You are on page 1of 66

Project Report

INTORDUCTION

HISTORY OF PRINT MEDIA

For centuries, civilizations have used print media to spread news and
information to the masses. The Roman Acta Diurna, appearing around
59 B.C, is the earliest recorded “newspaper”. Julius Caesar, wanting to
inform the public about important social and political happenings,
ordered upcoming events posted in major cities. Written on large white
boards and displayed in popular places like the Baths, the Acta kept
citizens informed about government scandals, military campaigns, trials
and executions. In 8th century China, the first newspapers appeared as
hand-written newssheets in Beijing

The printing press, invented by Johann Gutenberg in


1447, ushered in the era of the modern newspaper. Gutenberg’s machine
enabled the free exchange of ideas and the spread of knowledge --
themes that would define Renaissance Europe. During this era,
newsletters supplied a growing merchant class with news relevant to
trade and commerce. Manuscript newssheets were being circulated in
German cities by the late 15th century. These pamphlets were often
highly sensationalized; one reported on the abuse that Germans in
Transylvania were suffering at the hands of Vlad TsepesDrakul, also

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

known as Count Dracula. In 1556 the Venetian government published


Notizie scritte, for which readers paid a small coin, or “gazetta”.

In the first half of the 17th century, newspapers began to appear


as regular and frequent publications. The first modern newspapers were
products of western European countries like Germany (publishing
Relation in 1605), France (Gazette in 1631), Belgium (Nieuwe
Tijdingen in 1616) and England (the London Gazette, founded in 1665,
is still published as a court journal). These periodicals consisted mainly
of news items from Europe, and occasionally included information from
America or Asia. They rarely covered domestic issues; instead English
papers reported on French military blunders while French papers
covered the latest British royal scandal.

Newspaper content began to shift toward more local issues in the


latter half of the 17th century. Still, censorship was widespread and
newspapers were rarely permitted to discuss events that might incite
citizens to opposition. Newspaper headlines did announce the beheading
of Charles I at the end of the English Civil War, although Oliver
Cromwell tried to suppress all news books on the eve of the execution.
In 1766, Sweden was the first country to pass a law protecting press
freedom.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

The invention of the telegraph in


1844 transformed print media.
Now information could be transferred
within a matter of minutes, allowing for timelier, relevant reporting.
Newspapers were appearing in societies around the world. Japan’s first
daily newspaper, Yokohama Mainichi Shim bun, appeared in 1870
(although printing from movable type was introduced in Japan in the
late 16th century).

By the middle of the 19th century, newspapers were becoming the


primary means of disseminating and receiving information. Between
1890 to 1920, the period known as the “golden age” of print media,
media barons such as William Randolph Hearst, Joseph Pulitzer, and
Lord Northcliffe built huge publishing empires. These men had
enormous influence within the media industry, and gained notoriety for
the ways in which they wielded their power.

Newspapers have also played a role as disseminators of


revolutionary propaganda. Iskra (The Spark), published by Lenin in
1900, is one notable example. On June 21, 1925, Thanh Nien made its

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

debut in Vietnam, introducing Marxism to the country and providing


information on the revolution’s strategic policies.

Broadcast radio exploded onto the media scene in the 1920’s.


Newspapers were forced to re-evaluate their role as society’s primary
information provider. Like the new media technologies of today, the
development of a low cost, alternative media source produced
rumblings that radio would topple the newspaper industry. To respond
to this new competition, editors revamped the paper’s format and
content in order to broaden their appeal, and stories were expanded to
provide more in depth coverage.

The technological revolution of today is creating new challenges and


opportunities for traditional media. Never before has so much
information been so accessible to so many. By the end of the 1990s,
some 700 had web sites; today there are thousands.

The amount and immediacy of information on the Internet is


unparalleled, but it has not signaled the end of the newspaper’s
relevance. Newspapers in print remain a popular and powerful medium
for the reporting and analysis of events that shape our lives. WAN
estimates that one billion people in the world read a newspaper every
day!

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

HISTORY OF PRESS COUNCIL

Press Council is a mechanism for the Press to regulate itself. The raison
d’etre of this unique institution is rooted in the concept that in a
democratic society the press needs at once to be free and responsible.

