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AH 5095

Healthy Cooking Teaching Laboratory:
Plant-Based Eating

Brought to you by the UConn Allied Health Graduate Coordinated Dietetics Students:
Michelle Sarta, Claudia Mejia, Jennifer Ouellette, Will Kelsey, Tyler Leeman, Melina Conrad,
Ashton Christopher and Carlee Putnam




















Table of Contents

3 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. Overview
4-5……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…. Meeting Minutes
6………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………….. Flow Chart
7-13……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Recipes
14…………………………………………………………………………….Discussion of Menu and Nutrient Analysis of Recipes
15-16…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Marketing Plan and Materials
17………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…Production Sheet
18-22……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……………Shopping Lists
22………………………………………………………………………………………………….…Discussion of Accuracy of Purchasing
23-31…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…Lesson Plan
32-37………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Lesson Handouts
38-40……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………………Accounting
40-41…………………………………………Function Cost Summary and Breakeven Analysis / Food and Supply Cost
41………………………………………………………………….……Labor Cost Summary and Energy Expenditure Summary
42-47…………………………………………………………………………………………………………Employee Utilization Summary
48……………………………………………………………………………………………………….Clean-up Schedule and Assignment
49……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Participant Evaluation Tool
50-51………………………………………………………………………………………………..……Participant Evaluations Summary
52……………………………………………………………………………….……………Self-Assessment Tool for Group Members
53-58………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Individual Self Assessments
59…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…Group Project Evaluation Tool
60-65…………………………………………………………………………………….………Summary of Group Project Evaluations
65-68………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Additional Discussions









2
Overview

A plant-based eating themed cooking class was conducted by the UConn Allied Health
Graduate Coordinated Dietetics Students. The goals of this project were to plan, implement and
evaluate a healthy cooking teaching laboratory to the public. Project roles were divided as
follows: Manager, Menu Coordinator, Marketing, Production, and Evaluation Supervisor,
Curriculum Coordinators, Purchasing Agent, Sanitation and Program Coordinator and
Accountant. Each of these roles contributed to this project by performing various delegated
tasks. The target audience were students, faculty, and community members within the UConn
Storrs campus area. Marketing to this population involved the production and distribution of
advertisement flyers throughout the Allied Health and College of Agriculture Departments, as
well as through electronic mailing lists.
Menu items were a collaboration of six convenient and reproducible plant-based
recipes, all of which were analyzed for likability, feasibility, and nutrient composition. The
lesson plan was outlined to include culinary skill enhancement and nutritional education
regarding plant-based eating. Participants tasted and evaluated all of the recipes, and were able
to create one or two of the recipes themselves under the guidance of a designated team leader.
The project was evaluated both by group members and participants, and feedback was
collaborated to provide guidance and modifications for future classes.























3
Meeting Minutes

CPMS Cooking Class Meeting Minutes 1
Date: January 16/2018
Time and location: 11:00 am, Koons Hall
Members:
Present: Michelle Sarta, Jennifer Ouellette, Carlee Putnam, Will Kelsey, Ashton Christopher, Tyler
Leeman, Melina Conrad, Claudia Mejia
Absent: No absentees
Quorum present? Yes

Proceedings:
− Meeting called to order at 11:00 am by all group members

− Agenda Topic #1
o Division of roles
§ Notes

Members discussed what roles we all wanted to perform and assign names to each one of the seven
categories
− Agenda Topic #2
o Decide on a theme for the healthy cooking teaching class
§ Notes

Members brainstormed themes and decided on a vegetarian meal
− Assessment of the Meeting:

Members generated very good ideas, suggestions, and themes
− Meeting adjourned at 11:30 a.m.
− Minutes submitted by Menu Coordinator, Claudia Mejia

CPMS Cooking Class Meeting Minutes 2
Date: March 20/2018
Time and location: 6:30 pm, Oaks Building
Members:
Present: Michelle Sarta, Jennifer Ouellette, Carlee Putnam, Will Kelsey, Ashton Christopher, Tyler
Leeman, Claudia Mejia
Absent: Melina Conrad
Quorum present? Yes

Proceedings:
− Meeting called to order at 6:30 p.m. by Manager, Michelle Sarta

4
− Agenda Topic #1
o Structure of cooking class
§ Notes

Members discussed that it was best to set up stations and one recipe leader and add up to three
participants to each station.
− Agenda Topic #2
o Length of recipes and time required for assembling and cooking
§ Notes

Members reviewed recipe times and decided how much time we needed for preparation and things that
needed to be ready ahead of time in order to avoid a lengthy class
− Assessment of the Meeting:

Members had a mindful and focused discussion with very good ideas, suggestions, and participation
− Meeting adjourned at 7:30 p.m.
− Minutes submitted by Menu Coordinator, Claudia Mejia

CPMS Cooking Class Meeting Minutes 3
Date: March 27/2018
Time and location: 6:30 pm, Oaks Building
Members:
Present: Michelle Sarta, Jennifer Ouellette, Carlee Putnam, Will Kelsey, Ashton Christopher, Tyler
Leeman, Melina Conrad
Absent: Claudia Mejia
Quorum present? Yes

Proceedings:
− Meeting called to order at 6:30 p.m. by Manager, Michelle Sarta

− Agenda Topic #1
o Finalizing items for production day
§ Notes
− Assessment of the Meeting:

Questions regarding structure of lesson plan and production day schedule were addressed. Members
demonstrated a good understanding of expectations, and appeared to have requirements under
control.
− Meeting adjourned at 7:30 p.m.
− Minutes submitted by Manager, Michelle Sarta, in absence of Menu Coordinator, Claudia Mejia

5
Flow Chart

Assign Roles

Determine Send For
Pick Recipes
Theme Approval

Determine Final Feasibility /
Finalize Menu
Foods Acceptability

Menu Makes Prod. Sheet Modify menu as
Sense? (Rough) needed

Time needed? Acct. for Lesson

Lesson Planned

Planned to
Title / Time
market

Raw Nutribase Cooked

Determine Nutrient
Quantify Grocery List
Costing Analysis

Add Directions Ind. Recipes Whole Meal Ind. Recipes Complete Meal

Price for
participants

Marketing

GET FLYER OUT!

Collect Test / Modify
Participants Recipes

Finalize all
Synchronize all
Grocery List components
materials
above

Production Day


All of us; Michelle/Jenn; Claudia; Melina; Carlee; Jenn/Ashton; Will/Tyler

6
Recipes
2. Easy Grillable Veggie Burgers
Recipe grams: 816.11g/28.8oz
Serves 5 163.22g/5.8oz per serving

Carbohydrates: 40%
Protein: 11%
Fat: 49%

INGREDIENTS
1/2 cup Brown Rice, Long Grain, Raw
1 cup Pecan, Dried, Raw, Chopped
3/4 cup Onion, Raw, Chopped
1 tbsp Chili Powder
1 tbsp Cumin Seed
1 tbsp Paprika
1/2 tsp Pepper, Black, Ground
1 1/2 cup Black Bean, Low Sodium, Mature Seeds, Canned
68 gram Barbeque Sauce
1 tbsp Sugar, Brown, Unpacked
1/2 tbsp Olive Oil, 'pure'
1/2 tsp Salt, Sea, Iodized
1 tsp Salt, Table
1/3 cup Panko Bread Crumbs, Kikkoman

DIRECTIONS
Burgers:
Toast pecans on low heat, 5-7 minutes, being careful not to burn. Let cool. Cook oil & onion until soft. Set aside. Blend cooled
pecans w/ seasonings until a fine meal. Mash beans in mixing bowl (leave a few whole). Add rice, nut mixture, onion,
breadcrumbs, BBQ, & mix until moldable. Add BBQ if needed. Shape (1/2 or ¼ cup each) & cook or freeze.
Brown rice:
Cook rice according to package directions

NUTRIENT ANALYSIS/SERVING
Nutrient Value %DV Nutrient Value %DV

Calories 363 18% Monounsaturated Fat (g) 10*
Protein (g) 9 19% Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 5*
% Calories from Protein 11* Vit-C (mg) 4* 5%
Dietary Fiber (g) 10 34% Sodium (mg) 1002 44%
Fat (g) 19 24% Iron (mg) 4* 21%

Values marked with a single asterisk (*) indicate totals with some values not available. This may result in an under reporting of values.

4/1/2018, 10:03 AM

7
7. Watermelon, Cucumber & Feta Salad
Recipe grams: 1034.51g/36.5oz
Serves 6 172.42g/6.1oz per serving

Carbohydrates: 73%
Protein: 9%
Fat: 18%

INGREDIENTS
4 cup Watermelon, Raw, Diced
2 cup Cucumber, Peeled, Raw, Sliced
1/4 cup Onion, Raw, Sliced
1/3 cup Feta Cheese, Crumbled
3 tbsp Honey, Strained Or Extracted
3 tbsp Lime Juice, Raw

DIRECTIONS
Toss the salad ingredients together in a large bowl.
Whisk the honey and lime together in a small bowl. Pour over the salad and toss.
Add more honey and lime to taste.
Best served fresh and cold.

NUTRIENT ANALYSIS/SERVING
Nutrient Value %DV Nutrient Value %DV

Calories 93 5% Monounsaturated Fat (g) 0
Protein (g) 2 4% Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 0
% Calories from Protein 9 Vit-C (mg) 12 14%
Dietary Fiber (g) 1 3% Sodium (mg) 79 3%
Fat (g) 2 3% Iron (mg) 0 2%

4/1/2018, 10:05 AM

8
4. Vegan Jackfruit Crab Cakes
Recipe grams: 975.32g/34.4oz
Serves 6 162.55g/5.7oz per serving

Carbohydrates: 40%
Protein: 5%
Fat: 55%

INGREDIENTS
24 oz Jackfruit, Raw, Sliced
6 tbsp Water, Tap, Drinking
1/2 oz Old Bay, Wawa
1 tsp Sauce, Worcestershire, America's Choice
1 tsp Water, Tap, Drinking
2 clove Garlic, Raw
1 tbsp Lemon Juice, Raw
1/2 tsp Pepper, Black, Ground
3 tbsp Chives, Raw, Chopped
1/4 cup Coriander, Raw (cilantro, Chinese Parsley)
1/2 cup Bread Crumbs, Plain, Dry, Grated
1/2 cup Panko Bread Crumbs, Gfs
2 tbsp Flaxseed, Ground, Organic; Cold Milled Flaxseeds w/Lignans
1 tsp Sea Salt, Fine Ground, World Classics
1 tsp Mustard Powder
3 clove Garlic, Raw
3/4 cup Mayonnaise, Heinz
1 1/2 tbsp Lemon Juice, Raw
3/4 tsp Salt, Table
1/2 tsp Pepper, Black, Ground

DIRECTIONS
Make the flax eggs and set aside
Put all of the seasonings, mustard, lemon juice, and Worcestershire sauce in a large bowl and whisk together until completely
combined.
Add the jackfruit, flax eggs, herbs, and bread crumbs and combine with your hands until the mixture begins to stick together.
Form into cakes. The amount that this recipe makes depends on how large you make the cakes.
Place the cakes on a plate and refrigerate for at least an hour.
To Bake:
Preheat the oven to 375° and put the cakes on a cookie sheet. Squeeze lemon juice over the top of the cakes and bake for
approximately ten minutes or until golden brown. Flip and squeeze lemon juice on the top of the cakes and bake until golden
brown and firm to the touch.
To Fry:
Cover the bottom of a large skillet with a thin layer of oil (1 to 2 tablespoons) and heat on medium-high heat. When the oil is hot
add the cakes and cook until golden brown (approximately 5 minutes). Flip and cook until golden brown and firm to the touch.
Serve with aioli or sriracha and a lemon wedge.
Roasted Garlic Aioli:
To roast garlic: Preheat oven to 400F. Pull off extra outer layers of paper around bulb of garlic, leaving at least one piece to keep
garlic in place. Slice 1/4” off the bulb to expose the innards. Wrap the whole thing in tin foil and drizzle ½ tsp of olive oil over top
before closing it up. Roast in oven for 40 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Cloves should easily squeeze out of paper.
Save remaining unused cloves in fridge for up to 1 week.
Mince garlic cloves. Mix mayonnaise, garlic, lemon juice, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes
before serving with crab cakes.

