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Science Unit Plan

Hilary Dingman | Megan Valanne | Sarah Tibbo


EDUC 5473
Dr. Shaunda Wood
March 1st 2018, 2017
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Table of Contents:
Introduction to Unit p. 3.
Skeletal Unit Plan p. 4.
Lesson One p.11.
Lesson Two p.17.
Lesson Three p. 22.
Lesson Four p. 29.
Lesson Five p.35.
Lesson Six p.41.
Lesson Seven p.49.
Lesson Eight p.54.
Lesson Nine p.59.
Lesson Ten p. 64.
Lesson Eleven p.68.
References p. 72.
Appendix p. 76.
Bulletin Board / Learning Centre Application p. 111.
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Introduction to Unit

The Bay of Fundy is one of the seven wonders of North America and would be an exciting

topic for any elementary classroom to investigate. This miraculous land mark is home to the

highest tides, over 350 species of birds, and several unique freestanding rocks that show

generations of erosion. The unit that we have created has been specifically designed for a grade

four classroom but can be easily adapted by any teacher to meet their curriculum needs. The unit

will specifically address:

• Habitats.
• Rocks and Erosion.
• Moon Phases and tides.
as it pertains to the exploration of the Bay of Fundy. While we do not intend on traveling to the

Bay of Fundy for this unit, the goal is that students will be able to experience its unique traits

through a number of hands on and discovery-based activities. Since we do not intend on

traveling to the site, this unit could be taught at any time throughout the academic calendar. We

hope that by teaching this unit on the Bay of Fundy, students will be able to experience this

incredibly diverse coastal environment in an engaging and exciting way.


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Science Unit Lesson Plan Skeleton: Bay of Fundy/Hopewell Rocks


Megan Valanne
Sarah Tibbo
Hilary Dingman

For individual lesson plans, just say “ refer to skeleton for NGSS outcomes)
Part A:
NGSS
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NB Curriculum

GCO for Habitats:


• Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science,
physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply these understandings to
interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge.

SCOs for Habitats:


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• use the terms habitat, population, and community in appropriate contexts (104-6) •
identify questions to investigate about the types of plants and/or animals at a local
habitat, and the conditions under which they live (204-1)
• suggest improvements to the model of the natural habitat to make it more realistic and
habitable for organisms (206-6)
• using appropriate terminology to compare the structural features of plants that enable
them to thrive in different kinds of places (300-2, 104-6)
• predict how the removal of a plant or animal population affects the rest of the
community (301-1)
• relate habitat loss to the endangerment or extinction of plants and/or animals (301-2)

GCO for Rocks / Erosion:


Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science, physical
science, and Earth and space science, and apply these understandings to interpret, integrate, and
extend their knowledge.
SCOS for Rocks/Minerals/Erosion:
• describe the effects of wind, water, and ice on the landscape (301-5)
• describe ways in which soil is formed from rocks (301-4) building on grade 3 soil
knowledge
• describe natural phenomena that cause sudden and significant changes to the landscape
(301-7)

Language Arts Curriculum:


GCO 8: Students will be expected to use writing and other forms of representation to explore,
clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings; and to use their
imaginations.
SCO: Experiment with language, appropriate to purpose, audience, and form, that enhances
meaning and demonstrates imagination in writing and other ways of representing

Student Learning:
Habitats:
Misconceptions:
• Humans have no negative effect on marine life in Bay of Fundy.
In the previous grade, students would have had an introduction to plants and how they are
affected by their environmental conditions.
End of unit: students will have a firm grasp of the habitats that are within the Bay of Fundy

Rock/Erosion:
Misconception: erosion is only done by water;
Prior Knowledge: would already know about how soil is formed.
End of unit: I can describe how erosion creates soil. I can talk about how water and ice
erode and impact landforms. I can describe natural phenomena that change
landscapes.
Moon Phases
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Misconceptions:
1. Students are often confused by how moon phases are caused (i.e., by clouds, earth’s
shadow).
Learning Objectives:
1. Students will learn the phases of the moon.
2. Students will understand how the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun, affects the
ocean's movements.

Part B: Assessment Plan

Outcomes or Expectations Assessment Assessment


Strategy Tool

Use the terms habitat, population, and community in Activity Rubric


appropriate contexts (104-6) sheet/project

Identify questions to investigate about the types of Project Checklist


plants and/or animals at a local habitat, and the
conditions under which they live (204-1)

Explore and describe a variety of soils and find


similarities and differences among them. (100-36) Venn Diagram
Checklist

Represent data in graphical displays to reveal Project Checklist


patterns of daily changes in length and direction of
shadows, day and night. (5-ESS1-2)

Represent data in graphical displays to reveal Project Rubric


patterns of daily changes in length and direction of
shadows, day and night. (5-ESS1-2)

Experiment with language, appropriate to purpose, Culminating Checklist


audience, and form, that enhances meaning and task
demonstrates imagination in writing and other ways
of representing.
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Part C: Unit Plan

Lesson Outcomes or Assessment or What the What the


Title Expectations Evaluation Teacher Will Student Will
or Topic Do Do

Lesson Students will Journal The teacher Students will


#1:Wildlif learn about will discuss write , draw
e what a terms like or
Habitat is and “habitat” and demonstrate
common “wildlife” and their
animals that have students understandin
live around write in their g to the best
the Bay of journals of their
Fundy (104- ability in
6) their journal

Lesson Students will Discussion / The teacher Students will


#2: Plants learn about Journal will discuss collaborate as
how plants common as class and
and how they plants found then
grow. in Bay of write/draw
Students will Fundy and their thoughts
understand show students in journal,
how Tourism after
environment Video completing
affects plant
plants.(204- activities.
1)

Lesson Students will The teacher Students will


#3: Soil recall what Discussion/Journa will have do a think-
Review they learned l enough soil pair-share
in gr.3 using samples for and then
soil samples. each table write what
(100-36) group. Then, they learned
review soil in their
characteristics journal.
.

Lesson #4: Students will The teacher Students will


Soil at learn about will ask compare
Hopewell characteristic questions qualities of
Rocks s and creation Exit Slip via turn about this the two soil
of the soil at and talk habitat’s soil, samples,
and have discuss
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the Hopewell students answers with


Rocks site. compare it to a partner and
(301-4) the previous write in
lesson’s soil journal.
samples.

