a sixteenth note by hitting 2 on the numeric keypad
* The mouse pointer turns green, to show that it is “carrying” an object which will be inputted in
voice 2
* Now click the mouse pointer near the start of the sixth bar, pointing at the F space, the bottom
space on the staff:
Finish adding the bass and snare drum pattern to bar 6 using your MIDI keyboard as before.
For lots more detail about voices, b2.36 Voices in Reference.
Changing noteheads
If you enter notes into a percussion staff using alphabetic input, Sibelius doesn’t change the note-
heads automatically for you, so let’s learn how to do that manually by inputting the same pattern in
bar 7, this time using the computer keyboard:
* Select the bar rest in bar 7 and hit N to begin note input
* Hit 3 on the numeric keypad to choose an eighth note (quaver)
,
, . , .
,
,
, . ,
, ,
.
, , , , ,
,
, , ,
Project 3
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* Type G on your computer keyboard; make sure it goes above the staff
* Input another three eighth notes by hitting R
* Hit 2 on the numeric keypad to choose a sixteenth note (semiquaver)
* Type G on your computer keyboard twice to input two sixteenth note
Now that you’ve added the hi-hat notes, input the bass drum and snare pattern in voice 2:
Sibelius allows you to filter a selection, which means that you can select a set of objects with
particular characteristics. Let’s try this now:
* Select bar 7 so that it is surrounded by a blue box
* Choose Edit > Filter > Voices > Voice 1 (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+1 or xzX1)
* Sibelius makes a multiple selection of only the notes in voice 1, i.e. the hi-hat notes.
Now any edits you make will only apply to the selected notes in voice 1. So let’s change the note-
head:
* Change the notehead by typing Shift+Alt+1 or xz1
* All the notes change to display a cross notehead:
Alternatively you can choose the notehead from the menu in the Notes panel of the Properties
window. If you can’t see the Properties window, you can switch it on by choosing Window>
Properties (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+P or zXP).
To learn more about noteheads, b2.25 Noteheads in Reference.
Capturing an idea
Now let’s try making a new idea. The process of putting an idea into the Ideas window is called
capturing an idea:
* select bar 7 so that it is surrounded by a blue box
* choose Edit > Capture Idea (shortcut Shift-I), or click on the Capture Idea button ( ) at the
bottom of the Ideas window.
The music you selected immediately appears at the top of the list in the Ideas window, so you can
re-use it later.
Editing an idea
You can edit both the music and the tags of ideas.
To try out editing tags, select the idea you just captured in the Ideas window, then click the Edit
Idea Info button ( ) at the bottom of the window (or right-click (Windows) or Control-click
, ,
,
, ,
,
,
,
,
.
, , , , ,
,
,
,
,
, , ,
, ,
,
, ,
,
,
,
,
.
, , , , ,
,
,
,
,
, , ,
3.3 Ideas and drum notation
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(Mac) on an idea in the list and choose Edit Idea Info from the context menu). A simple dialog
appears:
* Give your idea a new Name here; type Urbane Funky Drums 1
* You can also type a few tags into the Tags box: there’s no limit on what you can type, so use as
many words as you can think of that will help you to find your idea again later on
* Click Color to show a color picker and choose a new background color for your idea. Again, you
can use color to categorize your ideas and to make it easier to find them again later on.
* When you’re satisfied with your choices, click OK to close the Edit Idea Info dialog.
To edit the music in an idea, select your idea again in the Ideas window, then click the Edit Idea
button ( ) at the bottom of the window (or choose Edit Idea from the context menu). A new
document window will appear, as if you had opened another score. You can edit it just like any
other score, e.g. adding or deleting notes and bars, adding text, lines and other markings, and so
on. When you have finished editing your idea, simply save it by choosing File > Save (shortcut
Ctrl+S or XS), then close the window by choosing File > Close (shortcut Ctrl+W or XW) to
return to your original score.
If you want to discard any unsaved changes in your idea, simply choose File > Close, then click No
when asked if you want to save your changes.
We’ve barely scratched the surface of what you can do with ideas. So don’t forget – b5.11 Ideas
in Reference.
Repeat bars
Often, drum and other percussion parts are made up of repeated patterns of one or two bars’
length. Rather than copying the same bar out numerous times, arrangers often add a repeat bar
symbol. This tells the performer to play the exactly the same pattern as the previous bar. Sibelius
understands this and plays back repeat bars just as a real performer would.
Let’s add a tambourine part to the score to learn how this works:
* Choose Create > Instruments, or hit the shortcut I
* From the Choose from list, select Common Instruments
* Choose the Percussion and Drums family and then select Tambourine
* Click Add to Score
* Select Tambourine from the Staves in score list and use the Down button to re-order it so that
it appears between Drum Set (Rock) and Synthesizer (a)
* Click OK to return to the score.
Now you should see a percussion staff added to your score, ready for you to write a drum part.
Next, click the Score button in the Ideas window and find the Urbane Tambourine 1 idea from
the list. Copy and paste this idea into bar 9.
To add a repeat bar symbol, select bar 10 of the tambourine staff and hit F11 to view the fifth
Keypad layout. Now hit 1 (on the numeric keypad) to add a single repeat bar. Keep typing 1 until
you reach bar 16.
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Notice that you can also add 2- and 4-bar repeats from the fifth Keypad layout. Sibelius will pla
back all these different kinds of repeats.
For more about repeat bars, b2.27 Repeat bars in Reference.
Finish the percussion parts
Input the remainder of the music on the Drum Set and Tambourine parts, referring to the printout
we made earlier. Use the Ideas window, repeat bars and multiple voices to help you finish inputting
the percussion parts.
3.4 Chord symbols
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3.4 Chord symbols
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 3 and make the 4 Chord symbols version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
In Sibelius, a chord symbol consists of two parts that describe the harmony at that point in the
music: chord text, and a chord diagram. Chord diagrams show the player which fingers need to be
on which fret on each string of a guitar; they are sometimes known as chord boxes, fretboard grids,
guitar frames and so on.
You can input chord symbols in one of two ways: by typing them directly into the score, or by
playing the notes they describe on a MIDI device. You can then choose whether to show either or
both parts of the chord symbol.
In this chapter, we’ll learn how to input and edit chord symbols by typing, how to play and adjust
MIDI chord symbol input and how to use some of the chord symbol plug-ins. To learn more about
chord symbols, b2.10 Chord symbols in Reference.
Creating chord symbols by typing
Sibelius lets you add chord symbols to your score very easily by typing.
* Click the note or chord above which you wish to place the chord symbol – for this example,
select the first full bar of the Electric Stage Piano staff.
* Choose Create > Chord Symbol (shortcut Ctrl+K or XK).
* A flashing caret appears above the note you selected.
* Type in plain English versions of the chords you want to see appear; Sibelius will create any
special symbols automatically as required to render the chord symbols consistent and legible.
Try typing Ab13(#11).
* Hit Space to advance to the next note or beat, or Tab to move to the start of the next bar.
Sibelius creates the appropriate chord symbol, using special sharp and flat characters as well as
many other special characters; in this case, you should see Ab13(#11).
However, the fastest way to input chord symbols is by playing them on a MIDI device and letting
Sibelius work them out for you.
Creating chord symbols by playing
Sibelius can recognize over 600 chord types by the notes they contain, so you can use your MIDI
keyboard (or guitar) to quickly input chord symbols into a score.
(You must have a MIDI device connected to your computer to play chords into Sibelius. If you don’t
have a MIDI device connected, simply type the chord symbols into the score, as above.)
Let’s try this out:
* Select the third full bar of the Electric Stage Piano staff
* Choose Create > Chord Symbol (shortcut Ctrl+K or XK)
* A flashing caret appears above the first note
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* On your MIDI keyboard, play a chord of C major
* Sibelius inputs a C chord symbol and advances to the next beat.
You can play a huge range of chords – from simple triads through to extremely complex extended
chords – and Sibelius will intelligently notate the best corresponding chord symbols. Try playing
various combinations of notes on your MIDI keyboard to see how they’re notated.
By default, Sibelius uses the voicing of the chord that you play to determine not only the chord
type, but also the specific way in which the chord is notated, e.g. if you play the chord in one of its
inversions, Sibelius will produce a chord symbol with an altered bass note, e.g. D/F#. For more
details on customizing Sibelius’s chord recognition, b8.13 Edit Chord Symbols in Reference.
Holding Ctrl or X, select the chord symbols you just created and delete them or use Undo to
remove them from the score. We’re now going to input the chord symbols for the chords used in
Urbane Filigree. These are quite complex chords, so here are the notes you will need to play to get
the corresponding chord symbols:
   
   
   
   

A¨13(#11) D¨13(#11) G¨13(#11) A13(#11)
F7½ B¨‹7 E¨13(#11) E‹9
A¨Ø7 D¨7½ G¨/A¨ A¨13[áÁ]
F©Ø7 B7(#5) B13(b9) F13(#11)
E13(#11)
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3.4 Chord symbols
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Finish adding the chord symbols to the score, referring to the printout we made earlier. You can
play them in on your MIDI keyboard or type the chord names, according to your preference.
Equivalent chord text
Sibelius automatically picks the best chord symbol for a set of pitches, but sometimes you may
want to see a different chord type. To see other possibilities for the same pattern of intervals, sim-
ply select the chord symbol (or chord symbols) whose chord type you want to change, then choose
Edit > Chord Symbol > Equivalent Chord Text (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK), or right-click
(Windows) or Control-click (Mac) and choose Equivalent Chord Text from the Chord Symbol
submenu.
To change, e.g. G#7 for Ab7, see Respelling a chord symbol, below.
Let’s try this:
* Select the Ab13(#11) chord in the first bar of the Electric Stage Piano staff
* Type Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK to change to the next equivalent chord text
* The chord type changes to D7[ïíî Î]/G#
* Type Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK to change to the next chord symbol
* The chord type changes to Gbmaj13[åÂsus2]/Ab
* Keep changing the chord text in this way until you cycle back to Ab13(#11) again.
In this way, you can quickly change the chord text of a chord symbol if Sibelius hasn’t chosen the
text you prefer, or if the voicing you play suggested a different type of chord.
Now you should check that the chords you inputted are all correctly notated; if you need to, change
them by typing Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK. To edit an existing chord symbol, simply double-click it, or
select the symbol you want to change, hit Return (on the main keyboard) to edit it. Then, either
play it again on your MIDI device, or type the correct plain English text.
Respelling a chord symbol
Sibelius automatically “spells” a chord according to the prevailing key signature, but there will be
occasions where you want to change a chord symbol root note for its enharmonic equivalent with-
out changing the chord type. Let’s see how this works:
* Select the chord symbol that you want to be respelled
* Right-click and choose Chord Symbol > Respell Chord Symbol from the context menu, or
choose Edit > Chord Symbol > Respell Chord Symbol
* The chord symbol’s root note (and any alternate bass note, if the chord is a slash chord) will be
respelled using the enharmonic equivalent.
Copying chord symbols
We’ve seen how chord symbols appear on a keyboard staff, but when you copy chord symbols to
other instruments Sibelius knows whether show a chord diagram or not, and even updates them
automatically to show the correct transposition on transposing scores.
Let’s copy the chord symbols you’ve just inputted:
* Triple-click on the top staff of the Electric Stage Piano to select it throughout the score
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* Choose Edit > Filter > Chord Symbols to select only the chord symbols
* Copy the chord symbols to the guitar staff by Alt+clicking or z-clicking at the start of the first
full bar of the Electric Guitar staff
* Copy the chord symbols to the bass guitar staff by Alt+clicking or z-clicking at the start of the
first full bar of the 4-string Bass Guitar staff.
At this point, it is worth noting that you can multicopy chord symbols across any number of staves;
simply copy the chord symbols you want to duplicate to the clipboard using Ctrl+C or XC, then
select the staves you want them copied to and type Ctrl+V or XV.
Revoicing chord diagrams
Sibelius automatically assigns a chord diagram to every chord symbol shown on a guitar staff.
These are either taken from a built-in selection for standard 6-string guitar tuning – chosen for
their ease of playing – or automatically calculated based on the notes the chord contains. This
means that even if you use special guitar tunings, Sibelius will provide you with a wide selection of
playable shapes for a particular chord type.
You can change the chord diagram that Sibelius chooses by default – just as you can change the
default chord symbol Sibelius picks when playing a MIDI device. To do this, simply select the
chord symbol (or chord symbols) whose chord diagram you want to change, then choose Edit >
Chord Symbol > Revoice Chord Diagram (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+K or xzXK), or right-
click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) and choose Revoice Chord Diagram from the Chord
Symbol submenu.
Let’s try this:
* select the Ab13(#11) chord in the first bar of the Electric Guitar staff
* type Ctrl+Shift+Alt+K or xzXK to revoice the chord diagram shown – try this a few times to
see the voicings Sibelius can generate for you
To learn more about how to determine the chord type or chord diagram that Sibelius should show
by default and how to change the appearance of chord symbols, b2.10 Chord symbols and
b8.13 Edit Chord Symbols in Reference.
Chord symbol plug-ins
Sibelius features some very useful plug-ins to help you work with chord symbols.
To add simple accompaniments from existing chord symbols try running Plug-ins > Chord
Symbols > Realize Chord Symbols. This uses the chord symbols in your score to create piano or
guitar accompaniments in a variety of accompaniment styles.
If you want to add chord symbols to existing music without playing or typing the symbols in, use
Plug-ins > Chord Symbols > Add Chord Symbols to let Sibelius choose the chord symbols for
you, based on the harmony of your music.
3.5 Repeats and codas
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3.5 Repeats and codas
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 3 and make the 5 Repeat structures and codas version into the Current version, by
choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking
Make current.
This chapter looks at how to change the form of your music with repeat barlines, 1st and 2nd-time
endings and codas. When playing back your scores, Sibelius plays all of these common repeat
structures – just as a performer would.
Repeat barlines
We’re going to repeat the first four bars of the piece, using repeat barlines. Let’s begin by adding a
repeat barline to the end of the repeated section:
* Click on the barline at the end of bar 4; it turns purple to show that it is selected
* Choose Create > Barline > End Repeat
* The barline immediately changes to a repeat barline, to denote the end of a repeated section.
In this context, this repeat barline instructs the performer to return to the start of the score and
repeat from there, which will include the pick-up (upbeat) bar too. To mark the start of the
repeated section, we need to create another repeat barline:
* Choose Create > Barline > Start Repeat
* The mouse pointer turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying” an object
* Click on the barline at the start of the first full bar to place the start repeat barline.
* Hit Esc to deselect everything, then hit P to play from the start of the score.
Sibelius now plays up to bar 4, then returns to bar 1 again before carrying on through the rest of
the score.
1st and 2nd ending lines
For more complex repeated sections, composers and arrangers use 1st and 2nd endings which are
only played on the first or second pass through a repeated section. In Sibelius, 1st and 2nd ending
lines are system lines – they behave in the same way as the tempo lines we used in Project 2.
Let’s create a repeat with 1st and 2nd endings; we need to insert a bar to use as the ending for the
first pass of our repeat section:
* Begin by selecting the end repeat barline we added earlier and hit Delete to remove it
* Ctrl+click or X-click on bar 4 in any staff to make a system selection – a purple double-box will
appear around all the staves
* Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC)
* Select bar 8 of the Trumpets in Bb staff, which we’ll use as the ending for the second pass of our
repeat section
* Choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to paste the copied bar into the score. The new bar
is inserted in between the existing bars, i.e. it becomes bar 8.
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* With this bar still selected, hit L to open the Create > Line dialog
* Choose the first line in the right-hand list of System lines, this is the 1st ending line
* Click OK to add the line to bar 8:
The line is added to the top of the score, but will appear above bar 8 in each individual part. Now
let’s add the end repeat barline and 2nd ending line to complete the repeat structure:
* Click on the barline at the end of bar 8; it turns purple to show that it is selected
* Choose Create > Barline > End Repeat
* The barline immediately changes to a repeat barline
* Select bar 9 of the Trumpets in Bb staff
* Hit L to open the Create > Line dialog
* Choose the third line in the right-hand list of System lines, this is the 2nd ending line
* Click OK to add the line to bar 8.
You may wish to shorten the lines to prevent them overlapping – do this by clicking on the end-
points and dragging with the mouse, or by using the 0 and 1 keys (don’t forget, you can use Ctrl
or X to move by a larger amount in this way):
Coda and dal segno (D.S.) repeats
Let’s create a simple coda and “dal segno” (D.S.) repeat; we’ll turn bars 22–25 into the coda section:
* Select the barline at the start of bar 22
* Choose Create > Barline > Double to add a double barline, which denotes a section end
* Choose Layout > Break > Split System to create a gap after the double barline. Notice how
Sibelius automatically restates the clefs, key signatures and braces for you.
* Select the rest at the start of bar 22 of the Trumpets in Bb staff
* Choose Create > Text > Tempo (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T or zXT)
* Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see the word menu
* Select the first of the two coda signs (Ø) from the list of suggested words and symbols
* Type the word Coda and hit Esc.
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3.5 Repeats and codas
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Now let’s add the dal segno repeat. When the player reaches the end of bar 21, we’ll instruct them
to jump back to bar 14:
* Select the double barline at the end of bar 21
* Choose Create > Text > Other System Text > Repeat (D.C./D.S./To Coda)
* Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see the word menu
* Choose D.S. al Coda from the list of suggested words and symbols
* Hit Esc to deselect
* Ctrl+click or X-click on any staff at bar 14 to make a system selection – a purple double-box will
appear around all the staves
* Hit Z to open the Create > Symbol dialog
* Select the first of the two segno symbols ($), shown at the top of the dialog, in the row labeled
Repeats
* Make sure that the Attach to option is set to System
* Click OK to create the symbol in the score
* Drag the symbol above the staff to an appropriate position at the start of the bar. (The difference
between symbols and other objects is that you can position symbols anywhere you like, enabling
you to override any of Sibelius’s positioning rules.)
Now, if you play back your score, Sibelius will follow the repeats we’ve added. To learn more about
using repeat structures, b4.6 Repeats in Reference.
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3.6 Arranging and playback
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 3 and make the 6 Arranging and playback version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
In this chapter we’ll learn about one of Sibelius’s useful arranging tools: the Arrange™ feature,
which you can use to automatically re-arrange music for different instruments. We’ll also learn
how to change the sounds Sibelius uses to play your score back, add effects and produce an audio
file of your score.
Add string backings
Using the existing Synthesizer part in the Urbane Filigree score, we’re going to create some simple
string backings.
* Add string parts to the score by choosing Create > Instruments (shortcut I).
* Make sure you have selected Common Instruments from the Choose from list, then select
Strings from the Family list.
* Click on Violin 1 to select it, then hold Ctrl or X and select Violin 2, Viola and Violoncello.
* Click Add to Score to add all the selected instruments to your score.
* Click OK to return to the score.
Sibelius’s Arrange feature is designed to assist with arranging and orchestration, and can save you
lots of time. You’ll see the potential for writing any kind of music right away:
* Click in an empty space in bar 10 of the top Synthesizer staff to select it
* Now Shift-click on the last bar of the other Synthesizer staff, so that both staves are enclosed
within a single light blue box
* Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the music to the clipboard
* Select bar 10 of the Violin 1 staff by clicking on an empty bit of staff
* Shift-click on bar 10 of the Violoncello staff to select all the string staves together
* Choose Notes > Arrange (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+V or xXV)
* From the dialog that appears, choose Standard Arrangement, and click OK.
Sibelius arranges the music onto the string staves in your score, intelligently splitting the music up
between the instruments
Arrange intelligently copies music from any number of staves into any other number of staves. It
can be used to produce piano reductions, and to “explode” chords onto multiple staves. Most
importantly of all, this sophisticated feature also helps you arrange and orchestrate for a wide vari-
ety of styles and ensembles.
For more details, b5.1 Arrange™ in Reference.
Mixing your score
As we learned in Project 1, the Mixer window is an extremely powerful tool for controlling the
way Sibelius plays back your scores. Here, you can change the sounds used to play back each of the
3.6 Arranging and playback
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instruments in your score, add effects such as reverb and chorus, edit specific parameters to adjust
each instrument’s sound and balance the overall mix of your score.
Firstly, we’re going to use the Mixer to mute the Synthesizer staves, since we no longer need them
now that we’ve arranged the music from them for our string section.
* Hit M to open the Mixer window, if it’s not already showing.
* Scroll down until you find the Synthesizer (a) and Synthesizer (b) staff strips.
* Click the Mute button ( ) on the right of both strips – you need to click it twice; one click
partially mutes the staff, the second click mutes it fully:
Now try playing back your score. You should hear that the string parts have replaced the
Synthesizer sound.
Adjust the volume of the staff strips to balance the string parts. If you want to change the volume of
the whole string section together, switch on the group strips ( ) at the top of the Mixer window.
This shows group strips for each family of instruments in your score. Adjusting these changes the
relative volume and pan of the whole family.
Changing instrument sounds
You can choose which of the sounds available on your computer Sibelius should use to play back
each individual instrument. Let’s change all of the string sounds to use solo instruments rather
than ensemble; this will give our score a smaller, more intimate feel:
* Scroll down the Mixer window until you find the Violin 1 staff strip
* Click the arrowhead to the left of the instrument name, which expands the staff strip
* Click on the arrow next to the read-out that currently displays (Violin Ensemble Lite (GPO))
* A menu appears, displaying the playback devices that Sibelius can use; we’re going to use
Sibelius Sounds Essentials
* Choose Essentials > Strings > Violin > Violin Solo Lite (GPO) to change to a solo violin sound:
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Now change the Violin 2, Viola and Violoncello staves in the same way, so that they use the Violin
Solo 2 Lite (GPO), Viola Solo Lite (GPO) and Cello Solo Lite (GPO) sounds respectively. To
close up any of the staff strips in the Mixer, simply click again on the arrowhead to the left of the
instrument name.
Try playing back your score again to hear the difference – you may want to adjust the balance to
suit the new sounds.
Effects parameters
Each instrument sound has up to six effect parameters, which are controlled by faders shown
underneath the expanded staff strip:
Expand all the staff strips in the Mixer window by Shift-clicking on one of the arrowheads to the
left of the instrument names.
Try adjusting the faders to change the different effects and listen to the change in Sibelius’s
playback. If you want to return a fader to its default setting, just double-click it. (Note that this
doesn’t apply to the Reverb and Chorus knobs, just the horizontal faders.)
To learn all about how to use the Mixer to change Sibelius’s playback, b4.3 Mixer in Reference.
Exporting an audio file
Using VST/AU virtual instruments, such as Sibelius Sounds Essentials, Sibelius allows you
to export your score as an audio file at the click of a button. You can burn audio files
directly to CD, or convert them into other formats, such as MP3, allowing you to give
recordings to conductors or performers to give an idea of how the music sounds, or even for
practicing along to.
Let’s export an audio file of Urbane Filigree:
* Choose Play > Move Playback Line to Start (shortcut Ctrl+[ or X[) or click the corresponding
button on the Playback window
* Choose File > Export > Audio or click the toolbar button, shown above right
* Choose a Filename for your audio file and click OK
* Sibelius records your score as an audio file and saves it in the same folder as the score.
For more information, b9.10 Exporting audio files in Reference.
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Project 4
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4.1 Setting up a worksheet
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4.1 Setting up a worksheet
This project shows you how to use some of Sibelius’s many educational features, which enable you
to create worksheets and teaching resources and manage classroom use of Sibelius.
The first chapter of this project looks at setting up a worksheet from scratch in Sibelius and saving
the template to re-use again. You’ll learn how to change the text font for a whole score, and how to
edit the properties of different types of text.
Worksheet Creator
The extensive Worksheet Creator feature (b5.25 Worksheet Creator in Reference)
automatically produces thousands of different kinds of worksheets, exercises, posters, flashcards
and reference materials for students at all levels. So, before writing your own worksheet, see
whether the Worksheet Creator already has one that is suitable, or that you can quickly adapt.
If not, the Worksheet Creator also includes a variety of worksheet templates in different formats
with empty bars for you to fill in. Even this can save quite a bit of time, so again, if a suitable tem-
plate is provided then use it rather than creating a worksheet completely from scratch.
(To access these templates, choose File > Worksheet Creator and on the dialog that appears,
choose Template and click Next. The list of available worksheet templates appears on the left
hand side; we’re going to create our own worksheet though, so click Cancel.)
Creating a worksheet from scratch
If you want to create a worksheet from scratch instead of using one of the templates, you will need
to be familiar with the layout tools available in Sibelius, chiefly adjusting staff spacing and creating
system or page breaks (both of which you can learn more about in Project 2 of this Handbook).
We’re going to use these skills – and learn some new ones – to create a sample worksheet template,
which we’ll add to the templates in the Worksheet Creator.
Let’s start by setting up a new score:
* Choose File > New or click the toolbar button
* The New Score appears
* Choose the Blank manuscript paper and click Change Instruments
* In the dialog that appears, ensure that Common Instruments is selected in the Choose from list
* Choose the Others family and select Unnamed (treble staff) from the list of available instruments
* Click Add to Score and then OK
* Click Finish to close the New Score dialog and create a score.
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You should see this:
Now let’s add some more bars and create the initial page layout:
* Choose Create > Bar > Other (shortcut Alt+B or zB)
* In the dialog that appears, set Number of bars to 43 and click OK
* The mouse pointer turns dark blue, to show that it is “carrying an object”
* Click anywhere in the score to add the new bars
* Hit Esc to deselect everything
* Choose Layout > Auto Breaks
* In the dialog that appears, switch on Use auto system breaks and choose Every 4 bars
* Click OK and your score should instantly update to lay out the score.
Before we continue with our template, choose House Style > Engraving Rules (shortcut
Ctrl+Shift+E or xXE). This opens the Engraving Rules dialog, which you can use to make vari-
ous changes to the settings in your score. Any adjustments you make to a note or other object here
will apply to every note or object of the same type in the score. We need to make two adjustments:
* On the Bar Numbers page, set Frequency to No bar numbers, which stops bar numbers from
appearing in the worksheet.
* On the Staves page of the dialog, set Justify staves when page is at least n% full to 100%.
This gives you complete control over the vertical positioning of staves when laying out your
worksheets, because it stops Sibelius from automatically spacing the staves evenly down an
entire page as it fills up.
You should only ever disable vertical justification as you have done here when you are creating a
worksheet, exam paper or other kind of special music example: vertical justification is always
desirable when you are producing every other kind of score. Take the time to read the advice in
b8.10 Staff spacing in Reference.
Click OK to close the Engraving Rules dialog.
We can also adjust the size of the staves, so that all the bars fit onto a single A4 page:
4.1 Setting up a worksheet
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* Choose Layout > Document Setup (shortcut Ctrl+D or XD)
* Change the Staff size value to 6mm or 0.24 inches, as appropriate
* Click OK to return to the score.
Adding text
Let’s add a title and some placeholder text for a student to write their name:
* Choose Create > Text > Title
* The mouse pointer turns blue to show that it is carrying an object
* Click at the top of the first page and type “SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS”
* Hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect
* Choose Create > Text > Subtitle
* The mouse pointer turns blue to show that it is carrying an object
* Click at the top of the first page and type “Worksheet 1”
* Hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect
* Choose Create > Text > Special Text > Worksheet header (first page, r)
* The mouse pointer turns blue to show that it is carrying an object
* Click at the top of the first page and type “Name: __________” and hit Return to start a new line
* Type “Class: __________”
* Hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect.
You should see this:
Edit All Fonts
We’re going to change the text in this worksheet so that it uses a clear and legible font:
* choose House Style > Edit All Fonts
* change the Main Text Font to Verdana by selecting it from the drop-down list.
Now the text should look like this:
From now on, all text that you add to the worksheet will default to using the Verdana font.
Name: __________
Class: __________
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- - - -
Worksheet 1
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS
Name: __________
Class: __________
/
- - - -
Worksheet 1
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS
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Editing a text style
When you want to change the properties of a certain type of text, you should edit the text style.
This specifies the font, size, position and other characteristics for a type of text.
In the worksheet we’ve set up, let’s edit the Title and Subtitle text styles, so that the text is left-
aligned on the page:
* Click on the title to select it
* Choose House Style > Edit Text Styles (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+T or xzXT)
* In the list of available text styles, Title should be selected; click Edit
* On the Horizontal Posn page, choose Left under Align to page and click OK
* Select Subtitle from the list of available text styles and click Edit
* On the General page, switch on Italic
* On the Horizontal Posn page, choose Left under Align to page and click OK
* Click Close to return to the score:
Add to worksheet templates
Let’s add this score to the other available templates in the Worksheet Creator. This will make it
available for you to use in the future, saving you the time it takes to prepare the template.
* Choose File > Add to Worksheet Creator.
* Choose Template from the Type options and give your worksheet a name, e.g. Scales and
arpeggios.
* If you want to add any other information which would help you identify this template in future,
type this into the Description (for teacher) box.
* Click OK to add the worksheet to the list of templates and return to the score.
Next time you open File > Worksheet Creator and view the list of templates, the Scales and
arpeggios template we just created appears in the list.
Name: __________
Class: __________
/
- - - -
Worksheet 1
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS
4.2 Scales and arpeggios
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4.2 Scales and arpeggios
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 4 and make the 2 Scales and arpeggios version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
In this chapter we’re going to learn how to use plug-ins to quickly create a set of scales of the same
type, ready for practicing, revising or assessing. We’ll look at respelling pitches as their enhar-
monic equivalents, e.g. changing G# to Ab, and re-inputting pitches to change scale types; using all
of these tools you can quickly produce a vast array of scale sheets with very little effort.
Adding scales
We’re going to use one of Sibelius’s powerful plug-ins to create a sheet of scales in all keys in just a
few clicks, which will form the basis of the worksheet exercises we’ll create in this project. Let’s add
major scales in all keys:
* Choose Plug-ins > Other > Scales and Arpeggios
* In the dialog that appears, make sure that you choose Add scales and arpeggios to current
score and click Next
* Choose Major Scales from the drop-down menu and click Next
* A dialog appears with many different options for the scales that will be added to the score; you
can choose whether to show ascending or descending scales, the range of octaves spanned, the
starting note and note lengths and many more options
* Make sure that the Scale Type is set to Major and that the Include key signature option is
switched on
* Choose All except octave from the Number of scales or arpeggios drop-down list, and
Chromatic from the Interval of start notes drop-down list. This adds major scales starting on
all pitches from C through to B.
* Click Finish and Sibelius will add the scales to your score.
You should see major scales ascending and descending over two octaves, with a boxed text label
identifying each scale. Sibelius automatically adds the key signature before each scale and starts
the next scale on a new system.
Respelling enharmonic accidentals
You can instantly change between any enharmonic accidentals by selecting a note or notes and
hitting Return (on the main keyboard). Let’s change the D# major scale to Eb major:
* Select the four bars of D# major
* Hit Return to respell all the accidentals
* Hit Esc to deselect the notes.
The key signature is now incorrect, so let’s change it:
* Hit K to open Create > Key Signature
* Choose Eb major from the right-hand list and click OK
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* The mouse pointer turns blue
* Click at the start of the first bar of the new Eb major scale to create the key signature there
* Double-click on the label above the staff (or select it and hit Return) to change the text to read Eb
Major:
Sibelius places a key signature change on the previous system, but this isn’t necessary in our work-
sheet, so let’s hide it:
* Select the key signature change in the last bar of the previous system (after the double barline); it
turns purple to show that it is selected
* Type Ctrl+Shift+H or xXH to hide the key signature change
* To restore the way in which the notes and double barline were spaced, select the entire bar and
choose Layout > Reset Note Spacing (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+N or xXN).
For more about hiding and showing notes and other objects, b5.9 Hiding objects in Reference.
Now respell the E# major scale as F major (you may wish to respell the Fb pitches as E again after-
wards) and the A# major scale as Bb major, hiding the key signature changes in the same way. Don’t
forget to change the labels!
Changing a scale
If you want to change an existing scale to another type of scale, there are two easy ways to do this in
Sibelius. You can re-input the pitches while using the same rhythms, or use another plug-in.
Notice how we’ve ended up with two F major scales because we respelled the E# major scale. Let’s
change the second F major scale into a F# major scale by re-inputting the pitches:
* First, change the key signature to F# major, hiding the key signature change as before
* Select the first note of the scale, the F natural
* Choose Notes > Re-input Pitches (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+I or xXI)
* A dotted caret appears (rather than the normal solid line), which tells you that Sibelius will
overwrite the existing pitches, but not their rhythms
* Play a scale of F# major ascending and descending over two octaves on your MIDI keyboard, or
type F G A B C D E F G A B C etc. (Sibelius will automatically sharpen every note because of the
key signature)
* Change the boxed text label to F# Major.
You should now see this:
If you want to transform the character of a scale, e.g. from major to harmonic minor, Sibelius has a
useful plug-in to instantly do this:
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4.2 Scales and arpeggios
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* Select the four bars of D major scale
* Choose Plug-ins > Transformations > Transform Scale
* In the dialog that appears, the Current scale should be set to D Major (Ionian)
* Change the New Scale drop-down list to F Harmonic Minor and click OK.
The notes are transformed into a completely different type of scale (although you will still need to
change the label and key signature):
You could also add the note names beneath the staff to help students learn a scale. Simply select
the bars you want to add note names to, and choose Plug-ins > Text > Add Note Names to let
Sibelius automatically add the name of each pitch above or below the staff.
To learn more about Sibelius’s range of powerful plug-ins, b6. Plug-ins in Reference.
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4.3 Layout and formatting
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 4 and make the 3 Layout and formatting version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
This chapter looks at how to perform some of the more complex layout and formatting skills you
may want to use in order to create unfinished worksheets for students to complete. We’ll learn how
to set up exercises for students to complete a scale, copy a scale onto a staff with a different clef and
identify a scale type.
Adding another staff
First, we’ll add a viola staff, with an alto clef:
* Choose Create > Instruments
* From the Strings family, select Viola and click Add to Score
* Select Viola in the right-hand list and use the Down button to move it below Unnamed (treble
staff)
* Click OK to return to the score.
The staves will be quite squashed up on the page, so select the double barline at the end of a system
about two-thirds of the way down the page, and choose Layout > Break > Page Break.
Now delete the instrument name appearing at the start of each system by selecting it and hitting
Delete. You will need to do this once for the first system, and a second time for the subsequent
systems.
You may also wish to hide the cautionary key signatures which are created at the end of the
systems on the Viola staff. To do this, select the key signature at the end of the system so that it
turns purple, and then type Ctrl+Shift+H or xXH.
Incomplete scales
Let’s create some unfinished scale exercises, to be completed. First, triple-click on the treble staff to
select everything, then Alt-click or ?-click on the viola staff to copy all the scales across, then move
the pitches down an octave by typing Ctrl+? or ??. Now we can remove material from the score
where we want students to complete the scale:
* Select the last three bars of Viola staff F harmonic minor scale and remove them by hitting
Delete
* With the bars still selected, hide the bar rests by typing Ctrl+Shift+H or xXH. (If you are
making a worksheet to give to students as a printed handout, you could just hide the notes rather
than deleting them, since they won’t be printed. This also means that Sibelius will leave enough
space for students to write the correct notes in.)
* Hit Esc to deselect everything.
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You should see a completed F harmonic minor scale on the treble staff and the first eight pitches
only on the viola staff, followed by three empty bars:
Now, let’s do the same for the Eb major scale, but this time we’re going to hide the entire treble staff:
* Once you’ve laid out the incomplete viola version of the Eb major scale following the same steps
as above, select the four bars of the treble staff version of the same scale
* Hit Delete to remove all the notes
* Choose Layout > Hide Empty Staves (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+H or xzXH)
* The treble staff part disappears, leaving only the viola staff behind:
In this way, you can provide hints to help complete the unfinished scales or simply remove the
pitches for a student to write out themselves.
Using the layout skills we’ve just learned, change some more of the scales into exercises.
* Delete the E major descending scales on both staves and hide the rests.
* Delete the middle two bars of the F major scale on the viola staff, hide the bar rests, remove the
scale from the treble staff and hide the treble staff completely.
* Add a page break between the E major and F major scales (you can remove a page break by
choosing Layout > Break > Page Break again).
* Add another page break between the G# major and A major scales.
* Delete the F# major, G major and G# major scales from the treble staff and hide the bar rests.
* Delete the A major, Bb major and B major scales from the viola staff and hide the bar rests.
Dragging and indenting staves
Our worksheet doesn’t yet have any questions on it, so we’re going to add some tasks for
completion. First, however, we’ll need to move the systems apart or indent them to make space to
fit the text in between.
Let’s use the C major and C# major scales as examples. We’ll indent the systems to place some text
to the left of them:
* Choose View> Handles (this shows small rectangles on objects like staves, barlines, note stems,
etc. to indicate that you can drag them to change their position)
* Click on the rectangle at the start of the first bar of the treble staff
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F Harmonic Minor
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* Drag the staff until the first barline is level with the end of the “and” in the title we added earlier:
In the same way, drag the start of the system with the C# major scales to the same point:
Before we add any text, drag the treble staff with the F harmonic minor scale down to make some
room between it and the staff above. To do this, simply click on an empty space in the staff and drag.
In the same way, drag the viola staff with the Eb major scale and the treble staff with the E major
scale to make room above them.
Adding text to a worksheet
Since there are many types of text which you may want to add to a worksheet (questions, quotes,
examples, explanations, etc.), Sibelius’s plain text style is the best choice for adding text.
Any plain text which you add to this worksheet will appear in the main text font (which we
changed to Verdana earlier) without any special music characters or symbols, so that you can treat
it like typing into a word processor.