NUTRIENT ANALYSIS/SERVING
Nutrient Value %DV Nutrient Value %DV

Calories 361 18% Monounsaturated Fat (g) 0*
Protein (g) 5 10% Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 1*
% Calories from Protein 5* Vit-C (mg) 22* 25%
Dietary Fiber (g) 3* 11% Sodium (mg) 1553 68%
Fat (g) 22 28% Iron (mg) 1* 5%

Values marked with a single asterisk (*) indicate totals with some values not available. This may result in an under reporting of values.

4/1/2018, 10:04 AM

9
5. Roasted Garlic Aioli
Recipe grams: 53.82g/1.9oz
Serves 6 8.97g/0.3oz per serving

Carbohydrates: 14%
Protein: 2%
Fat: 84%

INGREDIENTS
3/4 cup Mayonnaise, Hellmann's
3 clove Garlic, Raw
2.5 tbsp Lemon Juice, Raw
3/4 tsp Salt, Table
1 tsp Pepper, Black, Ground

DIRECTIONS
To roast garlic: Preheat oven to 400F. Pull off extra outer layers of paper around bulb of garlic, leaving at least one piece to keep
garlic in place. Slice 1/4” off the bulb to expose the innards. Wrap the whole thing in tin foil and drizzle ½ tsp of olive oil over top
before closing it up. Roast in oven for 40 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Cloves should easily squeeze out of paper.
Save remaining unused cloves in fridge for up to 1 week.
Mince garlic cloves. Mix mayonnaise, garlic, lemon juice, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes
before serving with crab cakes

NUTRIENT ANALYSIS/SERVING
Nutrient Value %DV Nutrient Value %DV

Calories 85 4% Monounsaturated Fat (g) 4
Protein (g) 0 1% Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 2
% Calories from Protein 2* Vit-C (mg) 3 3%
Dietary Fiber (g) 0 1% Sodium (mg) 565 25%
Fat (g) 8 10% Iron (mg) 0 0%

Values marked with a single asterisk (*) indicate totals with some values not available. This may result in an under reporting of values.

4/1/2018, 10:04 AM

10
3. Genereal Tso's Tofu Stir-Fry
Recipe grams: 1254.63g/44.3oz
Serves 6 209.10g/7.4oz per serving

Carbohydrates: 56%
Protein: 12%
Fat: 32%

INGREDIENTS
12 oz Tofu, Extra Firm, Nasoya Organic
3 tbsp Soy Sauce, Tamari (shoyu), From Soy
1 tsp Sesame Oil, Salad Or Cooking
4 tbsp Cornstarch
2 tbsp Canola Oil (rapeseed Oil), Low Erucic Acid
2 tsp Sesame Oil, Salad Or Cooking
2 tsp Cornstarch
2 clove Garlic, Raw
1 tbsp Ginger Root, Raw
1/4 cup Maple Syrup, 100%
3 tbsp Soy Sauce, Tamari (shoyu), From Soy
1 tbsp Water, Tap, Drinking
1 tbsp Sesame Oil, Salad Or Cooking
90 gram Onion, Young Green, Tops Only, Chopped
1 tbsp Chili Garlic Sauce, Huy Fong Foods
1 tbsp Brown Rice Vinegar, Mizkan
1/4 cup Maple Syrup, 100%
1 tsp Chili Garlic Sauce, Huy Fong Foods
1 cup Brown Rice, Medium Grain, Raw
1/2 lb Broccoli, Raw, 5'' Long

DIRECTIONS
1. If serving with rice and broccoli, begin preparing at this time. Otherwise, move onto the next step.
2. Wrap tofu in a clean, absorbent towel and set something heavy on top to wick away moisture, such as a cast iron skillet. Let
rest for about 10 minutes.
3. Prep/chop green onions, garlic, and ginger at this time. Set aside.
4. While tofu is pressing, prepare sauce by combining sesame oil, cornstarch, minced garlic, minced ginger, rice vinegar, coconut
sugar or maple syrup, tamari or soy sauce, and water in a small mixing bowl and whisk thoroughly to combine. If using coconut
sugar, make sure it’ s dissolved before proceeding. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.
5. Heat a large metal or cast iron skillet over medium heat. In the meantime, unwrap tofu and cut into even pieces, about
3/4-inch cubes.
6. Add tofu to a shallow mixing bowl and top with tamari or soy sauce, chili garlic sauce, sesame oil, and maple syrup. Toss to
combine. Let rest 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
7. Use a slotted spoon or fork to transfer tofu to a quart-size or large freezer bag. Add cornstarch 1 Tbsp at a time and toss to
coat. Continue adding more cornstarch and tossing until tofu is coated in a gummy, white layer - about 5 Tbsp.
8. To the hot skillet, add 2 Tbsp oil and let warm for 30 seconds. Then use a slotted spoon or fork to add tofu to the pan (leaving
any excess cornstarch behind).
9. Cook on all sides for 1 minute, or until light golden brown. You don’ t want it blackened or burned, as you’ ll be cooking it again
later with the sauce. Aim for a consistent golden brown crust. Remove tofu from pan as it’ s finished browning. Set aside.
10. Return skillet to burner and increase heat to medium-high. Add 1 Tbsp sesame oil, chopped green onions, and dried red
chilies. Sauté for 1-2 minutes, stirring frequently.
11. Add the sauce and tofu. Cook, stirring frequently, to coat the tofu and vegetables for 1-2 minutes, or until warmed through
and the sauce has slightly thickened.
12. Remove pan from heat and add sesame seeds (optional). Toss to coat.
13. Serve with rice and steamed broccoli (optional), or other desired sides.
* Recipe loosely adapted from Pure Wow and Food.com. Tofu method adapted from The Kitchn.
Recipe from <https://minimalistbaker.com/general-tsos-tofu/>

NUTRIENT ANALYSIS/SERVING
Nutrient Value %DV Nutrient Value %DV

Calories 375 19% Monounsaturated Fat (g) 6*
Protein (g) 11 23% Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 5*
% Calories from Protein 12* Vit-C (mg) 36* 40%
Dietary Fiber (g) 3* 12% Sodium (mg) 1091 47%
Fat (g) 13 17% Iron (mg) 2 13%

Values marked with a single asterisk (*) indicate totals with some values not available. This may result in an under reporting of values.

4/1/2018, 10:04 AM

11
1. Baked veggie balls in sweet tomato sauce
Recipe grams: 1778.43g/62.7oz
Serves 6 296.41g/10.5oz per serving

Carbohydrates: 42%
Protein: 16%
Fat: 42%

INGREDIENTS
3/4 cup Bulgar, Dry (bulgur)
1/2 cup Onion, Raw, Chopped
3 clove Garlic, Raw
1 medium-stalk Celery, Raw, Medium Stalk, 7.5 - 8'' Long Stalk
1 medium Carrot, Raw, Medium
4 tbsp Olive Oil, Salad Or Cooking
1 oz Parsley, Raw
1 can Chickpea (garbanzo), Canned, Mature Seeds, Drained Solids
1 large Egg, Chicken, Raw, Whole, Fresh
1 tsp Lemon Peel, Raw
30 gram Cheese, Parmesan, Dry Grated, Less Fat
1 cup Red Pepper, Sweet, Canned, Solids & Liquids, Halves
1/2 cup Bread Crumbs, Whole Wheat, 365 Everyday Value
60 gram Ricotta Cheese, Part Skim
1 tsp Salt, Table
2 can Italian Peeled Plum Tomatoes, Tesco

DIRECTIONS
Veggies balls: Half-fill a large pan with cold water, add the bulgur wheat and leave to soak for 20 minutes, then drain and rinse
well. Tip back into the pan and top up with cold salted water.
Bring to the boil over a high heat, pop the lid on, then reduce to a low heat for around 20 minutes, or until cooked through but
still with a bit of bite, stirring occasionally.
Meanwhile, peel the onion and 1 clove of garlic and trim the celery and carrot, then roughly chop and place into a processor.
Blend in food processor until finely chopped.
Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large ovenproof frying pan over a medium heat, add the chopped vegetables and fry for 12 minutes,
or until softened, stirring occasionally.
Once cooked, drain the bulgur wheat and leave to cool.
Pick the parsley leaves and put to one side, then roughly chop the stalks. Place the stalks and most of the leaves into the
processor. Drain and add the chickpeas, then crack in the egg. Add the breadcrumbs and half the cooled bulgur, then chop in
food processor to a rough paste.
Pour into a large bowl with the cooked vegetables and the remaining bulgur.
Finely grate in the lemon zest and Parmesan, then add it to the bowl. Season with a pinch of black pepper and mix well with your
hands until smooth.
Divide and roll the mixture into golf-ball-sized balls, placing them on a tray as you go - you should end up with 24 in total. Cover
the tray with cling film and place in the fridge for 30 minutes to firm up.
Preheat the oven to 400ºF
Peel and finely chop the remaining garlic. Return the large ovenproof frying pan to a medium heat, drizzle in 1 tablespoon of oil,
then add the garlic and cook for 2 minutes, or until golden.
Pour the tomatoes, breaking them up with a wooden spoon, and then pour in ½ a tin’ s worth of water. Reduce the heat to low
and simmer for around 10 minutes, or until thickened. Squeeze in half the lemon juice.
Once the veggie balls are firm, remove from the fridge.
Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat, add the balls and cook for around 8 minutes, or until
browned all over, turning occasionally, then transfer to the tomato sauce.
Tear the red peppers into strips with your fingers, then arrange in the sauce. Season the sauce to taste and dot over the ricotta.
Place the pan in the oven for around 20 minutes, or until golden and bubbling. Serve with a scattering of parsley leaves and
lemon wedges for squeezing over.
This recipe has been adapted from: <https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/vegetables-recipes/baked-veggie-balls/>

NUTRIENT ANALYSIS/SERVING
Nutrient Value %DV Nutrient Value %DV

Calories 326 16% Monounsaturated Fat (g) 8*
Protein (g) 12 24% Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 2*
% Calories from Protein 16* Vit-C (mg) 20 22%
Dietary Fiber (g) 9 33% Sodium (mg) 960 42%
Fat (g) 14 17% Iron (mg) 2 13%

Values marked with a single asterisk (*) indicate totals with some values not available. This may result in an under reporting of values.

4/1/2018, 10:00 AM

12
6. Cinnamon Zucchini Walnut Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting
Recipe grams: 2971.22g/104.8oz
Serves 16 185.70g/6.6oz per serving

Carbohydrates: 43%
Protein: 5%
Fat: 52%
Alcohol: 0%

INGREDIENTS
3/4 cup Sugar, Brown, Unpacked
3/4 cup Sugar, Granulated
4 medium Egg, Chicken, Raw, Whole, Fresh
1 cup Canola Oil, Pure Canola Oil
2 cup All Purpose Flour, Unbleached, Organic; Enriched, Presifted
2 tsp Cinnamon, Ground
1 tsp Baking Soda
1/2 tsp Baking Powder, Argo
1/2 tsp Salt, Table
4 large Zucchini w/Skin, Raw, Large, Summer Squash
1 cup Walnut, English, Dried, Raw, Chopped
1/4 cup Butter, No Added Salt
8 oz Cream Cheese
1 tsp Vanilla Extract
3 tbsp Heavy Whipping Cream, Horizon
3 cup Confectioners Powdered Sugar, Great Value

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 350° F. Lightly grease a 9×13-inch pan with nonstick cooking spray.
In a large bowl, beat together sugars, eggs, and oil until well combined. Set aside.
In a medium bowl, sift the flour, cinnamon, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Combine dry ingredients with the wet
ingredients. Stir in zucchini and walnuts.
Pour batter evenly in pan. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until toothpick inserted comes clean. Cool completely.

CREAM CHEESE FROSTING
Beat the butter and cream cheese together until creamy.
Add vanilla extract and heavy whipping cream and beat until combined.
Beat in the powdered sugar until smooth. Frost the cooled cake and serve immediately.

NUTRIENT ANALYSIS/SERVING
Nutrient Value %DV Nutrient Value %DV

Calories 484 24% Monounsaturated Fat (g) 10*
Protein (g) 6 12% Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 8*
% Calories from Protein 5* Vit-C (mg) 15 16%
Dietary Fiber (g) 2* 6% Sodium (mg) 255 11%
Fat (g) 29 37% Iron (mg) 1 8%

Values marked with a single asterisk (*) indicate totals with some values not available. This may result in an under reporting of values.

