SYLLABUS

Massasoit Community College Professor Louis M. Rosenberg, PhD English Composition II Fall, 2010 ENGL102 English Composition II 3 credits English Composition II is a course designed to strengthen students' skills as writers and to focus on analysis and argument. Assignments include critical examination of literature and an essay using research and documentation utilizing the MLA style sheet. Emphasis is on writing as part of the processes of thinking and learning. Prerequisite: English Composition I

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REQUIRED TEXTS
AUTHOR John Schilb, John  Clifford  Nick Flynn  TITLE Making Literature Matter Another Bullshit Day in Suck City ISBN PUBLISHER 978‐0‐312‐47491‐1 978‐0393051391 Bedford/St. Martins W.W. Norton

OTHER LEARNING RESOURCES

ONLINE You will be submitting assignments, downloading information, and interacting with me
and other class members online. See “Technology” section for more information. of class.

FILMS All assigned films (see “Films” section), must be obtained by you and screened outside

LEARNING OUTCOMES

1. Read intellectually challenging texts with increased comprehension and enriched aesthetic response. 2. Incorporate the vocabulary of literary analysis into class discussion and writing in order to facilitate thinking about texts from various literary genres. 3. Express in discussion and in writing an awareness of diverse voices found in literature.

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

O R H IG M and IN C AY ed AL he N o ck O ut SY th T B on LL e E th AB w eb CU e f US si R irs te R t d fo EN ay ra T of ny cl as up s da te s
TEACHING PROCEDURES

4. Build a context for understanding literature by linking class readings to other academic disciplines and to universal human experiences. 5. Write essays that go beyond summary to the analysis and interpretation of texts. 6. Apply the grammatical and rhetorical skills of Composition I to a variety of complex writing tasks in preparation for writing across the curriculum. 7. Conduct research and assess information from a variety of sources in order to understand the research topic. 8. Compose essays that incorporate research and documentation in preparation for the assignments of other college courses. 9. Strengthen Core Competencies* in order to increase success in this and other courses and in the workplace. *Critical thinking, technology skills, oral communication, quantitative skills, reading, and writing.

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LECTURES a)

b) a)

It is during the lectures when students are expected to ask any questions concerning any aspect of the course and/or assignments. It is, by far, more beneficial for students to ask questions of general academic concerns here, during the lectures, rather than to see me after class. It cannot be stressed enough how important it is for students to attend the lectures. Students will write essays throughout the semester. (See § “Essays” for more logistical information) It should be noted here that students are encouraged to work with tutors as rewrites are rarely granted.

ESSAYS

b) a)

PEER‐EDITING

b) b)

STUDENT a) DEBATES

USE OF THE a) COLLEGE’S

Throughout the semester, I may have students form groups for peer‐ editing. Traditionally, peer‐editing is between two or three students who review and comment on each other’s assignments by using a preformatted rubric. Peer‐editing may be handled completely online. I may assemble students into two teams for debating a particular subject/issue. Students who do not feel comfortable speaking in front of the class (on a team) will have the opportunity to instead submit research essays. It cannot be overstated how important it is for students to work with a tutor at the Writing Center during the composition of each essay.

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

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ACADEMIC b) Therefore, it is strongly recommended that students see their tutors early in the semester in order to establish a valuable working RESOURCE relationship. FACILITY

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30% = Submitted Assignments (essays, etc.) 15% = Participation (including online) 15% = Term Exams 20% = In‐Class Assignments 10% = Course Exams (Mid‐Term [if applicable], Final)

GRADING RUBRIC

EVALUATION OF STUDENT PROGRESS

In grading student essays, I usually employ a rubric where each domain (grammar, logic/reason, etc.) is given a qualitative value. Because I do not believe in marginalia (writing endlessly in the margins), the rubric serves as the grading explanation. However, included in my evaluative process is the expectation that students will make an appointment with me, or see me after class, should they require further, more detailed analysis of their work. It is the students’ responsibility to determine when (and if) an appointment with me is necessary. And students should never wait to handle any academic issue. Student competency is by no means only (and simply) the letter grade. If a student has outside issues (family, job, health, etc.), these will be taken into account when evaluating the student’s performance in the course. While every student is graded equally and objectively, I may be inclined to allow certain concessions (such as an extension on a particular assignment) should a student demonstrates just‐cause. Having said this, all students are expected to operate at the “college level” at all times. Nothing less is acceptable. TERM EXAMS Several times throughout the semester, students will sit for a Term Exam. Normally, these exams are composed of five short‐answer questions. In evaluating the Term Exam, I am most interested in the content of the student’s answer rather than grammar/syntax issues—that said, chronic issues of such will be reflected in the grade. The answer sheets for the Term Exams are preformatted with five empty blocks in which the responses are written and may never travel outside of them. Therefore, the Term Exam features an “either you know it or you don’t” overall dynamic with no room for compromise. I’m interested in “quality, not quantity.” As a result, students should not feel obligated to fill the entire block; oftentimes,