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C Major
Worksheet 1
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS
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Name: __________
Class: __________



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Worksheet 1
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS
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Let’s try this out by adding an explanation to the left of the first two scale examples that we just
indented:
* Choose Create > Text > Other Staff Text > Plain Text
* The mouse pointer turns blue
* Click to place the text so that the flashing caret appears level with the top of the first staff and in
line with the title
* Simply type and hit Return (on the main keyboard) to move to a new line where the text begins
to overlap the staff. Type the following:
The maj or scale is one of t he most import ant scales in West ern Classical music.
You should complete all of the unfinished scales in this worksheet. Fill in the missing pitches for
the treble clef and alto clef staves.
* hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect.
Now let’s create some more plain text to add explanations above the different types of scale, in the
same way add type the following above the F harmonic minor scale:
The harmonic minor scale is also very import ant in West ern Classical music and many ot her
musical t radit ions. Complet e t he F harmonic minor scale below by copying t he not es int o
t he alt o clef:
Then, above the Eb major scale:
Finish t his Eb maj or scale in alt o clef:
And finally:
Complet e t hese E maj or scales in t reble and alt o clefs:
Plain text is useful in a wide range of contexts, because it appears exactly where you click the
mouse pointer to place it, so you can place text anywhere on a page.
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4.4 Classroom Control
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called
Project 4 and make the 4 Classroom control version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
If you have a network license version of Sibelius, running on the Sibelius Licence Server, there are a
host of features available for teachers that enhance the experience of using Sibelius in the class-
room. This chapter shows you how to quickly distribute work to students or collect the score
they’re working on. We’ll also learn how to quickly compare a student’s work against the completed
answer sheet.
Distributing work using the Sibelius Licence Server
To access Sibelius’s classroom control features, choose File > Classroom Control and enter the
teacher password that you set up in the Licence Server Control Panel. The dialog that appears
shows you a list of computers connected to the Licence Server and the score they are currently
working on.
Let’s send the worksheet we’ve been creating to all the other students in the classroom:
* Click Select All to select all the students listed
* Click Send Current Score.
Sibelius distributes the score across the network to all the connected computers.
You can send any score to a whole class like this (click Send Other Score if you don’t have one
open), or you if you want to send work to an individual student, simply select their name from the
list and click Send Current/Other Score.
Retrieving scores using the Sibelius Licence Server
In the same way that you can distribute work across a network, you can also collect students’ scores
at the click of a button. Let’s retrieve the completed worksheets from all the students:
* Click Select All to select all the students listed
* Make sure that the Save and open retrieved scores radio button at the right-hand side of the
dialog is chosen
* Click Get Score.
Sibelius collects the scores from each connected computer across the network and saves them to
your computer, then opens each one.
To find the scores, open your Scores folder: inside a folder called Student Scores are separate
folders for each student, containing their score.
You can retrieve a score from any individual student in the same way, by selecting their name from
the list and clicking Get Score.
For more details, b5.3 Classroom Control in Reference.
4.4 Classroom Control
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Switching between scores
When you open all your students’ scores, you may find that changing between them is quite
confusing. Sibelius adds the student’s username to the end of their score filename, so you can see at
a glance which scores are open by clicking on the Window menu and looking at the open files
listed at the bottom.
To quickly change between open scores, you can use a handy keyboard shortcut. Type Ctrl+Tab or
X~ to switch to the next open score. Ctrl+Shift+Tab or xX~ switches to the previous open
score.
Comparing completed worksheets
You can use Sibelius’s Compare window to quickly view the differences between a student’s
completed worksheet, and the answer sheet!
If you can’t see the Compare window, switch it on by choosing Window> Compare (shortcut
Ctrl+Alt+C or zXC):
Let’s compare a student score against the answers. (If you didn’t retrieve a student’s score, you can
simply complete the worksheet yourself – be sure to put some mistakes in and see if you get caught
out!)
* Open the Project 4 example score.
* From the Compare window, choose the student’s completed worksheet from the Compare drop-
down list.
* Choose the – Finished Worksheet version in the Project 4 file from the With drop-down list.
* Click the Compare button ( ).
* Sibelius displays both the scores side-by-side and shows a summary of the differences. From
these differences, you should be able to tell if the student hasn’t correctly completed the work-
sheet.
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* Click Close to return to the scores. The Compare window now shows a list of the differences
between the two worksheets:
Double-click on any of these differences in the list to view the relevant bars in both scores. Sibelius
also draws a colored background behind objects that have been added (green), removed (red) or
altered (orange).
With this powerful tool you can quickly see which students have been unable to complete an
exercise, and even generate a detailed report of the differences Sibelius finds – complete with
screenshots of the scores – to open in your word processing software. For more on versions and
comparing scores, b5.22 Versions in Reference.
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Project 5
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5.1 Using video
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5.1 Using video
With Sibelius, you can add a video to your score that will remain synchronized with playback,
allowing you to write music to picture without having to worry about SMPTE, LTC, striping or any
other synchronization technological nasties – all you need is your computer, which makes it ideal
for use in schools, at home and in professional environments.
This project introduces some of the ways in which you can use video inside Sibelius, such as
creating hit points, displaying timecode on your score and fitting music to picture with plug-ins.
You’ll also learn about how you can export audio from Sibelius to use as a soundtrack for a movie
in your video editing software, e.g. Pinnacle Studio.
The first chapter of this project looks at attaching a video to an existing score.
Sibelius can use both Windows Media Player and QuickTime (if you have it installed) on Windows
to play back videos, and QuickTime on Mac. Therefore, any video file that your operating system
can play back should also work fine in Sibelius. For a full list of formats that your operating system
should typically support, b4.10 Video in Reference.
First, choose File > Open (shortcut Ctrl+O or XO) and find the example score called Project 5 in
the Project Files folder inside your example scores folder. Open this score.
This is the original score written by Howard Goodall for an excerpt from the animated TV series
featuring the well-known comedy character, Mr Bean.
Before we add a video file to the score, you should make the 1 Using the video feature version
into the Current version, by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the
list, and clicking Make current.
Adding a video to a score
To add a video to the score:
* Choose Play > Video and Time > Add Video
* The Mr. Bean video file is in the same folder as the Project 5 score; select it and click Open.
The video will appear in Sibelius’s Video window, showing whichever frame happens to fall at the
current position of the green playback line.
With the video attached, hit Space to start playback, and watch how Sibelius plays back the score;
you should also watch the animated Mr. Bean clip carefully, since we’ll be trying to fit the music to
the actions of the characters later in this project.
Notice how the video plays in sync with the score at all times, even when you drag the tempo slider
to adjust the playback speed. The video will also remain in sync if you move the timeline slider on
the Playback window – try it and see!
The Video window
To show or hide the Video window, choose Window> Video, or use the shortcut
Ctrl+Alt+V or zXV. You can also click the toolbar button shown on the right.
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The video already contains some dialogue, but you can set the level so that it is comfortably mixed
with the level of the score you are working on. Simply adjust the position of the volume slider on
the Video window as appropriate. When set to its leftmost position, the video’s soundtrack will be
inaudible.
You can adjust the size of the video window using the four buttons to the left of the volume control
on the Video window itself. They will resize the video to 50%, 100%, 200% of its original size, and
full-screen mode respectively. Alternatively you can use the menu items in the Play > Video and
Time submenu.
Finding videos
The Internet is the best place to look for videos to write music for. There are many web sites with
adverts or movie trailers which you could download to use as additional source material for
student composition projects.
You could also write music for videos that you’ve made yourself – later in this project we’ll learn
how to take a Sibelius score and make it into a soundtrack in your video editing software.
5.2 Writing music to picture
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5.2 Writing music to picture
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Project
5 and make the 2 Writing music to picture version into the Current version, by choosing File >
Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
To add the video to this version, choose Play > Video and Time > Add Video and select the Mr.
Bean video file from the same folder as the Project 5 score.
The video will appear in Sibelius’s Video window, showing whichever frame happens to fall at the
current position of the green playback line.
This chapter teaches you how to use timecode and hit point tools and plug-ins to fit the music to
picture.
Add timecode and duration
Timecode means the position in time of a point in a score or video. It is usually measured from the
start of the score, or in film/TV scoring from the start of the reel or some other convenient point.
When you play back a score, a timecode read-out is displayed in the Playback window, together
with a read-out of the current tempo in beats per minute (b4.1 Working with playback in
Reference).
Hit points are time references in the score that pinpoint important events that occur in a film or
video, to make it easier for you to write music that fits in with these points.
Sibelius can display timecode automatically as text in your score. It calculates the time position of
barlines based on the number of bars, bar lengths and metronome marks up to that point. Time-
code is particularly useful for working out precise timings of particular passages of music, or for
synchronizing musical events with hit points (events in a film).
Let’s add timecode to appear above every system in the score, as well as a marker with the
calculated duration:
* Choose Play > Video and Time > Timecode and Duration:
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* Choose the At start of every system radio button to tell Sibelius to display timecode on each
system
* Switch on Duration at end of score
* Change the Units setting to Frames (01:23:04:15) to calculate the timecode based on the
number of frames per second. (This is the standard format used for film/TV scoring.)
* Make sure that the number of frames per second is set to 24 and click OK to return to the score.
You should now see a timecode read-out displayed above every system in the score. Sibelius will
recalculate the timecode as you change tempo, add or remove bars, or change bar lengths, and so on.
Add hit points
When you add a hit point to your score, it is added at the current position of the playback line. You
can add a hit point by clicking the Add Hit Point button ( ) on the Video window, or by choos-
ing Create > Other > Hit Point. A hit point is added above that point in the score; Sibelius will
recalculate the position of any hit points in your score as you change tempo, add or remove bars, or
change bar lengths – just like timecode.
We’re going to identify specific points in the Mr. Bean clip where the music should coincide with
the action, each time the workmen drop the piano:
* Make sure that the playback line is at the beginning of the score, and hit Space to play
* Every time you see the workmen put down the piano in the Mr. Bean clip, click the Add Hit
Point button.
At the end of the score you should have created five hit points. They should be approximately at
these points:
* Hit 01 – 00:00:27:00
* Hit 02 – 00:00:40:01
* Hit 03 – 00:00:50:12
* Hit 04 – 00:01:00:19
* Hit 05 – 00:01:07:23
Don’t worry if the hit points you add are not exactly at the times shown above, or if you add too
many hit points, because we’re about to learn how to adjust and remove hit points.
Editing hit points
Let’s edit the hit points we just added to the score by choosing Play > Video and Time > Hit Points
(shortcut Shift+Alt+P or xzP):
* In the dialog that appears, you should see a list of the hit points we just added
* To change a hit point’s timecode, click once on the Timecode value to select it, then click again
to type in the precise values shown above
* Hit Return (on the main keyboard) to apply the change.
You can edit a hit point’s Name in the same way, so change all of the hit points from, e.g. Hit 01 to
Piano Drop 01, etc.
5.2 Writing music to picture
133
P
r
o
j
e
c
t

5
You can also delete any hit point by selecting it and clicking Delete, or create a new hit point by
clicking New. When you’ve finished editing, click OK to return to the score.
To learn more, b4.11 Timecode and hit points in Reference.
Fit existing music to picture
You can change the tempo of your score to ensure that musical events coincide with the action in a
video clip, but Sibelius has a useful plug-in to do this for you:
* Make a passage selection in the Bassoon staff from the start of bar 8 to the first note in bar 12
* Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Fit Selection to Time
* Change the Set end of selection to option to Time of selected hit point
* Choose Piano Drop 01 from the drop-down list and click OK
* Sibelius calculates the change in tempo needed to make the hit point coincide exactly with the
gap in the music, and displays a summary of the changes made. Click Close to return to the
score.
* Now if you play back the score, you’ll notice that the video and the sound are perfectly
synchronized, since the workmen drop the piano on the second beat of bar 12!
* In the same way, make a passage selection from the second beat of bar 12 to the third beat of bar
16, then change the Set end of selection to option to coincide with the Piano Drop 02 hit
point.
Do the same for the last three hit points, so that they occur at these points:
* Piano Drop 03 on the second beat of bar 20
* Piano Drop 04 on the eight note (quaver) rest before the last beat of bar 23
* Piano Drop 05 on the eighth note rest before the second beat of bar 26.
Finally, make sure that the ending happens as Mr. Bean smiles to himself:
* Make a passage selection from the eighth note rest in bar 26 to the first beat of bar 29
* Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Fit Selection to Time
* Change the Set end of selection to option to New end time
* Enter 0 Hours 1 Minutes 17 Seconds and click OK.
Now play back the entire score to see the results.
Project 5
134
5.3 Adding a soundtrack to video
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Project
3 and make the 3 Adding a soundtrack to video version into the Current version, by choosing
File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current.
To add the video to this version choose Play > Video and Time > Add Video and select the Mr.
Bean video file from the same folder as the Project 5 score.
This chapter shows you how to export a score you’ve created from Sibelius as an audio file, so that
you can add it to a video of your choice as a soundtrack, using your favorite video editing program.
Exporting an audio file
Using virtual instruments, such as Sibelius Sounds Essentials, Sibelius allows you to export
your score as an audio file at the click of a button. You can burn audio files directly to CD,
or convert them into other formats, such as MP3, allowing you to give recordings to
conductors or performers to give an idea of how the music sounds, or even for practicing along to.
Let’s try exporting an audio file of the Mr. Bean soundtrack:
* Choose Play > Move Playback Line to Start (shortcut Ctrl+[ or X[) or click the button on the
Playback window
* Choose File > Export > Audio or click the toolbar button, shown above right
* Choose a Filename for your audio file and click OK
* Sibelius records your score as an audio file and saves it in the same folder as the score.
For more information, b9.10 Exporting audio files in Reference.
Open a movie in your video editor
At this point, you should launch your favorite video editing software. We’ll look at how to use
Pinnacle Studio (Windows only) to do edit a video, but you could also use iMovie, Windows Movie
Maker or many other programs.
Open the movie that you want to add a soundtrack to.
Add soundtrack in Pinnacle Studio
Click on the 2 Edit tab.
To add music, click on the treble clef icon (sixth tab) on the left side of the video album. Browse for
the audio file you exported from Sibelius and drag it to the corresponding track on timeline – also
marked with a treble clef.
Finishing off your movie in Pinnacle Studio
Click on the 3 Make Movie tab.
To save your movie to your hard drive for websites, emailing, or presentations, select AVI, MPEG,
Stream, or Share as File Type. Then click Create file and choose a location to save your movie.
To burn a DVD, insert a recordable DVD and click on the Disc tab. Click Create disc to burn your
movie.
135
Index
This index refers to this Handbook only;
Reference contains far more information and
detail on Sibelius’s features. So if you can’t find
something in this index, try looking it up in
Reference.
1st and 2nd ending lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
A
accelerando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
alphabetic input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
anacrusis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
arpeggios
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Arrange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
articulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 79
ASIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Audio Engine Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
audio tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110, 134
Auto Breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86, 114
B
backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
bar numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
barlines
repeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
bars
copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
pick-up (upbeat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
repeating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
bigger staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
blank pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
boxed text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see hit points
breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
automatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
C
capturing ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
caret . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
cautionary
key signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
chord boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see chord symbols
chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
adding/removing chord diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
creating by playing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
creating by typing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
equivalent chord text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
respelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
revoicing chord diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Classroom Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
clefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
click . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
codas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
collision avoidance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Compare window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80, 125
comparing scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
concert pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
context menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
graphics into Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
multiple objects at the same time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
with the mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Create menu
Bar submenu
Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Barline submenu
End Repeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Start Repeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Chord Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Clef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 120
Key Signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 106
Other submenu
Hit Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Instrument Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86, 94
Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Text submenu
Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 76
Lyrics submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Other Staff Text submenu
Plain text 123
Repeat (D.C./D.S./To Coda) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Subtitle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 106
Index
136
Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Title Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Tuplet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
creating
bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 120
parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
crescendo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 78
cues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
cursor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see playback, inputting, text
D
D.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
dal segno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
title pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
dialog
defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
diminuendo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 78
DirectSound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Document Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Don’t say this again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
drum set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
duration at end of score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
dynamic parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56, 85
dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 76
hairpins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
E
Edit All Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Edit menu
Capture Idea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Chord Symbol submenu
Add/Remove Chord Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Equivalent Chord Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Revoice Chord Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Cut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Delete Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Filter submenu
Chord Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Paste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 49
Paste As Cue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Redo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Repeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Select submenu
Select All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Select Graphic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Edit Text Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
editing
text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Engraving Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 114
enharmonic respelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see scales, arpeggios
exporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
audio tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110, 134
graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Expression text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 76
F
fast-forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
File menu
Add to Worksheet Creator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Classroom Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Export submenu
Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110, 134
New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8, 35
Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 48, 50, 88
Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Publish on SibeliusMusic.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Quick Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Save As . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Save Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Versions submenu
Edit Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Worksheet Creator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see scores
filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Flexi-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
into two staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Focus on Staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
fonts
changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81, 120
fretboard grids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .see chord symbols
G
graphics
exporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
green line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
guitar frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .see chord symbols
Contents
137
H
hairpins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 77
handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Help menu
Sibelius Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see troubleshooting
Hide Empty Staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
hiding
key signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
notes and rests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
staves with music on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
hit points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131, 132
editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
House Style menu
Edit All Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 115
Edit Text Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Engraving Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 114
house styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
I
Ideas window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
indenting staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Inkpen2 font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
inputting
chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
chords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
drum set notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
guitar tablature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
in real time via MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
in step-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
into two staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
pitches only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
installing
Sibelius
Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
instrument names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
instrumental parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56, 85
instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
instruments
adding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86, 94
clefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
transposing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Internet publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
irrational rhythms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
K
key signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70, 75
hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
keyboard (MIDI)
USB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
keyboard reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 41
Keyboard window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Keypad window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
L
landscape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
laptop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81, 120
note spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
of parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
staff spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 114
Layout Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Layout menu
Auto Breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86, 114
Break submenu
Page Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Split System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
System Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Document Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82, 115
Hide Empty Staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Optimize Staff Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Reset Note Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Reset Space Above Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Reset Space Below Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Licence Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
lines
1st and 2nd endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
after lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
hairpins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
rit./accel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
extenders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
hyphens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
importing from a text file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
M
Magnetic Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 81
manuscript paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
metronome click . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
MIDI guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
MIDI input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50, 54
of chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Index
138
MIDI interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 30
MIDI setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 29
Mixer window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 109
changing instrument sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
mouse wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
moving Sibelius to another computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
multicopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
multiple selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
music fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
N
Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
notebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
noteheads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
notes
adding note names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
articulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
changing notehead type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
converting to tablature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
inputting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
make bigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
make smaller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
resetting spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
respelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
transposing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 53
tuplets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Notes menu
Arrange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Flexi-time Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Flexi-time Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 91
Input Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Re-input Pitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Transposing Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
O
objects
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Optimize Staff Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Opus font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
P
page breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
page size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
pages
blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
viewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
pan position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Panorama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56, 85
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Parts window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
passage selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Paste As Cue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
pasting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see copying
PDF files
opening with PhotoScore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
PhotoScore Lite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
phrase-marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see slurs
piano
keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
pick-up bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Pinnacle Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
pitch
sounding (concert) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
written (transposed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
plain text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Play menu
Move Playback Line to Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Playback Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Video and Time submenu
Add Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Hit Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Timecode and Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
changing instrument sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
fast-forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
rewind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
starting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
stopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Playback window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 57
playing techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Plug-ins menu
Chord Symbols submenu
Add Chord Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Realize Chord Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Composing Tools submenu
Fit Selection to Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Reduce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Other submenu
Scales and Arpeggios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Simplify Notation submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Change Split Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Renotate Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 92
Text submenu
Contents
139
Add Note Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Transformations submenu
Transform Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
portrait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Primary Sound Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
privacy policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Properties window
Notes panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Text panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Q
quantize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .see renotate, Flexi-time
R
rallentando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
redo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Reduce plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
registering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Re-input Pitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
reinstalling Sibelius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
renotate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 87
Repeat (D.C./D.S./To Coda) text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
repeat bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
repeats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
ending lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
repitching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Reprise font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Reset Note Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
rests
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
reverb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
rewind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
ritardando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
S
scales
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Scorch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Score Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
scores
backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
comparing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79, 125
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
moving around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
multiple versions of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
switching between . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
selections
graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
multiple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
passage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
system passage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Sibelius Licence Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Sibelius Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Sibelius Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Sibelius Sounds Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
SibeliusMusic.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
site licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
size
of pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
of staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
slurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 78
sounding pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
soundtrack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
spacing
of staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
split point
changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Split System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
staff size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82, 115
staves
adding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
changing distance between . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 114
changing playback sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 121
indenting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
make smaller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
muting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
resetting spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
step-time input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
stereo position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
strips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see Mixer window
Subtitle text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
syllables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
system
break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
passage selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Index
140
T
tablature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Technique text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 77
tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 77
adjusting for Flexi-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
setting with text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Tempo text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
aligning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 76
editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
editing text styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Expression text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
instrument names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
note names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
plain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Technique text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 77
Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Tempo text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
time signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
timecode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
title pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70, 84
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Title text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
tool windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
transposed pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
transposing
by an octave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
triplets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
troubleshooting
playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
tuplets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
U
undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
uninstalling Sibelius
Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
upbeat bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
V
versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
comparing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
soundtrack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
View menu
Focus on Staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Hidden Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Layout Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Panorama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Zoom submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
viewing
parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
muting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
see also dynamics
W
Window menu
Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80, 125
Hide Tool Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 41
Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 57
Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Switch to Full Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
windows
switching between . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
word menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 107
worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
written pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Z
zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Edition 6.1 September 2009

Handbook written by Tom Clarke and Daniel Spreadbury. See the About Sibelius dialog for a full list of the software development team and other credits. We would like to thank all those (too numerous to list) who have provided helpful comments and suggestions for Sibelius and its documentation. Please email any suggestions for improvements to this Handbook to docs@sibelius.com (but please do not use this address for suggestions or queries about the Sibelius program itself – see the separate Latest information & technical help sheet for the correct address for your country).

This product is subject to the terms and conditions of a software license agreement.

Sibelius copyright © Avid Technology, Inc. and its licensors 1987–2009 Sibelius Handbook copyright © Avid Technology, Inc. 1992–2009 Published by Avid Technology, Inc., The Old Toy Factory, 20–23 City North, Fonthill Road, London N4 3HF, UK
All rights reserved. This Handbook may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means – electronic, recording, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise – in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the publisher. Although every care has been taken in the preparation of this Reference, neither the publisher nor the authors can take responsibility for any loss or damage arising from any errors or omissions it may contain. Sibelius, the Sibelius logo, Scorch, Flexi-time, Espressivo, Rubato, Rhythmic feel, Arrange, ManuScript, Virtual Manuscript Paper, House Style, SoundStage, Opus, Inkpen2, Helsinki, Reprise, magnetic, multicopy, Optical, Dynamic parts, SoundWorld, Panorama, the blue notes and double helix logos, SibeliusMusic.com, SibeliusEducation.com, ‘The fastest, smartest, easiest way to write music’ and ‘99% inspiration, 1% perspiration’ are all trademarks or registered trademarks of Avid Technology, Inc. in the USA, UK and other countries. All other trademarks are acknowledged as the property of their respective owners.

2

Contents
Start here 5
The story of Sibelius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 About this Handbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Before you install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Installing Sibelius for Windows . . . . . . . . 12 Installing Sibelius for Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Registering Sibelius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 MIDI setup for Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 MIDI setup for Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 About the projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.4 Marking up a score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 2.5 Layout and formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 2.6 Dynamic parts™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 2.7 Exporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Project 3

89

Project 1
1.1 Opening a score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 Editing and inputting notes . . . . . . . . 1.3 Selections and copying music. . . . . . . 1.4 Flexi-time™ input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 Alphabetic and step-time input . . . . . 1.6 Playback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7 Text and dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33
35 40 46 50 53 57 60

3.1 Writing for keyboard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 3.2 Writing for guitar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 3.3 Ideas and drum notation . . . . . . . . . . . 95 3.4 Chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 3.5 Repeats and codas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 3.6 Arranging and playback . . . . . . . . . . 108

Project 4
4.1 Setting up a worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2 Scales and arpeggios . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 Layout and formatting . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4 Classroom Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

111
113 117 120 124

Project 5

127

Project 2

65

2.1 Creating a new score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 2.2 Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 2.3 Clefs, key signatures and tuplets . . . . 74

5.1 Using video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 5.2 Writing music to picture . . . . . . . . . . 131 5.3 Adding a soundtrack to video . . . . . 134

Index

135

3

Contents 4 .

Start here Start here .

Start here 6 .

Top publishers such as Hal Leonard. It handles every kind of music. it’s the world’s best-selling music notation software. and the world’s leading publishers. after graduating from Oxford and Cambridge Universities. unsure of what to expect.The story of Sibelius The story of Sibelius Start here Twins Ben and Jonathan Finn first began work on Sibelius when they were students in 1987. and the Royal Academy of Music. In 1993. composer Steve Reich. rock guitarist Andy Summers. London. with offices in the USA. and over the course of the following decade the Finns’ company grew beyond all expectations. Electronic Musician’s Editors’ Choice award (three times). Music Sales and Boosey & Hawkes use Sibelius both for traditional publishing and to deliver music via the Internet straight to a customer’s printer. Sibelius was acquired by Avid. and spent six years of their spare time developing a vast range of sophisticated features. schools and universities to composers. and customers in more than 100 countries worldwide. jazz musician Jamie Cullum. from choir to symphony orchestra. 7 . Sibelius 5 picked up an unprecedented four Editor’s Choice awards from the specialist press. In fact. from rock to avant garde. It’s perhaps a tribute to the ease of use and sophistication of Sibelius that one and the same program is used both by elementary schools and top professionals. with an intuitive user interface and built-in intelligence that had never been seen in previous music programs. In 2006. Sibelius proved to be an instant success. arrangers. and an unbeatable 10/10 score from Computer Music magazine. teachers. MacWorld’s 5 Star rating (twice). the Finns started their own company to sell the program. Sibelius has also won extraordinary acclaim including Keyboard magazine’s Key Buy award. and continues to go from strength to strength. Famous Sibelius users include conductor Michael Tilson Thomas. makers of Pro Tools and other industry-standard products for digital media production and music creation. Who uses Sibelius? Sibelius is designed for every kind of musician – including you! Sibelius users range from students. choral composer John Rutter. too – from early music to jazz. performers. UK and Australia.

Boxes in Reference You’ll find boxes like these scattered throughout the Reference.” b 2. This Handbook assumes a basic understanding of how to use your computer (such as the mouse. but if you don’t work through these projects you will run a risk of never discovering some basic features. By the time you have completed the projects – which will take you only a few hours – you will be able to input. You are then very strongly advised to work through at least the first three of the five projects contained in this Handbook before embarking on any serious work of your own with Sibelius. or choose Help > Documentation > Sibelius Reference (shortcut F1 or X?). Items in menus and sub-menus are denoted with >. play back and print out straightforward music. particularly if you are used to notation programs that work in different ways. or by looking in the optional Reference book). go to www.sibelius. which explains every feature in complete detail (with a Glossary of special terms). 8 . to buy this if you don’t already have it. explaining various notation and music engraving rules.com/buy. You can browse through relevant parts of Reference at your leisure. you must read the whole of this Start here section in order to get started with the program. Sibelius is easy to learn and mostly self-explanatory. keyboard. menus and dialogs are written like this.Start here About this Handbook Warning! However much you may dislike manuals. because most people only use quite a small proportion of music notation anyway. On-screen Reference More advanced topics are covered one by one in the Sibelius Reference. edit. The Reference is also available as a printed book as an optional extra. The Reference is not meant to be read from start to finish. Typography and cross-references Names of computer keys. and you’ll know how to get going on more complicated music too. click the toolbar button shown on the right.1 Accidentals means “see the Accidentals topic (within Reference)” (either on-screen by choosing Help > Documentation > Sibelius Reference. menus and files). so “choose File > Open” means “choose Open from the File menu. To start the onscreen Reference.

or a list box. for standard shortcuts like Ctrl+? or X? where both / and ? exist on the same key. labeled tabs at the top. particularly on Mac. however. then click the mouse’s only button. these are the conventions: Mac symbol Mac name Windows equivalent X Command Ctrl (“Control”) x Shift Shift z Option Alt R Return Return (on main keyboard) E Enter Enter (on numeric keypad) Sibelius is almost identical on Windows and Mac. don’t type Shift unless explicitly told to do so. To right-click something means to point at it with the mouse and click the right mouse button. you can simply click the right mouse button instead. you actually type Ctrl+/ or X/ without using Shift. On Mac. On some keyboards it is labeled with “Enter” or a special arrow symbol. To finish dragging. if you are using one of the older models of mouse that has only one button. but it still means Enter. To Control-click means to hold down the Control key on your keyboard (sometimes labeled Ctrl) and click the left or only mouse button. but where there are differences. For more information on the differences between Mac and Windows keyboard shortcuts. The numeric keypad is the rectangle of numbers and other characters at the very right-hand side of your computer keyboard. To drag something means to point at it with the mouse. On Windows. which lists all keyboard shortcuts available. to click something means to move the mouse arrow over it and click the left mouse button. the Windows convention is listed first.12 Menus and shortcuts in Reference. to click something means to move the mouse arrow over it and click the left mouse button. just let go of the mouse button. you have a mouse with a right mouse button. Shortcuts are also shown in menus. but has been included in case one or two of the terms is unfamiliar: * Some keys are labeled differently on different keyboards. Similarly. (Notebook (laptop) computers usually don’t have a separate numeric keypad – b 5. which you can click to switch between pages of the dialog. and then click and hold the left mouse button (or the only mouse button on Mac) while moving the mouse. “Enter” is the large key at the bottom right of the numeric keypad. For the purposes Start here * * * * * * * * * * of this Handbook. if you have one.12 Menus and shortcuts in Reference for more information. mainly in keyboard shortcuts. 9 . but we always call it Return. Some dialogs are divided into several pages and have a pop-up combo box (Mac).About this Handbook Basic terminology Most of the computer terminology that follows will be understood by almost all readers. On some keyboards it is unlabeled. “Alt+click or z-click” means hold down the Alt (Windows) or z (Mac) key and click. b 5. A dialog is a window with buttons on. Even though A is written as a capital letter. “Type Ctrl+A or XA” means hold down the Ctrl (Windows) or X (Mac) key and type A. Less well-known terminology is in the Glossary at the end of Reference. if. Similarly.) “Return” is the large key to the right of the letter keys.

com. We would also like to hear your suggestions for improvements to the Sibelius program itself. Suggestions We are always happy to receive reports of errors or misprints. but for the benefit of readers in other countries.Start here American and British English Sibelius and this Handbook use American English. both “bar” and “measure” are used (so for universality we’ve opted for “bar”). Please email them to docs@sibelius.” Any British readers who are offended by the American spelling of “center. or contact technical help.” “color” and so on will just have to use a pen to amend the spelling in the Handbook or (less effectively) on the screen. some non-American terms such as “crotchet” are included in parentheses. 10 . please post these suggestions to the chat page on the Sibelius web site. and “staff ” means British “stave. British readers may be interested to know that in America. and suggested improvements to the Handbook and Reference.

following the instructions in Installing Sibelius for Windows (page 12) or Installing Sibelius for Mac (page 17). If you have two or more 5-packs.Before you install Before you install Start here What’s in the box Unless you have X-ray vision. If you’ve bought more than five copies. skip to Installing Sibelius for Windows (page 12) or Installing Sibelius for Mac (page 17) as appropriate. Your program’s serial number is on the back of the case. Single copies If you have bought just a single copy of Sibelius (as opposed to a 5-pack or educational site license). You should also find: * Installation DVD-ROM in a plastic case. You may not install site license copies on notebooks (laptops). 5-packs and stand-alone site licenses Stand-alone site licenses let you run Sibelius on five or more non-networked computers at the same time. you’ve already managed to open the box to get at this Handbook. If you want to use Sibelius on a network but you have bought a stand-alone site license. with details of how to get help if you get stuck * Form for faxing your registration information to us – but it’s easiest to provide this information by the Internet. use each DVD-ROM and serial number to install on five of your computers. you’ll also find a CD-ROM (in the same case as the Sibelius DVD-ROM) and a separate booklet entitled Sibelius 6 Licence Server User Guide. If you’ve bought five copies. 11 . teachers’ home computers or elsewhere. Network licenses If you have bought a network site license. you must install and register Sibelius on each stand-alone machine separately. please contact technical help. explained later * If you’ve purchased a network site license. please refer to the enclosed Sibelius 6 Licence Server User Guide booklet for details on installing and registering Sibelius. you may have been sent a combination of “5-packs” (each containing a single DVD-ROM) and single copies. so don’t lose it! * A sheet entitled Latest information and technical help. unless authorized by Sibelius. or a single DVD-ROM that you can install on a specified number of computers. you will have received one installation DVD-ROM. All copies of the site license must be installed on a single geographical site of an educational institution. You cannot install stand-alone copies of Sibelius onto a network or virtual disk – it must be installed on each client machine’s local hard disk. Whatever size of site license you have purchased.