4/1/2018, 10:04 AM

13
Discussion of Menu and Nutrient Analysis of Recipes
Our discussion of menu items started on January 16/2018 right after this project was assigned.
The initial idea was “Build your own healthy burger”. We thought about a veggie-topped, herb-infused
turkey burger on whole grain bread with avocado mayo and a side of baked sweet potato fries. This idea
was quickly turned down because it didn’t show a lot of skill or wasn’t innovative enough.
Back to the drawing board; we kept the vegetarian theme and brainstormed for a while, and
finally decided on creating a whole vegetarian cooking class with different vegetarian dishes that the
participants would hopefully be interested enough not only in participating in the class, but also in
recreating these same dishes in their own homes sometime. We all started generating recipes from
different websites we searched on and finally sent a several recipes to Ellen for approval. She finally
approved of the dishes and helped us narrow down the recipes.
Once we have decided on the recipes, we proceeded to do nutrient analysis and make some
modifications to utilize ingredients that were easy to get. As an example, we switched coconut sugar for
brown sugar, tamari or coconut aminos for soy sauce, and so on. We wanted to highlight one new and
healthy vegetarian food trend so we included a recipe with Jackfruit. We also purchased the actual fruit
and had participants taste it and learn a little about it.
The reasoning behind our vegetarian meal was to align with the key recommendations from the
2020 Dietary Guidelines and encourage more eating of fruits and vegetables and less eating of saturated
fats, added sugars, and sodium. Even though we didn’t do any nutrient modification to our recipes,
choosing plant based recipes vs. meat-based still provides a lot of health benefits.

*Note: complete meal analysis not appropriate for this style cooking class, as this class was not
a meal, but more of a collection of recipes. Therefore, complete meal analysis was not
conducted. Recipe were quantified in excel by multiplying each item by 3 in order to allow for
the recipe to be reproduced 3 times.












14
Marketing Plan and Materials

Join us
for a healthy
cooking class!
Learn to cook with plant-based ingredients for a fresh,
new take on meals!
Recipes include*:

BBQ Black Bean Burgers
Black beans, toasted pecans, brown rice, and a blend of seasonings come together in this
unforgettable veggie burger

Watermelon, Cucumber & Feta Salad
It’s been a long winter. You can taste summer with this simple, yet elegant salad

Jackfruit “Crab” Cakes
A tropical fruit native to India takes on the texture of crab meat in these “crab” cakes

General Tso’s Tofu Stir Fry
Enjoy a popular Chinese food dish with an impressive twist

Baked Veggie Balls in a Marinara Sauce
Chick peas, bulgur wheat, and ricotta make a convincing meatball substitute

Zucchini Cinnamon Walnut Cake with a Cream Cheese Frosting
Have your veggies and eat your cake, too!

*All recipes are vegetarian

When: 4/9/18 at 4:30 PM
Where: UConn Jones Building Kitchen Lab - Jones 136
$15 per person
RSVP by: 4/6/18 to jennifer.ouellette@uconn.edu

Brought to you by UConn Allied Health Graduate Coordinated Dietetics Students

15
The above flyer was created after the topic and menu were selected, and was used to
advertise this cooking class. The flyer was distributed online through the Daily Digest, as well as
on a listserv for the College of Agriculture. Flyers were hung in the library, Jones building,
Wilbur Cross building, Koons Hall and the Student Union. All group members also helped spread
the word about the class. Participants that wished to sign up for the class emailed the
Marketing, Production, and Evaluation supervisor (Jenn), who then added them to the guest
list. Jenn answered all questions about the class that prospective participants had. The biggest
question was how long the class was going to be, so that should have added to the flier. An
email was set out on Friday to all participants reminding them that they were signed up for the
class, reminding them about the cost and payment options, and letting them know the room
number of the foods lab. We had one participant that requested being a group that did not
have dairy products. We pre-assigned her to one of those recipes; however, she did not make it
to the class. After the class filled on Friday afternoon, Jenn continued to get emails about the
class into the weekend. Another 5 people were interested in joining the class if it had not been
full.



















16

Production Sheet

17


Shopping List (Nutribase)
SOY SAUCE, TAMARI (SHOYU),from soy 6 tbsp
MAPLE SYRUP, 100% 1/2 cup
WATER, TAP, DRINKING 7 tbsp
WATER, TAP, DRINKING 1 tsp

LEMON JUICE, RAW 5 tbsp
LIME JUICE, RAW 3 tbsp
BULGAR, DRY (BULGUR) 3/4 cup
BROWN RICE, LONG GRAIN, RAW 1/2 cup

BROWN RICE, MEDIUM GRAIN, RAW 1 cup
ALL PURPOSE FLOUR, UNBLEACHED,Gold Medal,Organic; enriched, presifted 2 cup
EGG, CHICKEN, RAW,whole, fresh 1 large
CHEESE, PARMESAN, DRY GRATED, LESS FAT 30 gram

RICOTTA CHEESE, PART SKIM 60 gram
EGG, CHICKEN, RAW,whole, fresh 4 medium
BUTTER, NO ADDED SALT,Breakstone's 1/4 cup
CREAM CHEESE 8 oz

FETA CHEESE, CRUMBLED 1/3 cup
OLIVE OIL,salad or cooking 4 1/2 tbsp
SESAME OIL,salad or cooking 3 tsp
CANOLA OIL (RAPESEED OIL),low erucic acid 2 tbsp
SESAME OIL,salad or cooking 1 tbsp
CANOLA OIL,Crisco,pure canola oil 1 cup
LEMON PEEL, RAW 1 tsp
JACKFRUIT, RAW,sliced 24 oz
WATERMELON, RAW, DICED 4 cup
SALT, TABLE 4 tsp
SUGAR, BROWN,unpacked 1 tbsp
SALT, SEA,Hain,iodized 1/2 tsp

CORNSTARCH 4 tbsp
CORNSTARCH 2 tsp

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BREAD CRUMBS, PLAIN,dry, grated 1/2 cup
SUGAR, BROWN,unpacked 3/4 cup

SUGAR, GRANULATED 3/4 cup
BAKING SODA 1 tsp
VANILLA EXTRACT 1 tsp
HONEY, STRAINED OR EXTRACTED 3 tbsp

CHICKPEA (GARBANZO),canned, mature seeds, drained solids 1 can
BLACK BEAN, LOW SODIUM,mature seeds, canned 1 1/2 cup
TOFU, EXTRA FIRM, NASOYA ORGANIC,Vitasoy 12 oz
Bread Crumbs, Whole Wheat,365 Everyday Value 1/2 cup

Italian Peeled Plum Tomatoes,Tesco 2 can
BARBEQUE SAUCE,McDonald's 68 gram
Panko Bread Crumbs,Kikkoman 0.83 cup
Brioche Hamburger Buns,Aunt Millie's 5 bun
Chili Garlic Sauce,Huy Fong Foods 1 tbsp
Brown Rice Vinegar,Mizkan 1 tbsp
Chili Garlic Sauce,Huy Fong Foods 1 tsp
Old Bay,Wawa 1/2 oz
Sauce, Worcestershire,America's Choice 1 tsp
Sea Salt, Fine Ground,World Classics 1 tsp
Mayonnaise,Heinz 1 1/2 cup
Baking Powder,Argo 1/2 tsp
Heavy Whipping Cream,Horizon 3 tbsp
Confectioners Powdered Sugar,Great Value 3 cup
PECAN, DRIED, RAW, CHOPPED 1 cup
FLAXSEED, GROUND,Spectrum,Organic; cold milled flaxseeds w/lignans 2 tbsp

WALNUT, ENGLISH, DRIED, RAW, CHOPPED 1 cup
PARSLEY, RAW 1 oz
CHILI POWDER 1 tbsp
CUMIN SEED 1 tbsp

PAPRIKA 1 tbsp
PEPPER, BLACK, GROUND 2 1/2 tsp
CHIVES, RAW, CHOPPED 3 tbsp

19
CORIANDER, RAW (CILANTRO, CHINESE PARSLEY) 1/4 cup
MUSTARD POWDER,Spice Islands 1 tsp

CINNAMON, GROUND 2 tsp
ONION, RAW, CHOPPED 1 1/4 cup
GARLIC, RAW 13 clove
CELERY, RAW, MEDIUM STALK,7.5 - 8'' long stalk 1 medium-stalk

CARROT, RAW, MEDIUM 1 medium
RED PEPPER, SWEET,canned, solids & liquids, halves 1 cup
ICEBERG LETTUCE, RAW,include crisphead types, large 1 head
TOMATO, RED, RIPE, RAW, WHOLE,year round average (2.6'' diameter) 2 whole

GINGER ROOT, RAW 1 tbsp
ONION, YOUNG GREEN, TOPS ONLY, CHOPPED 90 gram
BROCCOLI, RAW,5'' long 1/2 lb
ZUCCHINI W/SKIN, RAW, LARGE,Summer squash 4 large
CUCUMBER, PEELED, RAW,sliced 2 cup
ONION, RAW,sliced 1/4 cup

Grocery List (Formatted)
The grocery list was extracted from Nutribase. Due to the nature of this cooking class, the
shopping list was multiplied by 3 so that there would be enough ingredients to make each recipe three
times.

Grocery List
Amounts Needed Purchasable Amounts
Produce
JACKFRUIT 72 oz 4, 20 oz cans
WATERMELON 12 cup 2 medium melon
LEMON PEEL 2 2/3 tbsp 6 lemon
CILANTRO 2/3 cup 3, 2.5 oz package
CHIVES 9 tbsp 0.75 oz
ONION 7 cup 7 large onions
GARLIC 39 cloves 15 garlic bulbs
CELERY 3 medium-stalk 3 medium stalk
CARROT 3 medium 3 medium
GINGER ROOT 3 tbsp 1 root
BROCCOLI 1.5 lb 6 large heads

20
ZUCCHINI 12 large 12 large
CUCUMBER 6 cup 5 medium
ITALIAN PEELED PLUM TOMATOES 5 1/3 can 6, 14.5 cans
TOMATOES 6 each 6 each
MINT 1 bunch 1 bunch
LETTUCE 15 large leaves 2 heads
Sauces/oils
SOY SAUCE 18 tbsp 8 oz bottle
100% MAPLE SYRUP 1.5 cup 12.5 oz bottle
WATER 21 1/3 tbsp Can get in lab
LEMON JUICE 15 tbsp 8 oz bottle
LIME JUICE 9 tbsp 4.5 oz bottle
OLIVE OIL 13.5 tbsp 16.9 oz bottle
SESAME OIL 9 tbsp 5 oz bottle
CANOLA OIL 4.5 cup 24 oz bottle
BARBEQUE SAUCE 217.60 gram 18 oz bottle
CHILI GARLIC SAUCE 5 1/3 tbsp 8 oz bottle
WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE 2 2/3 tsp 10 oz bottle
BROWN RICE VINEGAR 2 2/3 tbsp 5 oz bottle
MAYONNAISE 4.5 cup 32 oz jar
Dairy
EGGS 21 large 2 dozen
GRATED PARMESEAN CHEESE 0.9 cups 6 oz bag
RICOTTA CHEESE 6.36 oz 15 oz tub
BUTTER 0.75 cup 1 lb box
CREAM CHEESE 24 oz 2, 16 oz tub
CRUMBLED FETA CHEESE 1 cup 12 oz tub
HEAVY WHIPPING CREAM 3 tbsp 1 pint
TOFU 36 oz 3, 14 oz bags
Grocery
BULGAR WHEAT 2.25 cup 28 oz bag
LONG GRAIN BROWN RICE 1.5 cup 24 oz
MEDIUM GRAIN BROWN RICE 3 cup 24 oz
BREAD CRUMBS 2 2/3 cup 24 oz can
PANKO READ CRUMBS 2.50 cup 3, 8 oz can
CANNED BLACK BEANS 4.50 cup 2 cans
CANNED SWEET RED PEPPER 3 cup 2, 16 oz jar
BRIOCHE BUNS 15 Buns 2, 12 packs
SEASEME SEEDS 3 tbsp 5 oz jar
CANNED CHICKPEAS 2 2/3 can 3, 15 oz cans