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

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FIVE‐MINUTE PAPERS

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circumstances, whatsoever. The Final Exam will cover the full arch of the course. FURTHER Unless otherwise instructed, students may use their course notes on all exams INFORMATIO (“Term,” “Midterm,” and “Final”), and I usually allow the exams to be written in N small, quiet groups. However, students may not use any electronic devices, (including computers, PDAs, electronic dictionaries, etc.) during any exam because allowing these amenities would put those without them at a disadvantage. Therefore, if you take notes on a computer, simply print them out and bring them to the exam. Attention ESL Students: While you are certainly welcome to use a dictionary (electronic, book, computer, etc.) during the lectures, you may not use them during the exams. As aforementioned, only notebooks are allowed.

MIDTERM EXAMINATIO N FINAL Students will sit for a Mid‐Term and a Final Exam. These are open‐notebook, and EXAMINATIO I often allow students to work in small groups (of no more than two or three). N Please understand that the course exams may not be made up under any

two or three sentences are all that are necessary. Term Exams may not be made up; however, the lowest score is dropped. At the beginning of nearly every class, students will write a Five‐Minute Paper. As its title suggests, students will have five‐or‐so minutes to complete this assignment. The Five‐Minute Papers pose one question/prompt that is based on the assigned readings, some important topic covered during the lecture(s), or both. Like the Term Exams, students are provided with a preformatted answer sheet designed to limit the amount of space for their response in order to insure “quality over quantity.” Five‐Minute Papers may not be made up; however, the lowest two scores are dropped. Your course may include a Midterm Exam. Please see the “Assignments” section for further information, including scheduling.

ATTENDANCE

It is important that you are present for all of the lectures. History dictates that grades are almost always reflected in parity with absences; therefore, more absences or late arrivals will, indeed, compromise your grade. You are responsible for everything that occurs in your course, whether or not you are present during a particular lecture. If you find that you must miss a class, it is your responsibility to see a fellow student in order to get the lecture notes as well as any announcements that were made. Remember that I may alter an assignment’s due‐date and/or language and announce such changes during class.

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

O R H IG M and IN C AY ed AL he N o ck O ut SY th T B on LL e E th AB w eb CU e f US si R irs te R t d fo EN ay ra T of ny cl as up s da te s
ASSIGNMENT POLICIES
Without exception, all submitted assignments must be typed. ESSAYS…  are often drafted/corrected in peer groups.  riddled with grammar, logic, syntax, non‐sequitir issues will not pass. Students are expected to hand in only essays of final quality. This is achieved by working with tutors, showing me drafts of work‐in‐ progress, etc.  must conform to the MLA standard. This includes a Works Cited page even if the only source used for the particular essay is one of the class texts. In other words, if you use it, cite it!

It is important to note that the following assignment types are not eligible for make‐up. Therefore, late arrivals and absentees will miss these grading opportunities:  In‐Class Assignments (Five‐Minute Papers, debates, etc.)  Term Exams  Midterm and Final Exams

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SUBMITTING  LATE ESSAYS

Because 30 points are automatically deducted, the highest grade one can achieve on an essay submitted late is a 70. It goes almost without saying that it is never a good idea to miss a deadline!

PLAGIARISM Plagiarism is the use of someone else work/intellectual property without

giving credit. If I suspect plagiarism, I will require you to engage with me in an oral defense of the essay. If after the oral defense I believe that you did, in fact, plagiarize, you will fail the course. Generally, I handle plagiarism issues internally, without involving the administration.

LATE ASSIGNMENTS BACKUP COPIES AND THE ARCHIVING OF ALL SUBMITTED ASSIGNMENTS

You must meet all of your deadlines! See “Submitting Late Essays,” above. Otherwise, late assignments are never accepted. You are required to backup (or, in the case of written assignments, keep copies of) all of the assignments that you submit and that are returned to you throughout the course. Further, you must have ready access to these backups should I request them. Such backups, however, do not in any way (including the grading or regarding of an assignment) supersede my authority as final arbiter for this course.