. but you may find that you cannot use as many sounds simultaneously.mspx for more details. 1GB+ total physical RAM (2GB recommended). ASIO-compatible soundcard You can use Sibelius Sounds Essentials if your computer doesn’t meet the recommended requirements. Connecting MIDI devices Before you install Sibelius.x. How to determine if you are running Windows XP SP2 or SP3 If you have Windows XP but are unsure whether or not you have Windows XP SP2 or SP3: * Click the Start button.Start here Installing Sibelius for Windows Minimum hardware requirements Minimum requirements for Sibelius 6 alone: Windows XP 32-bit SP2 or later. you need to purchase an upgrade to a more recent version of the Windows operating system. If the computer on which you want to run Sibelius isn’t connected to the Internet. 550MB hard disk space. and hit Return (on the main keyboard) * You will see a simple window. 3.. Windows Me.microsoft. If you have Windows 95. you might want to connect any external MIDI devices you plan to use – or see b MIDI setup for Windows on page 26. Windows Vista 32-bit SP1 or later. Windows 98. You must be running Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later to install and run Sibelius 6. then choose Run. DVD-ROM drive Additional recommendations for using the included Sibelius Sounds Essentials sound library: Intel Core Duo or AMD Turion or better. then you need to update: the simplest way of doing this is to download it automatically by choosing Windows Update from the Start menu.5GB total hard disk space. 12 . you can obtain Windows XP Service Pack 2 on CD-ROM or via a special download that can be burned to CD and deployed on another computer. If you don’t. * Type winver in the Open box. See http://www. Windows 7 32-bit or 64-bit.com/windowsxp/sp2/default. like this: You should see Service Pack 2 or Service Pack 3 at the end of the second line of text. 512MB+ RAM. Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.

then if you are prompted to read a license agreement. This may take a couple of minutes.Installing Sibelius for Windows However. Similarly. we’ll go out on a limb and tell you what actually happens when installing Sibelius: * Exit any programs that are running. we recommend that you run Sibelius (like all other applications) as a non-privileged user. you will be told that it must be installed. you can do this at any time. then after installing it. In order to register Sibelius after installing it. choose Run and type D:\autorun. It’s a particularly good idea to exit any anti-virus or anti* * * * * * * spyware programs loaded automatically at start-up. click Accept to accept the terms of the license agreement you are shown. if you are running Windows XP and do not have the Microsoft .” What this really means is that the author isn’t quite sure what will happen next. you will be told that it must be installed. you may see a small window called AutoPlay appear. and then wait patiently while the . Take the Sibelius DVD-ROM out of its case. Installing Sibelius It is traditional for software manuals to gloss over the crucial installation process. Therefore we recommend that you install Sibelius. This may take a couple of minutes. and say something like: “follow the instructions on the screen. if you do not have the Microsoft Windows Installer installed. the programmers might have changed the installation procedure at the last minute. Click Install. In the main installation window. (If there’s no sign of activity after a while. or you don’t know anything about user accounts or administrator privileges on your computer. If you’re the only person who uses your computer. For all he knows. you must either be using an administrator user account.) On Windows Vista or Windows 7. and close the drive slot Wait for a few seconds. and wait while the Windows Installer kit is installed. or be able to provide an administrator username and password when prompted. launch it and register it as an administrator user. then hit Return on the main keyboard.NET Framework 2. Start here Administrator privileges You must install Sibelius using a user account on your computer with administrator privileges.NET Framework is installed. your screen may now go dark and a window titled User Account Control will appear. where D is the letter of your DVD-ROM drive. However. to increase the security of your system.0 installed.exe. click the Start menu. so if you don’t feel like grappling with MIDI cables at the moment. 13 . The DVD-ROM drive should start up and a dialog will appear on the screen. put it (labeled side up) in the DVD-ROM drive of the computer. Under Install or run program. Click Install. you can safely ignore the above and install the software as usual. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the installation to proceed. click Run autorun. After having registered the software. go ahead and install Sibelius now. click Install Sibelius 6 to start upgrading Sibelius On Windows Vista or Windows 7. On Windows XP.

click Finish. * On Windows Vista or Windows 7. Installing Sibelius Sounds Essentials Sibelius Sounds Essentials is a high-quality library of sounds for use with Sibelius. When the installer has completed. so please be patient. Choose the I accept the license agreement radio button. you should now consider whether to install any other applications from the Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM. You are given the opportunity to read the Sibelius license agreement. Click Next. click Finish to return to the window that first appeared when you inserted the DVD-ROM. Things flash and zoom past on the screen as the sounds are installed. A window appears that says Welcome to the Sibelius Sounds Essentials for Sibelius 6 Installation Wizard. leave this set to the default. Before you run Sibelius 6 for the first time. Click Install. We recommend you leave it on Anyone who uses this computer. leave this set to the default. Unless you have purchased PhotoScore Ultimate. your screen may now go dark and a window titled User * * * * * * Account Control will appear. Unless you have strong feelings about where you want the sounds to go and you know how to alter the location. The installer suggests a folder to install Sibelius into. Things flash and zoom past on the screen as Sibelius is installed. or PDF files downloaded from the Internet. which is also at the end of Reference.Start here * After a few more seconds. click Install Sibelius Sounds Essentials * After a few moments. Click Next. Click Next. This may take several minutes. Click Next. the installer will start. Choose the I accept the agreement radio button. which determines whether everybody who uses your computer will see a shortcut to Sibelius on the Desktop. Installing PhotoScore Lite PhotoScore Lite is an application from Neuratron that allows you to scan printed music. you should now install PhotoScore Lite from your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM: 14 . a window appears that says Welcome to the Sibelius 6 Installation * * * * * Wizard. It tells you you’re now ready to install Sibelius. Unless you have strong feelings about where you want Sibelius to go and you know how to alter it. then click Next. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the installation to proceed. transpose and print them as if you had inputted them yourself. The installer suggests a folder to install the sounds into. This will take several minutes. then click Next. into Sibelius and edit. When the installer has completed. It tells you you’re now ready to install Sibelius Sounds Essentials. To install it: * In the main installation window. You’re asked if you want to install Sibelius for Anyone who uses this computer or Only for me. or just you. You are given the opportunity to read the license agreement. Click Next.

playing. Again. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the installation to proceed. You are given the opportunity to read the Scorch license agreement. the Product ID field is filled in for you. your screen may now go dark and a window titled User * * * * Account Control will appear. Click Next once more and PhotoScore Lite will be installed. then click Finish. simply click Next. When you’ve filled in the form. It tells you you’re now ready to install Scorch. AudioScore Lite tells you where it will be installed. click Install Scorch * It may take up to a minute or longer for the Scorch installer to start: please be patient. Installing Sibelius Scorch You should now install Scorch. click Install AudioScore Lite * On Windows Vista or Windows 7. your screen may now go dark and a window titled User Account Control Start here * * * * will appear. again. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the installation to proceed. so that you can send it to Sibelius for further editing. Unless you have purchased AudioScore Ultimate. the Product ID field is filled in for you. Otherwise. When you’ve filled in the form. PhotoScore Lite tells you where it will be installed. Otherwise. 15 . You are prompted to choose an installation folder for Scorch. Read it and click Next You’re asked to fill in a few details: type in your Name. Read it. Click Next. transposing and printing Sibelius scores on the Internet: * First. Click Next once more and AudioScore Lite will be installed. your screen may now go dark and a window titled User Account Control will appear. * In the main installation window. a * * * * window appears that says Welcome to the Sibelius Scorch (all browsers) Setup Wizard.Installing Sibelius for Windows * In the main installation window. Click Next. choose the I Agree radio button. again. On Windows Vista or Windows 7. you can change this if you have strong feelings about it. click Install PhotoScore Lite * On Windows Vista. click Next. Read it and click Next You’re asked to fill in a few details: type in your Name. click Next. quit any web browsers that are running. Click Next to see the license agreement for AudioScore Lite. the free web browser plug-in for viewing. click Next. Installing AudioScore Lite AudioScore Lite is an application that automatically transcribes music that you sing or play an acoustic instrument into a microphone. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy for the installation to proceed. you can change this if you have strong feelings about it. Click Next to see the license agreement for PhotoScore Lite. then click Next. then click Finish. Eventually. click Next. you should now install AudioScore Lite from your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM: * In the main installation window.

Reinstalling Sibelius If you need to reinstall Sibelius. It’s listed as Neuratron PhotoScore Lite. It’s listed as Sibelius Sounds Essentials for Sibelius 6. then follow the instructions on the screen. If you have installed Sibelius Sounds Essentials. you can normally just install it again in the same place without uninstalling it first – see Reinstalling Sibelius above. Wait while the application is reinstalled. If you have installed PhotoScore Lite. as the operating system doesn’t like this. To uninstall Sibelius itself. then follow the instructions on the screen. simply insert the DVD-ROM into your computer and proceed as if you were installing Sibelius for the first time. select it. If your copy of Sibelius becomes corrupted for some reason. click Close. click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or Uninstall (Windows Vista or Windows 7). click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or Uninstall (Windows Vista or Windows 7). uninstall it first. click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or Uninstall (Windows Vista or Windows 7). * When the installer has completed. Then follow the instructions on the screen. then follow the instructions on the screen. You don’t need to uninstall Scorch. and click Add/Remove (Windows XP) or Uninstall (Windows Vista or Windows 7). This only takes a few moments. If you have installed AudioScore Lite. probably so that you can install it on another computer. uninstall it next. uninstall it next.Start here * Things flash and whizz across the screen as Scorch is installed. then click Finish. * Open Control Panel from the Start menu. It’s listed as Neuratron AudioScore Lite. then Next again to confirm your choice. select it. The installer will detect that Sibelius is already installed on your computer and show a dialog with three options: choose Repair and click Next. Double-click Add/Remove Programs (Windows XP) * * * * * or Programs and Features (Windows Vista or Windows 7). select it. Do not attempt to move or rename the Sibelius program folder or the folder of any other program. select Sibelius 6 in the list. 16 . Uninstalling Sibelius Uninstalling means taking your copy of Sibelius off your computer.

1GB+ total physical RAM (2GB recommended).4 Tiger or later Choose About This Mac from the Apple menu. DVD-ROM drive Additional recommendations for using the included Sibelius Sounds Essentials sample library: Intel Core Duo or better. Provided the first part of this number is 10. It is recommended that you are running the most up-to-date version of Mac OS X to use Sibelius.6. Connecting MIDI devices Before you install Sibelius. Choose the Software Update pane from System Preferences to check that you are using the latest version.11 or later. go ahead and install Sibelius now. If you are running a version of Mac OS X earlier than Mac OS X 10. you can do this at any time. 17 . and you can install and run Sibelius 5. but you may find that you cannot use as many sounds simultaneously.7 or later.5. you are running Mac OS X 10.4.Installing Sibelius for Mac Installing Sibelius for Mac Start here Minimum hardware requirements Minimum requirements for Sibelius 6 alone: Mac OS X 10. 550MB hard disk space. See www. You will see a simple window. you cannot install and run Sibelius. You should upgrade Mac OS X now.4 or greater. 3.apple.4. How to determine if you are running Mac OS X 10.4.4 Tiger or a newer version of Mac OS X.5GB total hard disk space You can use Sibelius Sounds Essentials if your computer doesn’t meet the recommended requirements. However. or Mac OS X 10. Mac OS X 10. although this normally incurs an upgrade fee. like this: Just below the large text that reads Mac OS X you will see text that reads something like Version 10.com for details.10. 512MB+ RAM. so if you don’t feel like grappling with MIDI cables at the moment. you might want to connect any external MIDI devices you plan to use – see MIDI setup for Mac on page 29.

you should now consider whether to install any other applications from the Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM. or you don’t know anything about user accounts or administrator privileges on your computer. which is also at the end of Reference. An icon for the DVD. and close the drive slot. To install it: * Double-click Install Sibelius Sounds Essentials to start the installation. titled Welcome to the Sibelius 6 Installer. click Continue. * Sibelius Sounds Essentials must be installed on your Mac’s boot disk (you can move it later. then Agree. you must be able to provide an administrator password when prompted. Installing Sibelius * Take the Sibelius DVD-ROM out of its case. * A window appears. double-click the Install Sibelius 6 icon. you will be informed that installation was successful. A window appears. * You are given the opportunity to read the license agreement. Wait for a few seconds. Read it. if you want – see Moving Sibelius Sounds Essentials below). Before you run Sibelius 6 for the first time. You are prompted for your administrator password: type it and click OK. you may be told that the installation will take up almost no space on your computer. Click Continue. labeled Sibelius 6. Installing Sibelius Sounds Essentials Sibelius Sounds Essentials is a high-quality library of sounds for use with Sibelius. should appear on your desktop. so don’t click Change Install Location: simply click Install. Click Close. if it doesn’t. and a window should open automatically.) You have to install Sibelius on your Mac’s boot disk. A progress bar appears as the software is installed. put it (labeled side up) in the DVD-ROM drive of the * * * * * * * * computer. To install your upgrade.Start here Administrator privileges In order to correctly install and register Sibelius. Read it. If you’re the only person who uses your computer. click Continue. This may take several minutes. (If you are reinstalling Sibelius 6. You are given the opportunity to read the Sibelius license agreement. You are told how much space on your computer will be used by installing Sibelius 6. 18 . Eventually. then Agree. so don’t click Change Install Location: simply click Install. * You are prompted for your administrator password: type it and click OK. double-click the Sibelius 6 icon. titled Welcome to the Sibelius Sounds Essentials for Sibelius 6 Installer. After having registered the software. we recommend that you run Sibelius (like all other applications) as a non-privileged user. you can safely ignore the above and install the software as usual. to increase the security of your system. Click Continue. which will start the installation process.

Unless you have purchased PhotoScore Ultimate. Click Close. * You are given the opportunity to read the license agreement. This will take several minutes. Click Continue. simply click Install A progress bar zooms across the screen. so that you can send it to Sibelius for further editing. titled Welcome to the PhotoScore Lite Installer. play. so don’t click Change Install Location: simply click Install. * A progress bar zooms across the screen. transpose and print them as if you had inputted them yourself. you should now install AudioScore Lite from your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM: * Double-click Install AudioScore Lite to start the installation. * You are shown PhotoScore Lite’s license agreement. and click OK. Click Continue. Click Close. read it. simply click Install * You are prompted to type your computer’s administrator password. Scorch must be installed on your Mac’s boot disk. * A window appears. Type it. and you’re then told that installation was successful. You are given the opportunity to read Scorch’s license agreement. Click Close. then * * * * * Agree. or PDF files downloaded from the Internet. you will be informed that installation was successful. read it. Unless you have purchased AudioScore Ultimate. and click OK. Click Continue. 19 . Start here Installing Scorch You should now install Sibelius Scorch (which allows you to view. You are prompted to type your computer’s administrator password. * Double-click Install Sibelius Scorch to start the installation. titled Welcome to the Sibelius Scorch Installer. titled Welcome to the AudioScore Lite Installer. Installing PhotoScore Lite PhotoScore Lite is an application from Neuratron that allows you to scan printed music. * A window appears. click Continue. and you’re then told that installation was successful. Read it. so please be patient! * After a few minutes. quit any web browsers that are running. you should now install PhotoScore Lite from your Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM: * Double-click Install PhotoScore Lite to start the installation. and click Accept On the next screen. click Continue. into Sibelius and edit. Type it. transpose and print Sibelius scores on the Internet): * First. Installing AudioScore Lite AudioScore Lite is an application that automatically transcribes music that you sing or play an acoustic instrument into a microphone.Installing Sibelius for Mac * A progress bar appears as the software is installed. then Agree * On the next screen. * A window appears.

Reinstalling Sibelius If you need to reinstall Sibelius for any reason: * First. and you’re then told that installation was successful. Click Yes to choose the new location. simply drag the Sibelius 6 icon from your Applications folder to the trash. Click Close. What next? Now turn to Registering Sibelius on page 21. Do not move the Libraries folder. probably so that you can install it on another computer. drag the existing Sibelius 6 application icon from your Applications folder to the Trash * You may also want to trash the Sibelius 6 preferences file. which is in both Users/username/ Library/Preferences and /Library/Preferences.plist * Insert the Sibelius 6 DVD-ROM into your computer. then click Continue * You are told how much disk space the installation will use: click Install. 20 . then Agree * On the next screen. you can normally just install it again in the same place – see Reinstalling Sibelius above. and click OK. read it. * You will see at least two folders: Essentials for Sibelius 6 and Libraries. called com. then follow the instructions for Installing Sibelius above.g. If your copy of Sibelius becomes corrupted for some reason. to uninstall PhotoScore Lite or AudioScore Lite. * You are prompted to type your computer’s administrator password. Uninstalling Sibelius Uninstalling means taking your copy of Sibelius off your computer. just drag the PhotoScore Lite or AudioScore Lite icon to the trash. choose your Mac’s boot disk. * Drag the Essentials for Sibelius 6 folder to your preferred location. To uninstall Sibelius for Mac. click Continue. Moving Sibelius Sounds Essentials To move Sibelius Sounds Essentials to another volume. go to /Library/Application Support/Sibelius Software/Sibelius Sounds. Type it. Likewise. You will be prompted for your administrator password. then click Choose. * In the Finder. so provide it and click OK. e. * A progress bar zooms across the screen. if it is running. * Run Sibelius again: you will be told that Sibelius is unable to find the Essentials sound library.sibelius6. after installation: * Quit Sibelius.sibelius. an external hard disk.Start here * You are shown AudioScore Lite’s license agreement.

Registering Sibelius Registering Sibelius Start here You should register your copy of Sibelius in the first week or two of using it. future upgrades. fax or email to register. simply follow the instructions under Registering on the Internet below. and access to online support via the Sibelius web site (www. but you might as well get it out of the way now. Consult the separate Sibelius 6 Licence Server User Guide booklet for further details. 21 . To protect us against piracy. your screen may now go dark and a window titled User Account Control will appear. If you don’t register Sibelius in the first 15 days. click OK: % On Windows Vista.) Running Sibelius on more than one computer If (and only if) you have a single-user copy of Sibelius.com). you can move one of your copies to your new machine. this will not work and will instead cause saving to be disabled until you register. % On Windows XP. Click Continue to tell Windows that you are happy to proceed. as long as you never have more than two registered copies of Sibelius at any given time. unregistered copies of Sibelius will not save. and to protect you against having your software stolen. you will be prompted for your administrator password: type it and click OK. you will be eligible for technical help. When you subsequently get round to registering. and once you have registered. Registering 5-pack and site licenses You can register educational 5-pack and site license copies of Sibelius in exactly the same way as a single copy. Registering network licenses You cannot register network copies of Sibelius over the Internet. or enter an administrator password if prompted. If you later need to install Sibelius on a new computer. you may be prompted for an administrator password. You will only need to fill in your details when you register the first copy (unless you have more than one Sibelius installation DVD-ROM and serial number). But so you can use Sibelius before you get around to registering it. Registering on the Internet Sibelius will prompt you to register each time you run it. Both copies of Sibelius must be used only by you. To register Sibelius on a second computer. Then the following will happen: * You are told that Sibelius 6 must be run for the first time using an administrator account. Run Sibelius 6 either by double-clicking the Sibelius 6 icon on your desktop (Windows) or in your Applications folder (Mac). you will be able to save for the first 15 days without registering. it will be re-enabled. in which case enter it. To do this. This is quick and easy to do. and they may not be used simultaneously. so follow the instructions in Registering on the Internet below. see Moving Sibelius to another computer below. (Please don’t try altering your computer’s date or reinstalling Sibelius in order to extend the 15 days. you must contact Sibelius by phone. % On Mac. saving will be temporarily disabled.sibelius. you can install and register Sibelius on two computers for your own personal and exclusive use.

Choose the Register using this computer’s Internet connection radio button and click Next. how you heard about Sibelius. Click Finish.Start here * Now you are asked to enter your Sibelius serial number. you may be asked to confirm your eligibility. church. if you are registering further copies of a multi-user license. school. enter the organization’s address (including the Organization field). or reinstalling an existing copy) it will give you a further message. then click OK. future upgrades. Registering using a web browser If the computer on which Sibelius is installed does not have an Internet connection. college. university. You can either use the Internet connection on the computer on which Sibelius is installed (the quickest and easiest of all). choose Help > Register Sibelius. Fill out all the fields. A few seconds later you will be told that Sibelius has been successfully registered. 22 . If it’s owned by your school. but when asked if you want to give Sibelius access to the Internet. Sibelius will now prompt you to connect. Type it in. if you are a professor. See Educational copies in North/Central/South America below for eligibility requirements.g. and click Finish. business or other organization. If you are registering an educational copy bought in North/South/Central America. Sibelius will check the registration status of your copy. choose the appropriate option to allow it. The precise message that appears will depend on the firewall (if any) you are using. click Connect If you are using a firewall. and click Next. If your computer isn’t already connected to the Internet. Most firewalls will warn you when a program is trying to access the Internet for the first time. We are committed to your privacy – see Privacy policy below. otherwise registration will fail. You will find this printed on a label on * * * * * * * * * * * the CD case that your copy of Sibelius came in. When choosing from the Activity list. Click Yes to proceed. Once it has established a connection. college or university. We need your name and address details to enable you to get technical help. you are not obliged to send this information. You will then be prompted to register Sibelius. making sure to fill in all required fields. You will next be prompted to enter your contact details. You are also shown some basic information about your computer setup that you can choose to send to us so that we can more easily assist you if you require technical help. choose the Register using a web browser on this or another computer radio button. enter your home address and leave Organization blank. click Next. it’s the number beginning with S. if it has been registered before (e. Next you’re asked to fill in some details about your musical interests. or a web browser on another computer (see Registering using a web browser below). choose one of the Teacher options. If you are a student yourself. and so on. Then type in your details. choose one of the Student options. etc. but it may save you time later if you send it now. make sure that you allow Sibelius access to the Internet. or installing a second copy for your own personal use. If this copy of Sibelius is owned by you personally.

If you have no access whatsoever to an Internet connection. Monday–Friday (except public holidays) between 9am–5pm. There’s no need to keep a record of the Computer Number or Registration Number after you have registered. To obtain your Computer Number (which you need to write on the form you fax to us): * Choose Help > Register Sibelius * Choose the Register using a web browser on this or another computer radio button. you will be given a Registration Number to type into the Register Sibelius dialog in order to complete your registration. Call 1-888-280-9995 toll-free (outside the USA.30pm PST. you need to enter the Registration Number in the same way via Help > Register Sibelius: this time. Monday–Friday (except public holidays) between 10am–6pm 23 . your program will be registered (and will continue to be able to save). type in the Registration Number. then click Finish. you can register by fax or phone. Start here Registering by fax We recommend you register on the Internet instead if possible. Users who purchased in North. But to register by fax. call 1300 652 172.Registering Sibelius You will be instructed to visit a page on the Sibelius web site in order to provide your registration information. call 1-650-731-6106). But to register by phone: * Choose Help > Register Sibelius * Choose Register using a web browser on this or another computer. When you have typed in the Registration Number and click Finish. except holidays. When you receive a reply (normally within one working day). Users who purchased in Australia: To register or re-register. Users who purchased in the UK or any other country: To register or re-register. Central & South America: Monday to Friday 7am–4. You will be told that Sibelius has been successfully registered. fill in your name and organization (if applicable). and ensure you can see your computer screen while you are on the phone * You will be given a Registration Number (beginning with the letter R) to type into the box on the screen. Registering by phone We recommend you to register on the Internet instead if possible. At the end of the process. * Call the number below. There’s no need to keep a record of the Computer Number or Registration Number after you have registered. and click Next. See below for eligibility requirements for educational copies. then click Register Later. call 020 7561 7995 (+44 20 7561 7995). please fill in and fax the form included in the Sibelius box to the fax number given on the form. and click Next * Write down your Serial Number and Computer Number.

you should contact technical help for assistance. non-profit educational institution. you must live in North/South/Central America. you can use Help > Unregister Sibelius. you need to reinstall Sibelius and you find it is no longer registered. simply use the Help > Register Sibelius dialog. or * You are a private music teacher and also a current member of MTNA. then it will be assumed that you are in fact installing a second copy of Sibelius (see Running Sibelius on more than one computer above). your copy of Sibelius contacts our server and informs it that the copy running on that machine is no longer registered. If either or both of the computers are unable to connect to the Internet. If you are not eligible. non-profit educational institution. To re-register. or * This copy is installed for staff/student use in a fully accredited. 24 . You can instead purchase a professional copy of Sibelius. When you register Sibelius. When you choose this option. you can reregister it automatically over the Internet provided you are reinstalling on the same computer on which you previously had Sibelius installed. for any reason. You can then install Sibelius on another computer and use Help > Register Sibelius to register Sibelius over the Internet in the normal way. you will be asked whether you are eligible. provided both computers can connect to the Internet. you may be eligible to purchase an educational copy from a dealer in your country. Moving Sibelius to another computer If you need to move a registered copy of Sibelius from one computer to another. we may require you to provide proof of status. in exactly the same way as registering for the first time. then do not register or use Sibelius. and also one of the following must be true: * You are currently an educator or full-time student at a fully accredited. If you have a single-user license and are reinstalling Sibelius on a different computer. Sibelius will know that this copy has been registered before. Reinstalling and re-registering Sibelius If. you may only use it if you are eligible to do so. This method requires that both computers (the one on which you are unregistering Sibelius. but instead please return it to the dealer you bought it from within 14 days of purchase for a refund.Start here Educational copies in North/Central/South America If you purchased an educational copy of Sibelius in North/South/Central America. or * You are currently an official music ministry representative of a church or other religious institution. To be eligible. or if you live outside North/South/Central America. MENC or an MTNA/ MENC allied group. and disables the saving feature. and the one on which you are subsequently registering Sibelius) be able to connect to the Internet.

Registering Sibelius Problems registering Sibelius? If you have technical problems while registering Sibelius. Please respect our efforts in developing Sibelius by ensuring that no-one attempts to make illegal copies of it. etc. upgrades. and are registered under the Data Protection Act.com with full details. you agree to our privacy policy – see www. information etc.com/ privacy or contact us for the full policy. or to share your information with partner companies as detailed above. please contact us. when registering) to verify your identity or send you information so you can get technical help. contact technical help (see the separate Latest information and technical help sheet). By registering or upgrading Sibelius.sibelius. with your country’s distributor or with manufacturers of other products we provide you with (e. other products.g. just use the unsubscribe link which we include in our email mailings and on www. upgrades. Start here Privacy policy We are committed to protecting your privacy. except for sharing it with other Avid companies. but a summary is as follows: We may use personal information you provide us with (e. In some countries.sibelius. it doesn’t matter if your free entitlement to technical help by telephone has expired. We will not give personal information about you to anyone else without your permission. please email piracy@sibelius.com. If you don’t want us to send you information (including information about Sibelius upgrades) by post or email. Piracy Thank you for buying your copy of Sibelius legitimately. special offers. If you know of anyone copying Sibelius. Piracy deprives software companies of the revenue needed to improve their programs and develop new products. on our behalf. PhotoScore) so they can provide you with technical help. piracy is so widespread that some companies are unable to justify distributing software at all.g. If you don’t want to receive information from us by email. 25 .

Connecting MIDI devices directly via USB Most new MIDI keyboards and other devices can connect directly to your computer’s USB sockets without the need for a separate MIDI interface. MIDI keyboards. not a thing – the universal standard for connecting electronic musical instruments together. This topic takes you through the first two steps. Once the drivers are correctly installed. and can also be plugged into your computer. and follow the on-screen instructions to install the necessary driver software. and also of connecting your computer to external MIDI devices via the gameport. including the model of your computer. and as they’re already in your computer you don’t need to attach cables at all in order to play music back. simply connect a USB cable (which may be provided with your device) to your computer. Failure to do so may result in Sibelius not correctly detecting your MIDI device when it loads. see b 1. Most Windows computers are supplied with a soundcard that is capable both of General MIDI playback. installing the necessary software. but in general there are three kinds of connection: * Many MIDI devices such as keyboards have USB connections. however if you want to upgrade your system in the future. synthesizers.4 Sibelius Sounds Essentials in Reference for how to set it up. b 4. samplers and other electronic music gadgets can all be plugged into one another with MIDI cables. enabling you to connect your MIDI keyboard directly to your computer using only one USB cable * You can connect a separate MIDI interface to a USB port on the back of your computer. How your MIDI devices connect to your computer depends on a number of factors. and plug your MIDI controller into the MIDI interface using MIDI cables * You can connect an external MIDI device directly to the “gameport” (or joystick port) on your computer’s soundcard with a special cable. and then setting up MIDI in Sibelius. Many computers have both a gameport and a USB port – neither option is more preferable than the other. Soundcards and software synthesizers are also MIDI compatible.10 Input devices in Reference.10 Input Devices in Reference. To install one of these devices.Start here MIDI setup for Windows If you are using Sibelius Sounds Essentials for playback. and which other hardware you already have connected. you should probably opt for a MIDI interface or a keyboard that can connect directly to one of your system’s USB sockets. There are three steps to setting up your MIDI devices: connecting the hardware. Connecting MIDI devices to your computer MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. It is a standard. 26 . sound modules. the model of your MIDI devices. You should switch on the power on your USB-connected MIDI devices before running Sibelius. you can set up input and playback in Sibelius – b 1. if you need more information.

Connecting MIDI devices via the gameport In general. or if * your soundcard doesn’t support “full duplex” operation (e. MIDI interfaces usually connect to a USB port on your computer. This means that music played on the keyboard will go out of the keyboard. We’ll assume your MIDI interface connects via USB. because it’s a notebook (laptop). a sound module.g. provided you have a soundcard that supports “full duplex” operation (check with the manufacturer). but you’re unable to play music into Sibelius from your external device). rather than a keyboard. To plug in just a MIDI keyboard. you can set up input in Sibelius – b 1. So connecting up a keyboard alone looks like this: If you want to connect just. MIDI interfaces usually require additional driver software. and show you some common MIDI setups. or if * your computer doesn’t have a gameport. if the keyboard has sounds built into it). Connections between MIDI devices all use standard MIDI cables. To make the computer play back music into the keyboard (e. say. simply connect the MIDI interface’s “Out” to the sound module’s “In.” If your keyboard has two “In” or “Out” sockets. which will be supplied by your device’s manufacturer. You might need a separate MIDI interface if: * your external MIDI device doesn’t have its own USB connection. if you find that Sibelius plays back Start here through your external MIDI device. pictured on the right.7 Input Devices in Reference.MIDI setup for Windows Connecting MIDI devices via a MIDI interface A MIDI interface is a small box that sits between your computer and your external MIDI devices. also connect the MIDI interface’s “Out” to the keyboard’s “In. along the cable and in to the computer.” Once you’ve connected your MIDI devices to your computer. or if you can use a direct USB connection instead. it usually doesn’t matter which you use – they’re just convenient duplicates of each other. 27 . connect its “Out” socket to the MIDI interface’s “In” socket.g. sending MIDI data back and forth. you won’t need to buy a separate MIDI interface for your computer.

” and the plug labeled “Out” to the socket on the keyboard marked “In. which looks something like this: Note how the two MIDI plugs are labeled “In” and “Out. say. which looks something like this: The gameport is the rectangular-ish connector.10 Input Devices in Reference. shown here at the far left. Provided you have the “In” and “Out” plugs in the right sockets on your MIDI keyboard (or sound module).” To connect this cable to. you can now finish setting things up – b 1. To connect this to an external MIDI device. Typically. you’ll need a “Y-shaped” MIDI-to-gameport cable. it will be on the soundcard.Start here Using your soundcard’s gameport also has the advantage of not requiring any further driver software – you can just plug in your MIDI device. a MIDI keyboard.” That’s all there is to it. and away you go. you should connect the plug labeled “In” to the socket on the back of the keyboard marked “Out. The gameport is usually found next to the sockets used to connect speakers and microphones to your computer. 28 .

synthesizers. to connect a Roland SC-88 Pro sound module to a new iMac or G4 with USB. 29 . In both cases. and as they’re already in your computer you don’t need to attach cables at all in order to play music back. b Sibelius Sounds Essentials in Reference. samplers and other electronic music gadgets can all be plugged into one another with MIDI cables. then b Input Devices in Reference to find out how to set up MIDI input in Sibelius. You may have to switch your sound module or keyboard off and on again to make it take notice of changing this setting. However. MIDI keyboards. Connecting MIDI devices directly This diagram shows how to connect a sound module (shown) or MIDI keyboard directly. sound modules. so no MIDI interface is required. which will be supplied by your device’s manufacturer. On Mac. not a thing – the universal standard for connecting electronic musical instruments together. use Mac OS X’s Audio MIDI Setup utility. the newer Roland SC-8820 connects directly via USB connection. you’ll need to use an external MIDI interface. It is a standard. Check your module or keyboard’s manual for precise connection details.MIDI setup for Mac MIDI setup for Mac Start here If you are using Sibelius Sounds Essentials for playback. simply connect your MIDI devices as described below. so ensure that this is set correctly (in this case. To set up MIDI on Mac. Direct connections often require additional driver software. and can also be plugged into your computer. it should be set to USB). because it’s a fairly old model. For example. Connecting MIDI devices to your Mac MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. or via a MIDI interface. There is normally a switch on the back of the keyboard or sound module that determines which of the connections it should send and receive data through. you often have the choice of connecting a MIDI device either directly (to the computer’s USB or Firewire ports). Soundcards and software synthesizers are also MIDI compatible. MIDI devices connect via USB or Firewire ports.

change its Name (to match the name of the device. In the dialog that appears.g. To add a MIDI keyboard or other input device. then choose the most appropriate avail- 30 . you should connect your devices as shown below: The second MIDI cable goes from the “Out” socket on the keyboard to the “In” socket on the MIDI interface. it should appear in the large white window If the attached MIDI device is a sound module.11 Playback Devices in Reference for what to do next If the attached device is a MIDI interface. you should click the Add Device button to add a new external device Double-click the new external device icon. you need to use the Mac OS X utility Audio MIDI Setup to tell the operating system what each of the devices are: * Run Audio MIDI Setup by double-clicking its icon. Connect a sound module using a MIDI interface like this: The MIDI cable is connected from the “Out” socket on the MIDI interface to the “In” socket on the sound module. which is in the Utilities folder inside the * * * * * Applications folder Click the MIDI Devices tab Provided your MIDI device is correctly installed. e. you don’t need to do anything else – just quit Audio MIDI Setup and refer to b 4. which will be supplied by your device’s manufacturer.Start here Connecting MIDI devices via a MIDI interface A MIDI interface is a small box that connects MIDI devices to your Mac via its USB port. MIDI interfaces often require additional driver software. Roland JV-1080). Audio MIDI Setup Once you have connected up your external MIDI equipment.

then b 1. * Now you need to tell your Mac that your new device is connected to your MIDI interface.MIDI setup for Mac able options from the Manufacturer and Model lists. Drag from the arrows on the icon representing each device to draw “wires” between their inputs and outputs. (Advanced users with complex MIDI setups may need to click the More Properties button to control additional parameters such as on which MIDI channels the device can send and receive data. simply quit Audio MIDI Setup.com/MusicSoftware/MacOSX/AudioMIDISetup/ Start here 31 .sonosphere. * When you’re done. Further information on using the Audio MIDI Setup utility can be found on the Web here: http://www.10 Input Devices in Reference for what to do next.

hide empty staves. and how to input lyrics. ties. Project 1 (2 hours) This project shows you how to open a score. and learn how to use Sibelius’s Ideas window to store and re-use snippets of music. Project 4 (1 hour) This project is especially useful if you are planning to produce learning materials for students or teach with Sibelius in the classroom. introduces the concepts of navigating around them using both the Navigator window and various keyboard and mouse shortcuts. and to marking up your score with text and dynamics. you will learn how to edit and input notes using your mouse. which will take you roughly eight hours to work through from start to finish. In this project you will create a worksheet of scales. but it should also be of interest if you want to learn some of the more advanced techniques for laying out and formatting music. Op. and D. 32 . Project 3 (2 hours) This project teaches you the basics of writing for keyboard. you will learn to recreate an excerpt from Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor. change text fonts. Project 5 (1 hour) This project introduces the Video window. You will also explore adjusting playback using the Mixer window.S. and explore the different kinds of objects – including articulations. 83 by scanning the four instrumental parts using PhotoScore Lite. hit points. you will also learn how to export an audio track from Sibelius in order to add it as a soundtrack to a video in an editing package such as Pinnacle Studio. and explores techniques for writing to picture. making selections. and learn how to indent staves. al Coda). guitar and drums. including working with timecode. as these explain all of the key concepts and features that you will use every day in Sibelius. but you should work through them as well if you can make the time. Bean. slurs and text – commonly used to mark up scores. and more. and a plug-in for adujsting the duration of a section of music. The fourth and fifth projects are more tightly focused on specific features. computer keyboard and MIDI keyboard. Using a video from the animated series Mr. then copying and pasting them into a newly-created score. You will learn how to create clef and key signature changes. more advanced note input including tuplets. You will be introduced to playback. Using an arrangement of the folk song Scarborough Fair. Project 2 (2 hours) In this project. You will also be introduced to dynamic parts. You are recommended to work through at least the first three projects. and exporting graphics from Sibelius.Start here About the projects The remainder of this Handbook is taken up with five projects. lines. and copying and pasting. together with an introduction to creating chord symbols and repeat structures (including 1st and 2nd ending lines.