21
Baking Needs
BAKING SODA 1 tsp 16 oz box
VANILLA EXTRACT 1 tsp 2 oz bottle
SUGAR 3/4 cup 16 oz box
BAKING POWDER 1/2 tsp 8.1 oz can
CONFECTIONERS POWDERED SUGAR 9 cup (72 oz) 3, 32 oz bag
CORNSTARCH 34.25 tsp 16 oz box
BROWN SUGAR 1 cup 16 oz box
PECANS 3 cup 4, 7 oz tubs
WALNUTS 3 cup 4, 7 oz tubs
GROUND FLAXSEED 5 1/3 tbsp 16 oz bag
HONEY 9 tbsp 12 oz bottle
ALL PURPOSE FLOUR 6 cup 2 lb bag
Seasoning
OLD BAY SEASONING 1 1/3 oz 6 oz can
CHILI POWDER 3.20 tbsp 2.5 oz bottle
CUMIN SEED 3.20 tbsp 14 oz bag
PAPRIKA 3.20 tbsp 2.1 oz bottle
GROUND BLACK PEPPER 7.5 tsp 1.5 oz can
MUSTARD POWDER 3 tsp 3.07 oz
GROUND CINNAMON 6 tsp 1 oz jar
PARSLEY 3 oz 3 oz package, fresh
SEA SALT 1.60 tsp 9.5 oz bottle
TABLE SALT 12 tsp 26 oz can

Discussion of Accuracy of Purchasing
We were able to get everything that was needed for the meals at Big Y, with the exception of
the canned and fresh jackfruit. Michelle bought the canned jackfruit at Trader Joe’s and the fresh
jackfruit at Stop and Shop. Although at Big Y they did not have whole watermelon, only quarter cut
pieces, so we were able to purchase all of what they had left, which was about 7 slices. We didn’t have
to make any substitutions from the original grocery list and we did not run out of any ingredients once
we started the cooking lesson. Also, everyone took some leftovers home to avoid unnecessary waste.
While shopping we got most items on sale and were able to save a lot of money that way. The total cost
for all of our recipes ingredients came out to a little over $300. This was enough food to make each
recipe three times. We quantified the recipes and the ingredients by just multiplying them by three. We
multiplied the ingredient amounts by three so that we would have enough for each group to be able to
make their own batch, as well as the group leader to have enough to make to teach the lesson. Some
suggestions for improvement would be to have only one group member put items into NutriBase. Once
the menu coordinator (Claudia) had everything in NutriBase, it was easier to have her export the grocery
list to the purchasing agent (Melina) to clean it up and add in the purchasable amounts through a shared
drive.




22
Lesson Plan
Plant-Based Power ups
[Time: 2.5 hours]

Introduction & Pre-Evaluation (20min)
Overview - Michelle

Lesson (1-1.5 hours)

Participants will be divided amongst 5 groups coordinating with the 5 recipes. Each group is
assigned an instructor who will guide each recipe and go over the health related benefits of
each. At the end of the lesson everyone will group up and taste all of the recipes then proceed to
the classroom for a discussion.

BBQ Black Bean Burgers - Will
Talking Points:
1. Black Beans
a. Good source of protein: 7g per serving
i. Maintain lean body mass
2. Good source of fiber: 6g per serving
a. Helps to regulate blood glucose and insulin levels
i. Lowers cholesterol
ii. Helps prevent constipation
3. Decreased amount of fat (& saturated fat) compared to burgers made with beef
a. Contain unsaturated fats which help improve your body’s lipid profile
Materials:
❖ Medium Skillet ❖ Spatula
❖ Stove ❖ Plastic wrap
❖ Blender/food processor ❖ ½ cup or ¼ cup measuring cups
❖ Large mixing bowl ❖ Strainer
❖ Fork ❖ Large pot
❖ Large spoon

Watermelon, Cucumber, and Feta Salad - Jenn
Talking Points:
1. Watermelon
a. Watermelons are comprised on 92% water
b. Contain high levels of lycopene, a phytonutrient which give the fruit its red color
and are effective at protecting cells from damage

23
i. Lower risk of heart disease
ii. Lowers blood pressure
c. Lycopene is also an inhibitor of inflammatory processes
d. Vitamin A from watermelon can also promote growth of new collagen and
elastin cells which helps keep skin and hair healthy
2. Cucumber
a. High alkaline levels which help regulate the body’s pH and neutralizing acidity.
i. Beneficial for GI issues like: heartburn, gas, bloating
b. Contain silica which aids in developing healthy connective tissues in muscle,
ligaments, tendons, cartilage and bone
c. Help prevent hypertension with high levels of fiber, magnesium and potassium
Materials:
❖ Large bowl ❖ Fork
❖ Small mixing bowl ❖ Knife
❖ Whisk

Jackfruit “Crab” Cakes - Tyler
Talking Points:
1. Jackfruit:
a. Originate from the indian subcontinent and is also known as the jacktree or jak.
b. Some can grow up to 80lbs making them the largest tree-borne fruits in the
world
c. Can be used in desserts, savory meals, salads, candied varieties and roasted fruit,
as well as eating the fruit raw
d. Contain antioxidants, such as lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-carotene, this fruit can
be very beneficial for skin health, as it can minimize the effects of free radicals
and oxidative stress
i. Beta carotene can also be broken down into vitamin A, reducing oxidative
stress in the eyes, preventing macular degeneration
e. Contains a phenolic compound, artocarpesin, which which may be beneficial for
preventing inflammatory and respiratory diseases.
Materials:
❖ Cutting board ❖ Baking sheet
❖ Knife ❖ Measuring cup
❖ Large bowl ❖ Small bowl
❖ Whisk ❖ Fork

General Tso’s Tofu Stir Fry - Carlee
Talking Points:

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1. Tofu:
a. Also known as a bean curd, and is produced by coagulating soy milk.
b. Rich source of iron magnesium, copper, phosphorus, calcium and potassium
i. Prevents anemia, improves cardiovascular health
c. Isoflavones
i. Phytoestrogen which can promote heart health and maintain bone health
d. Helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels with a low fat and high protein content
Materials:
❖ Knife ❖ Whisk
❖ Cutting Board ❖ Large 10 “metal skillet
❖ Clean, absorbent towel ❖ Shallow mixing bowl
❖ Something heavy to place over tofu ❖ Wooden spoon
(Ex: cast iron skillet) ❖ Slotted spoon or fork
❖ Small mixing bowl ❖ Quart size freezer bag

Baked Veggie Balls in A Marinara Sauce - Claudia
Talking Points:
1. Chickpeas/Garbanzo beans
a. High fiber content helps regulate blood glucose levels, lipid profile and insulin
levels helping to prevent diabetes
i. Prevents constipation and helps regulate a healthy digestive tract
b. Iron, phosphate, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and vitamin K help
promote bone structure and strength
c. Choline in chickpeas helps with sleep, muscle movement, learning, and memory
i. Aids in the absorption of fat and and reduces chronic inflammation
Materials:
❖ Large pan ❖ Ovenproof frying pan
❖ Medium pot with lid ❖ Large bowl
❖ Knife ❖ Baking sheet
❖ Cutting board ❖ Oven

Zucchini Cinnamon Walnut Cake with a Cream Cheese Frosting - Jenn
Talking Points:
1. Zucchini
a. One medium zucchini can supply 50% of the RDA for vitamin C
b. High pectin content
i. Polysaccharide which can improve cardiovascular health
ii. Improve arterials health and lower inflammation
c. Good Source of potassium

25
i. Helps to lower blood pressure and prevent heart disease
d. Good Source of B vitamins including folate, riboflavin and vitamin B6.
i. Help support a healthy metabolism by aiding in protein, carbohydrate
and nucleic acid metabolism
Materials:
❖ 9” x 13” pan
❖ Large bowl
❖ Medium bowl
❖ Whisk or KitchenAid mixer
❖ Sifter
❖ Wooden spoon
❖ Toothpick

26
Floaters - Michelle & Melina
Sanitation - Ashton

Show & Tell (30min)
Each group will discuss what they learned while making their recipes.
❖ What is healthy about the recipe? (SMART)
❖ How did the food taste?
❖ What did not go well?
❖ What did go well?
❖ Would you try this at home? (SMART)
❖ Can you commit to making a vegetarian meal 1-2 times per week? (SMART)

Summary & Take Home Messages - Michelle
Post Eval (10min)

SMART Objectives:
Goal(s):
● To introduce adults to the intricacies of plant based cooking to promote learning and
adaption of new healthy food habits.
● To reinforce the the use of plant based meals as an important tool to use in order to
promote short-term and long-term health
Objectives:
● By then end of our 1 ½ hour lesson at least 50% of the participants will agree to try
cooking one of the recipes at home.
● After our 1 ½ hour lesson at least 75% of the participants will be able to identify one
health benefit of eating a plant based meal
● After our vegetarian meals lesson at least 50% of the participants will be able to identify
a protein source high in fiber

Independent Practice:
Article on the benefits of a vegetarian diet
- 20 ways to Enjoy more Fruits and Vegetables
- Eat More Plant Based Meals
- https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/going-meatless-once-a-week




27

Classroom Layout

Dining Room/Kitchen Layout

28
Discussion of Dining Room:

The dining room will be laid out into two sections; the kitchen and the classroom. The
classroom will be organized with 17 chairs for all participants to be seated and facing the
whiteboard for instruction. The introduction and pre-evaluation will be completed in this area.
The participants will then be assigned groups and relocated to the kitchen to begin making
meals. The kitchen will be laid out to have all groups within proximity to each other to
encourage conversation amongst groups, but not too close that ingredients and prep space will
be interfering with other groups’. After completion of the lesson, participants will return to the
classroom for a discussion of the evening and the post-evaluation.


Discussion of Nutrient Analysis:

The detailed nutrient analysis is contained in the Nutribase versions of the individual
recipes. The main concept of the nutrient breakdown throughout these recipes in the nutrient
density. As participants will read in the independent practice handouts, vegan and vegetarian
options provide enough macronutrients and micronutrients to live a healthy lifestyle. We are
focusing mostly on the increase in fiber and adequate protein. Both of these nutrients increase
satiety and can be beneficial for weight loss/management and health in general. In each group
the instructor will touch on them more in depth going into heart health, muscle, etc. Saturated
fat is one of the biggest nutrients decreased in our meals. We want to make sure we touch on
the nutrients we may not need as much of as well as the beneficial ones. We have also
mentioned a numerous amount of micronutrients found within these recipes that include a
variety of health benefits for the eyes, skin, bones, cells, muscles, hair, heart, and many more.
Overall these plant based meals provide a well-balanced variety of nutrients to promote a
healthy lifestyle.


Discussion of Pre and Post Lesson Evaluations:
Overall the results from our pre and post evaluation showed that our class had a decent
foundation of nutrition knowledge before taking our class. Each participant got a 100% on both
the pre and post evaluation quizzes. If we had known the level of knowledge of the participants
beforehand we could have created a more difficult quiz. One possible addition to this project
could be an option for participants to provide their nutrition related knowledge when they
enroll. We didn't want to make the quizzes too in depth, but this class understood the main
concepts were were trying to teach very well. Once noticeable change however, is that
participants were able to describe a greater variety of health benefits of eating plant based
meals on the post evaluation. The majority of the answers on the pre evaluation consisted of
plant based meals being either “ lower in fat/ saturated” fat or “being healthy” (n=9). On the
post evaluation, the health benefits listed included: “contains important nutrients”, “high in
fiber”, and “contain phytonutrients”. According to the quizzes, our participants had an

29
adequate food/nutrition related knowledge before attending the class, but I feel they still left
the experience learning new information and recipes to try on their own for family and friends.


Pre and Post Tests

April, 9 2018
UConn Coordinated Dietetics Program
Pre-test
Vegetarian Cooking Lesson

1) Which foods contain the most saturated fat?
A. Meats and animal products
B. Soy-based products
C. Fruits and Vegetables
D. Grains
E. Beans and legumes

2) A plant based diet won’t provide me with enough protein
A. True
B. False


3) What protein source contains the highest amount of fiber?
A. Chicken
B. Black beans
C. Beef
D. Salmon

4) List one health benefit of eating plant-based meals?.
________________________________________________________________________


5) Fiber: (circle all that apply)

A. Predominantly found in meat
B. Is found in higher amounts in fruits and vegetables
C. Helps regulate your body’s blood glucose and insulin levels

Thank you!