If the Press is to function effectively as the watchdog of public interest,


it must have a secure freedom of expression, unfettered and unhindered
by any authority, organized bodies or individuals. But, this claim to
press freedom

has legitimacy only if it is exercised with a due sense of responsibility.


The Press must, therefore, scrupulously adhere to accepted norms of
journalistic ethics and maintain high standards of professional conduct.

Where the norms are breached and the freedom is defiled by


unprofessional conduct, a way must exist to check and control it. But,
control by Government or official authorities may prove destructive of
this freedom. Therefore, the best way is to let the peers of the
profession, assisted by a few discerning laymen to regulate it through a
properly structured representative impartial machinery. Hence, the Press
Council.

HISTORY OF PRESS COUNCIL IN INDIA

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

The Press Council of India was first constituted on 4th July, 1966 as an
autonomous, statutory, quasi-judicial body, with shri justice J R
Mudholkar, then a judge of the Supreme Court, as chairman. The press
council Act, 1965, listed the following functions of the council in
furtherance of its objects

• To help newspapers to maintain their independence;


• To build up a code conduct for newspapers and journalists in
accordance with high professional standards;
• To ensure on the part of newspapers and journalists the
maintenance of high standards of public taste and foster a due
sense of both the rights and responsibilities of citizenship;
• To ensure the growth of a sense of responsibility and public
service among all those engaged in the profession of journalism;
• To keep under review any development likely to restrict the
supply and dissemination of news of public interest and
importance;
• To keep under review such cases of assistance received by any
newspaper or news agency in India from foreign sources, as are
referred to it by the central government

SCHEME OF THE STUDY:

The study is divided into four chapters as given below


Chapter I – Project details
Chapter II -- An overview

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Chapter III – Analysis


Chapter IV --Summary of findings and conclusion

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:

Design the important components for the print media i.e. pamphlets

OBJECTIVES OF STUDY:

1. To know the how the pamphlets are design

2. To know the characteristics of pamphlets

3. To know why the organization choosing pamphlets for


advertisement

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

4. To know is the pamphlets plates are really showing the effect on


consumers

5. To know the common people opinion about pamphlets.

NEED FOR THE STUDY:

This survey helps the researcher to understand the design of the


important components for print media i.e. pamphlets performance
evaluation, as well as why the organizations are choosing pamphlets to
advertise their products and services and also helps the respondents to
take the correct decision, choosing the appropriate place for their
valuable money. The basic need of undertaking this survey is to submit
a project report to the institute as the part of the academics.

METHODOLOGY:

From 2 sauces data can be collected

External sources

Internal sources

DATA COLLECTION METHOD:

Primary data: The data collected from the printing press and graphics

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

designers and respondents

Secondary data: The data collected from the internet and personal

interview

Sample Size: 200 Respondents

Sample Area: Printing press and pamphlets designers and customers

Sampling Technique: Non- probability sampling – (Judgmental)

HYPOTHESIS:
Ho = According to the survey undertaken & considering the scenario in
Hubli pamphlets are doing better compared to other mode of
advertisements

H1 = Not only pamphlets other mode of advertisements also playing


major role in to advertise their products and services

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA OF THE STUDY:

A) Printing Press 

B) Pamphlets Designers

C) Customers 

D) Areas 

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

ANALYSIS OF DATA (TOOLS):

The data and information obtained from the respondents are put into
spss form. Then the data is been organized in such a way that they
would yield specific results to the objective of the study. The data is
organized in the tally marks and various charts, graphs & pie charts that
will help to have overview of the fact and figures. All the work is done
under the data, which is collected, form the respondents. From the
process data the research loudly speaks of its findings and implications
that aid in arriving at a conclusion

LIMITATIONS:

• All experienced things can’t put on the paper.


• Probability of selecting exact sample is very difficult.
• It is conducted in open market, things tend to change rapidly.
HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

• Because of the busy schedule respondents may not have answered


properly which may not hold true in case they would have been
given lot of time to answer.
• The research was conducted in Hubli city only, so analysis and
recommendations may not be applicable to other cities.
• Sample size was 100; I feel this small size cannot represent the
whole consumer’s opinion
• The time period was between July 10th 2009 to August 18th 2009
For 30 days

OVERVIEW OF PRINT MEDIA & PRESS COUNCIL:

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

For centuries, civilizations have used print media to spread news and
information to the masses. The Roman Acta Diurna, appearing around
59 B.C, is the earliest recorded “newspaper”. Julius Caesar, wanting to
inform the public about important social and political happenings,
ordered upcoming events posted in major cities. Written on large white
boards and displayed in popular places like the Baths, the Acta kept
citizens informed about government scandals, military campaigns, trials
and executions. In 8th century China, the first newspapers appeared as
hand-written newssheets in Beijing.