Project 1 Project 1 .

Project 1 34 .

you’ll also learn how to print a copy of the arrangement we’re going to create in the subsequent chapters. the music appears. Let’s open one now. Double-click this. On Mac.1. you can also open scores when Sibelius isn’t running – just find the file on your computer and double-click it to open it in Sibelius (which automatically starts Sibelius if it isn’t already running). as the originals remain unaltered on your installation DVD-ROM. or choose File > Open (shortcut Ctrl+O or XO). Sibelius scores have icons that look like the one pictured on the right. This is an arrangement of a traditional ballad called Scarborough Fair. On Windows.sib is shown in the drop-down list. A standard Open dialog appears. When you’ve opened the Scarborough Fair score.1 Opening a score 1. then go into the Project Files folder. You can modify these without fear of retribution. you should find that you are inside a folder called Scores. which will contain a shortcut to a folder called Example Scores. As an aside. Alternatively.1 Opening a score The first chapter of this project shows you how to open a score in Sibelius and navigate around. select the score called Project 1. Opening a file Sibelius comes with some example scores that demonstrate various aspects of the program. looking somewhat like this: Project 1 35 . Choose Open recent file on the Quick Start dialog and make sure that Project 1. and then click Open. then click OK. you should find an alias called Sibelius Example Scores. you can open the file the old-fashioned way: click the toolbar button shown to the left.

which are for moving around the score: 36 . and in full detail in b 5. With long scores. You can’t drag the white rectangle off the top or bottom edges of the page displayed in the Navigator. This effect is very striking and enhances the disconcerting impression that you are moving a video camera around a real score. Try experimenting with the following shortcuts. In long scores. To do this. hold down Alt or z to move a screenful at a time * Hold Shift and scroll the wheel to move the page left and right. b 5. you can see that pages are laid side-by-side on a blue desk. and the view will instantly jump to that part of the score. Click anywhere on the Navigator. This rectangle is called the Navigator. the view of the score will continue to move leftwards or rightwards.23 View menu in Reference. If moving around the score is slow. switch it on by choosing Window > Navigator (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+N or zXN) – see Hiding and showing tool windows below. Sibelius is full of shortcuts that let you perform an action by typing a key rather than using the mouse. try setting the paper and/or background textures of the full score and parts to plain colors. By moving around the score with the Navigator. but the simplest of these is by dragging the paper on the screen with your mouse. so that they appear top-to-bottom or side-by-side. click the Navigator’s white rectangle and drag it around.6 Display settings in Reference. pages are joined in pairs as if in a score opened flat. For tips on changing Sibelius’s display.Project 1 Moving around the score There are a number of ways to move around the score. you can also use the wheel to scroll around the score: * Scroll the wheel up and down to move the page up and down. you should notice that the display on the gray rectangle in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen moves around too. You can also move around the score using keyboard shortcuts. As you do so. hold down Alt or z as well to move a screenful at a time * You can also use the wheel to zoom by holding down Ctrl or X – see Zooming below. and as single pages or spreads – see b 5.12 Menus and shortcuts in Reference. if you drag the white rectangle towards the left-hand or right-hand side of the Navigator. the faster it moves through the score. Alternatively. If you do this. or off the left edge of the first page or the right edge of the last page. However. so you can see where page-turns will occur. which pans the window smoothly around the score. If you have a mouse with a wheel button. If the Navigator isn’t open. click a blank part of the paper and drag the page. You can change the way pages of the score are laid out. click anywhere on the Navigator to show the score again. This allows you to move continuously across any number of pages. it is possible to click on the paper and drag the score off the edge of the screen. The white rectangle on the Navigator shows which portion of the music is shown on the screen. The further you drag. it shows a miniature view of some of the pages. It’s a good idea to learn keyboard shortcuts at least for the most common operations – these are listed on the back cover of this Handbook.

typing the Ctrl or X key with another key generally means “do this.1 Opening a score * Page Up (8 on some Mac keyboards) and Page Down (9 on Mac) move up or down a screenful * Home (4 on Mac) and End (7 on Mac) move left or right a screenful. or click the toolbar button shown on the right. Your score is instantly laid out as a single system on an infinitely wide page: Using Panorama allows you to input your music without Sibelius moving the page up and down. (Some Mac keyboards do not have a 7 (End) key. such as moving notes or other objects (such as text). hit Esc to deselect everything. increasing or decreasing note spacing. Esc is your get-outof-jail-free card in all eventualities! If you click on a note (or any other object in a score) and select it without meaning to. or a whole page if the whole width of the page is in view. and xX4 to go to the last page. instead. All the navigation methods we’ve already discussed work the same way in Panorama as they do in normal view. * Ctrl+Home or X4 and Ctrl+End or X7 go to the first or last page.1.) In Sibelius. with the 37 . Various operations in Sibelius use Ctrl or X to do things in big steps. but bigger” – in other words hitting the other key without Ctrl or X would perform the operation normally. the score only scrolls left to right. in which case you can use x4 instead to go right a screenful. which can be distracting. To switch to Panorama. and so on. Project 1 Panorama Sibelius has a wide range of tools to help make it easier for you to work on a score. you can use Panorama. if you want to cancel or stop an operation in Sibelius. For a more convenient way of viewing a score while you work on it. choose View > Panorama (shortcut Shift-P). Possibly the most important key you need when using Sibelius is the Esc key. adding the Ctrl or X key performs a bigger version of the operation. hit Esc.

or by clicking on the toolbar button (shown on the right). or Ctrl+– or X– to zoom out. and can be shown or hidden by switching Window > Keypad on or off.13 Panorama in Reference. or clicking the toolbar button again. then you can click the buttons on the toolbar to hide any of Sibelius’s tool windows. articulations. which always displays the clef. superimposed over the left-hand margin in Panorama view. which doesn’t appear in Panorama (because your score isn’t laid out on pages any longer). If you have a note or other object selected then Sibelius zooms in on the thing you select. or type in your own. This kind of view is sometimes called scroll view or gallery view in other programs. All of the project files you’ll be working on in this Handbook have a number of different versions. Versions While you work on a piece of music. Hiding and showing tool windows If your screen starts to get cluttered.Project 1 exception of the Navigator. so you can easily see where to start working from. Then zoom back in to 100%. which is a convenient size for doing most things in Sibelius. or you want to produce different arrangements of the same piece. Sibelius allows you to store all of these different versions in the same file. shown on the right. key signature and instrument name for each staff. Notice as you do this how the percentage zoom factor shown in the drop-down list on the toolbar changes. shown on the left. You can quickly see which version you’re viewing – and view other versions in the file – from the drop-down list on the toolbar. Try clicking on the first note of the vocal staff in the Scarborough Fair score and zooming in. Switch Panorama off again by choosing View > Panorama. You may have noticed the blue magic margin. You can also hide all of Sibelius’s tool windows by clicking the Hide Tool Windows button on the toolbar. You can select a particular zoom factor preset from the list. but the quickest of these is by using the keyboard shortcuts for zooming: type Ctrl++ or X+ to zoom in. ties and other markings. it can be very useful to save different versions of the same score – especially if you’re going to experiment. you can zoom in and out smoothly by holding Ctrl or X and scrolling the wheel up and down. The Keypad at the bottom right of the screen is an indispensible tool for inputting notes. including the Navigator. which we’ve already discussed. so that you can go backwards (or forwards) in time through the life of your score. b 5. Click the button again to show the windows you had open previously. accidentals. 38 . corresponding to the chapter headings. If you have a mouse with a wheel button. Zooming There are several ways to adjust the magnification of the score. For more information about Panorama. Try zooming out so that you can see the whole page of music on your screen.

22 Versions in Reference for more details. b 5. Printing a score Choose File > Print (shortcut Ctrl+P or XP) to open a standard Print dialog. because you’ll be reading music from it when we cover note input shortly. If you ran into any problems. Choose File > Versions > Edit Versions again. so you won’t be able to change anything in the score. simply click in the drop-down list on the name of the version you want to see. a high-quality printout of the Scarborough Fair score should emerge from your printer. From the list of versions. select 2 Editing and inputting notes. we need to be able to edit another version. which opens the Edit Versions dialog. and click Make Current. and make a new non-editable version of the existing one. b 5. For more information. Instantly the string parts that were hidden are shown.1. You should now see an incomplete arrangement of Scarborough Fair. switch Focus on Staves back on by clicking the toolbar button again. You’ll need a printout of the finished arrangement of Scarborough Fair to refer to while completing the rest of this project.1 Opening a score All versions except the Current version are non-editable. Click Yes. because we don’t need to work on them. To view another version. Sibelius will ask you if you want to make this version the current one. You should now see a completed arrangement of Scarborough Fair without the string staves visible. Hold on to this printout. For the next chapter of this project.8 Focus on Staves in Reference. Sibelius will ask you if you want to make this version the current one. and copy music from them. although you can play them. From the list of versions. Don’t worry about all the options: just click OK on Windows or Print on Mac to print your score. select notes and other objects. select 1 Opening a file. and make a new non-editable version of the existing one. print them. or choose View > Focus on Staves (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+F or zXF) to switch Focus on Staves off. Project 1 Focus on Staves The score you’ve just made into the current version uses Sibelius’s Focus on Staves feature to hide the staves that you’re not currently working on. Click Yes. or by choosing View > Focus on Staves.16 Printing in Reference for help. and click Make Current. Choose File > Versions > Edit Versions or click the Edit Versions button on the toolbar (to the left of the versions drop-down menu). so let’s print one now. See b 5. You won’t need to work on any of the string parts at any point in this project. Within a few moments. 39 . so we’ll save paper by hiding them in our printout! Click the toolbar button shown on the right.

hitting Esc will stop it playing back.” You can also use the Tab key (above Caps Lock on your computer keyboard) to move forward through every object attached to a particular stave. lyrics and so on. Keep hitting Tab and you’ll advance through the notes. Did you notice? This is another example of “do this. placing notes with the mouse. opening files from other programs – but the fastest way of all is by typing using your computer keyboard and editing as you go. do you remember that we looked at using the Esc key as a get-out-of-jail-free card? Well. To go backward in this way. Moving between notes While Sibelius lets you click on a note to select it (that’s why it turns blue. It can be used in any of the following situations: * When adding notes with the mouse. when you’re inputting or editing your music in any of the ways Sibelius allows. to move to the first note or rest in a bar. Try this out in the Scarborough Fair score: make sure you have nothing selected (by hitting Esc) and then hit Tab. playing a MIDI keyboard or guitar. so you don’t need to use your mouse at all. Tab selects the first object on the page. simply type Shift-Tab. 40 . simply type Ctrl+0 or Ctrl+1. choose File > Versions > Edit Versions. the fastest way to move between notes in Sibelius is to use your computer keyboard. You can move forwards and backwards from one note or rest to the next one by using the 0 and 1 keys. You should see the first note on the vocal staff of the score turn blue.Project 1 1. and clicking Make current. If you haven’t already done so. hitting Esc will stop you adding any more notes and leave the most recently-added note selected * If you’re editing a piece of text. You can also click the top left button on any Keypad layout – the one with the picture of the mouse pointer on it – to perform the same function (see The Keypad. below). Esc is of the utmost importance. hitting Esc will stop you typing or deleting any text and leave the object selected * If you have something selected. Sibelius allows you to input music in a number of ways – by scanning sheet music. hitting Esc will stop you placing any more notes * When typing notes with your computer keyboard. select this version in the list. dynamic markings. so that you can edit or change it).2 Editing and inputting notes In order to complete this section of the project. you should have already made the 2 Editing and inputting notes version into the Current version (see above). rests. Most of the actions you will perform in Sibelius are related to inputting notes and editing what you’ve inputted. Escape is your best friend Before we learn how to enter and edit notes in a score. hitting Esc will deselect it * When Sibelius is playing back your score. but bigger.

articulations. see Notebook (laptop) shortcuts below. you can either click the tabs with the mouse. When this feature set is 41 . If you use a notebook (laptop) computer. Thankfully you don’t need to resort to laboriously entering every note individually with the mouse. These words and other musical and technical terminology are explained in the Glossary in Reference. the button (shortcut F7 on Windows. shortcut Ctrl+. Select Notebook (laptop) shortcuts from the menu at the top of the dialog. To use these. while using Sibelius. – on the numeric keypad on Mac) goes back to the first layout. hit F7–F12. you may already be wondering how you’ll input any notes at all. you can use the standard numbers along the top of your keyboard which will correspond to the same numbers on the Keypad.2 Editing and inputting notes The Keypad The Keypad at the bottom right of the screen is where you choose note values.). Have a quick look to see what’s in the other layouts – fairly obscure stuff. Instead of using the numbers on the keypad. second layout. accidentals. or click the button (shortcut +) to cycle through the layouts. nor do you need to find a friend to hold down the Fn key while you type! Sibelius has some alternative single-key shortcuts built in. Beware that because the numeric keypad is used for specific functions in Sibelius. then click OK. then select the Menus and Shortcuts page. ties and other markings for creating and editing notes. We’ll talk about this more later on. Typing these keys does exactly the same as clicking the buttons with the mouse. To change layout. since you don’t have to carry a keyboard under your arm the whole time! Project 1 Notebook (laptop) shortcuts If you use a notebook (laptop) computer without a separate numeric keypad. you can’t switch off Num Lock to use the number keys as alternative arrow keys etc. which allow you the same freedom and speed when inputting notes. choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac. which we’ll call the first layout. The first layout is the one you’ll be using most of the time. The row of numbers at the bottom of the Keypad are for setting the “voice” of the note you’re inputting or editing. The button at the top left-hand corner of each Keypad layout (shown at the left) can be used as a substitute for the Esc key – this is particularly useful if you are using Sibelius on an interactive whiteboard in a classroom.) The numeric keys at the right of your computer keyboard correspond to the buttons on the Keypad. etc. Note value means the length of a note. This is so that you can have multiple rhythms played simultaneously on the same staff. as you can with other programs. (Articulations are symbols above or below a note such as staccato.1. tenuto and accent. and is quicker. The six little tabs just below the bar that says Keypad choose between six different layouts of musical symbols on the Keypad. or X.

Scarborough and save it to your Desktop. To save a score for the first time. we should use File > Save As (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+S or xXS) to save a copy of the score under a new name. If your computer should suffer a power failure or crash. preferably on a removable device like a USB flash memory stick (sometimes called a “pen drive”) or by burning onto CD-R. Files in Reference. simply click on it to select it and choose the corresponding Keypad button. For more information on these useful features. So to change the duration or add accidentals to a note. Save your work! Before we get down to the real business of learning how to edit and input notes. to save a pristine copy before you make a major change or to export a log showing the development of your score. You will find that if you learn to use the numeric keys and navigate with the arrow keys.12 Menus and shortcuts in Reference. You should always save your work regularly. However.Project 1 in use. and keep backups. the next time you start Sibelius you will be given the opportunity to restore any lost work. Choose File > Save Version or click the toolbar button shown here. then click Save. or if you make a major change that you later decide you don’t want. give your score a name. Sibelius makes a numbered backup and puts it into the Backup Scores folder inside your Scores folder.g. use Shift-1 to Shift-9 to enter intervals above a note – b 5. your score gets deleted by accident. your Scores folder). On Windows the Scores folder is inside your My Documents folder. every time you save your score using File > Save. you can work much faster than by clicking on the buttons with your mouse. You can save a version of your score at any point. b 5. Call it e.22 Versions and b 9. Sibelius also automatically saves a copy of your score into a special folder every few minutes.g. Furthermore. Editing notes with the Keypad All of the Keypad keys instantly modify the currently-selected note. choose File > Save (shortcut Ctrl+S or XS) or click the toolbar button shown here. because we’re working on an existing score that already has a name. which you can then use to save and review drafts. let’s take a moment to save the score. You can also purchase a separate numeric keypad to connect to your computer via USB that will allow you to use Sibelius’s standard shortcuts. the Scores folder is inside your user Documents folder. to keep track of arrangements. If. a B natural quarter note (crotchet) * Hit 3 (on the numeric Keypad) to change this to an eighth note (quaver) – notice how Sibelius has helpfully padded out the bar with an eighth note rest after the note to ensure that the bar remains the correct length 42 . find a suitable location (e. say. select the second note of the vocal part in bar 11. check inside the Backup Scores folder for a recent backup. on Mac. Let’s try it: * In the Scarborough Fair score.

it can’t help you at all. More details are in b 5. this only works for actions you’ve performed in Sibelius. and hit 9 (on the numeric Keypad) to change the natural to a flat.2 Editing and inputting notes * Change it back to a quarter note duration.21 Undo and Redo in Reference. on-screen piano keyboard which can display over seven octaves of keys at three different sizes (just drag the bottom right-hand corner of the window and drag it to resize). Mouse input and the Keyboard window Inputting notes with a mouse is simple in Sibelius. You should end up with: Project 1    Undo and Redo If you make a mistake. This undoes the last operation you did. Sadly. so if you spill your coffee all over the computer keyboard. This is a virtual. With the B natural selected. Typing Ctrl+3/2 or X3/2 moves the selected pitch up and down by an octave. Hit 7 once more to put the natural back on the note. Click the right-arrow toolbar button or choose Edit > Redo (shortcut Ctrl+Y or XY) to redo whatever you just undid. You can also use the arrow keys on your keyboard to change the pitch of selected notes. Click on a key with your mouse to hear the note played back: 43 . and you should see the deleted note miraculously reappear. Sibelius supports multi-level undo – try typing Ctrl+Z or XZ a number of times to see your score restore itself to how it was before you began to edit it. try moving the D up an octave by typing Ctrl+3 or X3. select the quarter note (crotchet) D and hit 5 on the numeric keypad to change it to a half note (minim). in which case just click the first layout tab (or hit F7) and try again. but it can be quite time-consuming. Before we begin inputting notes. Keep undoing until the note is a B natural again. or you are unhappy with changes you’ve made. If none of this seems to work properly then you probably weren’t in the first Keypad layout. choose Window > Keyboard or click the Keyboard button on the toolbar to open the Keyboard window. To test this. Try clicking the left-arrow toolbar button shown here or choose Edit > Undo (shortcut Ctrl+Z or XZ). Sibelius even includes an “undo history” that lists all the operations you’ve recently done. If you hit 9 again. hit Esc to deselect the note. then click it to select it again – you should hear Sibelius play a Bb. For example. Notice how the next note in the bar is overwritten.1. and lets you jump back to any earlier point in time. hit 2 until the pitch changes to a D below the staff. so you should try to use the shortcuts we’ve just discussed to speed things up. you can save yourself the trouble of going back and correcting your score manually. Sibelius then removes the redundant accidental – but the note will play back as a Bb (there’s a Bb in the key signature).

We’ll begin by choosing our first note from the Keypad. F and E:           The next bar begins with a quarter note rest. you can use 3 and 2 to adjust the pitch of the note after you’ve inputted it. The caret means that Sibelius is ready for you to input more notes. Now hit 4 (on the numeric keypad) to choose a quarter note (crotchet). The mouse pointer turns dark blue. to show that it is “carrying” a note. then hit 4 to select the quarter note again and click to add a note in the F space. so hit 0 on the numeric keypad to create a rest (the quarter note should still be selected). 44 . Now click the mouse pointer near the start of the clarinet staff. As you move the mouse pointer over the score. showing you where the dotted quarter note will be created when you click. The caret is especially useful for alphabetic input. and a vertical dark blue line – called the caret – is just to the right of it. to complement the vocal melody. clicking the mouse pointer to add a G. Notice that the note you just added is dark blue. so we’ll explain exactly what it does then. Notice how it even draws leger lines above and below the staff. (on the numeric keypad) to make the quarter note dotted. ensure nothing in your score is selected by hitting Esc (or clicking the top left button on the Keypad). First. showing that it’s selected.Project 1 We’re going to input a section of the countermelody from the start of the clarinet staff. a gray shadow note is drawn. pointing at the A space. The quarter note button on the Keypad stays selected. You should think of the caret like the familiar line you find in word processing software. Hit 3 to select the eighth note (quaver) on the Keypad and click with the mouse to add a G on the second line up. so you can carry on creating more notes by clicking with the mouse – you don’t need to re-choose the quarter note button. Add another three quarter notes to fill the next bar. Hit . so you can position high and low notes accurately. second space up:       If you clicked in the wrong place. which we’ll come on to a little later.

simply hit 4 on the numeric keypad before you click the key on the Keyboard window (or click in the score) to add the note. 45 . Let’s try it: * Select the quarter note (crotchet) D in the third bar of the clarinet staff * Hit the key on your numeric keypad that corresponds to the . (staccato dot) on the top row of buttons on the Keypad.2 Editing and inputting notes Let’s continue inputting the countermelody using the Keyboard window. we’re going to add some articulation instructions for the benefit of performers – you’ll see later on that Sibelius will also obey these articulations when playing back your score! In the same way as we learned how to change the selected note’s duration or accidentals. the Keypad buttons instantly add or remove articulations and ties. Begin by hitting 3 to select eighth notes (quavers) and enter the melody below. You should end up with:                   You can also use your computer keyboard to “play” the Keyboard window – see b 1. when you need to add the quarter note. Just click a note. using the Keyboard window. clicking on the keys and using the numeric keypad to change the note values. This adds a staccato mark to the note. then choose a Keypad button to add one of these objects to the note. Project 1 Adding articulation and ties with the Keypad To finish our countermelody.1.3 Keyboard window in Reference. or remove it again. * Repeat this for the quarter note D in the next bar                     Now navigate to the start of the second system to add a tie: * Select the half note (minim) A in the ninth bar of the clarinet staff * Hit Enter (on the numeric keypad) to put a tie after the note: * Now use the arrow keys and the numeric keypad to add articulations and ties to the rest of the clarinet countermelody.

g. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions.e. which shows that you can do things to them using the mouse and keyboard. we’re ready to look at selecting passages of music to manipulate. Try this by selecting the first note of the clarinet staff in the first bar of the Scarborough Fair score. The main difference is how you select the objects in the first place. copy or delete notes and other objects en masse. hold down the Ctrl or X key and click the left mouse button) one or more other objects to add them to the selection. You’ll most often select a passage in order to copy music from one instrument to another. This is mainly useful for objects other than notes. and clicking Make current.g. where continuous stretches of music are selected. 46 . e. To select multiple objects. Now carefully Ctrl+click or X-click the next note. Try removing the title from the selection.3 Selections and copying music If you are starting from this section of the project. We’ll look at how to make and use different kinds of selection in the Scarborough Fair score. selecting multiple articulations or several bits of text. Before we learn how to make a passage selection. where just one object is selected * Multiple selections. we’ve already looked at how to select notes by clicking them with the mouse. you should deselect the current objects by hitting Esc (or clicking the top left button on the Keypad). select a single object. shown with a light blue box (“staff passage”) or purple double-box (“system passage”) round them. they go colored. Now that we’ve discussed how to edit existing notes. If you accidentally add an object to the selection in this way. You can select text and other objects this way. Selections and passages When objects in the score are selected. maybe running over many pages. chords and rests – e. and use the keyboard shortcuts to make those edits faster. You can do pretty much the same things to all three kinds of selection. selecting this version in the list. you should open the example score called Project 1 and make the 3 Selections and copying music version into the Current version. copy or delete lots of notes at once.Project 1 1. It can run along one staff or several. Multiple selections let you perform edits to specific objects: try using the 3 and 2 keys to move the selected notes up and down. Selecting single objects is simple enough. There are three main kinds of selection: * Single selections. Passages allow you to edit. because they’re doubling each other. A passage is a continuous chunk of music. Almost everything you will do to change your score in Sibelius involves selections. or by hitting the Tab key. then Ctrl+click or X-click (i. so try Ctrl+clicking or X-clicking on the title. where several separate objects are selected * Selected passages. you can remove it by Ctrl+clicking or X-clicking the object again.

g. You should see a purple double-box appear around all the staves for that bar: * You can hold Ctrl or X while single-. This is really useful for copying music.g. but it can sometimes be useful for special notations.or triple-clicking to select system passages for a bar.9 Selections and passages in Reference.1. because all articulations. e. You can also use Backspace to delete objects. respectively * You can even select the entire score at once by choosing Edit > Select > Select All (shortcut Ctrl+A or XA). altering the format of the whole score. they will be shown in gray if you switch on View > Hidden Objects (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+H or zXH). double. 47 . Now carefully Shift-click on an empty part of the staff in the fourth bar of the acoustic guitar staff. Other objects can also be hidden for special purposes. Ctrl+click or X-click on an empty part of the first bar of the vocal staff. This is particularly useful for transposing the whole score. its color changes to a lighter shade to show that it’s been hidden. double. when you deselect it. Project 1 To make a system passage selection. You shouldn’t normally hide rests. to ensure that the rhythm still adds up. or add or remove individual staves using Ctrl+click or X-click. To see where hidden objects are.3 Selections and copying music To make a staff passage selection. text and other objects attached to the staff get copied too! Again. You should see a single light blue box surrounding all the intervening notes: Notice how every object attached to the staff is selected in the range of the passage. and leaves the rest of the rhythm still aligned as if the rest were still there. More details on selections are in b 1. you can Shift-click another staff to add all staves in between to the selection. to copy a bar) * Double-clicking an empty part of a bar selects that staff for the duration of the system * Triple-clicking an empty part of a bar selects that staff throughout the score * After single-. which hides it. There are various ways to select certain types of staff passage quickly: * Clicking an empty part of a bar selects that bar on one staff (e. dynamic markings. or for selecting particular types of object throughout the score. or choose Edit > Delete. then deleting them with the Delete key: * Delete a piece of text. begin by clicking on the first note of the clarinet staff in the first bar.or triple-clicking. When you first delete a rest. or the whole score. the Arranger text (from the top of the first page) * Delete a note: it turns into a rest. it’ll disappear altogether. Deleting notes and other objects Try selecting various objects. You can delete a rest. you can use the 3 and 2 keys to move the selected notes up and down. You can also see the selection in miniature on the Navigator. the duration of the system.

then use Undo to restore them again. you can use it instead of Alt+click to do a copy and paste in a single action. so there’s no need to try it now. so this is a very important function to learn. staves. Begin by selecting the fifth bar of the acoustic guitar staff: Now Alt+click or z-click onto the space at the start of the bar before the note you just placed in the sixth bar. if you have a third (i. You can use Alt+click or z-click to copy any combination of objects in a score. Let’s try it. This method works well for copying large chunks of music. but later come to regret your rashness. This is not used much in Sibelius. On Windows. Copying Copying music between bars. If you feel like living dangerously and switching this option on. and notice that you can switch on a checkbox labeled Don’t say this again if you want Sibelius to stop mollycoddling you (after all. click on the staccato quarter note (crotchet) in the fifth bar of the clarinet staff and then Alt+click or z-click onto a space in the empty sixth bar of the acoustic guitar staff. any articulations on a note will be copied in this way. but ends up at the pitch corresponding to the staff line or space where your mouse pointer was when you clicked. Remember that you can use Undo and Redo to restore anything you delete. The easiest way is to make a passage selection containing the bars you want to remove from the score (see Selections and passages above). multiple or passage selections. If you only have a two-button 48 . Try deleting the last three bars of the Scarborough Fair score. The note is copied exactly.e. there’s always Undo!). but cuts objects to the clipboard so that you can paste them elsewhere with Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV). then hit Delete. You’ll be asked if you’re sure you want to continue: click Yes. Notice that the staccato dot is copied too. middle) mouse button or a clickable scroll wheel. Another way to delete bars is to make a system passage selection. and even different files is very easy in Sibelius. Deleting bars Often you’ll find that you want to remove one or more bars – empty or not – from your score. then choose Edit > Delete Bars (shortcut Ctrl+Backspace or XBackspace). and you’ll see this: Sibelius overwrites the note you’d previously placed there with the newly-copied music. you can make this and other similarly dismissed warning messages appear again by clicking Show All Messages on the Other page of File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac).Project 1 Edit > Cut (shortcut Ctrl+X or XX) is similar to Delete. There are two ways to delete bars in Sibelius. by making single.

You can use this to quickly repeat any note. followed by Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to paste it elsewhere. Using the different methods we’ve discussed for copying music. text. chord. Both Edit > Copy and Edit > Paste functions are available on the context-sensitive menu you get by right-clicking (Windows) or Control-clicking (Mac) when one or more objects is selected. to duplicate the function of the middle mouse button. This method is slower than the previous ones and so is not particularly recommended. except for copying music between different scores (because Alt+click or z-click only copies within the same score).3 Selections and copying music mouse. Project 1 49 . complete the missing bars in the guitar part by copying the preceding bar (or bars) into any remaining empty bars on the acoustic guitar staff. and hit R to see the bars repeated immediately after themselves. that is. clicking the left and right mouse buttons simultaneously. passage of music or various other objects after itself. you can do this by performing a chord-click.1. Sibelius also allows you to duplicate notes or other objects in your score so that an exact copy appears immediately after the original by choosing Edit > Repeat (shortcut R). Select the four bars of the bass line you just entered using Alt+click or z-click. You can also use the traditional way of copying music to clipboard by choosing Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC).

5 Alphabetic and steptime input on page 53. however. We’re going to look now at Sibelius’s unique realtime note input system. you can set up input and playback in Sibelius. you should open the example score called Project 1 and make the 4 Flexi-time input version into the Current version. Once your MIDI device is correctly installed. you don’t need to tell Sibelius that you’re changing input method. you should choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and go to the Input Devices page: 50 . “Real-time” input simply means that you can play into a computer program and it will write down both the pitches and the rhythm you play. and then “quantize” the music afterwards in an attempt to clean up any inaccuracies in your rhythm.1 MIDI setup for Mac on page 29. much faster ways to input notes. it is very difficult for any program to understand what rhythm you are playing without either analyzing the music after your performance. anyway. Sibelius takes a unique approach that enables you to play in a rather freer style. you must have a MIDI keyboard or MIDI guitar connected to your computer – see 1. and by inputting notes using the Keyboard window. We’ve already looked at note entry by clicking on a staff with the mouse.4 Flexi-time™ input If you are starting from this section of the project. That’s the theory. which you should try and see which one feels most comfortable for you – or mix and match. skip on to b 1. selecting this version in the list. and still get good results. Using a MIDI device To use Flexi-time. In practice. If you don’t have a MIDI keyboard or MIDI guitar. However. There are.1 MIDI setup for Windows on page 26 or 1.Project 1 1. or being given a lot of help. and clicking Make current. To do this. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. which is called Flexi-time. This usually means you have to play along as exactly as possible with a metronome click.

10 Input Devices in Reference.1 Working with playback in Reference. we’re going to be using a MIDI keyboard.1. because as soon as you choose Notes > Flexi-time Input (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+F or xXF) or click the circular record button on the Playback window.g. choose Notes > Flexi-time Options (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+O or xXO). For this chapter. We’re going to record one verse of the clarinet part. then start recording what you play. Sibelius will give you one bar count-in. If you can’t see the Playback window. then b 1. rather than Keyboard. (If you do not hear a metronome click.) 51 . M-Audio Oxygen 8) and check that the Use checkbox is switched on. Let’s do this first – you should be looking at the Scarborough Fair score we’ve been working on. b 1. this tells Sibelius where to start recording from Now brace yourself. The Playback window allows you to view and control Sibelius’s playback. Project 1 Trying it out You’ll need the printout of the score that we made at the start of this project in order to read the music from it. switch it on by choosing Window > Playback (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+Y or zXY): Play Rewind Move Playback Line to Start Fast-forward Stop Flexi-time Record Live Live Tempo Playback Play Live Tempo Click (on/off) Timeline slider MIDI in & out indicators Move Playback Line to End Timecode readout Current tempo Tempo slider We’ll start playing in notes using Flexi-time from bar 43 until the end of the verse in bar 61: select bar 43 in the clarinet staff so that it is enclosed in a single light blue box (or select the little bar rest rectangle itself). Click OK to return to the score. Because we’re recording in time with other instruments – and we’re only recording one line of music – you should choose None (non rubato) from the Flexibility of tempo drop-down list. To learn more about setting up input and playback with MIDI devices. If you are using a MIDI guitar. check your playback device is switched on.4 Flexi-time or b 4. Flexi-time options The easiest thing to do is to try playing in a single melodic line. so to ensure that we get the best results. and switch off the Record into multiple voices checkbox. you will need to change the Type value by clicking the drop-down menu and choosing Guitar.4 Flexi-time™ input You should find your device’s name in the table at the top of the page (e. Try it now: * Flexi-time gives you a single bar’s count-in by default – so in this case you should hear three clicks count-in.