30



April 9, 2018
UConn Coordinated Dietetics Program
Post-test
Vegetarian Cooking Lesson

1) Which foods contain the most saturated fat?
F. Meats and animal products
G. Soy-based products
H. Fruits and Vegetables
I. Grains
J. Beans and legumes

2) After today’s lesson, can a plant based diet provide you with the recommended amount of
protein?
A. True
B. False


3) After our lesson, which protein source contains the highest amount of fiber?
A. Chicken
B. Black beans
C. Beef
D. Salmon

4) List one health benefit of you learned about eating plant-based meals?.
________________________________________________________________________

5) Fiber: (circle all that apply)

D. Is predominantly found in meat
E. Is found in higher amounts in fruit and vegetables
F. Helps regulate your body’s blood sugar

Thank you





31
Handouts

RD Resources for Consumers:

Eat More Plant-based Meals
More and more people have become concerned about Find recipes and cookbooks that you like
their health, the environment or the animals that are and create time to cook.
raised for food and are eating more vegetarian meals. Skip the gourmet cookbooks (unless you are a
gourmet chef!) and go for the ones that are most
According to a 2012 National Harris Poll* 47% of similar to your cooking style. Today there is a wide
Americans eat at least one vegetarian meal a week and selection of vegetarian cookbooks that cater to a
as many as 14 million adults consider themselves to be number of tastes, style and type of vegetarian. And
vegetarians. If you are interested in becoming a vegetarian there’s no better way to control what food you eat
or just adding more plant-based foods to your diet, than to prepare it at home. The internet has millions
this resource will help make that change easy, fun and of vegetarian and vegan recipes (see below for our
sustainable. favorites sites).
Eat more of the plant-based foods you already eat. Explore familiar – and unfamiliar – stores.
Do you eat peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? How Health food stores, grocery stores and ethnic
about oatmeal with nuts and raisins? You are probably markets carry a variety of plant-based foods like
already eating vegetarian foods and don’t even realize non-dairy beverages, meat alternatives, interesting
it! Start by expanding these foods and meals. Add more produce and a variety of products that you’ve
fruits, vegetables or beans to the meals that contain probably never seen before! There are many types
animal products. Slowly make them more and more of soymilk, rice, grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts
vegetarian. and seeds and even more ways to eat or prepare
Don’t give up all of your favorite animal foods them. Make time to try different products and the
immediately. different preparation methods for each. Have fun
with this!
If you love pepperoni pizza more than life itself, suddenly
removing it from your diet may bring more gloom than Stock your kitchen with the healthy plant-
boom. The most sustainable changes come when they are based whole foods you want to eat.
done over time. Make the easiest changes first and when If you do this, it will be harder to lapse into old
those no longer feel new, move onto the more difficult ways. Form habits and prepare your environment
ones. so when you are busy and pressed for time you
have healthy, plant foods available to eat. Canned
Eliminate the animal foods you don’t eat often.
or prepared soup and beans and pre-cooked grains
You won’t miss these so let them go first. Substitute plant stored in the fridge reduce preparation time. Foods
protein for meat protein in recipes you already love. Try like hummus and other non-dairy dips with baby
adding beans or choose from a plethora of ‘fake meats’ carrots, lightly steamed cauliflower and broccoli,
that mock the taste and texture of chicken, beef or pork. and apple slices makes snacking easy and healthy.

32
RD Resources for Consumers: Eat More Plant-based Meals

Stay informed on nutrition. Fruits and vegetables are good for you. Just because
Read about plant-based nutrition from reliable sources you are a vegetarian doesn’t mean this is any less true!
(see resource list below). If you are going strictly vegan Every meal should have a fruit or vegetable. Find the
(eliminating all animal foods) make sure you are getting ones you like best and always have them on hand.
a reliable source of vitamin B12, which is found only in Broccoli and kale are nutrient-dense and easy to cook.
fortified plant foods like breakfast cereals, breads, and They can easily be sautéed with garlic and onions and
some soy milks, meat analogues and energy bars. served over pasta with marinara sauce or added to rice
and beans.
Involve the people around you. Nut butters are amazing. They can be added to
Cook, shop and plan with others. Invite friends over for breakfast foods, fruit and even as a base for plant-
a vegetarian feast. Involving friends and family with based sauces. Healthy fat, nutrient-dense and low-cost,
your dietary change makes it easier, more fun and more nut butters can be a key component to your plant-
likely to last. Just like there are benefits of exercising based diet. Peanut is great but try others like almond,
with a friend or a group, eating is no different. sunflower and sesame!
Find other vegetarians and vegans!
Most will be super excited to share their favorite foods,
Online
recipes and restaurants. There are many types of VN DPG: vegetariannutrition.net
vegetarians with varying food preferences, so talk to as See our Resources on Vitamin B12, Soy, Calcium and other hot topics
many as possible! Check out local vegetarian and vegan
International Vegetarian Union: ivu.org/recipes/
meet-ups and groups.
Vegetarian Resource Group: vrg.org/recipes
Nutrition Tips Veg Web: vegweb.com
Save time. While dried beans and fresh produce may Meatless Monday: meatlessmonday.com
be ideal, don’t hesitate to use canned beans and frozen Plant Based on a Budget: plantbasedonabudget.com
fruits and vegetables. It saves time and is still healthier
and cheaper than ordering take-out. Books by Registered Dietitians
Become familiar with a variety of grains. Pasta and
rice are common, but have you tried rice noodles, Vegan For Life - Ginny Messina and Jack Norris
quinoa or barley? Keep a number of these on hand and The Idiot’s Guide to Plant-based Diets - Julieanna
if you are pressed for time, start cooking them as soon Hever
as you get home. Then decide what you are going to Plant-powered Diet - Sharon Palmer
eat with them.
Appetite For Reduction - Isa Moskowitz and Matt
Beans, beans, the magical fruit. Okay, so they aren’t Ruscigno
fruit but they sure are magical! Soy is popular with
vegetarians, comes in numerous forms and can be See vegetariannutrition.net for an ongoing list
prepared in an infinite number of ways. And don’t
forget about lentils, chickpeas, pinto and black beans, * Poll: http://www.vrg.org/blog/2012/05/18/how-often-do-
americans-eat-vegetarian-meals-and-how-many-adults-in-the-u-s-
which should be included on a daily basis. Try adding
are-vegetarian/
chickpeas to pasta dishes or cooking your own pinto
beans with onions and garlic for burritos. If beans are
new to you, add them to your diet slowly to help with
digestion.

RD Resources are a project of the Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group. More topics available at
www.VegetarianNutrition.net. Professional resources also available for members at www.VNDPG.org. © 2013 by VN DPG.
Written by: Matt Ruscigno, MPH, RD
Expires December 2018.

33
4/8/2018 Going Meatless Once a Week

Going Meatless Once a Week
By Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
Published March 19, 2018

bhofack2/iStock/Thinkstock

Going vegetarian for one day a week for dietary or religious reasons is a small change in your diet that can
improve your health and the environment. Going light on meat was the norm a few generations ago when
meat often was consumed in side dish portions, while nutrient-rich beans and lentils, vegetables and whole
grains took center stage.

Don't Just Cut Back, Add to Your Diet

Eating no meat one day a week is not only about subtracting from your diet, but adding to it. Eating
more whole grains, beans and lentils and vegetables on your meatless day o ers many health bene ts.

Whole-grain, unprocessed carbohydrates — such as whole-wheat bread, whole-grain pasta, brown rice, oats,
buckwheat, quinoa and millet — can help prevent heart disease, certain cancers and diabetes. Experimenting
with a new grain choice on your next meatless day can provide ber for normal bowel function, along with a
variety of vitamins and minerals that contribute to the nutrient density of your diet.

Americans regularly eat more than enough protein, and adding beans or lentils to your meat-free meal also
maintains an adequate protein intake. Providing about 16 grams of protein per cup cooked, beans and lentils
also are a great source of ber, folate, iron and potassium. These nutrient-rich foods are good sources of
manganese, magnesium, copper, and thiamin.

Vegetables are nutrient powerhouses and add color and texture to your meals. Try leafy greens such as kale,
collards, bok choy and broccoli for good plant sources of calcium.

Good for the Environment

https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/going-meatless-once-a-week 1/2

34
4/8/2018 Going Meatless Once a Week

Consuming a plant-based diet can bene t the environment. According to the Food and Agricultural
Organization, livestock was estimated to contribute to 14.5 percent of global human-caused greenhouse gas
emissions (GHG). In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency estimates that livestock contributes to more
than one-third of methane emissions, one type of GHG. Eating less meat by going meatless one day a week
can contribute to e orts to reduce GHG.

Reviewed March 2018
Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN, is a Chicago-based author and owner of Personal Nutrition Designs, LLC, which provides
nutrition programs for athletes.
© 2018 eatright.org. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, All Rights Reserved.

https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/going-meatless-once-a-week 2/2

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Eat Right
Food, Nutrition and Health Tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

20 Ways to Enjoy More Fruits and Vegetables
Building a healthy plate is easy when you make half your plate fruits and vegetables. It’s also a great
way to add color, flavor and texture plus vitamins, minerals and fiber. All this is packed in fruits
and vegetables that are low in calories and fat. Make 2 cups of fruit and 2 ½ cups of vegetables
your daily goal. Try the following tips to enjoy more fruits and vegetables every day.

1. Variety abounds when using vegetables as pizza topping. Try broccoli, spinach, green peppers,
tomatoes, mushrooms and zucchini.

2. Mix up a breakfast smoothie made with low-fat milk, frozen strawberries and a banana.

3. Make a veggie wrap with roasted vegetables and low-fat cheese rolled in a whole-wheat tortilla.

4. Try crunchy vegetables instead of chips
with your favorite low-fat salad dressing
for dipping.

5. Grill colorful vegetable kabobs packed with
tomatoes, green and red peppers, mushrooms
and onions.

6. Add color to salads with baby carrots,
grape tomatoes, spinach leaves or
mandarin oranges.*

7. Keep cut vegetables handy for mid-afternoon
snacks, side dishes, lunch box additions or
a quick nibble while waiting for dinner.
Ready-to-eat favorites: red, green or yellow
peppers, broccoli or cauliflower florets,
carrots, celery sticks, cucumbers, snap peas or
whole radishes.

36
8. Place colorful fruit where everyone can 17. Stock your freezer with frozen vegetables to
easily grab something for a snack-on-the- steam or stir-fry for a quick side dish.
run. Keep a bowl of fresh, just ripe whole
fruit in the center of your kitchen or 18. Make your main dish a salad of dark, leafy
dining table. greens and other colorful vegetables. Add
chickpeas or edamame (fresh soybeans).
9. Get saucy with fruit. Puree apples, berries, Top with low-fat dressing.*
peaches or pears in a blender for a thick,
sweet sauce on grilled or broiled seafood 19. Fruit on the grill: Make kabobs with
or poultry, or on pancakes, French toast pineapple, peaches and banana. Grill on
or waffles. low heat until fruit is hot and slightly
golden.
10. Stuff an omelet with vegetables. Turn any
omelet into a hearty meal with broccoli, 20. Dip: Whole wheat pita wedges in hummus,
squash, carrots, peppers, tomatoes or baked tortilla chips in salsa, strawberries or
onions with low-fat sharp cheddar cheese. apple slices in low-fat yogurt, or graham
crackers in applesauce.
11. “Sandwich” in fruits and vegetables. Add
pizzazz to sandwiches with sliced pineapple, *See “Color Your Plate with Salad” at
apple, peppers, cucumber and tomato as www.eatright.org/nutritiontipsheets for more tips on
fillings. creating healthy salads

12. Wake up to fruit. Make a habit of adding
fruit to your morning oatmeal, ready-to-eat For a referral to a registered dietitian nutritionist and
cereal, yogurt or toaster waffle. for additional food and nutrition information visit
www.eatright.org.
13. Top a baked potato with beans and salsa or
broccoli and low-fat cheese.

14. Microwave a cup of vegetable soup as a
snack or with a sandwich for lunch.

15. Add grated, shredded or chopped
vegetables such as zucchini, spinach and
carrots to lasagna, meat loaf, mashed
potatoes, pasta sauce and rice dishes. This tip sheet is provided by:

16. Make fruit your dessert: Slice a banana
lengthwise and top with a scoop of low-fat
frozen yogurt. Sprinkle with a tablespoon
of chopped nuts.

Authored by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitian nutritionists.

©2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Reproduction of this tip sheet is permitted for educational purposes. Reproduction for sales purposes is not authorized.