The printing press, invented by Johann Gutenberg in 1447, ushered in


the era of the modern newspaper. Gutenberg’s machine enabled the free
exchange of ideas and the spread of knowledge -- themes that would
define Renaissance Europe. During this era, newsletters supplied a
growing merchant class with news relevant to trade and commerce.
Manuscript newssheets were being circulated in German cities by the
late 15th century. These pamphlets were often highly sensationalized;
one reported on the abuse that Germans in Transylvania were suffering
at the hands of Vlad TsepesDrakul, also known as Count Dracula. In
1556 the Venetian government published Notizie scritte, for which
readers paid a small coin, or “gazetta”.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

In the first half of the 17th century, newspapers began to appear as


regular and frequent publications. The first modern newspapers were
products of western European countries like Germany (publishing
Relation in 1605), France (Gazette in 1631), Belgium (Nieuwe
Tijdingen in 1616) and England (the London Gazette, founded in 1665,
is still published as a court journal). These periodicals consisted mainly
of news items from Europe, and occasionally included information from
America or Asia. They rarely covered domestic issues; instead English
papers reported on French military blunders while French papers
covered the latest British royal scandal.

Newspaper content began to shift toward more local issues in the latter
half of the 17th century. Still, censorship was widespread and
newspapers were rarely permitted to discuss events that might incite
citizens to opposition. Newspaper headlines did announce the beheading
of Charles I at the end of the English Civil War, although Oliver
Cromwell tried to suppress all news books on the eve of the execution.
In 1766, Sweden was the first country to pass a law protecting press
freedom.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

The invention of the telegraph in 1844 transformed print media. Now


information could be transferred within a matter of minutes, allowing
for more timely, relevant reporting. Newspapers were appearing in
societies around the world. Japan’s first daily newspaper, Yokohama
Mainichi Shim bun, appeared in 1870 (although printing from movable
type was introduced in Japan in the late 16th century).

By the middle of the 19th century, newspapers were becoming the


primary means of disseminating and receiving information. Between
1890 to 1920, the period known as the “golden age” of print media,
media barons such as William Randolph Hearst, Joseph Pulitzer, and
Lord Northcliffe built huge publishing empires. These men had
enormous influence within the media industry, and gained notoriety for
the ways in which they wielded their power.

Newspapers have also played a role as disseminators of revolutionary


propaganda. Iskra (The Spark), published by Lenin in 1900, is one
notable example. On June 21, 1925, Thanh Nien made its debut in
Vietnam, introducing Marxism to the country and providing information
on the revolution’s strategic policies.

Broadcast radio exploded onto the media scene in the 1920’s.


Newspapers were forced to re-evaluate their role as society’s primary
information provider. Like the new media technologies of today, the
development of a low cost, alternative media source produced
rumblings that radio would topple the newspaper industry. To respond
to this new competition, editors revamped the paper’s format and

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

content in order to broaden their appeal, and stories were expanded to


provide more in depth coverage.

No sooner had newspapers adapted to radio than they were forced to re-
evaluate themselves in light of a new and more powerful medium:
television. Between 1940 and 1990, newspaper circulation in America
dropped from one newspaper for every two adults to one for every three
adults. Despite this sharp decline, television’s omnipresence did not
render the newspaper obsolete. Some newspapers, like USA Today,
responded to the technological advancements by using color and by
utilizing the “short, quick and to the point” stories that are usually
featured on television.

The technological revolution of today is creating new challenges and


opportunities for traditional media. Never before has so much
information been so accessible to so many. By the end of the 1990s,
some 700 had web sites; today there are thousands.

The amount and immediacy of information on the Internet is


unparalleled, but it has not signaled the end of the newspaper’s
relevance. Newspapers in print remain a popular and powerful medium
for the reporting and analysis of events that shape our lives. WAN
estimates that one billion people in the world read a newspaper every
day!