It may be easiest not to watch the screen while you’re recording! * When you want to stop recording. Sibelius will recalculate the Flexi-time transcription and produce a rhythmically and visually simpler version. You may also like to experiment with the other plug-ins in the Plug-ins > Simplify Notation menu. following the speed of the clicks * Keep going for as long as you like. hit Delete and select bar 43 again.Project 1 * At the end of the count-in. You can also change other options such as rubato (the flexibility of your tempo).4 Flexi-time in Reference. If there are still any mistakes. If you want Sibelius to slow down your score while you record. Select the passage and choose Plug-ins > Simplify Notation > Renotate Performance. we’ll learn how to input onto two staves simultaneously. Make sure that the Overwrite selected passage checkbox is switched on. b 6. below. The tempo slider on the Playback window allows you to speed up or (more importantly in this case) slow down playback of your score. click the square stop button on the Playback window or hit Space. see Adjusting the recording tempo.7 Text and dynamics on page 60. set the Quantization unit (minimum duration) drop-down to Longer: 1/8 note (quaver). Since the music we recorded doesn’t use any note value smaller than an eighth note (quaver). allowing you to play more carefully. Take as many attempts as you need. the sound and count-in of the metronome click. In Project 3 of this Handbook.1 Working with plug-ins in Reference. Renotate Performance If you find that you end up with unwanted rests. and click OK. until you’re happy with the result. try playing the next few bars smoothly. You should only use the tempo slider to change the speed of playback for your whole score. you can use the editing techniques you have already learned to correct the note values and pitches. Take a look at what Sibelius has transcribed – if you’re not happy with the result. 52 . for changes in tempo you should use tempo text and metronome markings added to the score – see b 1. This applies to recording Flexi-time input too – set the slider to the left-hand side and the click will slow down. and notice how Sibelius displays the notes on the screen (it will usually be several notes behind you). overlapping notes or incorrect note durations. you can use one of Sibelius’s plug-ins (powerful extra features) to make these more legible. Adjusting the recording tempo Don’t worry if you’re having difficulty or your keyboard skills are a bit rusty – Sibelius doesn’t expect you to be a virtuoso! In a moment we’ll look at tidying up the transcription. To learn more about plug-ins. but first we’ll learn how to make Flexi-time recording a bit easier. then simply select the bars you’ve just inputted. which opens a simple dialog. and the way in which triplets and other tuplets are recognized – b 1.

Try adding the music to the clarinet part from bar 66 to bar 68: * Click the little bar rest rectangle in bar 66 of the clarinet staff. From now on.5 Alphabetic and step-time input If you are starting from this section of the project. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. do not touch the mouse – however tempted you are! * Hit N (the shortcut for Notes > Input Notes). then type 3 on the numeric keypad to * * * * * * * * choose an eighth note (quaver). Any buttons chosen on the keypad are merely preparing what will happen when you type A–G or click the mouse. you need to type any accidentals. (If you forget. articulations. you can always go back afterwards and edit the note. you should open the example score called Project 1 and make the 5 Alphabetic and step-time input version into the Current version. with alphabetic input. as with mouse input. so type Ctrl+3 or X3 to move the note up an octave.) The 53 . showing you where the next note will be added. a note is only actually created in the score when you type the letters A–G. Project 1 Alphabetic input You can input notes into Sibelius by typing the pitches using the letters A–G directly from the computer keyboard. Notice that the caret moves after every note you input. we’re going to learn two more ways of creating notes in Sibelius. or other Keypad markings before typing the letter. selecting this version in the list. Notice that Sibelius has input the A an octave too low. to input a B natural. so that it goes dark blue – this tells Sibelius where to begin. which makes the caret appear * Hit F7 to see the first Keypad layout (if it isn’t showing). So. C and A quarter notes Now. Now let’s finish inputting the notes into the clarinet staff.5 Alphabetic and step-time input 1. as we’ve stopped adding notes for the moment. You’ll need the printout of the score that we made at the start of this project in order to read the music from it. type 7 (on the numeric keypad) to select the natural Type B G to input the B natural and a G quarter note Hit Esc twice to stop creating notes and deselect the last note. and make chords using the numbers 1–9 on the main keyboard (not the numeric keypad). You should end up with this:         Just as notes are only created by the mouse when you actually click in the score. This inputs a D half note. Type F C and then Ctrl+3 or X3 to move the C up an octave Type A to add another eighth note Type 5 on the keypad to select a half note (minim) Type D 4 (on the numeric keypad) C A. and clicking Make current. Type F C A. so that Sibelius knows how long you want the notes to be. You must choose a note value.1. This is much quicker than mouse input once you’re used to it.

Changing the pitch of a note is just as simple: select the note and type the new pitch using the letters A–G. accidentals and other attributes just by selecting the note and choosing the appropriate button on the Keypad. 54 . and inputting the pitches with the other hand. You can also use your MIDI keyboard (or MIDI guitar) to play in pitches in a similar way to the alphabetic input. type Shift-1–9 to add an interval above. Input one of the notes in the chord as normal. you can select passages of notes and add notes above/below all of them at once using 1–9 or Shift-1–9. As with alphabetic input. 3 adds a note a third above. and type N to make the caret appear * Choose a note value on the Keypad (you must remember to do this. e.) You can keep adding further notes to a chord in the same way. If you don’t have a MIDI device connected to your computer. choose any articulations or other markings on the Keypad before creating a note. These Keypad keys remain on until you rechoose them. 1 adds a unison note. e. type a number 1–9 on the main keyboard (not the numeric keypad) to add a note an interval above. Use alphabetic input to enter the rest of the missing music from the clarinet part into your score from bar 69. (There aren’t shortcuts for adding notes below by letter-name. then: * on a regular keyboard. For more details b 1. Remember. Once you get used to changing the durations with one hand. you can edit an existing note’s articulations. complete this section using the alphabetic input method we just learned – or use the Keyboard window as a virtual MIDI keyboard! (b 1. you’ll find this a very fast method of creating notes. and is faster still. Shift-4 adds a note a third above * on either kind of keyboard.g. All you do is: * Select a rest to start creating notes from.1 Note input in Reference. or Sibelius has to guess) * Start playing notes on the MIDI keyboard. Chords in alphabetic input There are two simple ways to build chords in alphabetic input.) Step-time input is like alphabetic input using a MIDI input device. or type Shift-1–9 to add a note below. type Shift-A–G to add a note of that pitch above the current note. We’ve already seen how to change the length of a note by selecting it and choosing different note values from the Keypad. Shift-6 adds a note a sixth below * on a notebook (laptop) computer’s keyboard (see Notebook (laptop) shortcuts on page 41). using the letters A–G and R. Step-time input We’ve already looked at how to use a MIDI device to input music into Sibelius by recording in a real-time performance.3 Keyboard window in Reference.Project 1 only exception is adding ties (by hitting Enter) which is done after creating the note (just because it feels more natural as the tie is after the note). using the numeric keypad. Especially useful.g.

choose eighth notes (quavers) from the Keypad * Now begin playing in the notes. The only differences from alphabetic input are: * You don’t need to input accidentals. Sibelius automatically transposes transposing instruments for you – see below. to correct a note or chord’s pitch you can just select it and re-play it on your MIDI keyboard. as F# or Gb – on the basis of the key signature and the musical context. If you type notes using the letters A–G. To switch to transposing pitch and show the clarinet staff at the correct pitch for the performer to read. changing the note lengths from the Keypad as you go.1 Note input in Reference. as you would with alphabetic input). Sibelius makes an intelligent guess as to how you want black notes “spelled” – e.1. These differences make step-time input somewhat faster than alphabetic input. your score is shown at sounding (concert) pitch.) Sibelius’s note input methods allow you to enter notes into a score with Notes > Transposing Score switched on. Project 1 You can always go back with the arrow keys if you made a mistake. Notice how all of the music and key signatures on the clarinet staff are instantly changed to the clarinet’s transposing pitch. As with alphabetic input. * Similarly. using step-time input: * First. b 1. choose a new note value from the Keypad before creating the note * To input a rest. Try inputting the rest of the missing music onto the acoustic guitar staff from bar 69. Or there’s always Undo! It is much faster to use your MIDI keyboard (or MIDI guitar) to create chords than by clicking notes with the mouse or typing using your computer keyboard. then the corresponding written pitches will appear on the staff: * Choose Notes > Transposing Score or click the toolbar button to switch to transposing score * Select the first two bars of the clarinet staff and hit Delete to clear the notes * Type N to make the caret appear and choose a note value from the Keypad 55 . as Sibelius can of course tell when you’re playing a black note. Sibelius always knows which octave you want * You can input chords instantly just by playing them (you don’t have to input one note and then add further notes to it. hit 0 on the keypad. Transposing scores By default. select the bar rest in bar 69 in the acoustic guitar staff (so it goes dark blue) * Next.5 Alphabetic and step-time input * To change note value. When playing back a transposing score. For more details. or want to change something. and R to repeat notes or bars.g. Sibelius reads transposing instruments correctly to produce the correct pitch. Don’t forget that you can use Alt-click or z-click to copy music. which inputs a rest of the value selected on the Keypad. simply choose Notes > Transposing Score (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+T or xXT) or click the button on the toolbar (shown above left) – try this now. you can ask Sibelius to “respell” a note after creating it just by hitting Return (on the main keyboard). Sibelius transposes music when you copy it between transposing instruments so that it always sounds the same. However. Sibelius automatically handles all other complications produced by transposing instruments. (When viewing instrumental parts from a sounding pitch score.

b 2. Type Ctrl+2 or X2. add slurs. then choose Window > Switch to Full Score (shortcut W) or click the toolbar button on the left. b 7. transposing and laying out. this is the parts menu * Choose Clarinet in Bb from the list – the view changes to display one instrument. just as you would normally. D and E on the staff. 56 . you don’t need to do anything. C and D on the staff * Choose Notes > Transposing Score or click the toolbar button again to switch to sounding pitches – notice how the pitches transpose automatically to become G.1 Working with parts in Reference.18 Instruments in Reference for more details. and in fact. which inputs the pitches A. We’ll learn more about how to work with dynamic parts in the other projects in this Handbook – for more details. This part is ready for you to give to a performer. A.Project 1 * Type A B C D. B. to move the passage back to the original octave. C and D on your MIDI input device. it has everything the instrumentalist needs to perform this part. You can edit dynamic parts in exactly the same way as you would a score. These magical creations are known as dynamic parts™. Bb and C. and vice versa. Working with parts As well as automatically transposing instruments in a score. it has the same title. Notice how this inputs the pitches B. However. the same notes as the score (but at the correct written transposition) – in fact. then the sounding pitches will appear on the staff: * Choose Notes > Transposing Score or click the toolbar button to switch to transposing score * Select the first two bars of the clarinet staff and hit Delete to clear the notes * Type N to make the caret appear and choose a note value from the Keypad * play the notes A. C#. the parts are instantly updated. too. Undo the changes you made and restore the clarinet countermelody by choosing Edit > Undo. Sibelius has transposed the same passage up an octave in the full score. You don’t need to extract dynamic parts. Sibelius uses a revolutionary approach by which any change made in the score is automatically made in the part. when you play pitches in step-time using a MIDI input device. and nothing that they don’t! Try selecting a bar and transposing it up an octave by typing Ctrl+3 or X3. Because parts are created automatically when you start a score. You can move. add and delete notes. laid out on cream-colored paper to help you quickly differentiate between a score and a part. But whenever you change something in the score. These only contain notation relevant to the instrument and Sibelius takes care of all the formatting. and vice versa. they’re all kept in the same file as the full score – so they’re easier to organize. Let’s look at the parts for the instruments in the Scarborough Fair score: * Click on the drop-down menu on the toolbar that says Full Score. Sibelius creates a set of instrumental parts – one for each instrument in your score. B. expression markings etc.

by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. click the toolbar button (shown here). To show the Mixer. In the picture above.6 Playback If you are starting from this section of the project. Find the acoustic guitar staff strip. Playback controls Project 1 Click the Play button on the Playback window. to make the guitar sound louder during playback.6 Playback 1. Clicking the Play button or typing Space will tell Sibelius to play again from the point where it left off. So an even quicker way to play from the start of the score is to hit Esc to deselect everything. which should begin to play back (if it doesn’t. or hit the shortcut Ctrl+Alt+M or M. i. Why not listen to the arrangement of Scarborough Fair all the way through? When you want to stop. One of the most powerful features of Sibelius – which we’ve not really seen yet – is the ability to play your score back. To play from a particular point. you should rewind to the beginning of the score – to quickly rewind or fast-forward to the start and end of the score. wherever you stopped it playing before. if it’s open) and zooms to show you a full page of music. The Mixer is divided into color-coded strips. you can alternatively click on a note to select it. but who needs menus? Sibelius automatically hides the Keypad (and the Properties window. Drag the volume fader up to 118. or hit Space again.1. then hit P to play. and click and drag the volume fader to the right-hand side. which positions instruments in 3D space as if set out on a concert stage. choose Window > Mixer. You’ll see a vertical green line (called the playback line) passing through the music to indicate the position as it plays. use Ctrl+[/] or X[/]. You can also find this function in the Play menu. and the score moves around to follow the music. just click the Stop button on the Playback window. 57 . You can adjust the position and volume (as well as applying reverb and other effects) for each instrument yourself from Sibelius’s powerful Mixer window. you may have noticed that the instruments sound like they are at different stereo positions – this is Sibelius’s SoundStage™ feature at work. you should open the example score called Project 1 and make the 6 Playback version into the Current version. see I can’t hear anything! below. or hit Space to start the music. If you have problems with playback. you can see that each staff in your score gets its own light blue staff strip. The Mixer window As you play back Scarborough Fair.e. and hit P. You can rewind and fast-forward through a score using the appropriate buttons on the Playback window or by using the keyboard shortcuts [ (rewind) and ] (fast-forward). then see below). selecting this version in the list. and clicking Make current. so to play a piece from the start again.

can you hear how it starts to sound like the guitarist is playing in a big concert hall? Any changes to volume. 58 . which expands the staff strip: You will see lots more controls. and while Sibelius plays back the score. To learn all about Sibelius’s playback and the Mixer. As you mix more reverb into the guitar sound. including another slider above the Reverb and Chorus knobs. let’s change the stereo position of the drums. The Scarborough Fair score uses the powerful built-in Sibelius Player and the Sibelius Sounds Essentials sound library to create incredibly realistic sounds. Can you hear how the drum sounds seem to “move” to your left? Let’s look at how to use the Mixer to add effects such as reverb and chorus to instruments in a score: * Find the guitar staff strip and expand it by clicking the arrowhead * Click on the knob labeled Reverb * Drag with the mouse to turn the knob and adjust the amount of effect applied to the guitar – listen to how the sound changes. Find the drum set staff strip and click the arrowhead to the left of the instrument name. b 4. Playback & video in Reference. effects. Hit Space. click and drag this slider all the way to the lefthand side. stereo position (pan) and so on that you make in the Mixer are saved when you save your score (or save a version of your score) so that everything is just as you left it when you open it again.Project 1 Now.

Windows XP: * Go to the Start menu and choose Control Panel. switched on and have the volume turned up. then Hardware and Sound * Select the Adjust system volume link immediately underneath the Sound heading * Make sure the Sibelius volume (under Applications) and the main Device volume are not muted and are turned up Mac OS X: * Go to the Apple menu and choose System Preferences * Select Sound and then click on the Output tab * Make sure the Output volume is turned up and Mute is not selected. If you are still unable to hear Sibelius play your score. then click the Test button again. If you still can’t hear anything during playback. 59 . See b 4. check that Sibelius is correctly configured: * Choose Play > Playback Devices * Select Sibelius Sounds from the Configuration drop-down menu * Select Sibelius Player in the right-hand column. please contact technical help. otherwise choose Primary Sound Driver) and click Close * Select the Sibelius Player entry in the right-hand column. click Audio Engine Options at the bottom of the dialog * Check that your preferred interface is selected (on Windows. First. check to see if your computer operating system is configured to play audio produced by Sibelius. Find your operating system from the list below and follow the instructions. MIDI keyboard or other playback equipment are plugged in. then click the Test button * If you still can’t hear any sound. check that your computer speakers. Next. there are a number of things you should try before throwing your computer out of the window.6 Playback I can’t hear anything! If you press Play but can’t hear any noise. then click the Volume button * Make sure the main Volume Control and MIDI Synth/SW Synth are turned up and Mute is Project 1 not selected. then double-click Sounds and Audio Devices * Click the Audio tab at the top. Windows Vista: * Go to the Start menu and choose Control Panel. choose ASIO if available.1.12 Playback Devices in Reference for more information.

and choose a new Main Text Font. There are a few things you should remember when editing text: * If you just want to change the characteristics of a small amount of text. Most text instructions play back. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. you should use the options on the Text panel of the Properties window. technique instructions etc. Lyrics and Tempo. selecting this version in the list. because this will automatically change all existing text and also all new text you create in that style thereafter. But you’ll also want to add all kinds of other text yourself. to change the title. b 5. many instructions for musicians playing from a score take the form of text. Other than the notes.9 Edit Text Styles in Reference. because you won’t often need to adjust settings in there. e.g. bar numbers and instrument names. If you want to change the font or size. A lot of the text in a Sibelius score is entirely automatic so you don’t have to think about adding it. the Properties window is not shown on the screen. you should edit the text style rather than changing all the existing words manually. For example. Sibelius understands them and plays back accordingly. to another font in a single operation). which specifies its font. 60 .7 Text and dynamics If you are starting from this section of the project.g. and clicking Make current. you can change pieces of text individually.Project 1 1. Text styles are called obvious things like Title. so when you create dynamics or tempo markings. which isn’t very helpful for any singer wanting to perform our arrangement! Let’s add the lyrics: * Click on bar 5 of the vocal staff to select it * Choose Create > Text > Lyrics > Lyrics line 1 (shortcut Ctrl+L or XL) * A flashing caret appears below the first note * Now type the first line of lyrics.9 Edit Text Styles). instrument names. as this will instantly change all similar text throughout the score – b 3. page numbers. * If you want to change all of the text in your score to use another font (e. but it’s usually best to do so by editing the text style. you should open the example score called Project 1 and make the 7 Text and dynamics version into the Current version. position and other characteristics. Switch it on by choosing Window > Properties (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+P or zXP). you should edit the text style itself instead (b 3. A word about text Each type of text you can create in Sibelius has its own so-called text style. * If you want to change all the text throughout the score in just one particular text style. from dynamics and lyrics to metronome marks and tempo text. lyrics. if you decide you want your lyrics in a different font. Adding lyrics The vocal staff in the Scarborough Fair score has no lyrics. By default.17 Properties in Reference. choose House Style > Edit All Fonts. size.

1.7 Text and dynamics To add a break between syllables, type – (hyphen) and Sibelius will automatically position the text cursor at the next note. If the syllable spans more than one note, hit hyphen repeatedly (once for each note) until the cursor appears under the note where you want to enter the next syllable. To add a break between words, type Space. If the last syllable of the word you entered spans more than one note, repeatedly type Space until the cursor appears under the note where you want to start the next word. Sibelius will indicate that the word is supposed to continue melismatically by drawing a line up to the point at which the syllable ends. You should now see:
5

 

mf

Are

you

 
go - ing

  

  

Project 1

to Scar - bo -rough Fair?



Importing lyrics from a text file
Typing in lyrics by hand can be quite a laborious task – especially if you have to work out where to syllabify words. Sibelius can import a text file containing the lyrics to your song and automatically syllabify them for you. A text file containing the words to Scarborough Fair is included in the Project Files folder of example scores. Let’s import the lyrics:
* Triple-click the vocal staff to make a passage selection around the entire staff * Choose Create > Text > Lyrics > From Text File * Click Browse to see a standard Open dialog. On Windows, you should find that you are inside a

folder called Scores, which will contain a shortcut to a folder called Example Scores. On Mac, you should find an alias called Sibelius Example Scores. Double-click this, then go into the Project Files folder, select the text file called Project 1 Lyrics, and then click Open. * Click OK to import the lyrics (they will automatically overwrite the first line of lyrics you just typed in). You can also copy lyrics from other programs (such as word processors), create multiple verses of lyrics, and control every aspect of their appearance and formatting – b 3.3 Lyrics in Reference.

Dynamics
The term dynamics is used to mean both text instructions like mp and hairpins (wedge-shaped cresc./dim. lines), which Sibelius will respect when playing back your score – just as you’d expect a performer to do. Text dynamics are written in a text style called Expression. Let’s create a text dynamic at the start of the piece:
* Select the first note of the clarinet staff * Choose Create > Text > Expression (shortcut Ctrl+E or XE) * A flashing caret appears below the first note * Hold down Ctrl or X and type F – holding down Ctrl or X tells Sibelius to write the letters using

the special bold characters which should be used for dynamics – you could instead right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a menu of useful words appear. This menu is, appropriately enough, called a word menu. 61

Project 1
* Hit Esc to stop creating text.

You should now see:

   
f

  

Now add the rest of the missing text dynamics to the vocal, clarinet and acoustic guitar staves in the score, referring to the printout of Scarborough Fair that we made at the start of this project. You can write all the dynamics in this arrangement either by holding down Ctrl or X as you type them to tell Sibelius to use the special bold characters, or by using the word menu.

Tempo text
Tempo text is used at the start of a score and at sections where the tempo of the music changes dramatically. Sibelius follows tempo text during playback and changes the speed accordingly. You may have noticed when playing back the score during the previous chapter that it sounds a little too slow. If you didn’t notice, hit Space now to play back your score and listen again! Let’s change the tempo by adding some Tempo text:
* Type Ctrl+Home or X4 to go back to the start of the score, and select the first bar (this tells

Sibelius where to put the tempo marking)
* Choose Create > Text > Tempo (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T or zXT) * A flashing caret appears above the bar – Sibelius knows that this type of text should go above the

staff, so it automatically puts it there * Now right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to display the tempo markings word menu * Choose Allegro from the menu and click it. The menu disappears and the word Allegro appears in your score. * Hit Esc to stop creating text. You should now see:
Allegro
Voice

  

Now, rewind the score to the beginning and hit Space to play back your score (make sure that the tempo slider on the Playback window is set to its middle position to hear exactly the right speed). You could try experimenting with a few of the different tempo suggestions available in the word menu by deleting the Allegro marking and choosing Create > Text > Tempo again – see how the score would sound using Prestissimo or Maestoso.

Technique text
To tell a performer to change the sound of an instrument, or to employ a particular instrumental technique or device, use Technique text. Sibelius understands your instructions too, and will play them back (depending on your playback device), so that you can use mutes, pizzicato, tremolo, distortion, and other effects in your score. 62

1.7 Text and dynamics Technique text is like Expression text, but it appears above the staff and non-italicized by default. To create a technique marking, choose Create > Text > Technique (shortcut Ctrl+T or XT). For more about Expression, Tempo and Technique text and other common text styles, b 3.2 Common text styles in Reference.

Editing existing text
To edit text that’s already in your score, you can double-click it, or select it and hit Return (on the main keyboard). Let’s change the name of an instrument in this way:
* select the instrument name Drum Set at the start of the first system

Project 1

* double-click the text to edit it * delete the existing text and type Drum Kit * hit Esc once to stop editing text, then again to deselect.

You can do this to any piece of text in your score, so it’s easy to change titles, lyrics, dynamics and other instructions.

Magnetic Layout
As we’ve been editing, you may have noticed that text and other objects in your score move around as the notes move. Or, you may have seen that some objects, when they’re selected, have a shadow object appearing underneath them. What you’re seeing are the effects of Magnetic Layout, Sibelius’s revolutionary collision avoidance and detection feature. No other notation software does the work of automatically laying-out your score beautifully for you as you create and edit the music! Magnetic Layout constantly adjusts the position of objects on the staves so that they don’t overlap each other or obscure the notes. We’ll learn more about how it works in Project 2, or b 8.2 Magnetic Layout in Reference.

63

Project 1 64 .

Project 2 Project 2 .

Project 2 66 .

Choose File > Open (shortcut Ctrl+O or XO) and find the example score called Project 2 in the Project Files folder inside the example scores folder. give your score a title. Open this score and choose 1 Creating a new score from the versions drop-down list on the toolbar. 67 . you’ll need a printout of the finished score of the music we’ll be creating. Project 2 Starting a new score To start a new score. which guides you through the creation of your score in five easy steps: * Choose the instruments from a list of pre-defined “manuscript papers. you will learn how to create a new score from scratch. how to scan music into Sibelius and how to present your score beautifully and clearly for the benefit of performers. if you want one. whether to use a traditional or handwritten music design Set the initial time signature and tempo Set the initial key signature Finally.” or create your own * * * * instrumentation. and choose the page size and orientation Decide the appearance of the score. Choose File > Print (shortcut Ctrl+P or XP) and click OK on Windows or Print on Mac to print your score. The dialog is so simple to use that you probably don’t need any help getting from one end to the other. because you’ll be reading music from it when we edit our arrangement shortly. Finale: Allegro molto.1 Creating a new score In this project.1 Creating a new score 2. You should now see a completed string quartet arrangement of an excerpt from Edward Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor. let’s work through it together. Within a few moments. III. a printout of the String Quartet in E minor score should emerge from your printer. to refer to whilst completing the rest of this project. You can click Finish after any step. so you don’t have to make all of these decisions at the very beginning if you don’t want to. A dialog captioned New Score appears. click the icon on the toolbar shown on the left. Printout Before we start creating a string quartet score. and create a title page.. or choose File > New (shortcut Ctrl+N or XN). Hold on to this. etc. Op. you’ll learn how to quickly set up a “manuscript paper” containing everything you need to start writing music.83. but since we want to set up a particular kind of score. The first chapter of this project shows you how to create a string quartet score ready for you to input notes.2. enter the composer’s name. e.g.

Sibelius will ask you if you want to add instruments to your score. click All instruments to display the complete set. because we want to learn how to create instruments. If you’re writing specifically for band. Creating instruments You can create new instruments whenever you like – you don’t need to decide them all at the start – but you should pick at least one instrument initially otherwise you’ll have nothing to write music for! Because Sibelius knows about so many instruments (more than 600). if you’re itching to write for more obscure instruments such as Quint Bassoon. By default. jazz or 68 .) To start a string quartet score (which is what we want) it’s quickest to use the String quartet manuscript paper. Sibelius shows you the Common instruments. Just like selecting real manuscript paper in a store. as the name suggests. such as special instrument name formats. suitable staff sizes and so on. completely blank manuscript paper). When you click Next. Click Yes. or pick paper that is pre-printed with standard groups of instruments. which number around 90. Ondes Martenot or Hurdy-Gurdy. you can choose between different shapes and sizes (at the bottom). already set up for you. it’s a good idea to use one of Sibelius’s built-in manuscript papers rather than defining your own.Project 2 Manuscript paper The first page of the dialog lists many types of instrumentation in alphabetical order. however. because the supplied ones have numerous helpful defaults. the Choose from list at the top left of the dialog shows you more convenient selections from the whole set. but for the moment just choose Blank (which is. (Later you can learn how to create your own manuscript papers. If you’re writing for a standard ensemble.

so you can leave (Unchanged) selected in the list.1 Creating a new score orchestral ensembles. (You may like to experiment in future with different house styles. the design of the notes and other symbols) used in the house style. choose the appropriate option from the list to see standard instruments used in those ensembles. but again you can customize the order if you want to. Add the Viola (solo) and Violoncello (solo) instruments in the same manner and then click OK. Choose Strings in the Family list. (You can see this dialog again at any time by choosing Create > Instruments. and click Next.g.) House style You’re now returned to the second page of the New Score dialog. 69 .g. The instrument names for the violins aren’t correct. Project 2 Time signatures and tempo The third page of the dialog allows you to choose a time signature and set the tempo of your score. and click Add twice to put two solo violin staves into the rightmost Staves in Score list. It’s very useful. and Sibelius allows you to tweak the look of your score in just about every imaginable way. or by typing the single key shortcut I. which allows you to set the house style of the score you’re about to create. Opus. and the main text font. but also to change their order at any time. such as the thickness of final double barlines! We don’t need to worry about these details at the moment though. to the size of the staves and notes. We’re going to input an excerpt from Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor. e. but you can fix that later on. Don’t worry if you can’t find a particularly unusual instrument – Sibelius also lets you design your own (b 8. then Violin (solo) in the Instruments list. The ones using the Reprise and Inkpen2 music fonts look handwritten – particularly suitable for jazz.2. clicking on them in the list updates the preview display of your score. You can think of the house style as the “look” or appearance of your score.e. e. different publishers have different house styles. Times. so we’ll need to add two violin instruments. as it allows you not only to add and remove instruments from your score. a viola and a cello. The names indicate the music font (i. to the most intricate details. The instruments are listed in the standard order in which they would appear in a score.) Leave the main text font at the default setting (Unchanged). If you want. take a look at the list of pre-defined house styles shown on the screen. from the fonts you use. And the Helsinki music font has a traditional engraved look.14 Edit Instruments in Reference).

Sibelius will add the title and composer to an extra title page it creates for you.) A mere blink of an eye later. change time signature (and just about everything else) at any point while working on your score. too – for now. you can in fact skip some of the steps when starting a score by clicking Finish at any earlier point. Edward Elgar. Key signatures The fourth page of the dialog allows you to choose a key signature. changing it to “Violin II. give your score a name – such as Elgar – then click Save. Sibelius has created your score. so choose File > Save (shortcut Ctrl+S or XS). leave this switched off. Choose Minor keys. find a suitable location (e. the name of the composer/lyricist. Our pick-up bar is one sixteenth note (semiquaver) long. ready for you to start adding notes: One detail to take care of: double-click the “Violin” instrument name on the first violin staff and edit it to “Violin I”. For now.Project 2 Leave the time signature at the default choice. Now click Next. then select E minor from the left-hand list. (As we mentioned earlier. since we’ll learn how to add a title page later on. switch on Start with bar of length.” There! Save your score Don’t forget to save the score at this point! We’re going to need to input some scanned music into it in the next chapter. on Mac. so choose a quarter note from the menu and type 132. such as the title of the score. and copyright information. the Scores folder is inside your user Documents folder.g. so for Tempo text. We need to add a tempo marking. and click Next. of course. and click Finish. The text is automatically added to the first page of music. Our tempo is 132 quarter notes (crotchet) per minute. enter Quartet for Strings as the Title. On Windows. You can. Op. 70 . your Scores folder or the Desktop). Score info The fifth and final page of the dialog allows you to enter some text. so we’re just setting the initial time signature here. the Scores folder is inside your My Documents folder. and if you switch on Create title page. 4/4. so choose that from the menu. and because we want a pick-up (upbeat) bar. type Allegro molto and switch on Metronome mark to add a specific tempo.83 as the Composer. then do the same for the second violin staff.

Violin I. When PhotoScore has opened. Sibelius comes with a free scanning program called PhotoScore Lite. you should make sure that you’ve installed PhotoScore Lite from your Sibelius DVD-ROM. 71 . you can scan and read the music directly into Sibelius. which scans and reads printed music. Before PhotoScore scans and processes the PDF file. ready to edit or transpose. click the Open PDFs button on the toolbar.2.2 Scanning 2. choose File > Scan with PhotoScore or click the Scan button on the toolbar (shown here) to launch PhotoScore. you should open the example score called Project 2 and make the 2 Scanning version into the Current version. or PDF files.2 Scanning If you are starting from this section of the project. but take longer to process. create parts and print – just as if you’d inputted it yourself. If you have existing printed sheet music.pdf file and click Open. select the String Quartet . since we’ll be scanning PDF files. it allows you to choose the resolution (in dpi) to scan at.) Scanning in PhotoScore Lite Before we go any further. play back. Find the folder named Project Files in the example scores folder. PhotoScore now processes the file and automatically “reads” the scanned pages to work out what the notes and other markings are. In Sibelius. Project 2 A standard Open dialog appears. Set your own resolution by typing 600 into the text field then click OK. you can still complete this chapter. and clicking Make current. (If you don’t have a scanner attached to your computer. This chapter shows you how to turn the new score you just created into a full conductor’s score from a set of string quartet parts. Higher resolutions are scanned in greater detail. selecting this version in the list. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions.

showing the number of missing or extra beats. Click Other and choose 1/16 from the drop-down lists. The Full detail view window at the top right-hand corner shows a zoomed-in portion of the original page. To correct this. Hence this part of the window is where PhotoScore Lite’s mistakes can occur. The pick-up (upbeat) bar at the start of the part has dotted red lines above and below the staff. followed by a series of blue notes over the barline. Make sure you switch on Invisible (for pick-up and irregular bars) so that PhotoScore hides the time signature. its interpretation of the first page of the violin part pops up in the main window. though features not appropriate for PhotoScore Lite have been omitted. Let’s correct some of the mistakes by comparing the bottom part of the window with the original scan at the top.Project 2 Editing scanned music Once the music has been read by PhotoScore Lite. Select the time signature in the output window (so that it turns light blue) and choose Create > Time Signature (shortcut T) to choose a different time signature. Here you can edit any mistakes PhotoScore Lite has made. Both of these are similar in function to the Keypad and Create menu in Sibelius. make sure Invisible (for pick-up and irregular bars) is switched off. The large bottom part of the window (with a light gray background) shows PhotoScore Lite’s interpretation of the first scan – that is. The top part of the window (with a buff-colored background) shows you the original page. Notice how the rest of the bars in the piece turn red and show blue notes over the barlines. This is because PhotoScore Lite has read the time signature as 4/4 and can’t understand why the bar is only one sixteenth note (semiquaver) long. Notice that PhotoScore Lite has a Keypad in the bottom right-hand corner and a Create menu at the top of the window. what PhotoScore thinks the first page of the original says. then click OK 72 . according to where you point your mouse. add a second time signature to the start of the first full bar of the part: * Hit T again to create a time signature and choose 4/4.

slurs and ties. copy and paste them onto the appropriate staff in the score we created.2.pdf and String Quartet . just click OK and let Sibelius open the file for you. but correcting key signatures and time signatures is much easier in PhotoScore Lite. or by typing Ctrl+Tab (Windows) or X~ (Mac) select the sixteenth note (semiquaver) rest in the pick-up (upbeat) bar of the Violin I staff choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to paste the music from the imported score into the prepared score. so we recommend that you do that before sending the output score to Sibelius. The PDF files for each of these parts are located in the same folder as the part we already scanned. String Quartet . then click OK. you should send them to Sibelius.scanned input. we’ll correct this later.pdf. for example Version 1 .pdf. Choose File > Send to > Sibelius (shortcut Ctrl+D or XD). Once you’ve sent them to Sibelius. Give this version a memorable name.Violoncello. Sending to Sibelius Once you have edited all the pages in a score. The Open PhotoScore or AudioScore File dialog will appear in Sibelius – don’t worry about the options here.Viola. We’ll be using this version later on to show how you can compare scores or versions quickly.5 Scanning in Reference. just as we did for the music on the Violin I staff. to show that it is “carrying” an object * Click at the start of the first full bar to place the time signature there. you should choose File > Save Version or click on the toolbar button. 73 . you should use PhotoScore Lite to scan. read and send to Sibelius the remaining string parts: String Quartet – Violin II. The violin part now appears in a new score in Sibelius. or simply click the little Sibelius icon ( ) next to the Save score button at the top of the output window. notice that Sibelius automatically adds bars into your score to fill with the copied music. For more details on editing PhotoScore’s output. Save a version At this point. Instantly your score is filled with beautifully-written music including all appropriate accidentals.2 Scanning * The mouse pointer turns dark blue. Mistakes such as pitch can be corrected in Sibelius. We’re going to transfer it to the score we prepared in the first chapter of this project: * triple-click in the first bar of the violin part we just imported from PhotoScore Lite to select all * * * * Project 2 the music on the staff choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the music to the clipboard switch to the score we prepared earlier by selecting it from the Window menu. Adding the remaining music Now. b 1. You may also have noticed that PhotoScore has shortened some of the slurs over notes – don’t worry for now. the red dotted lines will disappear. Sibelius will ask you to name your version and you can optionally add a comment to identify it later.