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Accounting

38

39



Function Cost Summary and Breakeven Analysis /
Food & Supply Cost

At the beginning of this project we brainstormed as a group about what an appropriate budget
for this lesson would be. We knew we wanted to do multiple recipes while using some different and
uncommon ingredients so we knew our budget may be on the higher side. What we really needed to
think about first was how many participants we wanted to allow and what an appropriate cost for the
class would be. Because this was our first time doing a class like this we felt that we should limit the
number of participants to no more than 2 of them to 1 of us. This left us with about 16 participants, so
we really aimed to have between 15 to 20 people enroll in the class. We then discussed what would be a
reasonable amount to charge for this class. After a while of group discussion and considering we are
only students we thought that our budget should fit between each participant paying $15 to $20. This
would give us a budget between $225 and $400 depending on the recipes we chose. Because we are
students and this class was a part of our requirements we did not have to factor in any labor costs. We
were not being paid to be there or for providing the class.

Once we decided which recipes were going to be used, the recipes needed to be quantified. We
decided that we would make 3 times each recipe. One for the instructor of the lesson and 2 for the
participants. This gave each recipe a portion factor of 3, but serving sizes varied per recipe. In total, six
different recipes were planning on being prepared and these each needed to be costed. Each recipe was
costed based on the edible portion and a total food cost was found. The total food cost was determined
by using the edible portion cost and the portion factor, totaling the cost of each ingredient needed to
triple each recipe. For the costing process, we used Peapod online, which is an online grocery shopping
services provided by Stop and Shop. After a total food cost was found for each recipe a cost per recipe
and per serving was also determined. Once each recipe was costed they were added together. The total
cost of edible portions for this recipe and misc. items, such as to-go containers, was $237.26. At this
time, we had 16 participants enrolled in the class, which we charged $15 for. After taking the grand total

40
($237.26) was divided by our 16 participants and the cost per participant to cover food costs was
$13.96, so we were under budget for edible portions.

While our edible food costs were covered by participants’ payments we did not breakeven when
it came to the actual purchasing cost for the class. The total cost after grocery shopping for the
ingredients needed was $302.25. It is expected that this cost would be higher than the costed price
because you cannot buy ingredients in the exact edible portion amount, therefore, you need to round
ingredient needs up based on the quantity available for purchasing. Costs of ingredients may have also
varied because of where the grocery shopping took place. The online costing may not have the exact
same costs as the prices in the store. Peapod is provided by Stop and Shop while we did our actual
shopping at Big Y. This would cause inaccuracies in our costing.

If this was an actual business that provided cooking class, not breaking even on one lesson
would not be as big of a loss. The leftover ingredients would be repurposed or stored and saved for later
uses. However, because this was only a singular class those losses cannot be made up. Based on the
post-evaluations we gave participants they felt that our class was appropriately priced or that they
would have paid more for the class. With this information, we can probably increase the cost of a similar
class in the future so we will be more likely to at least break even.

Labor Cost Summary
For this project, the staff of the class was not paid. However, if this was a real business you
would have to figure payment of staff into the cost of the class. This was one of the reasons we were
able to make our class only $15; we did not have to account for any additional labor costs, only the cost
of the food. If we were paying staff the class would be more costly. There was 8 staff members and each
would have to be paid for their prep time as well as the time in the actual class. On the day of the class
each staff person would need to be paid from 1pm, when we arrived, until 8 pm, when we lost.
Assuming our staff only got paid minimum wage ($10.10/hr) each staff member would be paid for
$70.70 for the class. When would then have to multiply this number by 8 to figure our total labor costs.
Total labor costs would equal $565.60 for the preparation and cooking class. This value is even higher
than the costs of the total ingredients. This shows that the highest costs that are usually covered by the
price of a cooking class is for the staff. To minimize these costs less staff would have to be present, or
less time would need to be taken to prepare and run the class.

Energy Expenditure Summary
There are some additional costs that should be considered when thinking about the total cost of running
a cooking class like this. Costs such as electricity and kitchen maintained need to be factored in when
calculating overall costs. Kitchens rely heavily on electronic or gas equipment that all has a cost of usage.
This can get rather pricey is kitchens are open for a long period of time; in the terms on this class you
would have to factor in the time of the actual costs and the time of preparation in the kitchen. Lighting
and air conditioning may seem like small costs but should be analyzed when trying to determine total
costs. Water is also used frequently both in the cooking and cleaning of cooking. In this class, the cost of
water used may be minimal, but in larger kitchens may be a large bill. In terms of cleaning and
sanitation, not only is a large volume of water required but you would also have to consider the cost of
dish soap, sanitizing solutions, sponges, etc. when calculating total costs. In this project, these costs
were not included in the total cost and not factored into participant costs; however, in a real business
these would be necessary to consider.

41
Employee Utilization Summary

Employee Utilization
Healthy Cooking Laboratory
Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/15/18 2 2
3/22/18 3 1.5
3/22/18 2 4
3/23/18 2 0.5
3/28/18 4 1
3/21/18 4 1.5
3/27/18 1 1
3/20/18 1 2
Michelle Sarta
Various 1 5
(Manager)
3/15/18 2 0.5
4/9/18 5 6
4/15/18 2 5






Total 30.5

42
Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/20/18 1 2
4/9/18 5 6
2/24/18 2 1
2/28/18 2 1
3/19/18 2 2
3/20/18 2 2
3/21/18 2 2
3/25/18 2 2
Claudia Mejia (Menu
3/27/18 2 1
Coordinator)
3/28/18 2 1
3/31/18 2 1
4/2/18 2 1
4/15/18 2 2
3/28/18 4 3
Various 1 1



Total 28.5

Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/20/18 1 2
3/27/18 1 1
4/9/18 5 6
3/12/18 2 0.5
Jennifer Ouellette 3/15/18 2 2
(Marketing, Production, 3/21/18 4 1
and Evaluation 3/22/18 4 2
Supervisor) 3/23/18 2 0.75
3/23/18 2 1
3/28/18 2 1
4/7/18 2 1
4/10/18 2 0.5
4/11/18 2 0.5

43
4/15/18 2 1
Various 1 3



Total 23.75

Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/20/18 1 2
3/27/18 1 1
4/9/18 5 6
3/22/18 2 3
4/7/18 2 2
4/8/18 2 3
4/10/18 2 1
4/15/18 2 1
Will Kelsey (Curriculum
Various 1 1
Coordinator)









Total 20.5

Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/20/18 1 2
Tyler Leeman 3/27/18 1 1
(Curriculum 4/9/18 5 6
Coordinator) 3/31/18 2 0.5
4/6/18 2 3
4/7/18 2 5

44
4/7/18 2 1
4/8/18 4 2
4/15/18 2 0.5
Various 1 1








Total 22.5

Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/27/18 1 1
4/9/18 5 6
4/8/18 2 3
4/5/18 2 3
Various 1 1



Melina Conrad

(Purchasing Agent)









Total 14.5

Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)

45
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/20/18 1 2
3/27/18 1 1
4/9/18 5 6
3/29/18 2 3
4/5/18 2 5
Various 1 1

Ashton Christopher
(Sanitation and
Program Coordinator)








Total 18.5

Group Member Date Code Time (hrs)
1/16/18 1 0.5
3/20/18 1 2
3/27/18 1 1
4/9/18 5 6
3/28/18 2 5
4/5/18 2 1
4/15/18 2 1.5
Carlee Putnam
Various 1 1
(Accountant)






46




Total 18




















47
Clean-up Schedule and Assignment

HACCP
Endpoint Cooking/Storing Temperature Record
FDA
Minimum/
Actual Maximum Corrective
Date Food Item Time Taken
Temperature Required Action

Temperature
[Egg]

4/9/2018 Baked Veggie 168 ºF 7:15PM 160ºF None
Balls in Sweet
Tomato Sauce
Black bean
4/9/2018 139 ºF 6:14 PM 135ºF None
burger
General tso’s
4/9/2018 135 ºF 5:49 PM 135ºF None
Tofu
[Egg]
4/9/2018 165ºF 6:01 PM 160ºF None
Vegan Jackfruit
Crab Cakes
Roasted garlic
4/9/2018 139 ºF 5:30 PM 135ºF None
aioli
[Egg]

Cinnamon
Zucchini
4/9/2018 167 ºF 6:15 PM 160ºF None
Walnut Cake
with Cream
Cheese
Frosting


48
Participation Evaluation Tool

Healthy Cooking Class Evaluation
Thank you for cooking with us today. We had a great time working with
you to create some new entrees. Please take a few moments to tell us what
you thought about our class. We’re future health professionals and we
appreciate your feedback as we move forward in our careers and educate
others.
Did you enjoy your experiences in class?

Was the class format appropriate and helpful in learning?

Were the recipes interesting? Would you make them again at home?

What did you like best about the class?

What would you change about the class?

Where did you learn about this class?

Was the cost appropriate for the lesson?

Would you be interested in doing another class? If so, what topics would
you like to learn about?

Thank you for cooking with us!!!
We hope we’ve inspired your inner chef J

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Participants Evaluations Summary

Did you enjoy your experience in class?
Yes No Additional Comments
12 0 Please keep doing these; Very much; Fun
group; Great class; A bit rushed
Was the class format appropriate and helpful in learning?
Yes No Additional Comments
12 0 Enjoyed cooking and making new trends;
Very much; I liked the group set up
Were the recipes interesting? Would you make them again?
Yes No Additional Comments
12 0 3 of them for sure; I will use the recipes at
home; they were very interesting; I would
make a few again; Not sure about the
jackfruit - It’s fun trying new things, but it’s
probably more sustainable to use more local
produce; Great recipes; Plan to make some
this week; Definitely, especially the Gen Tso
Tofu & Black Bean burgers; Loved the tofu
recipe
What did you like best about the class?
Learning new cooking techniques; Format; Variety of menu choices, opportunity to try new
recipes, learning about tofu and jackfruit; I liked it being hands-on; I learned a lot about
prepping and how to put the recipes together, I learned how to zest a lemon and use parsley;
I liked how we got to cook and then try all of the recipes; That it exists; Learning how to make
vegetarian main dishes/appetizers; Learning how to make tofu crispy; Hands-on teaching and
ability to taste everything. I learned that I like tofu; Cooking with other people; The jackfruit
crab cakes
What would you change about the class?
Nothing; Better quality tools and more tools; Have available some equipment, i.e. better
blender, can openers, etc.; Nothing; Perhaps rotate the groups through the recipes; Nothing;
Less frying maybe. I feel like there are healthier ways to prepare food; Not much; I don’t
think anything; This was the 1st class and a learning experience for all. It went a bit long;
Nothing; Have items ready ahead of time to cut time off the class; I wanted to thank you and
your coworkers for the class again...I enjoyed it!; It would be great to have recipes with lower
salt and sugar content. I always find it challenging to find recipes that are tasty without those
items. So, finding spices that could sub in for salt and sugar. The other item, is I think that
everyone should wear gloves during the event. I know that we all washed our hands, but I
think that gloves would be better when preparing food for the entire group to share.
Where did you learn about this class?
Daily digest (x3); Melina (x3); Email; From a friend; CAHNR email; Ellen’s email
Was the cost appropriate for the lesson?

50
Yes No Additional Comments
12 0 I am a student and appreciate that it wasn’t
more; Fine, I would have paid more
Would you be interested in doing another class?
If so, what topics would you like to learn about?
Yes No Additional Comments (Topics)
12 0 Knife skills; More vegetarian; More cooking
classes; More healthy yummy meals; How to
cook healthy vegetarian. These were all
heavy on the oils; I would like to learn more
about cultural foods; Topics such as breads,
pastas, desserts; Asian cooking (x2); Anything
to do with cooking is good for me;
Guacamole, mangos, and other South
American fruits and veggies; More classes on
healthy cooking. Maybe salads, make your
own salad dressings.



























51
Self-Assessment Tool for Group Members

GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form
Name:

Role:

Did group members contribute equally to the project?

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?

Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?

Would you make any changes?

Additional comments:

52
Individual Self Assessments
*Note: Group members were given the option to send individual evaluations directly to Ellen
Shanley in order to protect the privacy of their answers. This option will be indicated where
utilized.

Michelle
GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form
Name: Michelle Sarta
Role: Manager

Did group members contribute equally to the project?
Everybody contributed to the project with their required roles / expectations. There were some
roles that required more work and labor hours than others.

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?
Yes, I did my best to fulfill the managerial role within this group. I gave guidance and reminders
along the way. I also did my best to make sure that everybody was on the same page so that all
components of the project were in synch.

Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?
Yes, everybody fulfilled their assigned roles.

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?
Some of the roles required more time than others. For example, the Nutribase component was
very time-intensive, as well as the accounting.