Lesson Students will Teacher will Students will


#5:Rocks, learn that Activity Sheet give out work with a
Soil, and erosion takes activity sheet partner to fill
Erosion many forms. that focuses out the sheet.
(301-5) on rocks,
water, and
erosion.

Lesson #6: Students will Checklist Teacher will Students will


Moon learn the distribute fill out a
Phase phases of the KWL charts KWL chart.
moon. and writing Students will
utensils. actively
Teacher will watch a
play video on video on
moon phases. moon phases.
Teacher will Students will
provide create their
materials for own moon
flip book. phase
flipbook.

Lesson #7: Students will Rubric Teacher will Students will


Tides understand acquire devise a plan
how the enough to model how
gravitational materials for the positions
pull of the each student of Earth, the
moon and the to create their sun, and the
sun, affects own model. moon affect
the ocean's the Earth’s
movements. tides.

Part D: UDL, Differentiated Instruction, Tiers 1-3, or PLP

UDL: Class engagement through interactive, hands on lessons and assessments will help all
students stay focused and interested on the subject matter.
DI: In this unit, students are offered many choices of assessment for the final project so that
those with exceptionalities (and those without) can play to their strengths and their learning
styles when demonstrating what they have learned.
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Tier 1: The majority of students will be able to complete the activities as described in the plans.
Tier 2: Students who need extra help with the material will meet with the teacher and activities
will be adjusted based on their needs.
Tier 3/PLP: Accommodations for these students will be outlined in their PLP.

Part E: Reflection on Unit Plan


1. Is each intended outcome or expectation supported by a suitable teaching or learning
strategy?
We believe that we have addressed each outcome and expectation to the best of our
ability by complementing them with activities that are suitable to the age group, often
as outlined in the curricula.
Since our fictional school is located in the core of Fredericton, a field trip to the Bay of
Fundy is not economically feasible. For this reason, we have incorporated a number of
hands on activities so that students are provided with the best learning opportunity.
Such a field trip is also not likely due to the potential for students to be in wheelchairs, or
have other exceptionalities that prevent them from travelling to Hopewell Rocks.
2. Is a valid assessment strategy included for each enduring understanding?
Through our assessment strategy choices, students will be assessed in a variety of ways
(rubrics, checklists, exit discussions, and activity sheets), giving them the opportunity to
demonstrate their understanding in each lesson.

3. Will students have opportunities to sufficiently develop their inquiry and communication
skills, regardless of their initial skill level?
Students are given the opportunity to learn about various aspects of the Bay of Fundy. Through
the various lessons, students will participate in discussion, individual writing, group planning
and critical analysis. Discussion will take place as a whole class as well as with their small table
groups. There will be a variety of facets to express their understanding and develop
communication skills. This unit is presented as an exploration rather than a direct assessment,
allowing students to arrive at various conclusions at all levels.

4. Can you think of other challenges?


There is always potential for students to experience difficulty in grasping the content. We have
individual work as well as group work which allows students to help each other. Another challenge
could be finding child appropriate books to do as a read aloud, on the Bay of Fundy/Hopewell Rocks;
however, read alouds can be done with more advanced texts, not only picture books, so that is
something to consider.
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Date: February 26, 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy -Habitat.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 45 minutes to 1 hour.

New Brunswick Math Curriculum Outcomes


• GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science,
physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply these understandings to
interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge.

SCO: use the terms habitat, population, and community in appropriate contexts (104-6)
• Identify questions to investigate about the types of plants and/or animals at a local
habitat, and the conditions under which they live (204-1)

Learning Objectives:
I can:
• Understand what a habitat is.
• Understand what animals live in the Bay of Fundy area.
• Explain common words related to habitats.
• Explain why animals choose the habitats they live in.
• Describe ways that the environment affects plant life.

Tools Location

Assortment of books related to animals In purple bin on round table.


who live in the Bay of Fundy.

Student Journals. In the students’ desks.

Pencils x 20. On the trolley at the back of the room.

Wildlife Research Report activity sheet. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.

Video: Home Sweet Habitat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p15IrEuhYmo


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Engagement: 15 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will play the video: • The students will watch the video and
Home sweet Habitat to engage are reminded to pay attention to what
students and introduce them to is being said and demonstrated.
common terms. • The students will have the opportunity
• Once the video is finished, the to think about what they watched.
teacher will have students write, • The students will then work
draw or discuss what they independently, in partners, at their
noticed, learned, are confused tables, and jot down any thoughts or
about etc. in their journal. If questions they have about habitats
students prefer to discuss with after watching the video.
their table partners, they are • The students are exploring the general
encouraged to do so. understanding of what a habitat is. If
• The teacher will write down any there is any confusion, the teacher will
questions that students might clarify for them.
have, on the board to revisit. • If students are unsure of what the
• The teacher will remind students video demonstrated, the Exploration
that during this introductory phase of the lesson elaborates on the
phase of the lesson, that ideas.
questions or comments are • The students are not expected to
encouraged as the whole class is ‘know’ anything yet. They are
learning and exploring together. expected to think and ask questions.

Exploration: 25 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will explain to


students that we will be
exploring the habitats of the
animals who live in the Bay of
Fundy area.
• The teacher will write the terms: • The students will look through the Bay
Habitat, community, population of Fundy books and choose an
on the whiteboard. The interesting animal.
following is the scientific
definition accompanied with the
same term in student friendly
language.
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• The teacher will write down the


student friendly terms on the
board. The scientific definition is
to support the teacher’s
understanding.

Habitat: is an ecological or
environmental area that is inhabited by a
species of animal, plant, or other type of
organism
In student terms: a habitat is where a
particular type of animal or plant lives.

Population: the number of living things


that live in the same area.