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

HISTORY OF INDIAN PRESS

James Augustus Hickey is considered as the "father of Indian press"


as he started the first Indian newspaper from Calcutta, the Calcutta
General Advertise or the Bengal Gazette in January, 1780. In 1789, the
first newspaper from Bombay, the Bombay Herald appeared, followed
by the Bombay Courier next year (this newspaper was later
amalgamated with the Times of India in 1861).

The first newspaper in an Indian language was the Samachar Darpan


in Bengali. The first issue of this daily was published from the
Serampore Mission Press on May 23, 1818. In the same year, Ganga
Kishore Bhattacharya started publishing another newspaper in Bengali,
the Bengal Gazetti. On July 1, 1822 the first Gujarati newspaper the
Bombay Samachar was published from Bombay, which is still extant.
The first Hindi newspaper, the Samachar Sudha Varshan began in 1854.
Since then, the prominent Indian languages in which papers have grown
over the years are Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu and
Bengali.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

The Indian language papers have taken over the English press as per
the latest NRS survey of newspapers. The main reasons being the
marketing strategy followed by the regional papers, beginning with
Eenadu, a Telegu daily started by Ramoji Rao. The second reason being
the growing literacy rate. Increase in the literacy rate has direct positive
effect on the rise of circulation of the regional papers.

The people are first educated in their mother tongue as per their state
in which they live for e.g. students in Maharashtra are compulsory
taught Marathi language and hence they are educated in their state
language and the first thing a literate person does is read papers and gain
knowledge and hence higher the literacy rate in a state the sales of the
dominating regional paper in that state rises.

The next reason being localization of news papers. Indian regional


papers have several editions for a particular State for complete
localization of news for the reader to connect with the paper. Malayala
Manorama has about 10 editions in Kerala itself and six others outside
Kerala. Thus regional papers aim at providing localized news for their
readers. Even Advertisers saw the huge potential of the regional paper
market, partly due to their own research and more due to the efforts of
the regional papers to make the advertisers aware of the huge market.
HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

CURRENT SCENARIO

The Indian Newspaper industry is one of the largest in the world.


It publishes the largest number of paid-for titles in the world. In 1997,
the total number of newspapers and periodicals published was 41705,
which include 4720 dailies and 14743 weeklies. The highest number of
newspapers was published in Hindi, 16864.

The first major newspaper in India—the Bengal Gazette—was


started in 1780 under the British Raja. Other newspapers such as The
India Gazette, The Calcutta Gazette, The Madras Courier (1785), The
Bombay Herald (1789) etc. soon followed. These newspapers carried
news of the areas under the British rule. The Times of India was
founded in 1838 as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce by
Bennett, Coleman and Company, a colonial enterprise now owned by an
Indian conglomerate. The Times Group publishes The Economic Times
(launched in 1961), Navbharat Times (Hindi language), and the
Maharashtra Times (Marathi language).

During the 1950s 214 daily newspapers were published in the


country. Out of these, 44 were English language dailies while the rest
were published in various regional languages. This number rose to
2,856 dailies in 1990 with 209 English dailies. The total number of

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

newspapers published in the country reached 35,595 newspapers by


1993 (3,805 dailies).

The main regional newspapers of India include the Malayalam language


Malayala Manorama (published from: Kerala, daily circulation:
673,000), the Hindi-language Dainik Jagran (published from: Uttar
Pradesh, daily circulation in 2006: 580,000), and the Anandabazar
Patrika (published from: Kolkata, daily circulation in 2006: 435,000).
The Times of India Group, the Indian Express Group, the Hindustan
Times Group, and the Anandabazar Patrika Group are the main print
media houses of the country.

PRESS COUNCIL

Press Council is a mechanism for the Press to regulate itself. The


raison d’etre of this unique institution is rooted in the concept that in a
democratic society the press needs at once to be free and responsible.

If the Press is to function effectively as the watchdog of public


interest, it must have a secure freedom of expression, unfettered and
unhindered by any authority, organized bodies or individuals. But, this
claim to press freedom has legitimacy only if it is exercised with a due
sense of responsibility. The Press must, therefore, scrupulously adhere

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

to accepted norms of journalistic ethics and maintain high standards of


professional conduct.