Clef changes When you create a score using Sibelius. Let’s add another tenor clef change for the cellist at bar 26. you may want to add a change of clef to a staff. however. the cello part suddenly has two very high notes. key signatures and tuplets If you are starting from this section of the project. b 2. The score we’ve just assembled is ready to be turned into an arrangement. Let’s put a clef change before them to make the notes easier for the cellist to read: * Select the Ab eighth note (quaver) * Shift-click the G eighth note (quaver) immediately after it to make a passage selection * Choose Create > Clef (shortcut Q for “qlef ”) * Select the tenor clef (fourth from the top) in the left-hand list and click OK * Sibelius adds a small tenor clef and then automatically changes the clef back again after the passage you selected. Sibelius adds a small tenor clef – this time. 74 . In bar 15. Notice how the normal clef at the start of every system after this point has changed into a tenor clef. you should open the example score called Project 2 and make the 3 Clefs. in this case) to an existing score. but you can add the same information after you’ve inputted music into a score and change it retrospectively. key signatures and tuplets (triplets. selecting this version in the list. Notice how the notes are spaced further apart to allow room for the clefs. maybe a bar or less. key signatures and tuplets version into the Current version. referring to the printout of the full arrangement that we made. the Ab and G eighth notes (quavers) in the second half of the bar. This can make it easier for a performer to read if the music strays too far above or below the staff in the normal clef. Now add the remaining clef changes to the Viola and Violoncello staves in bars 43–44. Change the staff back to a bass clef after the first quarter note (crotchet) in bar 28 in the same way. We’ve already seen how to use the New Score dialog to set up a score in Sibelius. and clicking Make current. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. this time we’ll place it using the mouse: * Hit Esc to make sure you have nothing selected * Choose Create > Clef * Select the tenor clef in the left-hand list and click OK * The mouse pointer turns dark blue. For more information. Sometimes clef changes are for a short passage. it’s been added to the very end of bar 25 on the previous system.3 Clefs. However. to show that it is “carrying” an object * Click in the empty space at the start of bar 26 in the Violoncello staff * Again. in certain situations.Project 2 2.11 Clefs in Reference. at other times you may want the clef change to apply permanently from that point on. This chapter shows you how to add clef changes. the clefs are automatically added to the start of every system so you don’t have to think about them.

” sticking to the notes if they change pitch. a triplet bracket and number appear: 3      * Input two more notes to complete the triplet (a high E. 5 for a quintuplet or 6 for a sextuplet. so that the notes sound the same. For more information. which were missing in the scanned part: * Select the bar rest and hit 3 (on the numeric keypad) to choose an eighth note (quaver) * Type 8 G Shift-6 (use the 6 on the main keyboard. then typed 8 (on the numeric keypad) G to choose a sharp and add the G above the B. and another G#). the music changes key.) * Now type Ctrl+3 or X3.20 Key signatures in Reference. Notice how the bracket disappears automatically. removing or adding accidentals as appropriate. you’ll see the Sibelius automatically shifts the music up or down. e. modulating to A major. to show that it is “carrying” an object * Click at the start of bar 53 * Sibelius creates a double barline and a key signature of three sharps. to show the key change. You can type Ctrl or X with any number. * Hit Esc to make sure you have nothing selected. or for more complex tuplets such as 73:51 you can use the Create > Tuplet dialog. We’re going to create some triplets in bar 30 of the Violin II staff. We’re going to add a key signature to bar 53. (You could instead have inputted the B below the staff. notice the increased occurrence of sharp accidentals on notes. top space of the staff.3 Clefs. deleted or moved. For more information. b 2. then adds a note a sixth below it. which is the conventional notation for this case:    3   As you might expect. * Choose Create > Key Signature (shortcut K) * Select A major in the left-hand list and click OK * The mouse pointer turns dark blue. If you drag a clef change or key signature. Clef changes and key signatures can be selected and copied. to make a two-note chord. This inputs a G# eighth note. Project 2 Triplets and other tuplets Tuplets are rhythms which are played at some fraction of their normal speed – most commonly they are triplets. Finish adding the rest of the notes in this bar. not the numeric keypad).35 Triplets and other tuplets in Reference.2. and the tuplet brackets (when they are shown) are “magnetic. b 2. 75 .g. tuplets in Sibelius are intelligent: brackets are automatically hidden if the notes within the tuplet are joined by a continuous beam. See that the sharp accidentals in the following bars rendered unnecessary by the new key signature are automatically removed. key signatures and tuplets Key signatures You may have already noticed that towards the end of this excerpt.

technique and tempo markings. brilliante and appassionato) straight into Sibelius to appear in normal italicized text. let’s add the missing text dynamic marks.) * Type any terms not shown in the word menu (e. III. where it appears at when you create it with a note selected) rather than the exact place that your mouse pointer is.g. and we’ll observe how they interact with Sibelius’s revolutionary collision avoidance system. By copying text dynamics from one staff to another.83. Finale: Allegro molto by creating an empty score.g. slurs and articulations. then use Shift+Alt-click or xz-click.Project 2 2. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. Now we’re going to add some color and life to it. 76 . and clicking Make current. remember the following: * Choose Create > Text > Expression (shortcut Ctrl+E or XE) to add text dynamics * Hold down Ctrl or X as you type to produce bold text dynamics such as f. by marking the music with dynamics. you can save time by multicopying the dynamic across all the staves: * Create the dynamic mark using Expression text (as above) on the Violin I staff * Select the dynamic and choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy it to the clipboard * Hit Esc to deselect * Make a passage selection around the same bar in the remaining three staves * Choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to copy the item to the start of the passage. you’ll find that the process of marking up a score becomes much quicker – you can use any of the copying methods we learned in the first project of this Handbook. tempo markings. rubato. selecting this version in the list. poco. dolce. risoluto. Expression text In the first project of this Handbook we learned how to add text dynamics. Using the printout of the score that we made earlier. Multicopying an object Where all the staves in your score have the same dynamic marks (e. called Magnetic Layout™. Op. p.4 Marking up a score If you are starting from this section of the project. or the sf at bar 53). So far. This chapter shows you how to add these various markings. we’ve assembled an excerpt from Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor. cresc. As before. sf or rfz – holding down Ctrl or X tells Sibelius to write the letters using the special bold characters which should be used for dynamics * Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a word menu of useful dynamic terms appear (this is where you’ll find espress.. the ff at the start of bar 43. scanning the individual parts from PDF files and copying them into the score. you should open the example score called Project 2 and make the 4 Marking up a score version into the Current version. then Alt+click or z-click where you want it to appear. and dim. The fastest way is to select the text you want to copy. If you want to copy a text object to its default position (i. one copy on each staff. technique text.e.

Expression and Technique text styles are both examples of staff text. These are different types of lines: hairpins (crescendo and diminuendo marks). To add lines. then type L (or choose Create > Line) to open a dialog of different lines available. Hairpins and other lines There are still dynamic markings and tempo instructions that appear on the printout that we haven’t yet added to our score. it appears once above the system (and in scores with many instruments it may also appear above another staff further down the score). but it appears in each instrumental part. colla parte and ten. Let’s start by adding the crescendo hairpin to the Violin I staff in the second full bar of the excerpt: * Select the second note of the Violin I staff in the second bar after the pick-up (upbeat) bar 77 . Tempo markings are examples of this kind of text: if we add Tempo text to our score. But before we do. First.) straight into Sibelius to appear in normal non-italicized text. Project 2 In the same way. on the other hand. we can add the tempo markings. it’s important that we understand the differences between staff text and system text. Tempo text Once all the missing technique terms are added to your score. 56 and 60. Shift-H for a diminuendo hairpin and S for a slur.4 Marking up a score You can also multicopy several objects and paste them vertically across any number of staves – doing this can save you a lot of time when marking up your scores. and you should duplicate them on another staff if you want the same effect to apply to any other instruments in a score. we’ll be creating hairpins and slurs. In the excerpt we’re marking up. simply select a note or other object in your score to tell Sibelius where you want the line to start.) * Type any terms not shown in the word menu (e.2. which have their own shortcuts: H for a crescendo hairpin. applies to all staves in the score. Technique text Now that we’ve added all the missing text dynamics. Let’s add the missing tempo markings. slurs and ritardandos.g. This means that they apply only to a single staff. let’s add the technique instructions from the printout: * Choose Create > Text > Technique (shortcut Ctrl+T or XT) to add technique instructions * Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a word menu of useful technique terms appear (this is where you’ll find senza sord. the A tempo marking in bar seven: * Select the seventh bar of the Violin I staff * Choose Create > Text > Tempo (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T or zXT) to add tempo markings * Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see a word menu of useful tempo terms appear * Click A tempo to add it to your score * Hit Esc twice to stop editing and deselect the text. add the A tempo markings to bars 20. System text.

so you’ll need to add the missing slurs. add a rit. PhotoScore Lite didn’t recognise the slurs on the part (although the full version. 78 . only this time select an eighth note (quaver) halfway through the bar and hit L. choose the second instance of rit. can do this for you).21 Lines in Reference. When we scanned the PDF files of the string quartet parts. * Choose the second instance of poco rit. Let’s add the missing tempo lines: * Select bar 19 of the Violin I staff by clicking on an empty part of the bar * Hit L to open the Line dialog * Scroll down the right-hand list of System lines until you reach poco rit.                     p Now you can go through the rest of the score.                     p * Now select the ninth note in the same bar – also a sixteenth note (semiquaver) E – and Shift- click the last note of the bar. Sibelius treats these identically. adding missing hairpins – you can multicopy hairpins onto multiple staves. To place a slur. line to bar 59 in the same way. to extend the hairpin a note at a time. If you go too far. in the same way as we did for text dynamics. b 2.Project 2 * Type H to add a crescendo hairpin beneath the note * Hit Space four times. until you reach the middle of the bar. select the note you want it to start from and hit S. For more on lines. to extend the selection to the end of the bar * Type Shift-H to add a diminuendo: notice that it is automatically created to the same length as the selection you just made. in the System lines list so that a dashed duration line isn’t shown after the text. This is another time-saving tip. use Space to extend the slur a note at a time and ShiftSpace to retract it if you go too far. then select the note or rest where you want the slur to begin and hit S. PhotoScore Ultimate. use Shift-Space to retract it again. Slurs Slurs and phrase-marks are a special kind of line and – like hairpins – are so commonly-used that they have their own easy-to-remember shortcut: S.” since a phrase-mark is actually just drawn as a big slur. Add an identical poco rit. If you create a slur in the wrong place. (this line doesn’t display a dashed duration line after the text) * click OK to add the line to bar 19. Finally. As with extending hairpins. and calls them all “slurs. line to the last bar of the excerpt – again. simply select it and hit Delete. a sixteenth note (semiquaver) E.

adding the missing articulations from the printout we made earlier. b 2. 40.2. 21. For example.4 Marking up a score Try selecting a note at either end of a slur and moving it up and down – notice how the slur is magnetic. sticking as neatly as possible to the notes at either end. This adds a staccato mark to every note in the bar for both staves.28 Slurs in Reference. For more on slurs. Articulations In the first project in this Handbook. Sibelius’s Compare window allows you to compare two different scores – or two versions of the same score – and produce a summary of the differences between them. * Marcato markings in bars 49–52 of the Violoncello staff. * Staccatissimo marks in bar 48 on all staves. 29 and 40 of the Violin II staff. You can add articulations to notes in a multiple or passage selection. Comparing versions Whether you’re a composer. Now go through the excerpt. and 49–52 of the Viola staff. * Marcato markings in bars 9. For more on articulations. (staccato dot) on the top row of buttons on the Keypad. Hit F10 (or click on the Articulations tab on the Keypad) to find more articulation marks on the fourth Keypad layout. in order to highlight any differences once you’ve added detail to a score in this manner. every note in bar three of the Violin I and Violin II staves is played staccato: * Click in an empty part of the third bar of the Violin I staff and Shift-click on the third bar of the Project 2 Violin II staff to make a passage selection * Make sure that the first Keypad layout is displayed by hitting F7 * Hit the key on your numeric keypad that corresponds to the . Here you can add wedges. notice how a faint outline with six boxes appears around the slur. 22. you can also produce a very detailed comparison of every 79 . Clicking on any of these points and dragging it changes the shape in a particular direction. * Marcato markings in bars 20. you may find it very helpful to be able to compare the newly-marked up score with a previous version.3 Articulations in Reference. 23. * A staccatissimo mark in bar 49 of the Violin II staff. which can speed up the marking-up process considerably. including staccato and tenuto marks. You should find that most articulations you need are on the first Keypad layout. but you’ll need the fourth Keypad layout to add these additional marks: * Marcato markings in bars 8 and 38 of the Violin I staff. When you select a slur. and they give you an enormous amount of control over the shape of a slur. marcato and staccatissimo marks and fermatas of varying duration. we learned how to add articulations to notes from the Keypad. 10. These boxes are called handles. accents and ties. bowing marks. arranger or music copyist. b 2. You should be very careful to distinguish between slurs and ties between notes in your scores – ties are added from the Keypad (see below) and behave very differently than slurs. if you like.

or click the button on the toolbar (shown on the right).) * Click the Compare button ( ) next to the drop-down menus * Sibelius will analyze the versions and show dialog containing a brief summary of the differences between the scores * Click Close to view the detailed differences in the Compare window. removed (red) or altered (orange). from the first drop-down menu (this compares the current version of the score) * select – Version 1 – scanned input (or whatever name you gave to your saved version) from the second drop-down menu: (If you skipped the preceding chapters and opened the project file at this point.g. key signatures and tuplets version in the second list. For more on versions and comparing scores. Notice how Sibelius displays the two versions you asked it to compare side-by-side. you should select the 3 Clefs. b 5. Sibelius also adds a colored background to objects that have been added (green). from which you can select any scores that you have open and the versions they contain. 80 . At the top of the Compare window are two drop-down menus. With this powerful tool you can even generate a detailed report of the differences Sibelius finds – complete with screenshots of the scores – to open in your word processing software. Elgar (or whatever name you gave to your score when you saved it). e. Let’s compare the score in its current state with the version that you saved earlier: * select the score title.Project 2 difference – very useful for proof-reading. or for documenting the development of a piece of music. Doubleclicking in the Compare window on any of the differences found will move the view to that difference in both windows. choose Window > Compare. Try comparing some of the other versions in the project scores to see how comprehensive the comparison can be. To show the Compare window.22 Versions in Reference.

We’ve already noted some of the effects of Magnetic Layout. so that they aren’t moved or avoided.) which need to remain in fixed positions. preserving their relative positions horizontally. text and other objects. articulations etc. symbols. you’ll want to ensure that your music is flawlessly presented. accidentals. This works for all text objects. meaning Sibelius will move them together if any one of them needs to move to avoid a collision. Since Sibelius adjusts the score layout as you add more music. all in order to produce a beautiful and elegant score. it’s best to wait until the score is fairly complete. Sibelius has a wide array of tools and features to help you with formatting your music (formatting is the process of laying it out onto pages). we’ll learn how to create breaks. if you click on one of the dynamic marks (e. You’ll also see a set of gray shadow dynamics appearing across the system in the place where the dynamics would normally be.2 Magnetic Layout in Reference. rests.5 Layout and formatting If you are starting from this section of the project. so that less important objects (such as text. lines and other objects (e. the penultimate note at the end of the first full bar of the Violoncello staff * Use 2 to lower the pitch * As you move the pitch down. adjusting your score for you as you create and edit the music. Let’s see how this works: * Select the F# sixteenth note (semiquaver). Once you’ve inputted the notes in a score and finished marking it up.5 Layout and formatting 2. and “freeze” the positions in a score when you’re happy with the layout and want to prevent objects from moving around magnetically. and clicking Make current.g. we’ll look at Magnetic Layout in action and show how Sibelius is able to recalculate the positions of objects on the staff to prevent them overlapping each other or obscuring the notes. You can drag objects around on the staff and Sibelius will use the space available to ensure that they don’t overlap or obscure each other. manipulate the page orientation and staff size. change staff spacing and create title pages. In this chapter. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. notes. Project 2 Magnetic Layout First. you’ll see a dashed light blue line indicating that the dynamics are grouped together. the hairpin) to select it. selecting this version in the list. 81 . To learn how. usually closer to the staff. lines and symbols) move out of the way of more important objects (e. You can also switch Magnetic Layout on or off for individual objects. Otherwise your adjustments may have to be undone.g. Notice how Sibelius cleverly moves the whole line of dynamics together below the system. Now. Now let’s look at the various formatting controls which are available in Sibelius. Sibelius’s collision avoidance and detection feature.2. This is done intelligently. b 8. you should open the example score called Project 2 and make the 5 Layout and formatting version into the Current version. the dynamics below the staff move down to avoid the note.g. instruments. chord symbols).

select a barline and choose Layout > Break > System Break. You should use this to open up the spacing if you think the music on one system is too crowded.4 Auto Breaks in Reference. or use the shortcut Return (on the main keyboard). Sibelius can even add breaks automatically in helpful places – b 8. Sibelius has to react properly by reformatting the music that follows – which it does instantly. b 8. because a system break has been added there. Sibelius also lets you add page breaks. you need a system or a page to end at a particular point – for example. arranging or just copying out music. e. Try adding system breaks to the score we’ve been working on. or when the next section has a new title at the start. in the Elgar String Quartet excerpt. To add a system break. however. the A tempo marking at bar 7 marks the start of a new system. and to learn how to “lock” passages of music to stop them reformatting. In parts. in a piece with several movements. One advantage of this instant reformatting is that there’s no command to add a new system or page – this just happens as you go along. or conversely if you think that a system is too widelyspaced relative to the system above (in which case you can add a system break to the previous system to move one of its bars onto the next system). you will always want to go back and change things. Document Setup Another advantage of Sibelius’s instant reformatting is that you can make massive changes to music you’ve already inputted – such as changing the page shape – and the layout of the whole score is instantly updated accordingly. let’s change the orientation of the paper the score is shown on from portrait (taller than it is wide) to landscape (wider than it is tall) format. To find out more.1 Layout and formatting in Reference. Sometimes.Project 2 Breaks Whether you’re composing. which you should normally use only at the end of sections.g. such as adding bars in the middle of music you’ve already written. To show an extreme example of the kind of formatting that happens all the time. Choose Layout > Document Setup (shortcut Ctrl+D or XD): 82 .

You can ask Sibelius to make the best use of the space you’ve chosen between staves and systems by choosing Layout > Optimize Staff Spacing. You can also adjust the page size and margins from here. Let’s try this out on the first page of our score: * Click on the pick-up (upbeat) bar of the Violin I staff to select it 83 .2. it is useful to be able to increase the distance between staves within a single system in order to avoid collisions involving very high or low notes. The default distances between staves and systems are controlled by settings in House Style > Engraving Rules. you’ll quickly find that the page gets very busy and you need to space staves further apart to give notes and other objects more room to move around in. however.5 Layout and formatting Switch the orientation from Portrait to Landscape. and you should always try adjusting these values before making individual adjustments directly in the score. Take a quick look at each page to get an idea of just how comprehensive the options are. Sibelius now calculates the smallest distance to move the staves so that objects on one staff no longer collide with those on another. the Staves page contains the staff and system spacing options. However. try experimenting with these on your own scores. and see how the music is reduced in size to fit onto fewer pages. Sometimes.6 Document Setup in Reference. b 8. There are a number of ways to do this. The score now looks like this: Project 2 Try decreasing the Staff size option to 4mm. most of which you’ll probably never have to worry about. Staff spacing As you add more music to a score. and click OK. For full details about this dialog. a dialog that allows you to change the appearance of most aspects of your score in a single operation. see how it changes in the score preview on the right of the dialog.

Project 2
* Shift-click the Violoncello staff in the last bar of the bottom system of the first page * Choose Layout > Optimize Staff Spacing * Sibelius works out the best way to stop the music on one staff colliding with any other staves.

As a last resort, you may find that you need to manually resolve a collision on a single system, which you can do by dragging the staves. Try this out: select a bar in the Violin II staff by clicking on a blank bit of staff and drag it up and down – or use the shortcuts Alt+3/2 or z3/2 (hold Ctrl or X for larger steps). Notice how Sibelius reformats the music as you move the staff. You can change the spacing in this way between staves throughout your score, or for a single system, or indeed for any other passage you select. If you make a mistake, you can use the Layout > Reset Space Above/Below Staff options to reset the spacing to its default. For further details on these and other sophisticated tools for altering staff spacing, b 8.10 Staff spacing in Reference.

Creating title pages
You can create a title page when you first create your score (as we saw in the first chapter of this project) by switching on the Create title page option on the final page of the File > New dialog. However, you can also create a title page at any point, so let’s do that now. Choose Create > Title Page to see a dialog with options to choose how many blank pages to add at the start of your score and other details you may wish to add. (Since we added title and composer credits in the File > New dialog, Sibelius will automatically fill these in here, ready for you to add to the title page.) Switch on the Include part name option to display “Full Score” at the top of the page, then click OK to create a single title page with the title and composer text added.

Deleting title pages
When you create a title page – whether you choose Create > Title Page or add one from the File > New dialog – a special layout mark appears at the start of the score (shown on the left). If you can’t see this, check that View > Layout Marks is switched on. To delete a title page the title page you just created, simply click on this layout mark to select it and hit Delete. (Doing this will remove all blank pages from the start of your score, so if you want to remove one of a number of blank pages, you should refer to b 8.5 Breaks in Reference.) As with all other editing functions in Sibelius, you can always undo any changes you make to title pages – click Undo now to restore the title page we just deleted.

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2.6 Dynamic parts™

2.6 Dynamic parts™
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Project 2 and make the 6 Dynamic Parts version into the Current version, by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current. In the first project we learned about dynamic parts – the set of instrumental parts Sibelius creates for every score, showing notation relevant to one instrument and automatically updating to match the full score. It’s important to remember that if you edit or move anything in the full score, it also changes in the part. However, if you move something other than a note or chord in a part, it doesn’t move in the score; and it goes orange, to show that it’s now different in the part and score. This is so you can tweak the position of markings in parts without affecting the layout of your score. This chapter shows you how to create cues, edit the layout of parts, create new instrumental parts and produce a simple piano reduction of the string quartet arrangement.

Parts window
The Parts window (choose Window > Parts, shortcut Ctrl+Alt+R or zXR) allows you to make various changes to your parts individually, altogether, or to a specific selection of parts. You can print multiple parts, adjust the automatic layout of parts, create new parts, remove or add staves from existing parts, and so on, all from the Parts window. You can also view any part by doubleclicking on it in the Parts window.

Project 2

Under normal circumstances, you should not need to worry too much about the existence of the Parts window, so you can usually leave it switched off. However, to adjust the automatic layout of parts or to cater for situations where a part needs to contain more than one instrument (e.g. instrumental doubling or choral music), it is very useful. For full details, b 7. Parts in Reference.

Cues
Cue notes are small notes included to help the player keep track of where they are, and are not meant to be played. Cue passages can also indicate optional music, for example a harmonica solo might be cued in a clarinet part with an indication to “play if no harmonica is available.” Sibelius makes it simple to add cues to your parts; let’s try adding a cue:
* Make sure you are viewing the full score * Select bar 8 of the Violin I staff by clicking on an empty part of the staff * Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the music to the clipboard

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Project 2
* Now select the corresponding empty bar of the Violin II staff * Choose Edit > Paste As Cue (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+V or xzXV) to create a cue.

Hit W with the cue selected to view the Violin II part; hit Esc to deselect the cue and notice how Sibelius has created small, cue-sized notes and other markings, added a bar rest in a separate voice (but, as we’ll see, has hidden the cue in the full score) and indicated the cued instrument above the staff. If necessary, Sibelius will also add automatic clef changes or octave transpositions, change the staff type (to e.g. a guitar tab staff) and copy lyrics. Hit W again to return to the full score; the same bar on the Violin II staff appears to be empty but the cue is simply hidden.

Layout of parts
In general, when editing a score you should first input music into the full score, rather than the parts; and then tweak the position and design of things in the parts in the course of making final adjustments. Note though, that you can make layout changes such as moving staves, adjusting system and page breaks and changing note spacing quite freely in parts – this doesn’t count as moving objects around, because it doesn’t matter that the score and part end up with a quite different layout. Sibelius will intelligently lay out your parts so that mundane tasks such as making suitable page turns for players, adding system breaks at changes of tempo and section and the general justification (spreading the music out horizontally or vertically to fill up a page to the margins) of your parts are all handled without you having to do anything. This is all achieved by Sibelius’s Layout > Auto Breaks feature. You have control over every automated aspect applied to the layout of your parts, and if you are feeling particularly imperious, you can switch it off completely. For more information, b 8.4 Auto Breaks in Reference.

Create a new part
In situations where you need to rearrange a piece of music to incorporate different instruments, the ability to create a new part from existing music is a huge time-saver. We’re going to create an alternative bassoon part from the cello staff. Make sure the Parts window is open, then:
* First, click the New Part button (

) in the Parts window. * A dialog appears, which allows you to choose which staves the new part should contain * Select Violoncello from the left-hand list and click Add to Part, then click OK * you should now see a second part called Violoncello appearing in the Parts window; doubleclick this to open it. To turn this into a bassoon part, we need to add an instrument change; instrument changes can be added to part of a score (for instrumental doubling) or can replace one instrument with another, preserving the existing music:
* Choose Create > Other > Instrument Change (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+I or xzXI) * The Choose from list shows convenient selections from the whole set of instruments (as in the Create > Instruments dialog); choose Common Instruments, then from the Woodwind

family choose Bassoon and click OK 86

Notice that Sibelius has already created a new Piano part. and the Reduce plug-in will condense the music from the two violin staves onto the right-hand piano staff. Click OK. and add a Piano instrument to the score. * Choose Create > Instruments (shortcut I). then Shift* * * * * * * click on the Violin II staff to select all bars on both staves. In the dialog that appears. * Triple-click on the Violin I staff to make a passage selection around the whole staff. before the very start of the first system of music in the part. and the Reduce plug-in will condense the music from the Viola and Violoncello staves onto the left-hand piano staff. This time. These automate all kinds of procedures. you can even write your own plug-ins. If you’re that way inclined. you can tidy up the piano part using the editing skills you’ve learned so far. such as adding chord symbols.2.6 Dynamic parts™ * The mouse pointer turns dark blue. Click OK. as is the part name in the Parts window. choose Use existing staff as destination. Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Reduce again. to show that it is “carrying” an object * Click to the left of the initial barline. 87 . We’re going to use one of these plug-ins to create a simple piano reduction of our Elgar excerpt: * Hit W to look at the full score. or use Plugins > Simplify Notation > Renotate Performance to simplify untidy passages. Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Reduce. with the music from both piano staves included in it. in the dialog choose Piano~(2) from the drop-down list. working out harp pedal changes or proof-reading your music. then Shift-click on the Violoncello staff to select all bars on both staves. ManuScript – designed to make repetitive tasks quicker by automatically doing things which might otherwise be quite time-consuming. The part is changed into a bassoon part automatically – notice how the instrument name appearing at the top left-hand corner of the page is updated. Now triple-click on the Viola staff to make a passage selection around the whole staff. harmonizing tunes. Project 2 If you like. and choose Piano from the drop-down list. Creating a piano reduction Sibelius comes supplied with over 100 useful plug-ins – extra features written in Sibelius’s built-in programming language.

pages or smaller sections of your score into other programs. For details. Copying graphics to other programs Let’s learn how to export snippets of music as graphics. 88 .8 Exporting graphics in Reference.com in Reference.Project 2 2. Now let’s publish it online: * Choose File > Publish on SibeliusMusic. Microsoft Word) Choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV). create your own member pages. you can export files. play it back.com. In Sibelius. into which you can enter all the various details about your piece. and clicking Make current. b 5.com site for all the world to see within 24 hours! If you have not previously created an account with SibeliusMusic. Et voila! If you find that the resulting graphic is not detailed enough.com Once you have completed your score. click Join at the top left of the web page and enter your details to create a new account.com. make sure you have saved it. and print it out. and how to publish your music on SibeliusMusic.7 Exporting If you are starting from this section of the project.19 SibeliusMusic. In addition. if necessary. Microsoft Word). or be prompted to create an account (see below). You can also copy and paste graphics directly from Sibelius. PNG. b 9. TIFF. This chapter shows you how to copy a graphic from Sibelius into another program (e. You may be asked for your username and password. using simple copy and paste.g. view bestseller charts and create your own online stores.com * You are shown a web page in your browser. EMF (Windows only) and PICT (Mac only) formats. using Sibelius’s free Scorch plug-in. * Once you have supplied all the information about your score. review scores. so other people can view it. With SibeliusMusic you can also sell your own music. adjust Dots per inch on the Other page of File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and redo the steps above. upload and listen to live recordings. BMP. by clicking and dragging Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the contents of the box to the clipboard Hit Esc to clear the selection Open the application into which you wish to paste the graphic (e. you should open the example score called Project 2 and make the 7 Exporting version into the Current version. * Make a passage selection around the whole of the first system of music * Choose Edit > Select > Select Graphic (shortcut Alt+G or XG): a dashed box with handles * * * * * appears around the music Move the handles at the edges of the box to adjust its size. Publishing music on SibeliusMusic. Sibelius also allows you to export graphics as files in EPS. selecting this version in the list. change key and instruments. either as a PDF or a graphics files in various formats. For more details. Sibelius helps you publish music on the Internet. click Next * Your score should appear in the SibeliusMusic.g. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions.

Project 3 Project 3 .

Project 3 90 .

then select the 1 Writing for keyboard version from the list and click Make Current. choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and go to the Input Devices page.3.1 Writing for keyboard 3. using repeat structures and producing horn arrangements. We’re going to record the missing Electric Stage Piano part. Flexi-time Options We’re going to learn how to play complex music into Sibelius using a MIDI keyboard using Flexitime input. we’re going to be using a MIDI keyboard. how to create chord symbols using text and MIDI input. If you would prefer not to record music into Sibelius in real-time. and shows you how to input more complex keyboard music with your MIDI keyboard using Sibelius’s Flexi-time input. choose File > Open (shortcut Ctrl+O or XO) and find the example score called Project 3 in the Project Files folder in the example scores folder. in order to carry on with the project. You should now see an arrangement which is missing music from the Electric Stage Piano and Electric Guitar parts. and switch off the Record into multiple voices checkbox. 91 . Project 3 Using a MIDI keyboard To use Flexi-time you must have a MIDI device connected to your computer. The first chapter of this project builds on the note input skills we learned in the first project of this Handbook. Click Yes to make this into the current version and then click Close. To learn more about setting up input and playback with MIDI devices. If you want to slow the tempo down to make it easier for you to record. b 1. You should now see a completed arrangement of a funk tune called Urbane Filigree. If you don’t have a MIDI keyboard. you will learn some of the important features to help you produce jazz and commercial music: inputting complex keyboard music and writing for guitar. storing and re-using snippets of music using the Ideas window. skip on to 3. Within a few moments.2 Writing for guitar on page 91. choose Notes > Flexi-time Options (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+O or xXO). choose File > Versions > Edit Versions. because you’ll be reading music from it when we edit our arrangement shortly. choose File > Print (shortcut Ctrl+P or XP) and click OK on Windows or Print on Mac to print the score. you can still input the missing music using the step-time input method we learned in the first project of this Handbook. Now. Choose None (non rubato) from the Flexibility of tempo drop-down list. Open this score. as well as how to make your scores sound more realistic for making audio recordings. Printout First. Hold on to this printout. For this chapter. drag the tempo slider on the Playback window to the left-hand side.1 Writing for keyboard In this project. Since we’ll need to refer to a printout of this arrangement throughout this project. Click OK to return to the score.10 Input Devices in Reference. To set up input and playback in Sibelius. a printout of Urbane Filigree should emerge from your printer. so to ensure we get the best results.

b 6. Then select the first bar of the two adjacent Electric Stage Piano staves in the score: click the upper staff. You may also like to experiment with the other plug-ins in the Plug-ins > Simplify Notation menu. resume playing the right hand Electric Stage Piano part. * Plug-ins > Simplify Notation > Renotate Performance allows you to tidy up unwanted rests. b 1.Project 3 Two-handed Flexi-time input Place the printout so that you can clearly read the music on the Electric Stage Piano staves (or. At bar 17. by selecting a passage in both staves and running the plug-in. try playing the next few bars smoothly. overlapping notes or incorrect note durations. there are two plug-ins you should try: * Plug-ins > Simplify Notation > Change Split Point allows you to change the point at which notes are split between the right-hand and left-hand staves of a keyboard instrument. improvise your own part following the chord symbols above the staves on the printout).4 Flexi-time in Reference. simply stop playing with your right hand. or choose Notes > Flexi-time (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+F or xXF). 92 . select the music on both staves and run the plug-in. if you prefer. At the end of the count-in. this tells Sibelius where to start from and which instrument you want to record into. the music you’re playing will appear in notation on the screen. Simplify notation plug-ins If you find that Flexi-time produces complicated notation and you want to simplify it. As you play. For more about recording Flexi-time input. you can tell Sibelius to recalculate the Flexi-time transcription and produce a rhythmically and visually simpler version. As we saw in Project 1. * Flexi-time gives you at least a whole bar’s count-in by default – so in this case you should hear * * * * one bar and three beats count-in to the pick-up. click the square stop button on the Playback window or hit Space or Esc. following the speed of the clicks. then Shift-click the lower staff so that both are selected. When you want to stop recording. If you have passages in your recorded input where notes would be better suited to being on a different staff. To learn more about plug-ins. If there are still any mistakes. Plug-ins in Reference. When you reach the existing music in the upper staff at bar 9. you can use the editing techniques you have already learned to correct the note values and pitches. Now: * Click the red button on the Playback window.

rather than Keyboard. step-time input and the Keyboard/Fretboard windows. Sibelius has a number of tools and features specifically designed to make it easier to write for guitar.2 Writing for guitar 3. Otherwise.2 Writing for guitar If you are starting from this section of the project. you’ll see that you need to change some of the notes and chords to use a muted (cross) notehead. four. Sibelius contains information about all kinds of stringed instruments which can be notated using “tab” and displays the correct number of strings and appropriate tuning. whether you want to write for a standard guitar. Among these is the ability to notate music using guitar tablature. lute or the more familiar bass balalaika! You can copy music from notation staves onto a guitar tab staff – and vice versa. you should try to complete this chapter by using it to input notes into Sibelius. You should find your device’s name in the table at the top of the page and check that the Use checkbox is switched on. use a combination of your preferred note input methods to enter the music up to bar 20: mouse input. choose File > Preferences (in the Sibelius menu on Mac) and go to the Input Devices page. you should open the example score called Project 3 and make the 2 Writing for guitar version into the Current version.) Using a MIDI guitar If you have a MIDI guitar (or a guitar with a hexaphonic pick-up and guitar MIDI interface) connected to your computer that you want to use for this chapter. and how to input guitar tab. If you have a MIDI device connected to your computer. then select the number of strings. select the note or chord (hint: you can doubleclick on a chord to select all the notes it contains) and type the shortcut Shift+Alt+1 or xz1 to 93 . you can even change from a standard notation staff to a tab staff in the middle of a system.10 Input Devices in Reference. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. These are not alternative “modes” of writing music that you have to switch on or off – you can change input methods whenever you like. alphabetic input. Project 3 Input the guitar part You should refer to the printout we made earlier to see the music we’re going to input. you should set up the input and playback in Sibelius. Otherwise. and clicking Make current. In this chapter. To do this. selecting this version in the list. b 1. To learn more about setting up input and playback with a MIDI guitar. we’ll learn how to record music into Sibelius as standard notation and change it into guitar tab. You will need to change the Type value by clicking the drop-down menu and choosing Guitar. you can use a MIDI keyboard or the alphabetic note input method we learned in Project 1. (If you have a MIDI guitar. Once you have inputted the guitar part. record the guitar part as far as bar 20 using Flexi-time input by selecting the first bar of the staff and choosing Notes > Flexi-time Input (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+F or xXF) or clicking the red button on the Playback window. five or six string bass guitar. To do this.3.

to show that it is “carrying” an object * Click on the Electric Guitar staff at the very start of the first system of music. let’s try inputting some music from scratch: * Select the bar rest in bar 21 of the guitar staff * Hit N to start note input – make sure you have the first Keypad layout showing (hit F7 to be sure) * Type 3 0 (on the numeric keypad) to input an eighth note (quaver) rest * Hit 3 once to move up to the fourth string and type 4 (on the main keyboard this time) * Add a staccato articulation from the Keypad * Advance to the next position by typing 1 then type 4 (on the numeric keypad) to change to a quarter note (crotchet) * Hit 3 twice to move up to the second string and type 1 (on the main keyboard) * Move up to the first string and type 1 again. We’ll learn more about changing noteheads later in this project. using an instrument change: * Choose Create > Other > Instrument Change (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+I or xzXI) * Select Common Instruments from the Choose from list * From the Guitars family.25 Noteheads in Reference. to the left of its initial barline. You can still copy music to and from this tab staff using Alt+click or z-click – Sibelius will transform copied music into the appropriate notation for the staff type. standard tuning [tab] and click OK * The mouse pointer turns dark blue. also b 2. choose Electric Guitar. The notation staff is changed into a six-string tab staff automatically – notice how all the music is converted into tab notation. as shown below:   4 1 1 4 0 0 3 1 1 4   X X X   X X X   1 1 4 0 0 3 1 1 4   X X 7 5 5 4   0 6 6 4 5 5 3 6 6 4   X X X   X X X    6 6 4 5 5 3 6 6 4   7 7 6 5 6 6 5 4 Let’s turn the guitar staff back to conventional notation – use an instrument change to turn the staff back to Electric Guitar [notation]. 94 . Convert to tab Sibelius can instantly turn standard notation into tab. Writing tab notation Now we’ve seen how Sibelius can switch between standard and tab notation.Project 3 change the notehead to a cross. You should see the following:   4 1 1 4  Now input the remainder of the last four bars as tab.

compact and detailed. by choosing Window > Ideas (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+I or zXI). the Ideas window. click on it Project 3 there to select it * Use the Down button to re-order Drum Set (Rock) so that it appears between 5-string Bass Guitar and Synthesizer (a) * Click OK to return to the score. called ideas.3 Ideas and drum notation 3. you’ll find something suitable in seconds. but it also comes with more than 1500 built-in ideas covering a variety of musical genres and many different instruments. for later retrieval and re-use. so if you’re stuck for inspiration or looking for something stylish to kickstart your creative process. Now you should see a percussion staff added to your score. Having already looked at writing for keyboard and guitar. with which you can save snippets of music of any length. By default it opens in compact view. Not only does Sibelius allow you to capture your own creativity so quickly. and clicking Make current. Add a drum staff to the score The score we’ve been working on so far has no drum staff in it. making it easy to find them later on. select Common Instruments * Choose the Percussion and Drums family and then select Drum Set (Rock) * Click Add to Score. as we’ll see. Using the Ideas window to help with writing for percussion can save you a lot of time. You can provide tags (or keywords) for each idea. ready for you to write a drum part. you should open the example score called Project 3 and make the 3 Ideas and drum notation version into the Current version.3 Ideas and drum notation If you are starting from this section of the project. Auditioning drum ideas Show the Ideas window. if it’s not already shown. which looks like this: 95 . The Ideas window has two views. In this chapter we’ll explore one of Sibelius’s most powerful creative tools. we’ll also learn how to create drum notation in this chapter. or hit the shortcut I * From the Choose from list.3. and Drum Set (Rock) will appear in the Staves in score list. selecting this version in the list. so let’s add one: * Choose Create > Instruments. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions.