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?
Nothing was majorly challenging. There were several detail adjustments (minor things), and
some cases where work was wasted on recipes that ended up being removed from the finalized
menu. In the future, I would recommend students to test their recipes well ahead of time and
before they begin calculating cost or entering data into Nutribase.

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?
The biggest group challenge was determining a menu. This wasn’t necessarily challenging, but
we had to brainstorm a lot of ideas before coming to an agreement. Other challenges were
handled amongst the roles that they involved. The rest of the group was informed of changes
that were made.

Would you make any changes? Mentioned above.

Additional comments:

53
Claudia
GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form
Name: Claudia Mejia
Role: Menu Coordinator

Did group members contribute equally to the project?
I think so, but some roles I think required more work than others, and sometimes the
communications got stale so many decisions were left to the manager

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?
I definitely did

Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?
To the best of my knowledge, yes, maybe not in a timely manner, but everything got completed

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?
I don’t think so. The manager has to oversee everything all the time and be on top of people to
complete their tasks so maybe this job could have been divided for two people. The menu
coordinator has to be constantly updating recipes and doing nutrient analysis and luckily I have
the luxury to have Nutribase on my laptop but it can get pretty daunting I guess if someone has
to go to Jones very often to update recipes.

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?
No, overall, our group worked very smoothly

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?
n/a

Would you make any changes?
Some roles can be shared by two people

Additional comments:
Highly recommend students testing recipes before doing any nutrient analysis and once they
have decided on the final recipes, then input this into Nutribase so they can save themselves
from extra work


Jenn
*Evaluation sent directly to professor


54
Will
GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form
Name: Will Kelsey
Role: Curriculum Coordinator

Did group members contribute equally to the project?
Yes

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?
Yes

Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?
Yes

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?
Yes

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?
It took us a little bit of time to decide on what recipes to use for the demo.

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?
We all contributed 4 recipes to a folder and met up after class to discuss which ones to include.
Everyone was involved.

Would you make any changes?
I think more direction on what recipes to include would be helpful.

Additional comments:
None

Tyler
GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form
Name: Tyler Leeman
Role: Curriculum Coordinator

Did group members contribute equally to the project?
Yes, I felt all group members contributed equally and completed all of their required duties
throughout the duration of the project.

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?
Yes, I feel I worked well with Will and all of the other group members in order to complete all of
my assigned tasks/roles and contribute to a successful cooking class.

55

Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?
Yes, I don’t feel anyone slacked on completing any of their assigned tasks/duties.

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?
Yes, I feel everyone had an equal amount of work to complete. In preparation for and during
the cooking class, I feel everyone helped each other in any way possible so everyone was
successful.

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?
Testing recipes was very important in the planning phase because recipes that look good on
paper don’t always turn into recipes ideal for a cooking class. During the cooking lesson each
group also had a lack of ideal kitchen equipment for their participants

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?
In any situation where something wasn’t going perfectly I feel we would each step in to help
each other in any way possible. We all wanted this cooking class to be successful and I feel it
really showed in our execution of the class. Each member in charge of a recipe made it at home
in order to make sure it was a good recipe for our class. During the lesson we shared
ingredients and equipment with each other. Ashton and Melina also did a great job washing
dishes & equipment and kept us supplied with what we needed.

Would you make any changes?
The only thing I would change is the initial project description form. A lot of the roles had forms
or responsibilities that were not given any details so you weren’t quite sure what you needed to
have done. The only other change I would make would choose recipes that come together to
make a meal. We chose 6 different recipes, but organizing it as appetizers, entrée, and dessert
may improve future cooking classes.

Additional comments:

Melina
GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form
Name: Melina Conrad
Role: Purchasing Agent

Did group members contribute equally to the project?
Yes, we all contributed equally.

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?
I completed the grocery shopping and finalizing the grocery list. Claudia has Nutribase so she
put all the recipes into Nutribase and quantified them.

56
Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?
Yes, they all did.

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?
The roles were evenly divided with tasks so not one person was too overwhelmed.

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?
Challenges were in the beginning of picking which recipes we were going to do.

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?
We all decided on our back up recipes. Everyone was involved in the solution.

Would you make any changes?
I would possibly have one part of this due earlier so then we are not all so stressed out at the
end of the semester.

Additional comments:

Ashton
GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form
Name: Ashton Christopher
Role: Sanitation and Program Coordinator

Did group members contribute equally to the project?
Yes

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?
Yes

Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?
Yes

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?
Yes

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?
No

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?
No changes made

Would you make any changes?
No

57

Additional comments:

Carlee
GPAH 5095 Group Project – Individual Assessment Form

Name: Carlee Putnam
Role: Accountant

Did group members contribute equally to the project?
Yes- I thought that everyone did a good job of making sure their own roles were taken care of. I
think that some roles had more work than others; but overall, everyone actively contributed.

Did you complete the tasks you were assigned in your role?
Yes- I completed my necessary tasks.

Did the other group members complete their assigned tasks?
Yes- I thought everyone did a great job getting their own tasks completed when necessary.

Were roles evenly divided with tasks?
I thought some roles had more work than others, or more time consuming and challenging
tasks.

Were there any challenges that the group needed to address?
I thought agreeing on a menu and format for the class was a challenge. But after some time
discussing we were able to agree.

How were these challenges handled by the group? Was everyone involved in the solution?
Everyone was able to give their opinions and voice what they wanted out of the class. After a
while I think we all pretty much got on the same page.

Would you make any changes?
Nope! I really enjoyed this assignment!

Additional comments:




58
Group Project Evaluation Tool

GPAH 5095 Group Project Evaluation Form
Name:

Role in project:

Please take a few minutes and evaluate the project so we can make improvements in the
future.

Did project meet deadlines?

Did project meet objects?

Was the project was successful in teaching new cooking techniques and nutrition information to participants?

Did participants find the class helpful?

What went well with the class?

Is there anything you would change if you did another similar lesson?

Was there anything unexpected that came up in planning or administering the lesson? How did the group handle it?

Please answer the following questions based on your experiences in creating the lesson:

Was this project helpful in your understanding how to create, prepare, administer, and evaluate a lesson?

Were there any parts of the project that requirements were unclear or additional information would have been helpful?

Are there any parts of the project you would recommend changing for future classes?

Additional comments:

59

Summary of Group Project Evaluations
Please rate the following questions on a scale of 1-10, with 1 being disagree and 10 being
agree. If further comments are required, please record comments below the question.
Group members contributed to the project equally
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 3 4
Additional Comments
Each group member had their own role, and everybody fulfilled their responsibilities. In some
cases, the assigned roles were distributed differently than suggested, which was mainly for
convenience (e.g., one group member had Nutribase on their computer so took those roles in
exchange for others). This is a wonderful group of peers, and everybody was a pleasure to
work with. Just by nature, some group members worked more efficiently / timely than
others. In addition, some group members showed more of an interest in the project as
whole, rather than focusing on their one part. However, each group member contributed to
this project, and there were no issues with participation. I think that everybody was excited
to put on this class as a team. This was a big project to pull off, and it really made us work
together.
Group members were available and responsive during development and prep work:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 3 1 3
Additional Comments
Some of the group members contributed more to decision-making and planning than others,
however, each group member gave their opinion at some point, and everybody had the
opportunity to provide input. Recipe suggestions were collected from all group members so
that the menu would not be dictated by any one group member. From there, the menu was
modified as needed (after testing recipes), but still included recipes from several group
members. Since we see each other so often during class time, responsiveness was not an
issue.
Project met deadlines, parts of project were submitted on time:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
8
Project met guidelines:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
8
Additional Comments
Guidelines were met thus far. There were several points where modifications were
necessary, but this is a natural process for a group project such as this. As the manager, I had
to reach out to group members with feedback and requested modifications. I found that
every group member was receptive and timely with these modifications.
Project was successful in teaching new cooking techniques to participants:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

60
1 2 5
Additional Comments
With the participants that we had, it seemed as though all of them were thrilled during the
cooking class. Perhaps we could have chosen slightly more challenging recipes in some
instances, but it seems that all of the participants learned a lot from the class.

Short answers about how the class went:
Did participants find the class helpful?
● Yes
● Participants found the class helpful and enjoyed learning how to cook without using meat.
Many asked if we were doing another one
● I think that the participants enjoyed learning new recipes and some new ways to cook with
vegetarian proteins
● Yes, my group was very interactive and appreciated learning something new
● Yes, everyone seemed very excited to be there and to learn new things
● I felt our class went very well. All the recipes came out perfectly and were timed out
well between groups. Everyone was willing to help each other and it allowed the
class to flow very seamlessly. Yes, a majority of the participants took some handouts
or recipes with them to give them ideas for meals to prepare at home.
● Yes, a lot of positive comments from participants
● Yes, they seemed to be thrilled about the class. We received mostly positive feedback,
both during the class verbally, as well as in written form on the evaluations.
What went well with the class?
● Introduction and clean up went well, the class went well also
● Everyone worked well as a team and it was good having a floater, people to help out as
needed.
● I think that the participants really enjoyed all the recipes and seemed to really like how all the
food came out
● Everything! All of us students worked well together sharing equipment and preparing ahead
of time. The participants followed our instruction well and were active in asking questions,
ect.
● Participants enjoyed the experience and liked the food we prepared, I think everyone learned
something new in the class
● The recipes were completed all around the same time. The participants were able to
learn about the health benefits of the fruits and vegetables they were working with. I
feel the participants were more comfortable cooking with rare items like the jack fruit
once they saw an example of a simple and delicious recipe.
● Good timing of all the recipes, have all necessary items, people where engaged, and
very good organization in general
● The recipes we chose were all delicious! I thought that the food came out great. This
was very important, as it hopefully convinced our participants to try to eat more
plant-based foods at home.
Is there anything you would change if you did another similar lesson?

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● Not that I can think of
● I would maybe just change how people signed up, some weren’t able to join because it had
filled up and then some didn’t show up
● Maybe change the age of participants to be younger so you could teach more cooking skills
● The only change that might be beneficial is having even groups. My group filled up and I saw
another with only 1 person. Not anything pertinent, but would look better.
● Maybe prep some of the ingredients in advance to help things move a little quicker on the
longer recipes.
● Ensure adequate equipment prior to the class – measuring cups, spoons, etc.
● Being able to review the kitchen set up and talking points ahead of time, other than the
talking points we came up with individually
● Overbooking the class to help fill the empty spots
● I would just ensure that there are enough of the proper equipment for the
participants to use. It makes the meals a little more difficult when they are trying to
chop vegetables with an incorrect knife or measure ingredients using measures much
smaller than they need.
● Yes, some cooking equipment was limited so we have to wait for other to use it.
● I would put a lot more thought into the timing of recipes. We had one time-
consuming recipe (the veggie balls) which took longer than the rest of the recipes. I
think that we could have chosen recipes similar to the veggie balls, which require
more steps and have more hands-on cooking skills implemented. Still, all of the other
recipes were very well-liked and came out terrific! Participants still had a chance to
taste the veggie balls, just a bit later than the rest of the recipes.
Was there anything unexpected that came up in planning or administering the lesson?
How did the group handle it?
● There were no unexpected events, we planned accordingly
● We had to change our recipe selection once we made the recipes beforehand. We handled it
by just swapping it out for another recipe.
● I don’t think so. After we had a set up plan and decided on the format of the lesson, I think it
went smoothly from there
● Only unexpected issues I encountered were during the lesson and it was equipment related.
The food processors are not very user friendly, but we figured it out. There was a lack of can
openers and measuring tools(tbsp, ect). We all applied our preschool minds and shared, but
more would have made things go smoother.
● My group had an issue with one of the recipes not coming out right, we asked for help and
were able to work through it
● Our recipe took longer than expected to complete than expected, we just went with it but I
tried to keep participants engaged during that time
● We had multiple people not show up, which we could not control
● Some surprises I felt we encountered were a lack of equipment for all of us to be
preparing meals with the participants at the same time. Ashton and Melina did a
great job at cleaning the dishes and having equipment available for us when we
needed it. While planning the lesson we did have to change our recipes so preparing
the recipes ahead of time is extremely important in order to see if they are a viable
option.