HISTORY OF INDIAN PRESS COUNCIL

The Press Council of India was first constituted on 4th July, 1966 as
an autonomous, statutory, quasi-judicial body, with shri justice J R
Mudholkar, then a judge of the Supreme Court, as chairman. The press
council Act, 1965, listed the following functions of the council in
furtherance of its objects

• To help newspapers to maintain their independence;


• To build up a code conduct for newspapers and journalists in
accordance with high professional standards;
• To ensure on the part of newspapers and journalists the
maintenance of high standards of public taste and foster a due
sense of both the rights and responsibilities of citizenship;
• To ensure the growth of a sense of responsibility and public
service among all those engaged in the profession of journalism;
• To keep under review any development likely to restrict the
supply and dissemination of news of public interest and
importance;
• To keep under review such cases of assistance received by any
newspaper or news agency in India from foreign sources, as are
referred to it by the central government

OBJECTS AND FUNCTIONS OF THE COUNCIL


HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

The objects of the press council are substantially the same as were
laid down under the Act of 1965 and it is not necessary to repeat them
here. But the functions have undergone some change in that the three of
the functions listed in the earlier Act were not included in the 1978 Act
as they were considered to be burdensome for the council to perform.
These related to (a) promoting the establishment of such common
service for the supply and dissemination of news to newspapers as may,
from time to time, appear to it to be desirable; (b) providing facilities for
proper education and training of persons in the profession of journalism;
and (c) promoting technical or other research.

In addition, the Act of 1978 lists two of council: (I) to undertake


studies of foreign newspapers, including those brought out by any
embassy or any other representative in India of a foreign state, their
circulation and impact; and, (II) to undertake such studies as may be
entrusted to the council and to express its opinion in regard to any
matter referred to it by the central government.

POWERS OF THE COUNCIL

Section 14:1) where, on receipt of a complaint made to it or otherwise,


the council has reason to believe that a newspaper or news agency has
offended against the standards of journalistic ethics or public taste or
that an editor or a working journalist has committed any professional
misconduct, the council may, after giving the newspaper, or news

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

agency, the editor or journalist concerned an opportunity of being heard,


hold an inquiry in such manner as may be provided by the regulations
made under this Act and, if it is satisfied that it is necessary to do, it
may, for reasons to be recorded in writing warn, admonish or censure
the newspaper, the news agency, the editor or the journalist, as the case
may be.

Provided that the council may not take cognizance of a complaint if in


the opinion of the chairman, there is no sufficient ground for holding an
inquiry.

• If the council is of the opinion that it is necessary or expedient in


public interest so to do, it may require any newspaper to public
therein in such manner as the council thinks fit, any particulars
relating to any inquiry under this section against a newspaper or
news agency, an editor or a journalist working therein, including
the name of such newspaper, news agency, editor or journalist.
• Nothing in sub-section (1) shall be deemed to empower the
council to hold an inquiry into any matter in respect of which any
proceeding is pending in a court of law.
• The decision of the council under sub-section (1), or sub section
(2), as the case may be, shall be final and shall not be questioned
in any court of law.

GENERAL POWERS OF THE COUNCIL

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

For the purpose of performing its functions or holding any inquiry


under this Act, the council shall have the same powers throughout India
as are vested in a civil court while trying a suit under the code of civil
procedure, 1908. In respect of the following matters namely:-

• Summoning and enforcing the attendance of persons and


examining them on oath;
• Requiring the discovery and inspection of documents;
• Receiving evidence on affidavits;
• Requisitioning any public record or copies thereof from any court
or office;
• Issuing commissions for the examination of witnesses or
documents; and
• Any other matter, which may be prescribed
• Every inquiry held by the council shall be deemed to be a judicial
proceeding within the meaning of section 193 and 228 of the
Indian penal code

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

The earliest writing took the form of picture symbols. By the 4th
millennium BCE, picture languages were developing in Egypt, the
Middle East and China.

This Sumerian symbol is probably meant to represent a goat. It was


used like currency but showed animals to be traded. The token was
made from clay and baked. Later, Sumerians baked tablets of writing.
They were durable but not very portable.