(You can also right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) and choose Copy from the context menu. This way you can quickly narrow the list of ideas down to ones that might be suitable. at the bottom left. then choose Edit > Paste. Near the top of the list you will see Urbane Funky Drum Loop 1. input the notes using alphabetic input and see Changing noteheads below to change them manually. Try scrolling up and down the list. you can use any of the note input methods we’ve already learned. melody. and type Ctrl+V or XV to paste it in. You can search for ideas that correspond to a particular style or genre by typing different tags at the top of the window. you can simply play the pitch that corresponds to the line or space on the staff (as if it’s a treble clef staff) and Sibelius automatically chooses the correct notehead. either by typing Ctrl+C or XC.Project 3 Try switching between Library. slow. notice how a border appears around it to show that it’s selected.) Let’s input the drum pattern in bar 6: 96 . clear any tags you have typed from the top of the window and click on the Score button. Pasting an idea So let’s use this idea for ourselves. Select the first full bar of the Drum Set staff in the score. Score and All. First. the time signature of the idea. (If you don’t have a MIDI keyboard connected. You should see that the idea we just pasted in matches the first four bars of drum notation after the pick-up (upbeat) on your printout. Try typing a few tags to get an inkling of just how many different ideas in a variety of styles and genres are included with Sibelius: motown. let’s use some ideas suitable for the score we’ve just created. then choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV). funk. Inputting drum notation When inputting into percussion staves. the tempo of the idea. Each idea shows a small preview of the music or other objects contained within it. To check how an idea sounds. you have access to the more than 2000 built-in ideas. If you have a MIDI keyboard connected to your computer. and at the bottom right. Now. or by clicking the Copy button at the bottom of the window. but for drum notation – which uses different types of noteheads – it is much quicker to use step-time or Flexi-time input. the idea’s name. Important tags are shown in the four corners around the notation preview: at the top left. When the Library button is switched on. at the top right the letter L appears if the idea is located in the library rather than the current score. or make sure you have nothing selected. Now copy it to the clipboard. and click in the score where you want the idea to go. normally you will see two or three bars of one staff (although ideas can contain any number of bars or instruments). You could also click the Paste button at the bottom of the Ideas window. select Urbane Funky Drum Loop 1 in the Ideas window. You can add the next bar of music by pasting the Urbane Funky Drums 2 idea into bar 5 in the same manner. simply click and hold the mouse button on it: the idea will play in a loop repeatedly until you release the mouse button.) Pasting an idea into a score is just like any other kind of pasting: either select the place in the score where you want the idea to appear. happy.

Changing noteheads If you enter notes into a percussion staff using alphabetic input. again to remove the circle symbol if you need to. In order to add the bass drum and snare pattern so that their stems always point down while the hi-hat note stems point up. play the G above the staff. you’ll rarely need to use more than two voices at a time. and voice 4 is pink. pointing at the F space. on a single staff. to show that it is “carrying” an object which will be inputted in voice 2 * Now click the mouse pointer near the start of the sixth bar. hit Esc to make sure you have nothing selected * Now type Alt+2 or z2 to switch voices. this time using the computer keyboard: * Select the bar rest in bar 7 and hit N to begin note input * Hit 3 on the numeric keypad to choose an eighth note (quaver) 97 . so let’s learn how to do that manually by inputting the same pattern in bar 7. Sibelius doesn’t change the noteheads automatically for you. which corresponds to the Harmonic/Open button. (on the numeric keypad). For lots more detail about voices. voice 3 is orange.3 Ideas and drum notation * Select the bar rest in bar 6 and hit N to begin note input * Hit 3 on the numeric keypad to choose an eighth note (quaver) * On your MIDI keyboard. voice 2 is green. make sure you hit F7 to return to the first Keypad layout to continue inputting notes. or lines of notes and chords. The voices are color-coded: voice 1 (which we’ve used so far) is dark blue. the bottom space on the staff:              Finish adding the bass and snare drum pattern to bar 6 using your MIDI keyboard as before. then hit . to add the circle symbol to the open hi-hat note. simply hit F10 to choose the fourth Keypad layout. In this way. or click 2 on the row of buttons at the bottom of the Project 3 Keypad * Choose a sixteenth note by hitting 2 on the numeric keypad * The mouse pointer turns green. continue to input the hi-hat notes for the rest of the bar. b 2. we’ll be using voice two: * First. Sibelius can write up to four independent voices.36 Voices in Reference. You can hit .3. this corresponds to a closed hi-hat * Notice how Sibelius changes the notehead to a cross:     * Input another three eighth note hi-hats * Hit 2 on the numeric keypad to choose a sixteenth note (semiquaver) * Play G on your MIDI keyboard twice to input two sixteenth note hi-hats.

then click the Edit Idea Info button ( ) at the bottom of the window (or right-click (Windows) or Control-click 98 . The process of putting an idea into the Ideas window is called capturing an idea: * select bar 7 so that it is surrounded by a blue box * choose Edit > Capture Idea (shortcut Shift-I). so you can re-use it later. To learn more about noteheads. The music you selected immediately appears at the top of the list in the Ideas window. input the bass drum and snare pattern in voice 2:                 Sibelius allows you to filter a selection. you can switch it on by choosing Window > Properties (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+P or zXP). Now any edits you make will only apply to the selected notes in voice 1. the hi-hat notes. Editing an idea You can edit both the music and the tags of ideas.25 Noteheads in Reference. i. Capturing an idea Now let’s try making a new idea.Project 3 * Type G on your computer keyboard. Let’s try this now: * Select bar 7 so that it is surrounded by a blue box * Choose Edit > Filter > Voices > Voice 1 (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+1 or xzX1) * Sibelius makes a multiple selection of only the notes in voice 1. which means that you can select a set of objects with particular characteristics. b 2. select the idea you just captured in the Ideas window.e. or click on the Capture Idea button ( ) at the bottom of the Ideas window. If you can’t see the Properties window. make sure it goes above the staff * Input another three eighth notes by hitting R * Hit 2 on the numeric keypad to choose a sixteenth note (semiquaver) * Type G on your computer keyboard twice to input two sixteenth note Now that you’ve added the hi-hat notes. To try out editing tags. So let’s change the notehead: * Change the notehead by typing Shift+Alt+1 or xz1 * All the notes change to display a cross notehead:                 Alternatively you can choose the notehead from the menu in the Notes panel of the Properties window.

ready for you to write a drum part. simply choose File > Close. as if you had opened another score. and so on. To add a repeat bar symbol. * When you’re satisfied with your choices. 99 . type Urbane Funky Drums 1 * You can also type a few tags into the Tags box: there’s no limit on what you can type. select Common Instruments * Choose the Percussion and Drums family and then select Tambourine * Click Add to Score * Select Tambourine from the Staves in score list and use the Down button to re-order it so that Project 3 it appears between Drum Set (Rock) and Synthesizer (a) * Click OK to return to the score. click OK to close the Edit Idea Info dialog.3. adding text. arrangers often add a repeat bar symbol. select bar 10 of the tambourine staff and hit F11 to view the fifth Keypad layout. simply save it by choosing File > Save (shortcut Ctrl+S or XS).3 Ideas and drum notation (Mac) on an idea in the list and choose Edit Idea Info from the context menu). Now hit 1 (on the numeric keypad) to add a single repeat bar. This tells the performer to play the exactly the same pattern as the previous bar. Repeat bars Often. select your idea again in the Ideas window. To edit the music in an idea. A new document window will appear. then close the window by choosing File > Close (shortcut Ctrl+W or XW) to return to your original score. When you have finished editing your idea. We’ve barely scratched the surface of what you can do with ideas. so use as many words as you can think of that will help you to find your idea again later on * Click Color to show a color picker and choose a new background color for your idea. click the Score button in the Ideas window and find the Urbane Tambourine 1 idea from the list. A simple dialog appears: * Give your idea a new Name here. Next. then click No when asked if you want to save your changes.11 Ideas in Reference. drum and other percussion parts are made up of repeated patterns of one or two bars’ length. Let’s add a tambourine part to the score to learn how this works: * Choose Create > Instruments.g. Sibelius understands this and plays back repeat bars just as a real performer would. Now you should see a percussion staff added to your score. Keep typing 1 until you reach bar 16. You can edit it just like any other score. or hit the shortcut I * From the Choose from list. So don’t forget – b 5. then click the Edit Idea button ( ) at the bottom of the window (or choose Edit Idea from the context menu). Rather than copying the same bar out numerous times. adding or deleting notes and bars. you can use color to categorize your ideas and to make it easier to find them again later on. Copy and paste this idea into bar 9. Again. If you want to discard any unsaved changes in your idea. lines and other markings. e.

100 . Finish the percussion parts Input the remainder of the music on the Drum Set and Tambourine parts.27 Repeat bars in Reference. repeat bars and multiple voices to help you finish inputting the percussion parts. For more about repeat bars.Project 3 Notice that you can also add 2. Sibelius will pla back all these different kinds of repeats. Use the Ideas window. b 2. referring to the printout we made earlier.and 4-bar repeats from the fifth Keypad layout.

they are sometimes known as chord boxes. Project 3 Sibelius creates the appropriate chord symbol. a chord symbol consists of two parts that describe the harmony at that point in the music: chord text. * * * * select the first full bar of the Electric Stage Piano staff. and a chord diagram. we’ll learn how to input and edit chord symbols by typing. * Click the note or chord above which you wish to place the chord symbol – for this example. so you can use your MIDI keyboard (or guitar) to quickly input chord symbols into a score. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. In this chapter. Try typing Ab13(#11). selecting this version in the list. If you don’t have a MIDI device connected. (You must have a MIDI device connected to your computer to play chords into Sibelius. as above. Creating chord symbols by typing Sibelius lets you add chord symbols to your score very easily by typing.) Let’s try this out: * Select the third full bar of the Electric Stage Piano staff * Choose Create > Chord Symbol (shortcut Ctrl+K or XK) * A flashing caret appears above the first note 101 . Hit Space to advance to the next note or beat. you should see Ab13(#11). You can then choose whether to show either or both parts of the chord symbol. or by playing the notes they describe on a MIDI device. In Sibelius. b 2. using special sharp and flat characters as well as many other special characters. guitar frames and so on. or Tab to move to the start of the next bar. Choose Create > Chord Symbol (shortcut Ctrl+K or XK). A flashing caret appears above the note you selected. and clicking Make current. in this case. Chord diagrams show the player which fingers need to be on which fret on each string of a guitar. fretboard grids. simply type the chord symbols into the score.3. Sibelius will create any special symbols automatically as required to render the chord symbols consistent and legible. you should open the example score called Project 3 and make the 4 Chord symbols version into the Current version.4 Chord symbols 3. the fastest way to input chord symbols is by playing them on a MIDI device and letting Sibelius work them out for you.4 Chord symbols If you are starting from this section of the project. However. Type in plain English versions of the chords you want to see appear. how to play and adjust MIDI chord symbol input and how to use some of the chord symbol plug-ins. Creating chord symbols by playing Sibelius can recognize over 600 chord types by the notes they contain. To learn more about chord symbols.10 Chord symbols in Reference. You can input chord symbols in one of two ways: by typing them directly into the score.

if you play the chord in one of its inversions. Try playing various combinations of notes on your MIDI keyboard to see how they’re notated. select the chord symbols you just created and delete them or use Undo to remove them from the score. Sibelius will produce a chord symbol with an altered bass note. play a chord of C major * Sibelius inputs a C chord symbol and advances to the next beat. but also the specific way in which the chord is notated. We’re now going to input the chord symbols for the chords used in Urbane Filigree. For more details on customizing Sibelius’s chord recognition. These are quite complex chords. You can play a huge range of chords – from simple triads through to extremely complex extended chords – and Sibelius will intelligently notate the best corresponding chord symbols. D/F#.Project 3 * On your MIDI keyboard.13 Edit Chord Symbols in Reference.g. Sibelius uses the voicing of the chord that you play to determine not only the chord type. By default. so here are the notes you will need to play to get the corresponding chord symbols: A¨13(#11)      102         F7½ D¨13(#11)              B¨‹7 G¨13(#11)           A13(#11)          E‹9               A¨Ø7 E¨13(#11)                         A¨13[áÁ]              B7(#5) D¨7½       G¨/A¨              F©Ø7       B13(b9) F13(#11)                         E13(#11) .g. e. e. b 8. Holding Ctrl or X.

You can play them in on your MIDI keyboard or type the chord names. you can quickly change the chord text of a chord symbol if Sibelius hasn’t chosen the text you prefer. Then. or type the correct plain English text. if the chord is a slash chord) will be respelled using the enharmonic equivalent. To see other possibilities for the same pattern of intervals. according to your preference. Now you should check that the chords you inputted are all correctly notated. Let’s try this: * Select the Ab13(#11) chord in the first bar of the Electric Stage Piano staff * Type Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK to change to the next equivalent chord text * The chord type changes to D7[ïíî Î]/G# * Type Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK to change to the next chord symbol * The chord type changes to Gbmaj13[åÂsus2]/Ab * Keep changing the chord text in this way until you cycle back to Ab13(#11) again. and even updates them automatically to show the correct transposition on transposing scores. or right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) and choose Equivalent Chord Text from the Chord Symbol submenu. or choose Edit > Chord Symbol > Respell Chord Symbol * The chord symbol’s root note (and any alternate bass note. G#7 for Ab7. Equivalent chord text Sibelius automatically picks the best chord symbol for a set of pitches. simply double-click it. Copying chord symbols We’ve seen how chord symbols appear on a keyboard staff. To edit an existing chord symbol. change them by typing Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK. e. but there will be occasions where you want to change a chord symbol root note for its enharmonic equivalent without changing the chord type. Let’s see how this works: * Select the chord symbol that you want to be respelled * Right-click and choose Chord Symbol > Respell Chord Symbol from the context menu. or if the voicing you play suggested a different type of chord.3. In this way. then choose Edit > Chord Symbol > Equivalent Chord Text (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+K or xXK). Project 3 Respelling a chord symbol Sibelius automatically “spells” a chord according to the prevailing key signature. referring to the printout we made earlier. To change. but sometimes you may want to see a different chord type. but when you copy chord symbols to other instruments Sibelius knows whether show a chord diagram or not. simply select the chord symbol (or chord symbols) whose chord type you want to change. hit Return (on the main keyboard) to edit it. if you need to.4 Chord symbols Finish adding the chord symbols to the score.g. or select the symbol you want to change. below. see Respelling a chord symbol. either play it again on your MIDI device. Let’s copy the chord symbols you’ve just inputted: * Triple-click on the top staff of the Electric Stage Piano to select it throughout the score 103 .

or rightclick (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) and choose Revoice Chord Diagram from the Chord Symbol submenu. Chord symbol plug-ins Sibelius features some very useful plug-ins to help you work with chord symbols. This means that even if you use special guitar tunings.10 Chord symbols and b 8. You can change the chord diagram that Sibelius chooses by default – just as you can change the default chord symbol Sibelius picks when playing a MIDI device. To add simple accompaniments from existing chord symbols try running Plug-ins > Chord Symbols > Realize Chord Symbols. then choose Edit > Chord Symbol > Revoice Chord Diagram (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+K or xzXK). then select the staves you want them copied to and type Ctrl+V or XV.13 Edit Chord Symbols in Reference. b 2. simply select the chord symbol (or chord symbols) whose chord diagram you want to change. This uses the chord symbols in your score to create piano or guitar accompaniments in a variety of accompaniment styles. use Plug-ins > Chord Symbols > Add Chord Symbols to let Sibelius choose the chord symbols for you. it is worth noting that you can multicopy chord symbols across any number of staves. At this point. Revoicing chord diagrams Sibelius automatically assigns a chord diagram to every chord symbol shown on a guitar staff. Let’s try this: * select the Ab13(#11) chord in the first bar of the Electric Guitar staff * type Ctrl+Shift+Alt+K or xzXK to revoice the chord diagram shown – try this a few times to see the voicings Sibelius can generate for you To learn more about how to determine the chord type or chord diagram that Sibelius should show by default and how to change the appearance of chord symbols. 104 . based on the harmony of your music.Project 3 * Choose Edit > Filter > Chord Symbols to select only the chord symbols * Copy the chord symbols to the guitar staff by Alt+clicking or z-clicking at the start of the first full bar of the Electric Guitar staff * Copy the chord symbols to the bass guitar staff by Alt+clicking or z-clicking at the start of the first full bar of the 4-string Bass Guitar staff. To do this. These are either taken from a built-in selection for standard 6-string guitar tuning – chosen for their ease of playing – or automatically calculated based on the notes the chord contains. If you want to add chord symbols to existing music without playing or typing the symbols in. simply copy the chord symbols you want to duplicate to the clipboard using Ctrl+C or XC. Sibelius will provide you with a wide selection of playable shapes for a particular chord type.

This chapter looks at how to change the form of your music with repeat barlines. Let’s begin by adding a repeat barline to the end of the repeated section: * Click on the barline at the end of bar 4. Sibelius plays all of these common repeat structures – just as a performer would.5 Repeats and codas 3. we need to insert a bar to use as the ending for the first pass of our repeat section: * Begin by selecting the end repeat barline we added earlier and hit Delete to remove it * Ctrl+click or X-click on bar 4 in any staff to make a system selection – a purple double-box will appear around all the staves * Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) * Select bar 8 of the Trumpets in Bb staff.3. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. 1st and 2nd ending lines are system lines – they behave in the same way as the tempo lines we used in Project 2. which we’ll use as the ending for the second pass of our repeat section * Choose Edit > Paste (shortcut Ctrl+V or XV) to paste the copied bar into the score. 1st and 2nd ending lines For more complex repeated sections. to denote the end of a repeated section. Repeat barlines We’re going to repeat the first four bars of the piece. using repeat barlines. Project 3 Sibelius now plays up to bar 4. i. then hit P to play from the start of the score. When playing back your scores. The new bar is inserted in between the existing bars. we need to create another repeat barline: * Choose Create > Barline > Start Repeat * The mouse pointer turns dark blue. In Sibelius. selecting this version in the list. composers and arrangers use 1st and 2nd endings which are only played on the first or second pass through a repeated section. Let’s create a repeat with 1st and 2nd endings. In this context.e. 105 . and clicking Make current.5 Repeats and codas If you are starting from this section of the project. to show that it is “carrying” an object * Click on the barline at the start of the first full bar to place the start repeat barline. it turns purple to show that it is selected * Choose Create > Barline > End Repeat * The barline immediately changes to a repeat barline. you should open the example score called Project 3 and make the 5 Repeat structures and codas version into the Current version. this repeat barline instructs the performer to return to the start of the score and repeat from there. * Hit Esc to deselect everything. which will include the pick-up (upbeat) bar too. then returns to bar 1 again before carrying on through the rest of the score. 1st and 2nd-time endings and codas. it becomes bar 8. To mark the start of the repeated section.

Now let’s add the end repeat barline and 2nd ending line to complete the repeat structure: * Click on the barline at the end of bar 8. key signatures and braces for you. this is the 1st ending line * Click OK to add the line to bar 8: 1.) repeat. Notice how * * * * * Sibelius automatically restates the clefs.) repeats Let’s create a simple coda and “dal segno” (D. this is the 2nd ending line * Click OK to add the line to bar 8. or by using the 0 and 1 keys (don’t forget.             f      f           The line is added to the top of the score. You may wish to shorten the lines to prevent them overlapping – do this by clicking on the endpoints and dragging with the mouse.                 f          f       2. it turns purple to show that it is selected * Choose Create > Barline > End Repeat * The barline immediately changes to a repeat barline * Select bar 9 of the Trumpets in Bb staff * Hit L to open the Create > Line dialog * Choose the third line in the right-hand list of System lines. which denotes a section end * Choose Layout > Break > Split System to create a gap after the double barline. Select the rest at the start of bar 22 of the Trumpets in Bb staff Choose Create > Text > Tempo (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T or zXT) Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see the word menu Select the first of the two coda signs (Ø) from the list of suggested words and symbols Type the word Coda and hit Esc. you can use Ctrl or X to move by a larger amount in this way): 1. hit L to open the Create > Line dialog * Choose the first line in the right-hand list of System lines.                                               Coda and dal segno (D. we’ll turn bars 22–25 into the coda section: * Select the barline at the start of bar 22 * Choose Create > Barline > Double to add a double barline.S. but will appear above bar 8 in each individual part. 106 .Project 3 * With this bar still selected.S.

Project 3 107 .S.5 Repeats and codas Now let’s add the dal segno repeat./To Coda) * Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) to see the word menu * Choose D.3. in the row labeled Repeats * Make sure that the Attach to option is set to System * Click OK to create the symbol in the score * Drag the symbol above the staff to an appropriate position at the start of the bar. shown at the top of the dialog. we’ll instruct them to jump back to bar 14: * Select the double barline at the end of bar 21 * Choose Create > Text > Other System Text > Repeat (D. enabling you to override any of Sibelius’s positioning rules. if you play back your score. To learn more about using repeat structures. b 4.6 Repeats in Reference.) Now. When the player reaches the end of bar 21./D.S. al Coda from the list of suggested words and symbols * Hit Esc to deselect * Ctrl+click or X-click on any staff at bar 14 to make a system selection – a purple double-box will appear around all the staves * Hit Z to open the Create > Symbol dialog * Select the first of the two segno symbols ($). Sibelius will follow the repeats we’ve added.C. (The difference between symbols and other objects is that you can position symbols anywhere you like.

Project 3

3.6 Arranging and playback
If you are starting from this section of the project, you should open the example score called Project 3 and make the 6 Arranging and playback version into the Current version, by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions, selecting this version in the list, and clicking Make current. In this chapter we’ll learn about one of Sibelius’s useful arranging tools: the Arrange™ feature, which you can use to automatically re-arrange music for different instruments. We’ll also learn how to change the sounds Sibelius uses to play your score back, add effects and produce an audio file of your score.

Add string backings
Using the existing Synthesizer part in the Urbane Filigree score, we’re going to create some simple string backings.
* Add string parts to the score by choosing Create > Instruments (shortcut I). * Make sure you have selected Common Instruments from the Choose from list, then select

Strings from the Family list. * Click on Violin 1 to select it, then hold Ctrl or X and select Violin 2, Viola and Violoncello. * Click Add to Score to add all the selected instruments to your score. * Click OK to return to the score. Sibelius’s Arrange feature is designed to assist with arranging and orchestration, and can save you lots of time. You’ll see the potential for writing any kind of music right away:
* Click in an empty space in bar 10 of the top Synthesizer staff to select it * Now Shift-click on the last bar of the other Synthesizer staff, so that both staves are enclosed

within a single light blue box
* Choose Edit > Copy (shortcut Ctrl+C or XC) to copy the music to the clipboard * Select bar 10 of the Violin 1 staff by clicking on an empty bit of staff * Shift-click on bar 10 of the Violoncello staff to select all the string staves together * Choose Notes > Arrange (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+V or xXV) * From the dialog that appears, choose Standard Arrangement, and click OK.

Sibelius arranges the music onto the string staves in your score, intelligently splitting the music up between the instruments Arrange intelligently copies music from any number of staves into any other number of staves. It can be used to produce piano reductions, and to “explode” chords onto multiple staves. Most importantly of all, this sophisticated feature also helps you arrange and orchestrate for a wide variety of styles and ensembles. For more details, b 5.1 Arrange™ in Reference.

Mixing your score
As we learned in Project 1, the Mixer window is an extremely powerful tool for controlling the way Sibelius plays back your scores. Here, you can change the sounds used to play back each of the 108

3.6 Arranging and playback instruments in your score, add effects such as reverb and chorus, edit specific parameters to adjust each instrument’s sound and balance the overall mix of your score. Firstly, we’re going to use the Mixer to mute the Synthesizer staves, since we no longer need them now that we’ve arranged the music from them for our string section.
* Hit M to open the Mixer window, if it’s not already showing. * Scroll down until you find the Synthesizer (a) and Synthesizer (b) staff strips. * Click the Mute button (

) on the right of both strips – you need to click it twice; one click partially mutes the staff, the second click mutes it fully:

Now try playing back your score. You should hear that the string parts have replaced the Synthesizer sound. Adjust the volume of the staff strips to balance the string parts. If you want to change the volume of the whole string section together, switch on the group strips ( ) at the top of the Mixer window. This shows group strips for each family of instruments in your score. Adjusting these changes the relative volume and pan of the whole family.

Changing instrument sounds
You can choose which of the sounds available on your computer Sibelius should use to play back each individual instrument. Let’s change all of the string sounds to use solo instruments rather than ensemble; this will give our score a smaller, more intimate feel:
* Scroll down the Mixer window until you find the Violin 1 staff strip * Click the arrowhead to the left of the instrument name, which expands the staff strip * Click on the arrow next to the read-out that currently displays (Violin Ensemble Lite (GPO)) * A menu appears, displaying the playback devices that Sibelius can use; we’re going to use

Project 3

Sibelius Sounds Essentials * Choose Essentials > Strings > Violin > Violin Solo Lite (GPO) to change to a solo violin sound:

109

Project 3 Now change the Violin 2, Viola and Violoncello staves in the same way, so that they use the Violin Solo 2 Lite (GPO), Viola Solo Lite (GPO) and Cello Solo Lite (GPO) sounds respectively. To close up any of the staff strips in the Mixer, simply click again on the arrowhead to the left of the instrument name. Try playing back your score again to hear the difference – you may want to adjust the balance to suit the new sounds.

Effects parameters
Each instrument sound has up to six effect parameters, which are controlled by faders shown underneath the expanded staff strip:

Expand all the staff strips in the Mixer window by Shift-clicking on one of the arrowheads to the left of the instrument names. Try adjusting the faders to change the different effects and listen to the change in Sibelius’s playback. If you want to return a fader to its default setting, just double-click it. (Note that this doesn’t apply to the Reverb and Chorus knobs, just the horizontal faders.) To learn all about how to use the Mixer to change Sibelius’s playback, b 4.3 Mixer in Reference.

Exporting an audio file
Using VST/AU virtual instruments, such as Sibelius Sounds Essentials, Sibelius allows you to export your score as an audio file at the click of a button. You can burn audio files directly to CD, or convert them into other formats, such as MP3, allowing you to give recordings to conductors or performers to give an idea of how the music sounds, or even for practicing along to. Let’s export an audio file of Urbane Filigree:
* Choose Play > Move Playback Line to Start (shortcut Ctrl+[ or X[) or click the corresponding

button on the Playback window * Choose File > Export > Audio or click the toolbar button, shown above right * Choose a Filename for your audio file and click OK * Sibelius records your score as an audio file and saves it in the same folder as the score. For more information, b 9.10 Exporting audio files in Reference.

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Project 4 Project 4 .

Project 4 112 .

Even this can save quite a bit of time.) Creating a worksheet from scratch If you want to create a worksheet from scratch instead of using one of the templates. Worksheet Creator The extensive Worksheet Creator feature (b 5. before writing your own worksheet. we’re going to create our own worksheet though. flashcards and reference materials for students at all levels. you will need to be familiar with the layout tools available in Sibelius. chiefly adjusting staff spacing and creating system or page breaks (both of which you can learn more about in Project 2 of this Handbook). posters. You’ll learn how to change the text font for a whole score. choose File > Worksheet Creator and on the dialog that appears. and how to edit the properties of different types of text. if a suitable template is provided then use it rather than creating a worksheet completely from scratch. (To access these templates. We’re going to use these skills – and learn some new ones – to create a sample worksheet template. the Worksheet Creator also includes a variety of worksheet templates in different formats with empty bars for you to fill in.25 Worksheet Creator in Reference) automatically produces thousands of different kinds of worksheets. The first chapter of this project looks at setting up a worksheet from scratch in Sibelius and saving the template to re-use again. ensure that Common Instruments is selected in the Choose from list * Choose the Others family and select Unnamed (treble staff) from the list of available instruments * Click Add to Score and then OK * Click Finish to close the New Score dialog and create a score. which enable you to create worksheets and teaching resources and manage classroom use of Sibelius. So.4.1 Setting up a worksheet 4. see whether the Worksheet Creator already has one that is suitable. which we’ll add to the templates in the Worksheet Creator. so again. If not. exercises. or that you can quickly adapt.1 Setting up a worksheet This project shows you how to use some of Sibelius’s many educational features. Let’s start by setting up a new score: * Choose File > New or click the toolbar button * The New Score appears Project 4 * Choose the Blank manuscript paper and click Change Instruments * In the dialog that appears. choose Template and click Next. The list of available worksheet templates appears on the left hand side. so click Cancel. 113 .

Any adjustments you make to a note or other object here will apply to every note or object of the same type in the score. We can also adjust the size of the staves. because it stops Sibelius from automatically spacing the staves evenly down an entire page as it fills up. to show that it is “carrying an object” * Click anywhere in the score to add the new bars * Hit Esc to deselect everything * Choose Layout > Auto Breaks * In the dialog that appears. Click OK to close the Engraving Rules dialog. set Justify staves when page is at least n% full to 100%. Before we continue with our template. We need to make two adjustments: * On the Bar Numbers page. choose House Style > Engraving Rules (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+E or xXE). which stops bar numbers from appearing in the worksheet. so that all the bars fit onto a single A4 page: 114 . * On the Staves page of the dialog. switch on Use auto system breaks and choose Every 4 bars * Click OK and your score should instantly update to lay out the score. set Frequency to No bar numbers. This gives you complete control over the vertical positioning of staves when laying out your worksheets. Take the time to read the advice in b 8.10 Staff spacing in Reference. This opens the Engraving Rules dialog. exam paper or other kind of special music example: vertical justification is always desirable when you are producing every other kind of score. which you can use to make various changes to the settings in your score. You should only ever disable vertical justification as you have done here when you are creating a worksheet. set Number of bars to 43 and click OK * The mouse pointer turns dark blue.Project 4 You should see this: Now let’s add some more bars and create the initial page layout: * Choose Create > Bar > Other (shortcut Alt+B or zB) * In the dialog that appears.

24 inches. Project 4 Now the text should look like this: SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS Worksheet 1 Name: __________ Class: __________      From now on. 115 . Adding text Let’s add a title and some placeholder text for a student to write their name: * Choose Create > Text > Title * The mouse pointer turns blue to show that it is carrying an object * Click at the top of the first page and type “SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS” * Hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect * Choose Create > Text > Subtitle * The mouse pointer turns blue to show that it is carrying an object * Click at the top of the first page and type “Worksheet 1” * Hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect * Choose Create > Text > Special Text > Worksheet header (first page. r) * The mouse pointer turns blue to show that it is carrying an object * Click at the top of the first page and type “Name: __________” and hit Return to start a new line * Type “Class: __________” * Hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect.4. as appropriate * Click OK to return to the score. all text that you add to the worksheet will default to using the Verdana font.1 Setting up a worksheet * Choose Layout > Document Setup (shortcut Ctrl+D or XD) * Change the Staff size value to 6mm or 0. You should see this: SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS Worksheet 1 Name: __________ Class: __________      Edit All Fonts We’re going to change the text in this worksheet so that it uses a clear and legible font: * choose House Style > Edit All Fonts * change the Main Text Font to Verdana by selecting it from the drop-down list.