In student terms: the population is the


number of people, animals etc., that live
within the same place.
• The students will use the Bay of
• The teacher will explain to Fundy books to assist their learning.
students that all animals and All of the books are student friendly,
plants around the world have a with a large number of pictures and
habitat, similar to how the easy to understand language.
students have homes.
• The teacher will allow students
to copy down anything on the • The students will choose 1 animal they
board or to continue to jot down find interesting from the books.
ideas.
• Pass out the assortment of Bay
of Fundy books to students.
• Have students look through the
books to gain an understanding
of what the area looks like and
what animals are found there.
• The teacher will explain to • The students will complete the
students that they will narrow Wildlife Research Report using the
down their animals to one books and the teacher for assistance.
choice. • The students will have the opportunity
• The teacher will provide students to write and draw to demonstrate their
with the Wildlife Research understanding.
Report.
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Explanation:10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will collect the Bay • The students will use this time to
of Fundy books as well as the reflect on their learning from this
Wildlife Research Reports lesson
from the students. • The students will write in their
• The teacher will remind the journals about what they have
students that if they did not learned, interesting facts, things they
have the chance to finish their did not understand etc.
activity, there will be time in • The students are encouraged to
the next class. represent their understanding through
• The teacher will have students writing or drawing.
take out their science
notebooks and ask them to
write about anything they
learned about Bay of Fundy
and the animals that are there.

Elaborate:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will collect • The students will hand in their


students’ journals. journals to the teacher.
• The teacher will ask students to • The students will be reminded to
think about the animal they think about anything they want to
chose. learn the following day about the
• The teacher will remind students animal of their choice and their
that we will be returning to their habitat.
Wildlife Research Report • The students are encouraged to look
activity the next day. into the Bay of Fundy and their
Assessment (Appendix D) animal when they get home- but it is
• The teacher will look through not required.
the students’ journals to ensure
that the students are gaining an
understanding of animals and
their habitats.
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Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
Observation: Observation:
• The teacher will observe the • The students will participate in the
students’ abilities to follow lesson, demonstrating engagement the
direction. best that they can with the Wildlife
Research Report.
Science Journals:
• The teacher will be able to Science Journals:
monitor how students are • The students will reflect on the lesson
retaining information from the in their journals, demonstrating what
video as well as the books. they have learned or are concerned
• The teacher will use the rubric in about.
order to assess students.
(Appendix C)

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will thoroughly
explain the purpose of each step • The students will be encouraged to
of the lesson to ensure that express their confusion or ask
students are understanding questions for clarification.
• The teacher will look for non- • The students will communicate their
verbal, verbal, written cues etc. understanding in a way that makes
to determine student them comfortable. In order to not
understanding. embarrass students, that is the purpose
• The teacher will check in with of the teacher traveling around the
individual students periodically class.
to ensure everyone is on the right Flexible Representation:
track. • The students will demonstrate their
Flexible Representation: understanding in their journal in a way
• The teacher will have students that feels comfortable for them.
express their understanding in
their science journals through Process- Multiple Sense:
discussion, writing, drawing etc. • The students will be able to process
because students are able to the information through multiple sense
represent understanding through with support from the teacher.
different ways.
Process-Multiple sense:
• The teacher will make sure that
the students will be able to use
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manipulatives, oral instruction


and visual aids.
Notes for Next Time:
Overall Comments Suggestions
17

Date: February 27th, 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy - Animals/Habitats.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 50 minutes.

New Brunswick Math Curriculum Outcomes


• GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science,
physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply these understandings to
interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge.

SCO: use the terms habitat, population, and community in appropriate contexts (104-6)
• Identify questions to investigate about the types of plants and/or animals at a local
habitat, and the conditions under which they live (204-1)

Learning Objectives:
I can:
• Understand what a habitat is.
• Understand what animals live in the Bay of Fundy area.
• Explain why animals choose the habitats they live in.
• Describe ways that the environment affects plant life.

Tools Location

Assortment of books related to animals who In purple bin on round table.


live in the Bay of Fundy.

Student Journals. In the students’ desks.

Pencils x 20. On the trolley at the back of the room.

Wildlife Research Report activity sheet. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.

Video: Bay of Fundy Shore Birds. http://fbramazingplaces.ca/portfolio/marys-point-


johnsons-mills-a-great-migration/

Video: This Bay of Fundy Estuary. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7pKc_3ipfI

Bristol board x 20. On the shelf behind the teacher’s desk.

Assortment of sticks, rocks, leaves etc. In the red bin on the teacher’s desk.

Animal figures representing the animals of In the red bin on the teacher’s desk.
Bay of Fundy.

Shoeboxes x 20. Under the yellow table.


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Engagement: 15 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will remind students • The students will watch the video to
what they looked at the previous gain a further understanding of the
day and ask them if they found Bay of Fundy environment.
out any new information about • The students will be able to ask
the animal they picked. questions about the video, especially if
• The teacher will play the video the animal they chose is present in the
This Bay of Fundy Estuary. video.
• The teacher will then play the • The students will pay attention to the
video Bay of Fundy Shorebirds. large number of shorebirds that are
• The teacher will explain that present around the Bay of Fundy.
shorebirds are very prevalent in • The students will be reminded about
the Bay of Fundy area. the important vocabulary terms we
• The teacher will ask students if learned the day before.
anyone remembers the
vocabulary terms from
yesterday.
• If not, the teacher will remind
students about what Habitat and
Population mean.

Exploration: 30 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will hand out the • The students will continue working on
Wildlife Research Report their Wildlife Research Report activity
activity sheets to the students. sheet.
• The teacher will pass out the Bay • The students will continue to use the
of Fundy books from the day books for support as well as the
before. teacher.
• The teacher will circulate the
room being available to answer
any questions the students might
have.
• The teacher will explain that
students are going to create a
habitat for their Bay of Fundy
animal. • Once students have completed their
Wildlife Research Report activity,
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• The teacher will demonstrate they will begin their habitat


examples of how the students construction.
can complete their animal
habitat.

• The students will have the choice to


complete their construction on Bristol
board or with the assortment of habitat
materials that the teacher has provided.
• The students will use the books as a
• The teacher will give students reference for construction as well as
the option to complete the videos played by the teacher.
habitat as a drawing on Bristol • The students will look at the model the
board or a physical construction teacher has created as a way to
using the assortment of habitat monitor how their shoebox habitat
materials provided. could look.