A Chinese scroll written on silk is an early but expensive way to make


communication durable and portable.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Ancient Hebrews solved the problem in the same way by using rolls of
parchment (animal skins) wrapped around a stick.

Hebrews and Phoenicians solved another problems as well. They


developed a symbolic language that broke away from the pictographic
languages of Egypt, China and the Middle East.

The Greeks improved on this symbolic language. Everyone in Greece --


even slaves -- could read and write.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

"In 750 B.C.E., the Greeks, borrowing characters from a Semitic


language, perhaps Phoenician, developed a writing system that had just
twenty-four letters.

There had been scripts with a limited number of characters before, as


there had been consonants and even occasionally vowels, but the Greek
alphabet was the first whose letters recorded every significant sound
element in a spoken language in a one-to-one correspondence, give or
take a few diphthongs.

In ancient Greek, if you knew how to pronounce a word, you knew how
to spell it, and you could sound out almost any word you saw, even if
you’d never heard it before.

Children learned to read and write Greek in about three years, somewhat
faster than modern children learn English, whose alphabet is more
ambiguous.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Opinion of the study and data analysis:


Age of the respondents

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid 20-40 68 68.0 68.0 68.0
40-60 21 21.0 21.0 89.0
60 above 11 11.0 11.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

80

70

60

50

40

30

20
Count

10

0
20-40 40-60 60 above

age of the respondents

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Gender of the respondents

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid male 97 97.0 97.0 97.0


female 3 3.0 3.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

female

male

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Income of the respondents

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid 10000-20000 5 5.0 5.0 5.0
20000-30000 50 50.0 50.0 55.0
30000-40000 45 45.0 45.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

30000-40000
10000-20000

20000-30000

Occupation of the respondents

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Business man 76 76.0 76.0 76.0
Employee 24 24.0 24.0 100.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Total 100 100.0 100.0

80

70

60

50

40

30
Count

20

10
business man employee

occupation of the respondents

Image do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid Not important 5 5.0 5.0 5.0


Not at all important 7 7.0 7.0 12.0
Average 20 20.0 20.0 32.0
Important 18 18.0 18.0 50.0
Very important 50 50.0 50.0 100.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Total 100 100.0 100.0

not importent

not at all importent

average

very importent

importent

Font size do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 1 1.0 1.0 1.0
Not at all important 3 3.0 3.0 4.0
Average 25 25.0 25.0 29.0
Important 39 39.0 39.0 68.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Very important 32 32.0 32.0 100.0


Total 100 100.0 100.0

50

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

font size do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Features do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Valid Not important 9 9.0 9.0 9.0
Not at all important 25 25.0 25.0 34.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Average 19 19.0 19.0 53.0


Important 24 24.0 24.0 77.0
Very important 23 23.0 23.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

features do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Colors do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 2 2.0 2.0 2.0
Not at all important 3 3.0 3.0 5.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Average 21 21.0 21.0 26.0


Important 47 47.0 47.0 73.0
Very important 27 27.0 27.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

50

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

colors do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Design do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Valid Not important 1 1.0 1.0 1.0


Not at all important 4 4.0 4.0 5.0
Average 13 13.0 13.0 18.0
Important 52 52.0 52.0 70.0
Very important 30 30.0 30.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

not importent
very importent
not at all importent

average

importent

Message do you consider while designing the pamphlets


HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 2 2.0 2.0 2.0
Not at all important 15 15.0 15.0 17.0
Average 11 11.0 11.0 28.0
Important 31 31.0 31.0 59.0
Very important 41 41.0 41.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

50

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

message do you consider while designing the pamphlets

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Brand name do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 2 2.0 2.0 2.0
Not at all important 6 6.0 6.0 8.0
Average 26 26.0 26.0 34.0
Important 36 36.0 36.0 70.0
Very important 30 30.0 30.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

not importent

not at all importent

very importent

average

importent

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Contact address do you consider while designing pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 2 2.0 2.0 2.0
Not at all important 4 4.0 4.0 6.0
Average 26 26.0 26.0 32.0
Important 21 21.0 21.0 53.0
Very important 47 47.0 47.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