* Choose File > Add to Worksheet Creator. This will make it available for you to use in the future. In the worksheet we’ve set up. saving you the time it takes to prepare the template. choose Left under Align to page and click OK * Click Close to return to the score: Name: __________ Class: __________ Worksheet 1 SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS      Add to worksheet templates Let’s add this score to the other available templates in the Worksheet Creator. Title should be selected. click Edit * On the Horizontal Posn page. * Click OK to add the worksheet to the list of templates and return to the score.g. * If you want to add any other information which would help you identify this template in future. switch on Italic * On the Horizontal Posn page. choose Left under Align to page and click OK * Select Subtitle from the list of available text styles and click Edit * On the General page. type this into the Description (for teacher) box. Scales and arpeggios.Project 4 Editing a text style When you want to change the properties of a certain type of text. position and other characteristics for a type of text. so that the text is leftaligned on the page: * Click on the title to select it * Choose House Style > Edit Text Styles (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+T or xzXT) * In the list of available text styles. e. Next time you open File > Worksheet Creator and view the list of templates. the Scales and arpeggios template we just created appears in the list. let’s edit the Title and Subtitle text styles. 116 . size. This specifies the font. * Choose Template from the Type options and give your worksheet a name. you should edit the text style.

2 Scales and arpeggios 4. with a boxed text label identifying each scale.2 Scales and arpeggios If you are starting from this section of the project.4. you can choose whether to show ascending or descending scales. Adding scales We’re going to use one of Sibelius’s powerful plug-ins to create a sheet of scales in all keys in just a few clicks. The key signature is now incorrect. In this chapter we’re going to learn how to use plug-ins to quickly create a set of scales of the same type. Click Finish and Sibelius will add the scales to your score. using all of these tools you can quickly produce a vast array of scale sheets with very little effort. Let’s add major scales in all keys: * Choose Plug-ins > Other > Scales and Arpeggios * In the dialog that appears. Sibelius automatically adds the key signature before each scale and starts the next scale on a new system. e. You should see major scales ascending and descending over two octaves. you should open the example score called Project 4 and make the 2 Scales and arpeggios version into the Current version. Let’s change the D# major scale to Eb major: * Select the four bars of D# major * Hit Return to respell all the accidentals * Hit Esc to deselect the notes. and Chromatic from the Interval of start notes drop-down list. and re-inputting pitches to change scale types. the starting note and note lengths and many more options Make sure that the Scale Type is set to Major and that the Include key signature option is switched on Choose All except octave from the Number of scales or arpeggios drop-down list. so let’s change it: * Hit K to open Create > Key Signature * Choose Eb major from the right-hand list and click OK 117 . changing G# to Ab. Project 4 Respelling enharmonic accidentals You can instantly change between any enharmonic accidentals by selecting a note or notes and hitting Return (on the main keyboard).g. selecting this version in the list. revising or assessing. the range of octaves spanned. This adds major scales starting on all pitches from C through to B. We’ll look at respelling pitches as their enharmonic equivalents. and clicking Make current. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. make sure that you choose Add scales and arpeggios to current * * * * * score and click Next Choose Major Scales from the drop-down menu and click Next A dialog appears with many different options for the scales that will be added to the score. ready for practicing. which will form the basis of the worksheet exercises we’ll create in this project.

(Sibelius will automatically sharpen every note because of the key signature) * Change the boxed text label to F# Major. You can re-input the pitches while using the same rhythms. Now respell the E# major scale as F major (you may wish to respell the Fb pitches as E again afterwards) and the A# major scale as Bb major. from major to harmonic minor.g. e. Don’t forget to change the labels! Changing a scale If you want to change an existing scale to another type of scale. which tells you that Sibelius will overwrite the existing pitches.9 Hiding objects in Reference. there are two easy ways to do this in Sibelius. select the entire bar and choose Layout > Reset Note Spacing (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+N or xXN). it turns purple to show that it is selected * Type Ctrl+Shift+H or xXH to hide the key signature change * To restore the way in which the notes and double barline were spaced. b 5.Project 4 * The mouse pointer turns blue * Click at the start of the first bar of the new Eb major scale to create the key signature there * Double-click on the label above the staff (or select it and hit Return) to change the text to read Eb Major:  Eb Major                               Sibelius places a key signature change on the previous system. or use another plug-in. hiding the key signature changes in the same way. For more about hiding and showing notes and other objects. hiding the key signature change as before * Select the first note of the scale. Let’s change the second F major scale into a F# major scale by re-inputting the pitches: * First. Notice how we’ve ended up with two F major scales because we respelled the E# major scale. so let’s hide it: * Select the key signature change in the last bar of the previous system (after the double barline). change the key signature to F# major. You should now see this: F# Major                                  If you want to transform the character of a scale. but this isn’t necessary in our worksheet. Sibelius has a useful plug-in to instantly do this: 118 . but not their rhythms * Play a scale of F# major ascending and descending over two octaves on your MIDI keyboard. or type F G A B C D E F G A B C etc. the F natural * Choose Notes > Re-input Pitches (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+I or xXI) * A dotted caret appears (rather than the normal solid line).

the Current scale should be set to D Major (Ionian) * Change the New Scale drop-down list to F Harmonic Minor and click OK. Project 4 119 . b 6. To learn more about Sibelius’s range of powerful plug-ins.4. and choose Plug-ins > Text > Add Note Names to let Sibelius automatically add the name of each pitch above or below the staff. Plug-ins in Reference. The notes are transformed into a completely different type of scale (although you will still need to change the label and key signature):                                F Harmonic Minor You could also add the note names beneath the staff to help students learn a scale.2 Scales and arpeggios * Select the four bars of D major scale * Choose Plug-ins > Transformations > Transform Scale * In the dialog that appears. Simply select the bars you want to add note names to.

hide the bar rests by typing Ctrl+Shift+H or xXH. Now we can remove material from the score where we want students to complete the scale: * Select the last three bars of Viola staff F harmonic minor scale and remove them by hitting Delete * With the bars still selected. you should open the example score called Project 4 and make the 3 Layout and formatting version into the Current version. (If you are making a worksheet to give to students as a printed handout. Now delete the instrument name appearing at the start of each system by selecting it and hitting Delete. You may also wish to hide the cautionary key signatures which are created at the end of the systems on the Viola staff. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions.3 Layout and formatting If you are starting from this section of the project. then Alt-click or ?-click on the viola staff to copy all the scales across. and choose Layout > Break > Page Break.) * Hit Esc to deselect everything. with an alto clef: * Choose Create > Instruments * From the Strings family. we’ll add a viola staff. First. so select the double barline at the end of a system about two-thirds of the way down the page. you could just hide the notes rather than deleting them. You will need to do this once for the first system. Incomplete scales Let’s create some unfinished scale exercises. Adding another staff First. and then type Ctrl+Shift+H or xXH. since they won’t be printed. to be completed. selecting this version in the list. copy a scale onto a staff with a different clef and identify a scale type. This chapter looks at how to perform some of the more complex layout and formatting skills you may want to use in order to create unfinished worksheets for students to complete. We’ll learn how to set up exercises for students to complete a scale. The staves will be quite squashed up on the page. select Viola and click Add to Score * Select Viola in the right-hand list and use the Down button to move it below Unnamed (treble staff) * Click OK to return to the score. triple-click on the treble staff to select everything. This also means that Sibelius will leave enough space for students to write the correct notes in. and a second time for the subsequent systems. select the key signature at the end of the system so that it turns purple. and clicking Make current. To do this. 120 . then move the pitches down an octave by typing Ctrl+? or ??.Project 4 4.

however. select the four bars of the treble staff version of the same scale * Hit Delete to remove all the notes * Choose Layout > Hide Empty Staves (shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Alt+H or xzXH) * The treble staff part disappears. to indicate that you can drag them to change their position) * Click on the rectangle at the start of the first bar of the treble staff 121 . Delete the F# major. leaving only the viola staff behind:   Eb Major         In this way. note stems. remove the * * * * scale from the treble staff and hide the treble staff completely. barlines. but this time we’re going to hide the entire treble staff: * Once you’ve laid out the incomplete viola version of the Eb major scale following the same steps as above. so we’re going to add some tasks for completion. you can provide hints to help complete the unfinished scales or simply remove the pitches for a student to write out themselves. Using the layout skills we’ve just learned. Add another page break between the G# major and A major scales. First. * Delete the E major descending scales on both staves and hide the rests. We’ll indent the systems to place some text to the left of them: * Choose View > Handles (this shows small rectangles on objects like staves.3 Layout and formatting You should see a completed F harmonic minor scale on the treble staff and the first eight pitches only on the viola staff. Add a page break between the E major and F major scales (you can remove a page break by choosing Layout > Break > Page Break again). Bb major and B major scales from the viola staff and hide the bar rests. Let’s use the C major and C# major scales as examples. Dragging and indenting staves Our worksheet doesn’t yet have any questions on it. Delete the A major. G major and G# major scales from the treble staff and hide the bar rests. change some more of the scales into exercises.4. hide the bar rests. followed by three empty bars:                               F Harmonic Minor          F Harmonic Minor Now. let’s do the same for the Eb major scale. Project 4 etc. * Delete the middle two bars of the F major scale on the viola staff. we’ll need to move the systems apart or indent them to make space to fit the text in between.

122 .Project 4 * Drag the staff until the first barline is level with the end of the “and” in the title we added earlier: SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS Worksheet 1 C Major           C Major     In the same way. so that you can treat it like typing into a word processor. etc. drag the viola staff with the Eb major scale and the treble staff with the E major scale to make room above them. quotes. Any plain text which you add to this worksheet will appear in the main text font (which we changed to Verdana earlier) without any special music characters or symbols. Sibelius’s plain text style is the best choice for adding text. In the same way.). drag the treble staff with the F harmonic minor scale down to make some room between it and the staff above. simply click on an empty space in the staff and drag. drag the start of the system with the C# major scales to the same point: Name: __________ Class: __________ Worksheet 1 SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS C Major            C Major                   C# Major           C# Major                   F Harmonic Minor                           F Harmonic Minor         Before we add any text. To do this. examples. explanations. Adding text to a worksheet Since there are many types of text which you may want to add to a worksheet (questions.

* hit Esc twice to stop editing the text and to deselect.4. above the Eb major scale: Finish this Eb major scale in alto clef: And finally: Complete these E major scales in treble and alto clefs: Plain text is useful in a wide range of contexts. Project 4 123 . because it appears exactly where you click the mouse pointer to place it. so you can place text anywhere on a page. Complete the F harmonic minor scale below by copying the notes into the alto clef: Then. Type the following: The major scale is one of the most important scales in Western Classical music. in the same way add type the following above the F harmonic minor scale: The harmonic minor scale is also very important in Western Classical music and many other musical traditions. Now let’s create some more plain text to add explanations above the different types of scale.3 Layout and formatting Let’s try this out by adding an explanation to the left of the first two scale examples that we just indented: * Choose Create > Text > Other Staff Text > Plain Text * The mouse pointer turns blue * Click to place the text so that the flashing caret appears level with the top of the first staff and in line with the title * Simply type and hit Return (on the main keyboard) to move to a new line where the text begins to overlap the staff. Fill in the missing pitches for the treble clef and alto clef staves. You should complete all of the unfinished scales in this worksheet.

you can also collect students’ scores at the click of a button. 124 . Sibelius distributes the score across the network to all the connected computers. For more details. open your Scores folder: inside a folder called Student Scores are separate folders for each student. simply select their name from the list and click Send Current/Other Score. You can send any score to a whole class like this (click Send Other Score if you don’t have one open). To find the scores. selecting this version in the list. If you have a network license version of Sibelius. b 5. Let’s retrieve the completed worksheets from all the students: * Click Select All to select all the students listed * Make sure that the Save and open retrieved scores radio button at the right-hand side of the dialog is chosen * Click Get Score. or you if you want to send work to an individual student. Let’s send the worksheet we’ve been creating to all the other students in the classroom: * Click Select All to select all the students listed * Click Send Current Score. you should open the example score called Project 4 and make the 4 Classroom control version into the Current version. Sibelius collects the scores from each connected computer across the network and saves them to your computer. We’ll also learn how to quickly compare a student’s work against the completed answer sheet. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. there are a host of features available for teachers that enhance the experience of using Sibelius in the classroom.4 Classroom Control If you are starting from this section of the project.Project 4 4. You can retrieve a score from any individual student in the same way.3 Classroom Control in Reference. containing their score. then opens each one. Retrieving scores using the Sibelius Licence Server In the same way that you can distribute work across a network. choose File > Classroom Control and enter the teacher password that you set up in the Licence Server Control Panel. The dialog that appears shows you a list of computers connected to the Licence Server and the score they are currently working on. Distributing work using the Sibelius Licence Server To access Sibelius’s classroom control features. running on the Sibelius Licence Server. This chapter shows you how to quickly distribute work to students or collect the score they’re working on. and clicking Make current. by selecting their name from the list and clicking Get Score.

Sibelius adds the student’s username to the end of their score filename. Ctrl+Shift+Tab or xX~ switches to the previous open score.4. 125 . * Choose the – Finished Worksheet version in the Project 4 file from the With drop-down list. and the answer sheet! If you can’t see the Compare window. so you can see at a glance which scores are open by clicking on the Window menu and looking at the open files listed at the bottom. you may find that changing between them is quite confusing. (If you didn’t retrieve a student’s score. Type Ctrl+Tab or X~ to switch to the next open score. you can use a handy keyboard shortcut. * From the Compare window.4 Classroom Control Switching between scores When you open all your students’ scores. To quickly change between open scores. * Click the Compare button ( Project 4 ). you should be able to tell if the student hasn’t correctly completed the worksheet. you can simply complete the worksheet yourself – be sure to put some mistakes in and see if you get caught out!) * Open the Project 4 example score. Comparing completed worksheets You can use Sibelius’s Compare window to quickly view the differences between a student’s completed worksheet. * Sibelius displays both the scores side-by-side and shows a summary of the differences. switch it on by choosing Window > Compare (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+C or zXC): Let’s compare a student score against the answers. choose the student’s completed worksheet from the Compare drop- down list. From these differences.

126 . With this powerful tool you can quickly see which students have been unable to complete an exercise.Project 4 * Click Close to return to the scores. Sibelius also draws a colored background behind objects that have been added (green).22 Versions in Reference. For more on versions and comparing scores. removed (red) or altered (orange). The Compare window now shows a list of the differences between the two worksheets: Double-click on any of these differences in the list to view the relevant bars in both scores. and even generate a detailed report of the differences Sibelius finds – complete with screenshots of the scores – to open in your word processing software. b 5.

Project 5 Project 5 .

Project 5 128 .

g. and QuickTime on Mac.1 Using video 5. Notice how the video plays in sync with the score at all times. This is the original score written by Howard Goodall for an excerpt from the animated TV series featuring the well-known comedy character. selecting this version in the list.5. Open this score. choose File > Open (shortcut Ctrl+O or XO) and find the example score called Project 5 in the Project Files folder inside your example scores folder. LTC. Therefore. The video will appear in Sibelius’s Video window. which makes it ideal for use in schools. at home and in professional environments. showing whichever frame happens to fall at the current position of the green playback line. 129 . With the video attached. displaying timecode on your score and fitting music to picture with plug-ins. The video will also remain in sync if you move the timeline slider on the Playback window – try it and see! Project 5 The Video window To show or hide the Video window. such as creating hit points. Bean video file is in the same folder as the Project 5 score. you should also watch the animated Mr. Mr Bean. You’ll also learn about how you can export audio from Sibelius to use as a soundtrack for a movie in your video editing software. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. b 4. or use the shortcut Ctrl+Alt+V or zXV. you can add a video to your score that will remain synchronized with playback. e. The first chapter of this project looks at attaching a video to an existing score. For a full list of formats that your operating system should typically support. hit Space to start playback. even when you drag the tempo slider to adjust the playback speed. striping or any other synchronization technological nasties – all you need is your computer.1 Using video With Sibelius.10 Video in Reference. select it and click Open. you should make the 1 Using the video feature version into the Current version. since we’ll be trying to fit the music to the actions of the characters later in this project. Pinnacle Studio. and clicking Make current. Sibelius can use both Windows Media Player and QuickTime (if you have it installed) on Windows to play back videos. Before we add a video file to the score. Adding a video to a score To add a video to the score: * Choose Play > Video and Time > Add Video * The Mr. Bean clip carefully. any video file that your operating system can play back should also work fine in Sibelius. This project introduces some of the ways in which you can use video inside Sibelius. choose Window > Video. allowing you to write music to picture without having to worry about SMPTE. First. You can also click the toolbar button shown on the right. and watch how Sibelius plays back the score.

130 .Project 5 The video already contains some dialogue. 100%. When set to its leftmost position. Simply adjust the position of the volume slider on the Video window as appropriate. Alternatively you can use the menu items in the Play > Video and Time submenu. You can adjust the size of the video window using the four buttons to the left of the volume control on the Video window itself. Finding videos The Internet is the best place to look for videos to write music for. 200% of its original size. the video’s soundtrack will be inaudible. but you can set the level so that it is comfortably mixed with the level of the score you are working on. There are many web sites with adverts or movie trailers which you could download to use as additional source material for student composition projects. and full-screen mode respectively. They will resize the video to 50%. You could also write music for videos that you’ve made yourself – later in this project we’ll learn how to take a Sibelius score and make it into a soundtrack in your video editing software.

Sibelius can display timecode automatically as text in your score. showing whichever frame happens to fall at the current position of the green playback line. and clicking Make current. a timecode read-out is displayed in the Playback window. Hit points are time references in the score that pinpoint important events that occur in a film or video. Timecode is particularly useful for working out precise timings of particular passages of music.2 Writing music to picture If you are starting from this section of the project. Bean video file from the same folder as the Project 5 score. Add timecode and duration Timecode means the position in time of a point in a score or video. or for synchronizing musical events with hit points (events in a film). When you play back a score.1 Working with playback in Reference). The video will appear in Sibelius’s Video window. as well as a marker with the calculated duration: * Choose Play > Video and Time > Timecode and Duration: Project 5 131 . This chapter teaches you how to use timecode and hit point tools and plug-ins to fit the music to picture. choose Play > Video and Time > Add Video and select the Mr.5. It calculates the time position of barlines based on the number of bars. together with a read-out of the current tempo in beats per minute (b 4. or in film/TV scoring from the start of the reel or some other convenient point. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. Let’s add timecode to appear above every system in the score. selecting this version in the list. To add the video to this version. bar lengths and metronome marks up to that point. It is usually measured from the start of the score. you should open the example score called Project 5 and make the 2 Writing music to picture version into the Current version. to make it easier for you to write music that fits in with these points.2 Writing music to picture 5.

add or remove bars. We’re going to identify specific points in the Mr. or by choosing Create > Other > Hit Point. Bean clip.Project 5 * Choose the At start of every system radio button to tell Sibelius to display timecode on each system * Switch on Duration at end of score * Change the Units setting to Frames (01:23:04:15) to calculate the timecode based on the number of frames per second. 132 . Sibelius will recalculate the position of any hit points in your score as you change tempo. or if you add too many hit points. you should see a list of the hit points we just added * To change a hit point’s timecode. You should now see a timecode read-out displayed above every system in the score. because we’re about to learn how to adjust and remove hit points. Editing hit points Let’s edit the hit points we just added to the score by choosing Play > Video and Time > Hit Points (shortcut Shift+Alt+P or xzP): * In the dialog that appears. Sibelius will recalculate the timecode as you change tempo.g. Hit 01 to Piano Drop 01. and hit Space to play * Every time you see the workmen put down the piano in the Mr. click once on the Timecode value to select it.) * Make sure that the number of frames per second is set to 24 and click OK to return to the score. Bean clip where the music should coincide with the action. They should be approximately at these points: * Hit 01 – 00:00:27:00 * Hit 02 – 00:00:40:01 * Hit 03 – 00:00:50:12 * Hit 04 – 00:01:00:19 * Hit 05 – 00:01:07:23 Don’t worry if the hit points you add are not exactly at the times shown above. e. and so on. (This is the standard format used for film/TV scoring. etc. it is added at the current position of the playback line. You can add a hit point by clicking the Add Hit Point button ( ) on the Video window. click the Add Hit Point button. A hit point is added above that point in the score. add or remove bars. each time the workmen drop the piano: * Make sure that the playback line is at the beginning of the score. or change bar lengths – just like timecode. Add hit points When you add a hit point to your score. At the end of the score you should have created five hit points. so change all of the hit points from. or change bar lengths. then click again to type in the precise values shown above * Hit Return (on the main keyboard) to apply the change. You can edit a hit point’s Name in the same way.

* Now if you play back the score. Now play back the entire score to see the results. then change the Set end of selection to option to coincide with the Piano Drop 02 hit point. Click Close to return to the score. make a passage selection from the second beat of bar 12 to the third beat of bar 16. but Sibelius has a useful plug-in to do this for you: * Make a passage selection in the Bassoon staff from the start of bar 8 to the first note in bar 12 * Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Fit Selection to Time * Change the Set end of selection to option to Time of selected hit point * Choose Piano Drop 01 from the drop-down list and click OK * Sibelius calculates the change in tempo needed to make the hit point coincide exactly with the gap in the music. since the workmen drop the piano on the second beat of bar 12! * In the same way. you’ll notice that the video and the sound are perfectly synchronized. b 4. so that they occur at these points: * Piano Drop 03 on the second beat of bar 20 * Piano Drop 04 on the eight note (quaver) rest before the last beat of bar 23 * Piano Drop 05 on the eighth note rest before the second beat of bar 26. To learn more. Do the same for the last three hit points. Finally.11 Timecode and hit points in Reference.2 Writing music to picture You can also delete any hit point by selecting it and clicking Delete. click OK to return to the score. When you’ve finished editing. Bean smiles to himself: * Make a passage selection from the eighth note rest in bar 26 to the first beat of bar 29 * Choose Plug-ins > Composing Tools > Fit Selection to Time * Change the Set end of selection to option to New end time * Enter 0 Hours 1 Minutes 17 Seconds and click OK. or create a new hit point by clicking New. Fit existing music to picture You can change the tempo of your score to ensure that musical events coincide with the action in a video clip. Project 5 133 .5. make sure that the ending happens as Mr. and displays a summary of the changes made.

such as MP3. To add music.3 Adding a soundtrack to video If you are starting from this section of the project. allowing you to give recordings to conductors or performers to give an idea of how the music sounds. by choosing File > Versions > Edit Versions. or convert them into other formats. This chapter shows you how to export a score you’ve created from Sibelius as an audio file. Browse for the audio file you exported from Sibelius and drag it to the corresponding track on timeline – also marked with a treble clef.Project 5 5. or even for practicing along to. or presentations.10 Exporting audio files in Reference. Add soundtrack in Pinnacle Studio Click on the 2 Edit tab. Click Create disc to burn your movie. MPEG. but you could also use iMovie. click on the treble clef icon (sixth tab) on the left side of the video album. Windows Movie Maker or many other programs. Bean video file from the same folder as the Project 5 score. shown above right * Choose a Filename for your audio file and click OK * Sibelius records your score as an audio file and saves it in the same folder as the score. selecting this version in the list. To add the video to this version choose Play > Video and Time > Add Video and select the Mr. Sibelius allows you to export your score as an audio file at the click of a button. Open the movie that you want to add a soundtrack to. b 9. Stream. Exporting an audio file Using virtual instruments. To burn a DVD. We’ll look at how to use Pinnacle Studio (Windows only) to do edit a video. For more information. 134 . To save your movie to your hard drive for websites. Bean soundtrack: * Choose Play > Move Playback Line to Start (shortcut Ctrl+[ or X[) or click the button on the Playback window * Choose File > Export > Audio or click the toolbar button. or Share as File Type. you should open the example score called Project 3 and make the 3 Adding a soundtrack to video version into the Current version. so that you can add it to a video of your choice as a soundtrack. such as Sibelius Sounds Essentials. Open a movie in your video editor At this point. using your favorite video editing program. insert a recordable DVD and click on the Disc tab. You can burn audio files directly to CD. select AVI. Finishing off your movie in Pinnacle Studio Click on the 3 Make Movie tab. Then click Create file and choose a location to save your movie. you should launch your favorite video editing software. emailing. Let’s try exporting an audio file of the Mr. and clicking Make current.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 bigger staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Lyrics submenu . . . . . . 74 Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 cautionary key signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 pick-up (upbeat) . . . . . . . . . . . ./D. . . . . . . . . . . chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Compare window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Auto Breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Start Repeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 A accelerando . . . . . 101 Clef . . . . . . . . . . . .C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 collision avoidance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 adding/removing chord diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Other submenu Hit Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 alphabetic input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 bar numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 repeating . . . . . 132 Instrument Change . . 107 Subtitle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 chord boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 boxed text . . . . . 94 Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . try looking it up in Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 copying . . . . . 103 creating by playing . . . . . . Reference contains far more information and detail on Sibelius’s features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 equivalent chord text . . . . 79 concert pitch . . . . . . 103 graphics into Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Classroom Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 codas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 B backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 anacrusis . . 117 Arrange . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Create menu Bar submenu Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Key Signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 clefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86. . . . . . . 42 balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 audio tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Barline submenu End Repeat . . . . . . 82 automatic . . . . . . . . . . 62. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Audio Engine Options . . . . . . . . . . . 61. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 chord symbols . . . . . . . . . see hit points breaks . . . . . . . . . . . 86 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Index This index refers to this Handbook only. 76 with the mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 arpeggios creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 multiple objects at the same time . . . . 103 revoicing chord diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 context menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . So if you can’t find something in this index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 creating . . . . . . 108 articulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 barlines repeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 respelling . 82 C capturing ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 1st and 2nd ending lines . . . . . . . . 74 click . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 comparing scores . . . . . . . . . 69. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Text submenu Expression . . . . 98 caret . . . . . . . . . 60 Other Staff Text submenu Plain text 123 Repeat (D. ./To Coda) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see chord symbols 135 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Chord Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 bars copying . . . . 88 ideas . . . . . . . . . . . 101 creating by typing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 copying . . . . . . . . . . 79 ASIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 blank pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . text editing text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .see chord symbols E Edit All Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 fonts changing . . . . . . . 61. . . . . . .42 Save Version . . . . . . . . . . . 48 drum set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Title Page . . . . . . .com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 options . . . . . 75 creating bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 audio tracks . . . . . . . .42 Versions submenu Edit Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 cursor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Quick Start . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . arpeggios exporting . . . . . . .35 Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 dialog defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . see scales. . . . . . 131 dynamic parts . . . . . .93 guitar frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Don’t say this again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 dal segno . . . . . . . . . . 61. .88 formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Flexi-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 enharmonic respelling . . . . 116 Classroom Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56. . . . . . 113 files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Expression text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110. . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 crescendo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 F fast-forward .57 guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Select Graphic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Repeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 cues .39 Publish on SibeliusMusic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Revoice Chord Diagram . . . . . . . . . . 104 Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Filter submenu Chord Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see scores filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68. . . . . . . . . . . . .see chord symbols 136 . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 graphics . . . . 50. . 81. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 G graphics exporting . . . . . . . . . . .see playback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Focus on Staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 title pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Tuplet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61. . 104 Equivalent Chord Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 chord symbols . 120 fretboard grids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Paste . . 49 Cut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Delete Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 diminuendo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Redo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 duration at end of score . .39 Worksheet Creator . . . . . . . . . . 59 Document Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inputting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Chord Symbol submenu Add/Remove Chord Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Export submenu Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 D D. . . . . . . .67 Open . 110. . . . . . . . . . . . .Index Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 into two staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Select submenu Select All . . . . . . . . . . . 61. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 File menu Add to Worksheet Creator .88 green line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48. . . .69 formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Edit menu Capture Idea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48. . . . . . . . .68 exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Paste As Cue . . 110 Engraving Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Edit Text Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 dynamics . . . 78 DirectSound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Save As . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 hairpins . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 of chord symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Inkpen2 font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 guitar tablature . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Optimize Staff Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82. . . . . . . . . . . 54 drum set notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 MIDI input . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Layout menu Auto Breaks . . . . 105 after lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents H hairpins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 manuscript paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50. 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Split System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 irrational rhythms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 playback . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Help menu Sibelius Reference . . . . . . 61 I Ideas window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Licence Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ./accel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Keypad window . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 installing Sibelius Mac . 86. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 handles . . . . . 118 of parts . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 metronome click . . . . . 132 House Style menu Edit All Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 pitches only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81. . . . . 69 inputting chord symbols . . . . 60 extenders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 hairpins . . . . . . . . . 82 laptop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Edit Text Styles . 121 hiding key signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Break submenu Page Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 MIDI guitar . . . . . . . . 78 lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 chords . . . . . . . . . 118 notes and rests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Engraving Rules . . . 12 instrument names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 clefs . . . . . . . 114 Layout Marks . . . . . . . . . 55 Internet publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86. . . . . . . . . . . 106 System Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 into two staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Keyboard window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 note spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 keyboard (MIDI) USB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Windows . 39 hit points . . . . . 41 L landscape . . . . . . . . . 84 Reset Space Below Staff . . . . . . . . . . 63. . . . . . . 94 in real time via MIDI . . . . . . . 61 lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 improvements . 69 K key signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 staves with music on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 instruments adding . . . . 75 M Magnetic Layout . . . . . . 114 house styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 staff spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Reset Space Above Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 changing . . . . . . . . . 74 creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Hide Empty Staves . . . 85 instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Document Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 instrumental parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 hyphens . . . . . . . 61 green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 staves . . . . . . . . . 61 importing from a text file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Reset Note Spacing . . 61. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 in step-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 137 . . 10 indenting staves . . . . see troubleshooting Hide Empty Staves . 124 lines 1st and 2nd endings . . . . . 60. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 keyboard reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 editing . . . . . . . . . 68 transposing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 rit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 hiding . . . 78 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 passage selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Text submenu N Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 reduction . . . . . . . . . . see slurs piano keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51. . 36 moving Sibelius to another computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 converting to tablature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 mouse wheel . . . . . see copying PDF files opening with PhotoScore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Notes menu Arrange . . 48 deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Opus font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Playback Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Realize Chord Symbols . . . 109 changing instrument sounds . . . . . 26. . . . 30 MIDI setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 transposing . 47 Optimize Staff Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 plain text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 pasting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Playback window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 notes adding note names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 layout . . . . . . . . 52. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Simplify Notation submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 tuplets . .92 Renotate Performance . . . . . 42 hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . .Index MIDI interface . . . . . .87 pick-up bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Hit Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 viewing . . . . . . . . .57 line . . . . . . 91 Input Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 changing instrument sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 written (transposed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 playing techniques . . . . . . . . . .46 Paste As Cue . . . . . . . . 43. . . . . . . . 27. . . . . . . 56. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Flexi-time Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 multiple selections . . . . . . 53 Re-input Pitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Transposing Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 editing . .59 volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 notebook . . . . . . . . . . . 53 make bigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 multicopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 starting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 fast-forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Play menu Move Playback Line to Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Timecode and Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 articulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 make smaller . . . . . . . . . 134 pitch sounding (concert) . . 83 resetting spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 music fonts . . . . . . . . . . 133 Reduce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 phrase-marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 noteheads . . . . .70 Pinnacle Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Plug-ins menu Chord Symbols submenu Add Chord Symbols . . . . . . . . . .57 stopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Other submenu Scales and Arpeggios . . . . .37 parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 O objects deleting . . . . . . . . 69 P page breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 inputting . . . . . 79 changing notehead type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 pages blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Video and Time submenu Add Video . . . . . . . . .57 rewind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Mixer window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Parts window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 page size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 PhotoScore Lite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Composing Tools submenu Fit Selection to Time . . . . . . . . . . 51 Flexi-time Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . 109 Panorama . . . . . . . .92 Change Split Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 creating . . . . . . . . . . . 57. . . . . . . . . . . . 36 pan position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 respelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 reverb . . . . 82 preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 resetting spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 SibeliusMusic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 make smaller . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 syllables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 comparing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 rests deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 split point changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 slurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Text panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 system passage . . . . . . 77. . . . . . . . . 24 Mac . 78 redo . . . . . . . . . . 87 Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .com . . . . . . . . 79. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 multiple versions of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83. . . . 115 staves adding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 reinstalling Sibelius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Score Info . . 124 Sibelius Player . . 55 soundtrack . . . . . . . . . . . ./D. . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sibelius Sounds Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Sibelius Reference . . . . . . . . . 39 privacy policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 passage selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 selections graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Properties window Notes panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 passage . . . . . . . 87 reduction . . . . 107 repeat bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Reset Note Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 system break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 step-time input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 changing playback sounds . . . . 105 repitching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 moving around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 scores backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 indenting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 ending lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 switching between . . . . . . 106 Q quantize . . . . . . 106 staff size . . . . . 70 139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 renotate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .see renotate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ./To Coda) text . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 rewind . . 88 site licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 changing distance between . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Scorch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 strips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see Mixer window Subtitle text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Repeat (D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 multiple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flexi-time R rallentando . . . . 118 Reprise font . . 61 symbols . . 8 registering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 of staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 repeats . . . . . . . . . .S. . 57 ritardando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Add Note Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Re-input Pitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 sounding pitch . . . . . 20 Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 muting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 spacing of staves . . 82. . . . . . 43 Reduce plug-in . . . . 119 portrait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Transformations submenu Transform Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 S scales creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Primary Sound Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Split System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 stereo position . . . 59 printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 size of pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Sibelius Licence Server . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . 55 transposing by an octave . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 word menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76. . . . . . . . . . 115 tool windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Panorama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 timecode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Title text . . . . . . . . . . . 109 see also dynamics W Window menu Compare . . . . . . . . . . . 55 triplets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Keypad . . . 70. . . . . . 59 printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. . . . . . . . . . . 129 View menu Focus on Staves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Parts . .39 Handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Expression text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Switch to Full Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 aligning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Index T tablature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 editing text styles . . . . . . . . . . . . 62. 43 uninstalling Sibelius Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 transposed pitch .95 Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 instrument names .56 voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 title pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 U undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 editing . . . . . . . . . . 75 troubleshooting playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 worksheets . 113 written pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 tempo . . 76 deleting . . . . . . . 62 Tempo text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 scores . .57 muting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Hidden Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 windows switching between . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Zoom submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 time signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Technique text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 plain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Tempo . . . 53 instruments . 51. . . . . . . . . . . . 38. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Z zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Hide Tool Windows . . . . . . . . . . 75 upbeat bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 note names . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Tempo text . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 V versions . . . 77 adjusting for Flexi-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 soundtrack . . . . . . . .38 viewing parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 tuplets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Layout Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 comparing . . 52 setting with text . . . . . 57 Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Technique text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 140 . . . . . . . . . . . 80. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 dynamics . . . . . . . . . .

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