Explanation: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will have students • The students will clean up their table
clean up their materials. areas and go to the reading corner.
• The teacher will ask students to • The students will present their animal
bring their animal habitat habitat to the rest of the class.
construction to the reading • If students are not comfortable
corner. presenting, it is not required.
• The teacher will have students
show the class their habitat. • The students will show their habitat to
• The teacher will ask students the rest of the class and explain why
about their animal habitat and they chose that animal.
why they chose that animal to
research.
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Elaborate: 5 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will have a whole • The students will demonstrate their
class discussion with the understanding through a whole class
students about what they have discussion.
learned about the animals they • If students are not comfortable
have been researching. participating in the discussion, they
• The teacher will lead the are welcome to write down their
discussion. thoughts in their science journal.
• The teacher will have students • The students will take the Two Facts I
put their animal habitats on Learned sheet and observe other
display around the room. animal habitats.
• The teacher will give the • The students will write down two
students the Two Facts I things they learned about another
Learned sheet to use when student’s animal habitat.
looking and listening to the
other students. (Appendix K)

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
Observation: Observation:
• The teacher will watch how • The students will engage and
students work on their animal participate in the lesson.
habitat and use the information Wildlife Research Report:
that they are provided. • The students will hand in their activity
Wildlife Research Report: (Appendix J) to the teacher.
• The teacher will collect the Animal Habitat:
Wildlife Research Report to • The students will present their animal
assess how the students used the habitat to their peers and explain why
information. they chose that animal.
Animal Habitat:
• The teacher will monitor how
students are working on their
animal habitat. (Appendix E)
Two Things I Learned sheet: Two Things I Learned sheet:
• Students will hand in their sheet • The students will hand in their sheet
that demonstrates if they have that demonstrates if they have learned
learned anything about another anything about another student’s
student’s animal habitat. animal habitat.
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Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure that • The students will communicate their
students understand the content understanding visually or orally.
and the instruction by constant
check ins with students. Flexible Representation:
• The students will demonstrate their
Flexible Representations: understanding through whatever facet
• The teacher will include the they are comfortable with i.e., orally,
various ways students visually.
demonstrated their
understanding in the teacher Process- Multiple Sense:
assessments. • The students will be able to process
the information through multiple sense
Process- Multiple Sense: with support from the teacher.
• The teacher will ensure that the
lesson include visual, oral and
hands on activities to
accommodate all students in the
classroom.

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
22

Date: February 28th 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy – Plants.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 45 minutes to 1 hour.

New Brunswick Math Curriculum Outcomes


• GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science,
physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply these understandings to
interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge.

SCO: identify questions to investigate about the types of plants and/or animals at a local
habitat, and the conditions under which they live (204-1).

Learning Objectives:
I can:
- Explain what plants need to survive.
- Understand what plants surround the bay of Fundy area.
- Explain difference between aquatic and terrestrial plants.
- Describe ways that the environment affects plant life.

Tools Location

Assortment of books related to the Bay of Fundy. In purple bin on round table.

Student Journals. In the students’ desks.

Pencils x 20. On the trolley at the back of the room.

Parts of a Plant activity sheet. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.

Video: Hiking the FBR http://fbramazingplaces.ca/en/

Video: Parts of Plant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUH8iAanREY

Bay of Fundy Plant Brochure On teacher’s desk.

Book: The Tiny Seed written by Eric Carle. On the trolley at the back of the room.

Variety of plant seeds x 20 or more. In bin labeled ‘gardening’ behind teacher’s desk.

Gardening pots. Placed beside gardening bin behind the teacher’s desk.

Soil. In soil bag behind the teacher’s desk.

Plant Observation sheet. (Appendix M) In a folder on the teacher’s desk.


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Engagement: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will review with • Students will reflect on their prior
students what they already have knowledge about plants about how
learned about plants. they are effected by the environment.
• The teacher will ask students • Students will share their thoughts with
how plants survive, why some the class if they are comfortable doing
are found in different areas, and so.
how the environment effects the • The students will move to the reading
plants. corner.
• The teacher will give students • The students will listen to the teacher
time to reflect on their prior read the book about plants to them.
knowledge of plants before • Students will think about the
continuing on. information that is being given to them
• The teacher will read The Tiny from the book.
Seed by Eric Carle to the • Students will have the opportunity to
students. ask questions or make comments
about the book.
• Students will return to their desks once
the discussion is finished.

• The teacher will ask students


what they learned from listening
to the book.
• The teacher will gauge students’
understanding before asking
students to return to their desks.
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Exploration: 20 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will explain to • Students will watch as the teacher


students that they are going to preforms the demonstration of planting
watch a demonstration on a seed.
planting a seed. • Students will be able to ask questions
• The teacher will take the about the process as it is happening.
gardening bin to the front of the
class and place the materials on
the front table.
• The teacher will place enough
soil in the pot that it is almost
full.
• The teacher will place 2 or 3
seeds spread out in the pot.
• The teacher will demonstrate
how much water to give to the
seeds. • Students will work at their tables with
• The teacher will explain the their table partners.
process to students as they • Each group will get a pot, seeds, and
continue. the appropriate amount of soil.
• The teacher will explain to • Students will follow the same process
students that now they will have as the teacher when planting the seed.
the opportunity to do the same • Students will be reminded to not throw
activity at their tables. the soil or seeds around.
• The teacher will monitor how the • Once students are finished planting
students retained the information their seeds they will place them in
from the demonstration. front of the classroom window.
• The teacher will assist students • Students will put the Plant
who need support planting their Observation sheet into their Science
seeds into the pot. folder to use for the next day.
• The teacher will ask students to
place their pots in front of the
classroom window.
• The teacher will ask students to
return to their tables/desks.
• The teacher will hand out the
plant observation sheet to
students.
• The teacher will explain to
students that for the next few
weeks they will be checking on
their plants.
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Explanation: 20 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Students will try to complete the