50

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

contct adress do you consider while designinig pamphlets

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Logos do you consider while designing pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 9 9.0 9.0 9.0
Not at all important 27 27.0 27.0 36.0
Average 25 25.0 25.0 61.0
Important 24 24.0 24.0 85.0
Very important 15 15.0 15.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

logos do you consider while designing pamphlets

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Highlights do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 6 6.0 6.0 6.0
Not at all important 22 22.0 22.0 28.0
Average 24 24.0 24.0 52.0
Important 30 30.0 30.0 82.0
Very important 18 18.0 18.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

highlits do you consider while designing the pamphlets

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Caption do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 6 6.0 6.0 6.0
Not at all important 30 30.0 30.0 36.0
Average 19 19.0 19.0 55.0
Important 23 23.0 23.0 78.0
Very important 22 22.0 22.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

not importent

very importent

not at all importent

importent

average

Font style do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 6 6.0 6.0 6.0
Not at all important 4 4.0 4.0 10.0
Average 38 38.0 38.0 48.0
HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

Important 32 32.0 32.0 80.0


Very important 20 20.0 20.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

font style do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Certification do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 6 6.0 6.0 6.0
Not at all important 12 12.0 12.0 18.0
Average 26 26.0 26.0 44.0
Important 32 32.0 32.0 76.0
HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

Very important 24 24.0 24.0 100.0


Total 100 100.0 100.0

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

certification do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Size of the pamphlets do you consider while designing pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Average 8 8.0 8.0 8.0
Important 33 33.0 33.0 41.0
Very important 59 59.0 59.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

70

60

50

40

30

20
Count

10

0
average importent very importent

size of the pamphlets do you consider while designing pamphlets

Paper quality do you consider while designing pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Average 6 6.0 6.0 6.0
Important 30 30.0 30.0 36.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Very important 64 64.0 64.0 100.0


Total 100 100.0 100.0

70

60

50

40

30

20
Count

10

0
average importent very importen

paper quality do you consider while designinig pamphlets

Product details do you consider while designing pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Valid Not important 3 3.0 3.0 3.0


Not at all important 5 5.0 5.0 8.0
Average 22 22.0 22.0 30.0
Important 35 35.0 35.0 65.0
Very important 35 35.0 35.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

not importent
very importent
not at all importent

average

importent

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Reorganization do you consider while designing pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 20 20.0 20.0 20.0
Not at all important 30 30.0 30.0 50.0
Average 18 18.0 18.0 68.0
Important 15 15.0 15.0 83.0
Very important 17 17.0 17.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

40

30

20
Count

10
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

recognication do you consider while designing pamphlets

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Low cost that’s reason you are choosing pamphlets to advertise your products and
services

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Yes 100 100.0 100.0 100.0

It will reach nook and corner of market that’s region you choosing pamphlets to
advertise your products and services

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid No 20 20.0 20.0 20.0
Yes 80 80.0 80.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

no

yes

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Easy to circulate that’s reason you are choosing pamphlets to advertise your
products and services

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid No 13 13.0 13.0 13.0
Yes 87 87.0 87.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

100

80

60

40

20
Count

0
no yes

easy to cerculate thats reson you are chosing pamphlets to advertise you

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Limited market that’s reason you are choosing pamphlets to advertise your products
and services

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid No 36 36.0 36.0 36.0
Yes 64 64.0 64.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

70

60

50

40
Count

30
no yes

limited market thats reson you are chosing pamphlets to advertise your p

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Product image would you like to include in the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 1 1.0 1.0 1.0
Not at all important 4 4.0 4.0 5.0
Average 27 27.0 27.0 32.0
Important 23 23.0 23.0 55.0
Very important 45 45.0 45.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

50

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
mot at all importent importent

product image would you like to include in the pamphlets

Product usage would you like to include in the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 1 1.0 1.0 1.0
Not at all important 26 26.0 26.0 27.0
Average 17 17.0 17.0 44.0
Important 36 36.0 36.0 80.0
Very important 20 20.0 20.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importen
not at all importent importent

product usage would you like to include in the pamphlets

Back ground image would you like to include in the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid Not important 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
Not at all important 30 30.0 30.0 37.0
Average 18 18.0 18.0 55.0
Important 35 35.0 35.0 90.0
Very important 10 10.0 10.0 100.0
HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

Total 100 100.0 100.0

very importent not importent

not at all importent

importent

average

Natural sciences would you like to include in the pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid Not important 6 6.0 6.0 6.0