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

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TECHNOLOGY
Your class website functions as the central hub for the course. It is where assignments, discussions, scheduling of appointments, course announcements, etc. coalesce. Therefore, you must have access to the site on a daily basis as you are responsible for its official content – i.e. announcements, changes to assignments, class cancellations, etc. General Technology Requirements:  TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES OF ANY KIND ARE NOT VALID EXCUSES FOR MISSING DEADLINES, ANNOUNCEMENTS, ETC.1

O R H IG M and IN C AY ed AL he N o ck O ut SY th T B on LL e E th AB w eb CU e f US si R irs te R t d fo EN ay ra T of ny cl as up s da te s
 Those who do not own a computer will have to make daily visits to their university’s computer lab, their local library, etc. Time‐management is of the utmost importance – you should never work up to the eleventh hour. This is especially important concerning the composition and timely submission of assignments as technological issues do occur. You will always have a three day window during which to submit your online assignments.  Again, TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES OF ANY KIND ARE NOT VALID EXCUSES FOR
MISSING DEADLINES, ANNOUNCEMENTS, ETC.

A Brief Note on the Technology Requirement Those who are “technologically challenged” are encouraged to visit their university’s computer lab immediately and work with a lab technician on the basic functions of the Internet and word processing. There are also free community courses on the basic operations of the Internet, the computer and its universal software (word‐processing, browsing the web, etc.). Ours is a technological world, and to be the least bit competitive one must have mastery over such fundamentals as reading/replying/writing emails, uploading files, using a word processor, using a search engine (such as Google), as well as the ability to interact with a particular website’s technology (such as submitting forms, etc.).

1 Technological issues include, but are not limited to: Internet connectivity issues (where the student cannot access the Internet due to a disruption of service, whether or not it is the fault of the student or the service or computer or software that he/she is using); loss of data due to an unforeseen malfunction of computer hardware or software or transmission (Internet) errors; use of software/hardware that is not compatible with Professor Rosenberg’s servers; compatibility issues where the student’s assignment cannot be accessed by Professor Rosenberg; email delays of any kind; emails not received due to spam control software on the student’s computer/email service; Internet page errors of any kind; file size issues where a student’s file is rejected because it exceeds the maximum upload size; the use of improper software (as outlined herein); etc.

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

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FILMS
Below, you will find the film roster for your course. To view them, see the website (RESOURCES >> SCREENING ROOM on the gray main menu bar). Once again, it is important to note that you are responsible for screening the films yourself—we will not watch the films in class. See your course’s website for links to view them; the cost for a rental is about $2.99 each. Alternately, you may also purchase them. FILM INTERNET MOVIE DATABASE LINKS Napoleon Dynamite http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0374900/ Annie Hall http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075686/ Misery http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0100157/ Brokeback Mountain http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0388795/ Donnie Darko http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0246578/ Saw http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387564/

O R H IG M and IN C AY ed AL he N o ck O ut SY th T B on LL e E th AB w eb CU e f US si R irs te R t d fo EN ay ra T of ny cl as up s da te s

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

English Composition II Massasoit Community College Dr. Lou Rosenberg Fall, 2010

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ASSIGNMENTS
Below is a general schedule for the major topics covered as well as the due‐dates for essays, etc. For complete information about each assignment, please refer your course’s homepage on the LouRosenberg.com website.

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WEEK OF
9/13 9/20 9/27

THEMES

ESSAYS
Essay #1

FILMS

   

10/4 10/11 10/18

          

How to Write a Research Paper What is Literature? How and Why Does It Matter? How to Make Arguments about Literature. The Writing Process How to Write about Stories How to Write about Poems How to Write about Drama

Napoleon Dynamite

Essay #2

TOPIC: LOVE

10/25

11/1

True Love Romantic Dreams Love and Myth The Appearance of Love Jealous Love Is This Love? The Need for Romantic Illusions

Essay #3

Annie Hall

TOPIC: FREEDOM & CONFINEMENT
          A Tortuous Confinement Confined for Her Own Good Can Tradition Be a Trap? Trapped in Stereotypes

11/8

Essay #4

Misery

11/15

Brokeback Mountain

TOPIC: JOURNEYS

11/22

11/29

Roads Taken Journeys to the Past Inner Journeys A Journey’s Terrifying Beginning Accidental Journeys Journey to Death

Essay #5

Donnie Darko

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

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TOPIC: DOING JUSTICE
12/6 12/13     Discovering Injustice Punishment Racial Injustice Review/Final Exam Essay #6 Saw

O R H IG M and IN C AY ed AL he N o ck O ut SY th T B on LL e E th AB w eb CU e f US si R irs te R t d fo EN ay ra T of ny cl as up s da te s

Students should refer to their course’s website for all updates

Syllabus Subject to Change

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