• The teacher will give student Parts of a Plant activity sheet to the
the Parts of a Plant sheet best of their ability.
(Appendix L). • Students will ask for assistance if
• The teacher will explain to needed.
students that they will be • Students will watch the Parts of a
labeling the parts of a plant to Plant video to help them fill out the
the best of their knowledge. activity sheet.
• The teacher will play the video: • Students will make sure that their
Parts of a Plant once students sheets are filled out correctly with
have finished their sheet. the help of the video and the teacher.
• The teacher will explain to • Students will have their sheet
students that they will watch checked by the teacher.
the video and check to see if • Students will place their sheet into
they filled out their sheet the science folder to look back on if
correctly. needed.
• If there are changes to be made, • Now that students have been
students can make them. introduced to the basic components
• The teacher will have students of plants and have had the chance to
put the completed sheet into plant their own seeds, students will
their science folder to use for begin looking at plants found in a
future reference. local area.
• The teacher will go over the • Students will look through the books
activity sheet with the students. and may use the computer to learn
• The teacher will hand out the about a plant that is found in the Bay
variety of Bay of Fundy books of Fundy.
to the students. • Students may work together or
• The teacher will hand out the individually to complete the
Bay of Fundy Plant Brochure brochure.
to each student.
• The teacher will have the
computer ready to assist
students to look up the plant of
their choice from the Bay of
Fundy for their Brochure.
26

Elaborate: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• The teacher will have students • Students will move to the reading
come to the reading corner. corner.
• The teacher will make a list on • Students will think of ideas to go on
the chart paper titled “What I the chart paper
need to survive/What do plants • Students will notice that there are
need to survive” common things that both humans and
• The teacher will ask students to plants need in order to survive.
come up with things to fill in • Students will notice that since plants
both columns on the chart paper. are also a living thing that they need
• Students can approach the chart to be taken care of.
paper and write their idea down. • Students will be asked if they know
• The teacher will be looking to why they were originally asked to
show that there are similarities move their potted plants to the
between what humans need and window area.
what plants need because we are • Students will return to their desks.
both living things. • Students will take out their science
• The teacher will then ask journals and will be asked to reflect
students why they were on one aspect about plants that they
instructed to move their potted enjoyed from today’s lesson or
plants in front of the window. something new that they learned.
• The teacher will have students
return to their desks and take out
their science journals.

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
Observation: Observation:
• The teacher will observe the • Students will participate in the lesson,
students’ abilities to follow demonstrating engagement the best
direction. that they can with the multiple
Plant Demonstration: activities.
• The teacher will monitor how Plant Demonstration:
students retained the information Students will learn through participating
from the demonstration and how in the hands-on activity.
they complete the activity. Bay of Fundy Plant Brochure:
Bay of Fundy Plant Brochure: • Students will demonstrate their
understanding through completion of
the activity.
27

• The teacher gain an


understanding of students’ Science Journals:
comprehension of local plants • Students will reflect on the lesson in
while filling out their brochure. their journals, demonstrating what
(Appendix N) they have learned or are concerned
about.
Science Journals:
• The teacher will be able to
monitor how students are
retaining information and
understand where the student is
in their comprehension of the
lesson. (Appendix C)
• The teacher will use the rubric in
order to assess students.

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will thoroughly
explain the purpose of each step • Students will be encouraged to express
of the lesson to ensure that their confusion or ask questions for
students are understanding clarification.
• The teacher will look for non- • Students will communicate their
verbal, verbal, written cues etc. understanding in a way that makes
to determine student them comfortable. In order to not
understanding. embarrass students, that is the purpose
• The teacher will check in with of the teacher traveling around the
individual students to ensure class.
everyone is on the right track. Flexible Representation:
Flexible Representation: • Students will demonstrate their
• The teacher will have students understanding in their journal in a way
express their understanding in that feels comfortable for them.
their science journals through • If students need assistance with the
discussion, writing, drawing etc. Plant Demonstration activity, this is
because students are able to not a representation of
represent understanding through misunderstanding-assistance from the
different ways. teacher is acceptable.
Process-Multiple sense:
• The teacher will make sure that Process- Multiple Sense:
the students will be able to use • Students will be able to process the
manipulatives, oral instruction information through multiple sense
and visual aids. with support from the teacher.
28

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
29

Date: March 1st, 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy -Moon / Moon Phases.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 50 minutes.

NGSS

Learning Objectives:
I can…
• Understand that the Moon has different phases.
• Explain how the Moon interacts with the Sun and the Earth.
• Explain that the Moon looks different to us on different days throughout the month.
• Describe and name the various Moon phases.

Materials:
Tools Location
Moon Phase KWL Chart. (Appendix U) In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
Video - Moon Phase Demonstration. YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=wz01pTvuMa0
Styrofoam balls x 20. On the shelf at the back of the room.
Hot Glue Gun. In the drawer of the teacher’s desk.
Pencils x 20. On the trolley at the back of the room.
Clamp-on light fixture. Stored under the teacher’s desk.
Science Journals. In a basket beside the smartboard.
Science Journals – Assessment. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
30

Engagement: 15 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will explain to the • The students will start to think about
students that today we will be what they already know about the
discussing the Moon. Moon.
• The teacher will distribute a KWL • The students will receive a KWL chart
chart to each student. from the teacher.
• The teacher will explain to the • The students will actively listen while
students what a KWL chart is, and the teacher explains what a KWL
how it works. chart is, and how it works.
• The teacher will ask the students to fill • The students will fit out the first two
out the first two columns of their columns of their KWL chart (what
KWL chart (what they know and what they know and what they want to
they want to know). know).
• The teacher will ask the students • The students will answer the questions
several prompting questions about the if they feel comfortable.
Moon:
- When is the best time to see the
Moon?
- Can the Moon also be seen during
the day?
- Does the Moon look the same
every time that you look at it?
• The teacher will explain to the • The students will ask their teachers to
students that it takes the Moon twenty- provide further clarification, if
nine days, roughly one month, to confused at any point during the
travel around the Earth. lesson.
• The teacher will continue this • The students will consider if this is
conversation by informing the new information, or something that
students that the different phases that they were already aware of.
we see are when the Moon is at
different points in that orbit.