Not at all important 45 45.0 45.0 51.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

Average 28 28.0 28.0 79.0


Important 11 11.0 11.0 90.0
Very important 10 10.0 10.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

50

40

30

20

10
Count

0
not importent average very importent
not at all importent importent

natural sciences would you like to include in the pamphlets

Which % of image size required in your pamphlets

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent


Valid 0% 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
25% 29 29.0 29.0 36.0

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

50% 43 43.0 43.0 79.0


75% 21 21.0 21.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

0%
75%

25%

50%

FINDINGS:

 68% respondents are 20-40 age group people 21% respondents


are 40-60 age group people 11% respondents are 60 above age
group people

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

 5% respondents were 10-20 k income people 50% respondents


were 20-30 k income people 44% respondents were 30-40 k
income people
 Among 100 respondents 100% were preferring pamphlets
because it is low cost
 Among 100 respondents 80% were preferring pamphlets because
it will reach nook and corner of market 20 % were not preferring
pamphlets
 Among the 100 respondents 87% were preferring pamphlets
because easy to circulate
 Among 100 respondents 43% were preferring 50% image size

29% were preferring 25% image size 21% were preferring 75%
image size in their pamphlets and 7% were not required images in
their pamphlets
 Among 100 respondents 45% were product image are very
important in pamphlets 23% were important in pamphlets 27%
were average 26% not at all important in pamphlets
 Among 100 respondents about product usage 20% were very

important 36% were important 17% were average in pamphlets


26% not at all important about product usage in pamphlets
 Among 100 respondents 50% were images are very important
18% were important 20% were average

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

 Among 100 respondents 32% were consider font size as a very


important 39% were important 25% were average
 Among 100 respondents 41% were consider message as a very

important 31% were important 11% were average


 Among 100 respondents 59% were consider size of pamphlet as a
very important 33% were important 8% average
 Among the 100 respondents 64% were consider paper quality as a
very important 30% were important 6% average

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

CONCLUSION:

Now a days the print media i.e. pamphlets plays a major role in
advertisements because all organizations cannot afford the cost of other
media. Small organizations cannot expect huge market to their goods so
they are choosing pamphlets to capture local market. These pamphlets
are very cheaper compare to news paper and other Medias. These
pamphlets can go every nook & corner of the market with affordable
cost.
The main important components for print media i.e. pamphlets are
images, font size, font style, colors, brand name, captions, features,
highlights, size of the pamphlet, contact address, design etc.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

www.google.com
www.wkipedia.com
Magnum designers

SCHEDULE OF PROJECT:
The project proposal was submitted on 10-07-2009 to Sec Gen & prof.
Mr. Rohit. K & the project started under the guidance of Sec Gen &
prof. Mr. Rohit. K and Vinay srivastav and submitted on 18-08-2009.

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli


Project Report

QUESTIONER
Dear sir/madam
I the student of HET IMS perusing MBA I undertaken a survey to
design important components for print media i.e. pamphlets so kindly
spare your time to give the information. This information will be kept
confidential and is for academic purpose only.

PART 1: Personal Details

• Name:_______________________________________________
___

• Age: 10-20 20-40 40-60 60 above

• Gender: M F

• Occupation: Business man Employee Student

• Income level: a.10,000-20,000 b. 20,000-30,000 c. 30,000-


40,000

PART 2: Design important components for print media i.e. pamphlets

1. Which variables do you consider while designing the pamphlets

Variables influence Not important Not at all important Average Important Very
important
Images
Font size
Features
Colors
Design
Message
Brand
Contact address
HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Logos
Highlights
Caption
Font style
Certification
Size of pamphlets
Project Report

2. Why you are choosing pamphlets to advertise your products and services?

Influencing Factors Opinion


Low cost
It can go nook and corner of market
Easy to circulate
Limited market

3. Which type of images would you like to include in the pamphlets?

Types Not Not at Averag Import Very


important all e ant important
importa
nt
Product image
Product usage
Back ground image
Natural scenic

4. Which % of image size required in your pamphlets?

Images required ( in % ) Opinion


0%
25%
50%
75%
100%

Thank you for spending your time and giving valuable information. Have a
nice day
HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli
Project Report

HET’S Institute of Management Studies, Hubli