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ASIA S MRONGA

201000336

EEB 516 POWER ELECTRONICS ASSIGNMENT II
UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA FACULTY OF
ENGINEERING (BENGE)

 Use within any larger electronic system where engineering need exists for deriving an AC source from a DC source. Popular in “Vector controlled” induction motor drives Third harmonic It adds a third-order Lower than Highest maximum injection (THIPWM) harmonic content SPWM output voltage to a sinusoidal reference signal thereby increasing the utilization rate of the DC bus voltage . and power tools. SINE PWM B. but derived from distortion SPWM the “space-phasor” compared to representation of 3-phase SPWM quantities. or set of batteries. televisions. Types of PWM techniques.  Use in power generation systems such as electric utility companies or solar generating systems to convert DC power to AC power. A. kitchen appliances. to the device to produce AC power to run various electrical items such as lights. SPACE VECTOR PWM C. THIRD HARMONIC INJECTION PMW technique Method of operation THD Maximum output voltage Sine wave Triangular wave as a Higher harmonic Higher magnitude of PWM(SPWM) carrier and sinusoidal as a distortion the output voltage controller compared to SVPWM Space vector Similar to regular Less harmonic Higher than the PWM(SVPWM) sampling. car batteries.INVERTERS Q1. Applications of Inverters include:  Portable consumer devices that allow the user to connect a battery.

4 0. Square wave PMW with 1200 conduction Phase Voltages 400 200 0 -200 -400 200 0 -200 200 0 -200 0.45 0.25 0.Q2.35 0. 3 PHASE INVERTER Circuit on Mat lab Simulation Results: i.5 .3 0.

045 0.3 0.Line voltages LINE-TO-LINE VOLTAGES 500 Vab 0 -500 500 Vac 0 -500 500 Vbc 0 -500 0.03 0.005 0.04 0.45 0.015 0.035 0. Square wave PWM with 1800 conduction Phase Voltages .025 0.25 0.5 Line Currents SQUARE WAVE: LINE CURRENTS 120 DEGREES 100 80 60 40 20 0 -20 -40 -60 -80 -100 0 0.02 0.01 0.05 ii.35 0.4 0.

3 0.3 0.25 0.45 0.5 Line voltages SQUARE WAVE:PHASE VOLTAGES-180 DEGREES 500 0 -500 500 0 -500 500 0 -500 0.25 0.5 Line Currents LINE CURRENTS 100 80 60 40 20 0 -20 -40 -60 -80 -100 0.3 0.45 0.35 0.4 0.4 0.25 0. PHASE VOLTAGES 200 Van 0 -200 200 Vbn 0 -200 200 Vcn 0 -200 0.35 0.4 0.35 0.45 .

Sinusoidal PWM with fs = 1KHz Phase voltages Line voltages .SINUSOIDAL PMW MODEL Simulation Results: iii.

4 0.35 0. Sinusoidal PWM with fs= 7 KHZ.25 0.5 Line Voltages .line currents iv.45 0. Phase Voltage PHASE VOLTAGES 500 Van 0 -500 500 Vbn 0 -500 500 Vcn 0 -500 0.3 0.

This ripples shows how distorted the waveform is and hence we can say that the output of the inverter is highly distorted at 1000Hz than at 7000Hz.3 0.4 0. LINE-TO.45 0. the current waveform has a lot of ripples than when the switching frequency is quite high.015 0.25 0.35 0.35 0.5 DISCUSSION OF RESULTS From the above waveforms. it is evident that at low switching frequencies.45 0. 1000Hz.25 0.5 Line Currents SINUSOIDAL PWM LINE CURRENTS: Fs=7000Hz 100 80 60 40 20 0 -20 -40 -60 -80 -100 0.3 0.03 1000Hz current waveforms with much ripples . at 7000Hz.005 0. 1000Hz CURRENT WAVEFORM 150 100 50 0 -50 -100 0 0.01 0.02 0.025 0.4 0.LINE VOLTAGES 500 Vab 0 -500 500 Vbc 0 -500 500 Vac 0 -500 0.

making it much closer to the sine wave. current keeps going to zero for about 60 degrees in each half of a cycle while for 180 degrees conduction it never stays at zero. CONCLUSION Total Harmonic distortion can be minimized by increasing the switching frequency and by increasing the conduction time of the thyristors. 120 degree conduction PWM is much distorted as compared to 180 degrees conduction. 7000Hz CURRENT WAVEFORM 150 100 50 0 -50 -100 0 0. Because current tend to follow voltage.03 7000Hz current waveform with little ripples as Compared to the 1000 Hz one.025 0.01 0. for 120 degrees conduction. .02 0. Therefore.005 0.015 0.