Exploration: 20 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will refer to the Moon
phase demonstration (in the materials
section) if unclear of the activity.
• The teacher will explain to the
students that they will now be doing
an activity that will simulate the
various Moon phases.
31

• The teacher will give each student a • The students will receive a Styrofoam
Styrofoam ball, with a pencil in it on ball, with a pencil in it on one end to
one end to hold. hold.
• The teacher will explain to the
students that the Styrofoam ball will
represent the Moon, they will be the
Earth, and the light will be the Sun.
• The teacher will ask the students to • The students will spread out around
spread out around the room. the room.
• The teacher will turn off the lights.
• The teacher will demonstrate how to
hold the Moon between your face and • The students will watch while the
the light. teacher demonstrates how to hold the
• The teacher will show that the side of Moon.
the Moon facing you gets no sunlight.
• The teacher will allow the students a
• The students will take a turn holding
chance to try.
the Moon between their face and the
• The teacher will turn slowly light.
counterclockwise, holding the Moon
in front of their face.
• The teacher will let the students do the
same, while instructing them to watch • The students will turn slowly counter
the light on the Moon as they turn. clockwise, holding the Moon in front
• The teacher will tell the students to of their face.
continue to slowly rotate, keeping the • The students will continue to slowly
Moon in front of their faces, high rotate, keeping the Moon in front of
enough so that a shadow falls on it. their face, high enough so that a
shadow falls on it.
• The teacher will describe how more
light falls on the right side of the
Moon until one side is fully
illuminated (Full Moon).
• The teacher will point out that the
right side of the Moon begins to
darken and light falls on the right side,
as they continue to rotate.
• The teacher will get the students to
rotate to the beginning position, facing • The students will continue to rotate to
the Sun. the beginning position, facing the Sun.
• The teacher will repeat the rotation
• The students will listen while the
and introduce names of the phases.
teacher introduces the names of the
phases.
32

• The teacher will continue with this


process until the students are
comfortable with the concept.

Explanation: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will instruct the students • The students will sit at their desk.
to sit at their desk.
• The teacher will ask the students to • The students will take out their
take out their science journals. science journals.
• The teacher will allow students time to • The students will record and reflect
record and reflect the observations that the observations that they made
following the activity.
they made.
• The teacher will allow students to
demonstrate their understanding
through drawings or written work.
• The teacher will ask that the students • The students will put away their
put away their science journal. science journal.
• The teacher will bring the students’ • The students will focus their attention
attention back up to the front of the at the front of the class.
class.
• The teacher will write the word • The students will offer one thing that
“Moon” on the board and ask the class they learned today, if they feel
to offer one thing that they learned comfortable doing so.
today.
• The teacher will continue this
brainstorming process until all ideas
have been exhausted.

Elaborate: 5 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will collect the KWL • The students will hand in their KWL
charts to use next day. chart to their teacher.
• The teacher will ask the students to • The students will write in their agenda
look at the Moon this evening and to to look at the Moon and draw what it
draw what it looks like. looks like.
• The teacher will discuss with the
students what phase the Moon is at the
next day.
33

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
Observation: Observation:
• The teacher will note the student’s • The students will engage and
abilities to follow directions participate in the lesson being taught
throughout the lesson. to the best of their ability.

Science Journal: Science Journal:


• The teacher will be able to assess what • The students will reflect upon what
the students have learned through the they have observed during the
demonstration. demonstration.
• The teacher will use the grading rubric
provided to assess the students’ work.
(Appendix C)

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs
instructions. check.

Flexible Representations: Flexible Representations:


• The teacher will allow students to use • The students will demonstrate their
drawings or diagrams to display their understanding in their science journal
knowledge in their science journal. By by any means possible.
doing so, the teacher will be allowing
students to make entries even if they
are struggling with their writing.

Process – Multiple Sense: Process – Multiple Senses:


• The teacher will ensure that the lesson • The student will be able to process the
includes manipulatives, visual aids, information through various senses.
and auditory instruction. The student will receive a deeper
understanding of the content as a
result.
34

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
35

Date: March 2nd, 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy - Moon / Moon Phases.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 50 minutes.

NGSS

Learning Objectives:
I can…
• Understand that the Moon has different phases.
• Explain how the Moon interacts with the Sun and the Earth.
• Explain that the Moon looks different to us on different days throughout the month.
• Describe and name the various Moon phases.

Tools Location
Video - Moon Phases. YouTube:
https://www.flocabulary.com
/unit/moon-phases/
Oreo Cookies (5 packages). In a grocery bag under the teacher’s desk.
Plastic Spoons x 20. In a grocery bag under the teacher’s desk.
Paper Plates x 20. In a grocery bag under the teacher’s desk.
Learning Centre. Sitting on a table at the back of the room.
Moon Phase Data Sheet. (Appendix T) In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
Moon Phase Data Sheet – Assessment. (Appendix In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
F)
Moon Phase Cards (laminated and magnetized). Already ready to go on the white board.
KWL Sheet. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
Moon Phase Flip Book – Student Instruction Sheet. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
(Appendix O)
Moon Phase Flip Book – Activity Sheet. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
(Appendix P)
Moon Phase Flip Book – Assessment. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
Scissors. On the trolley at the back of the room.
36

Black Marker. On the trolley at the back of the room.


Pencils. On the trolley at the back of the room.
Stapler. On the teacher’s desk.

Engagement: 15 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will ask the students what • The students will discuss what the
the Moon looked like the previous Moon looked like the previous
evening. evening.
• The teacher will identify what phase • The students will refer to their
the Moon was last evening and will drawing to see if they were correct as
see if this connects with the students’ to what phase the Moon was at last
drawings. evening.
• The teacher will then review with • The students will recall some of the
students by asking them what facts information that they learned about the
they can remember about the Moon. Moon last day.
• The teacher will allow the students to • The students will answer if they feel
respond with their answer. comfortable.
• The teacher will inform the students
that we will be learning more about
the different Moon phases.
• The teacher will play a video on the • The students will watch the video on
Moon phases. the Moon phases.
• The teacher will review the eight • The students will remember the eight
phases of the Moon: New Moon, phases of the Moon: New Moon,
Waxing Crescent, First Quarter, Waxing Crescent, First Quarter,
Waxing Gibbous, Full Moon, Waning Waxing Gibbous, Full Moon, Waning
Gibbous, Third Quarter, and Waning Gibbous, Third Quarter, and Waning
Crescent. Crescent.
• The teacher will explain that today
they will become more comfortable
with this vocabulary.