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● Nothing unexpected
● During planning, there seemed to be some confusion about how the recipes would be
duplicated during the lesson. The lesson called for each recipe to be made three
times, as the group leader would make the recipe along with their participants making
the recipe with them. This caused some confusion in the planning process, however,
this was fixed before production day. On production day, there was still some
confusion about this aspect while setting up stations, but it was cleared up well
before participants arrived. I should have been a lot clearer to begin with about this,
and that would have avoided the confusion. In addition, the tofu dish wound up
taking less time than expected. To combat this, we ended up moving the watermelon
salad dish to this group so that they had more to work on. I would suggest future
classes to also have a “flexible” recipe that can be distributed to whichever group
finishes first.
Please answer the following questions based on your experiences in creating the lesson:
Was this project helpful in your understanding how to create, prepare, administer, and
evaluate a lesson?
● Yes
● This was helpful in understanding how to manage a large project with a group of people
● I think that it was very beneficial to plan and administer this type of lesson. It taught me how
much planning and time goes into creating a successful lesson. There was a lot that I didn’t
realize went into a cooking class behind the scenes.
● I have a lot of experience creating lesson plans from past projects and jobs, but I feel like it is
a good experience to further understand what is required to host a lesson like this.
● Yes, it is always interesting to see all of the planning that goes on behind the scene to have a
successful class. Our group worked well anticipating the project and how it would go and
didn’t have many surprises that caught us off guard.
● Yes, I feel it is a great experience for you to learn about all of the moving parts that go
into creating a successful lesson. We all worked together at each phase of the project
and were willing to help each other in any way we could.
● Yes, it was very involved and there were many details that needed to be taken care
of. A lot of constant coordination among all the group members.
● Yes, this was very helpful! I especially loved being the manager because it allowed me
to contribute to each part of the project, rather than focusing on one aspect of it.
Were there any parts of the project that requirements were unclear or additional
information would have been helpful?
● I feel like the roles could have been more detailed
● Nothing was unclear
● Nope
● The discussion on the dining room and nutrient analysis for the curriculum coordinator did
not have any instructions and were very unclear. We included what we thought was
appropriate, but really had no idea.
● A little more explanation under some of the job duties might have been helpful
● Also, for future groups – maybe some guidelines as far as acceptable types of topics or
themes. I know we went back and forth a couple of times before we had an idea that we got
approval for.

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● The only aspect I would have liked more information on is the details I should cover in
the dining hall discussion and the nutrient analysis discussion. We were just told to
complete the forms with no focal points or guidelines.
● I think a sample of how the final project should look like would have been helpful, but
I understand that this is the first time this is done.
● This cooking class was less of a meal, and more of a collaboration of several meals.
Therefore, nutrient analysis on the “meal” didn’t make much sense to consider /
report on, since these foods would likely not be eaten together as a meal. I think it
will be helpful next year when the students will have an example report to look at.
Are there any parts of the project you would recommend changing for future classes?
● Announcement of additional safety criteria – like rubber sole shoes
● Have a portion of this due earlier in the semester so then it isn’t so much of a stressor
towards the end of the semester
● No
● I don’t think the handouts and at home materials are necessary. One sheet with quick
pointers would probably be enough. We printed out copies for everyone and had a good
amount left. I think that is the nature of lessons in general. People come to learn there and
don’t want any “homework.” Perhaps providing them with an email if they have further
questions or would like further info we can send it to them.
● Possibly collecting payment ahead of time
● Possibly having participants sign up for recipes ahead of time
● Maybe have everyone make a meal instead of everyone making parts of a meal
● I would only add a little more details to the responsibilities of the specific positions.
Each position has a required list of forms they must create but no guidelines on what
is should look like or what information should be included. Besides that I felt all
aspects of our project went well overall.
● Maybe not having the break in between the assignment of the project and the actual
meal presentation. I think is helpful to just work on this as soon as it is assigned. The
way is set up now, we have food service rotation, then community, then go back to
food service. I think it will be better to just do maybe food service at the beginning
and community at the end.
● Tell them to add $5 to whatever cost they come up with. Our costing covered the
ingredients used, but did not account for leftover ingredients. Had we added $5 to
each participant, we likely would have covered the whole cost. Participants were
happy that the price was $15 and felt it was reasonable. Some even noted that they
would happily pay more. Also maybe slightly overbook the class with the expectation
that one or two may not show up. I would also have a system in place to keep the
group evaluation surveys and self-assessment surveys anonymous. Perhaps an online
survey with a link that can be distributed to group members? We had trouble keeping
these evaluations anonymous.
Additional Comments
• Overall I was very happy with our final product. We all kept constant communication when
choosing recipes and making sure we thought of everything before we would teach the class.
We also prepared our recipe at home prior to the lesson, which made teaching it to others go

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much smoother. Everyone was willing to help each other and I feel it really showed on the
day of our lesson. Lastly, I believe all the participants had a great time preparing and trying
the different recipes and most of them said they wanted to come to another cooking class
which was great to hear.
• I appreciate the role of the manager which I think is crucial for the success of the entire meal.
For the future, I think two people should be responsible for this part of the job.
• For future classes, I would definitely recommend that they try to make their recipes at home
before production day. We had a couple of recipes that we had high hopes for (a cauliflower
cream sauce and sweet potato brownies) that were tested at home and wound up being sub-
par. Since we tested these in advance, we were able to modify the menu to include different
recipes. For other recipes (jackfruit crab cakes and veggie balls), modifications were made to
make them even better, e.g. sodium was reduced in the crab cakes and the veggie balls were
browned before baking. I would recommend future classes to make their recipes well in
advance so that they know with certainty they want to use these recipes. This will avoid
having to modify too much, and will avoid wasted time. By the time we tested out our recipes
at home, they had already been put into Nutribase and costed out. We could have avoided
these extra steps by testing them before these steps were taken.



Additional Discussions
Marketing, Production, and Evaluation Supervisor
Jennifer Ouellette
In my role, I worked with the group to help select a theme and pick out recipes that
supported our theme. Plant based cooking was our selected topic and multiple recipes were
discussed with the group. Group members tried the recipes ahead of time to ensure that they
were good. I made a brownie recipe that did not turn out great. We ended up cutting that
recipe from our class and used the zucchini cake instead. We also had a couple of meetings to
discuss the amount of preparation and time required for each recipe. We discussed how hard it
was to find some of the ingredients. We used that information to decide if recipes were
feasible for production in our allotted time for the class. Michelle created the production sheet
based on this information.
After the topic was accepted, I created a flier that was going to be used to advertise our
cooking class. Michelle reviewed and made some edits before it was sent off to be posted
online. Director Shanley helped us promote the class by posting it on the Daily Digest. She also
sent it out in an email to Uconn. I hung up fliers for the class in the library, Jones building,
Wilbur Cross building, Koons and the Student Union. All group members also helped spread the
word about the class. Participants that wished to sign up for the class emailed me and I added
them to the guest list. I answered all questions about the class that prospective participants
had. The biggest question was how long the class was going to be. We should have added that
to the flier. I sent one email out on Friday to all participants reminding them that they were
signed up for the class, reminding them about the cost and payment options, and letting them
know the room number of the foods lab. We had one participant that requested being a group
that did not have dairy products. We pre-assigned her to one of those recipes; however, she

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did not make it to the class. After the class filled on Friday afternoon, I continued getting emails
about the class into the weekend. Another 5 people were interested in joining the class if it had
not been full.
Based on the class evaluations, we had a few participants that saw the post on the Daily
Digest, a few that saw the email post, and a few that enrolled based on word of mouth. No one
commented that they saw the fliers posted in the buildings on campus. We had 5 people not
show up to the class. One person had replied that she wanted to attend the class plus 3
people. She meant to sign up for 3 people all together, so that was an extra person that we had
originally counted in the class. One participant had to work late and emailed me that she was
not going to make it to the class. One participant could not make it last minute because her
daughter was in labor. Another participant could not make it because of a family emergency,
this was a group of 2. All of the participants that could not make it emailed me and apologized
for not making it. They all asked if there were going to be other classes available in the future.
I went to a brief training on becoming the cashier for our cooking class. Bambi walked
me through some of the key points. I also watched the online presentation about accepting
payments on campus. I filled out a spreadsheet with guests and how they paid. Most
participants paid in cash, so I issued them a receipt. A few people paid in check. One person
forgot their checkbook and made arrangements with Director Shanley. We should have
collected $255 in total; however, seen as we were missing 5 people we only collected $180.
Luckily we did not need to make change for anyone. Everyone paid in the exact amount.
I created evaluation forms to evaluate the participants’ experience. One of my
questions was answered incorrectly by participants about half the time. We’ll have to watch
wording on future evaluations. Otherwise, we received good data from our evaluation.
Participants in general enjoyed the class and would like to see additional classes. They liked the
format and being exposed to new recipes. They also really liked being able to try all the
different recipes. Talking with participants during and after the class, they really enjoyed
themselves and the food. They had fun working together and socializing while they were
creating their dishes. Summary typed up and sent to project leader for additional review.
I also created evaluation forms to evaluate how the project went from the group
perspective and individual perspective. We received good feedback from all group members.
The questions seem to be adequate for what we needed. Everyone found this project to be
helpful in learning about preparing, issuing, and evaluating a cooking class. Everyone had fun
and thought that participants learned a lot from the class as well. The recipes all came out
good and participants enjoyed them. Some recipes took longer than expected in our planning
phase. Some comments were made on possibly prepping more items ahead of time. Most of
the group felt that we worked well together keeping the class organized and running smoothly,
as well as a coordinated effort doing clean up as we went. We were short on some equipment,
such as measuring cups and measuring spoons. We had some cancellations, so maybe
overbooking the class in the future might ensure we have adequate participants to help cover
the cost of the class. Pre-signups for the specific recipes that participants want to cook might
be helpful in the future as well to ensure groups are equally balanced. There are comments
about changing the format of the class so everyone gets to make more recipes during the class.
Full summary typed up and sent to project leader for additional review.

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I enjoyed this project. I learned a lot about planning and executing a lesson. I also
learned a lot about evaluating the lesson. I can see how this would be a helpful tool in the
future for dietetic students. I love teaching and nutrition. This is definitely something that I
might do in the future. It was an enjoyable experience for the team creating and running it, as
well as for the participants. It was such a good feeling to be there teaching and answering
questions. It was also rewarding to see everyone having such a good time together and
enjoying all of the recipes we provided. That made all the work worth it. Great project and I
would recommend it to future classes.

Group Discussion of Project
After production day, we, as a group, met to discuss how we felt it went. Here are the results:

What went well?
People showed up, the food came out good. None of the recipes were ruined, nothing
was burned, and the timing of everything was coordinated. Ashton and Melina did a great job
cleaning as we went so that we didn’t have a lot of dishes at the end. It helped a lot that many
of the participants were savvy in the kitchen already.

What didn’t go well?
For next year’s class, we would recommend having safety information ahead of time. It
would be helpful to advise participants to wear shoes with rubber soles, as many participants
showed up in ill-equipped footwear. In addition, some people didn’t show up at all, meaning
that we didn’t collect our expected profits. When cooking the recipes, one of the groups ended
faster than the others. This was combated by having them make an additional recipe.

How can this cooking class be improved?
The kitchen requires more cooking equipment to ensure that we have an adequate
supply of cooking utensils for each group. Mainly, we were short on measuring materials
(tablespoon and cup measures), as well as cutting boards and can openers. The layout could
have been improved as this was a tight working space for this type of class. Having the
undergraduates’ and graduates’ production day so close together made for a very full fridge,
and we ran out of room in the fridge. Next year, we would recommend spreading these two
groups out to two different weeks. We also suggest that next years’ group is advised to have
their recipes tested well ahead of time so that they can finalize their menu as a first priority. In
hindsight, we would have had participants sign up for their preferred group ahead of time in
order to save time during the class. Finally, we would like to have known their level of
experience ahead of time to help them in making decisions on which group to choose (beginner
vs. more advanced recipes). Important: having a dedicated photographer would have been
extremely helpful and useful for our electronic portfolios. We ended up without any photos!

How could we have reduced the time spent in various “jobs”?
We could have pre-prepped some of the items, such as shredding the zucchini for the
zucchini cake ahead of time (this ended up taking a lot of time), or pre-measuring ingredients.

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How could the manager have delegated more?
Group members felt that they were happy with the amount of management. They
appreciated the reminders and guidelines for each project requirement. It was suggested that
the manager could have “ruled with a firmer hand”. That is, group members would have liked
to have had hard-set deadlines and demands, rather than being asked for items ‘as soon as
possible’.

Would we have chosen a different menu / different menu items?
A good idea would be to do a meal (an entrée, two sides, dessert), rather than multiple
different food items. It seemed like everybody wanted to learn how to cook everything, not just
one item.








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