Exploration: 20 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will explain to the
students that they will be recreating
the eight phases of the Moon using
Oreo cookies.
37

• The students will observe the teachers


pre-made model.
• The teacher will have already
prepared a model, which will look • The students will watch while the
something like the image above. teacher demonstrates how to recreate
• The teacher will first demonstrate how each of the eight Moon phases using
to recreate each of the eight Moon the Oreo cookies.
phases using the Oreo cookies. • The students will look over the “Moon
• The teacher will inform the students Phase Data Sheet,” and ask any
that they will need to transfer the Oreo questions that they might have.
cookies to the “Moon Phase Data • The students will remember to write
Sheet.” the name of each Moon phases when it
• The teacher will then ask that the is time to complete the activity sheet.
students write the name of each Moon • The students will each receive eight
phase next to cookie using a pencil. cookies, a paper plate, and a plastic
• The teacher will give each student spoon.
eight cookies, a paper plate, and a • The students will look at the Moon
plastic spoon. phase diagram on the learning centre
• The teacher will remind the students if they need help throughout the
to look at the Moon phase diagram on activity.
the learning center to help them • The students will check in with the
throughout the activity. teacher, when they believe they have
• The teacher will ask that the students completed the activity.
check in with them, when they believe • The students will eat their cookies
they have completed the activity. once they are done.
• The teacher will allow the students to
eat their cookies once they are done.

Explanation: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will have premade Moon • The students will observe the premade
Phase Cards magnetized on the white Moon Phase Cards laid out on the
board. white board.
• The teacher will have the Moon Phase
Cards scrambled.
• The teacher will ask the students to
come up one at a time, to place the
38

Moon Phase Cards in proper order • The students will come up one at a
starting with the New Moon and time and place the Moon Phase Cards
ending with the Waning Crescent. in proper order, starting with the New
• The teacher will continue with this Moon and ending with the Waning
process, until every student has had a Crescent.
chance to move one Moon Phase
Card.
• The teacher will then ask that the
students record a few things that they
have learned in the last two days on • The students will reflect on the last
their KWL sheet under the last column two days of learning and will fill out
(what I have learned). the last column on their KWL sheet
• The teacher will ask that the students (what I have learned).
to hand in the KWL chart as an exit
slip at the end of the class. • The students will hand in their KWL
chart at the end of the class.

Elaborate: 5 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will give each student a • The students will each receive their
Moon Phase Flipbook. own Moon Phase Flipbook.
• The teacher will also handout the • The students will also receive their
student instructions. own instructions for the activity.
• The teacher will explain to the • The students will complete this
students that this activity is done activity independently.
independently.
• The teacher will use this activity if a
student finishes early or requires
further instruction.

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
Observation: Observation:
• The teacher will note the student’s • The students will engage and
abilities to follow directions participate in the lesson being taught
throughout the lesson. to the best of their ability.

Moon Phase Data Sheet: Moon Phase Data Sheet:


• The teacher will use the Assessment • The students will complete the Moon
sheet in order to evaluate the students’ phase data sheet to the best of their
success. ability.
39

Moon Phase Flipbook: Moon Phase Flipbook:


• The teacher will use the Assessment • The students will use the provided
sheet in order to evaluate the students’ materials to complete the Moon Phase
success. (Appendix G) Flipbook to the best of their ability.

KWL Chart: KWL Chart:


• The teacher will collect and file these • The students will complete their KWL
KWL charts as an artifact of the Chart, and hand it in to the teacher
students’ learning. (Appendix U) prior to leaving the class.

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs
instructions. check.

Flexible Representations: Flexible Representations:


• The teacher will include conversations • The students will demonstrate their
that they have with their students in understanding according to their
their assessment. academic strengths.

Process – Multiple Senses: Process – Multiple Senses:


• The teacher will ensure that the lesson • The student will be able to process the
includes manipulatives, visual aids, information through various senses.
and auditory instruction. The student will receive a deeper
understanding of the content as a
result.
40

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
41

Date: March 3rd, 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy - Tides.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 50 minutes.

NGSS

Learning Objectives:
I can…
• Explain the difference between high and low tides and how they are created.
• Demonstrate how the moon and sun’s gravitational pull on the Earth creates tides.
• Identify the impact that tides have on plants and animals.
Materials:
Tools Location
Video: How Do Tides Work. YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=5ohDG7RqQ9I
Video: 360 Degrees – The Hopewell Rocks. YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=-ZFopdKVHDw
Moving Tides Model Printouts. (Appendix In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
R)
Anecdotal Notes (For Moving Tides Model). In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
Brass Brads x 20. In the teacher’s desk drawer.
Scissors. On the trolley at the back of the room.
Pencils. On the trolley at the back of the room.
Image: Hopewell Rocks. (Appendix S) In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
Science Journals. In a basket beside the smartboard.
Science Journals – Assessment. In a folder on the teacher’s desk.
42

Engagement: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will explain to students • The students will reflect on what they
that they will be learning about tides already know about tides.
today.
• The teacher will ask the students if • The students will think back to their
anyone has ever been to the beach own experiences with tides (they may
before. not have even realized that they have
• The teacher will ask some leading seen one in action before!)
questions, such as:
- Have you ever built a sand
castle and it eventually got
washed away?
- Have you ever noticed the
water getting closer and closer
to where you were set up on
the beach?
• The teacher will explain that this was
the work of a tide. • The students will watch the video
• The teacher will play the video “How being played, and jot down any
Do Tides Work” and will turn off the questions that they might have.
lights. • The students will actively listen while
• The teacher will review that tides are the teacher review the content outlined
the rise and fall of the levels of the in the video.
ocean. They are caused by the • The students will ask any questions
gravitational pull of the Sun and Moon that they might have regarding tides.
as well as the rotation of the Earth.
• The teacher will elaborate, stating that
the tides cycle as the Moon rotates
around the Earth and as the position of
the Sun changes.
• The teacher will continue the
discussing, by stating that throughout
the day the sea level is constantly
rising or falling.
• The teacher will explain that while the
Sun and the rotation of the Earth both
have some tidal impact, the location of
the Moon has the biggest effect on the
tide. The gravity of the Moon causes a
high tide both on the side of the Earth
directly below the Moon and the
opposite side of the Earth. Low tides
43

are on the sides of the Earth 90 • The students will view the diagram on
degrees away from the Moon. the board to help solidify their
• The teacher will draw this diagram on understanding of tides.
the board, in order to help students,
visualize this process.

• The teacher will then explain how the


tidal range is the difference in sea
level between low tide and high tide.
The tidal range will vary in different
locations depending on the location of
the Sun and the Moon as well as the • The students will question if they have
topography of the shore line. ever heard of the Bay of Fundy / have
• The teacher will point out that the the been there before.
largest tidal range is on the coast of
the Bay of Fundy here in New
Brunswick, where the tides can change
by as much as 40 feet from high to
low tide.
• The teacher will conclude this
instructional period by reviewing the
different types of tides outlined in the
video:
- High Tide: High tide is the
point in the tidal cycle where
the sea level is at its highest.
- Low Tide: Low tide is the
point in the tidal cycle where
the sea level is at its lowest.
- Spring Tide: Spring tide occurs
when the Sun and the Moon
are aligned to combine for the
largest tidal range of the
highest high tide and the
lowest low tide.
- Neap Tide: A neap tide is
when the tidal range is at its
smallest. This occurs during
44

the first and third quarters of • The students will use this time to clear
the Moon. up any questions they have.
• The teacher will do a final check for
understanding before moving on to the
next activity.

Exploration: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will ask that all the • The students will form a large circle in
students form a large circle in the the classroom.
classroom.
• The teacher will ask that the students • The students will sit crossed-legged,
sit crossed-legged, and with their and with their elbows linked wit the
elbows linked with the classmates next classmates next to them.
to them.
• The teacher will then choose one
student to be the “Moon” in this
demonstration.
• The teacher will ask that the “Moon” • The students will watch while one of
moves around the outside of the circle. their classmates moves around the
• The teacher will explain that the circle room, simulating the Moon.
is the waters of the Earth. • The students will listen and follow the
• The teacher will explain that as the various instructions that the teacher
Moon passes behind the students gives them.
(water), the waters bulge (lean) toward
the Moon, and then into the center as
the Moon passes.
• The teacher will also instruct the
students who are opposite of the Moon
to lean away from the Moon (this
represents water bulging out on the
opposite side of the Earth), and then to
lean into the center as the Moon
passes.
• The teacher will ask that the “Moon”
stops, so that the class can see where
the high tides are (next to the Moon
and the opposite side of the circle).
• The teacher will instruct the “Moon”
to begin again.
• The teacher will ask the “Moon” stops
• The students will consider how this
at several points in the circle, so that
activity reflects the Moons impact on
the class can see where the high and
the tides.
low tides are in relation to the orbit of
45

the Moon (Low tide will be at the


sides halfway between he high tide
bulges).
• The teacher will ask the students to
take a seat at their desk. • The students will take a seat at their
desk.

Explanation: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will explain that they will
be creating their own Moving Tides
Model.
• The teacher will ask the students to cut • The students will cut out three pieces:
our three pieces: The Moon’s The Moon’s gravity/tides piece, the
gravity/tides piece, the oceans piece oceans piece and the Earth piece.
and the Earth piece.(Appendix Q)
• The teacher will instruct students to • The students will poke a hole through
poke a hole through the middle of the middle of each piece that is
each piece that is marked with an “x” marked with an “x” (start with the
(start with the Earth, then the ocean Earth, then the ocean pieces, and
pieces, and lastly through the Moon’s lastly through the Moon’s
gravity/tides pieces) using the brass gravity/tides pieces) using the brass
brad. brad.
• The teacher will warn the students to
be careful when completing this step, • The students will be careful when
as the brass brad is a little sharp. completing this last step.
• The teacher will then ask the students
to label the low tides, and the two high • The students will label the low tides,
tides. and the two high tides.
• The teacher will ask that the students
to put their name on the back of their • The students will put their name on
model. the back of their model.

• The students will refer to the


completed model if they are struggling
with the steps.

• The teacher will explain that now they • The students will turn to their elbow
will turn to an elbow partner (the partner (the person sitting next to
them) and explain the process.
46

person sitting next to them) and


explain the process.
• The teacher will walk around the
room, making anecdotal notes on the
discussions that the students have with
their peers.

Elaborate: 15 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
• The teacher will explain that they will • The students will start to think about
be exploring their own tidal area. what tidal area they could be
• The teacher will play the “360 exploring.
Degrees – The Hopewell Rocks” • The students will watch while the
video to introduce the topic of the teacher plays the “360 Degrees – The
lesson. Hopewell Rocks” video.
• The teacher will replay the video at
any point in the lesson, in order to
answer the questions bellow.
• The teacher will discuss the different • The students will notice the different
levels of the tides, and at what time levels of the tide, and what time the
the tides change. tide changed.
• The teacher will ask the students to • The students will identify the features
identify the features of the tide (where of the tide.
are the high and low tide marks).
• The teacher will ask the students to • The students will think about how the
identify how animals and humans can tide may affect animals and humans.
be affected by the tides (i.e., how are
animals and plants on the shoreline
affected by exposure to sunshine and
wind as the tides goes in and out).
• The teacher will provide an image of
the tides for each student to put in
their science journal. • The students will record their ideas in
• The students will record their ideas in their science journal, referencing the
their science journal. image the teacher provided for
guidance.
47

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do
Observation: Observation:
• The teacher will note the student’s • The students will engage and
abilities to follow directions participate in the lesson being taught
throughout the lesson. to the best of their ability.
• The teacher will note these
observations in the anecdotal notes
provided in this lesson plan.
(Appendix B)
Science Journal:
Science Journal: • The students will reflect upon what
• The teacher will be able to assess what they have observed during the
the students have learned through the demonstration.
demonstration.
• The teacher will use the grading rubric
provided to assess the students’ work.
(Appendix C)

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs
instructions. check.

Flexible Representations: Flexible Representations:


• The teacher will allow students to use • The students will demonstrate their
drawings or diagrams to display their understanding in their science journal
knowledge in their science journal. By by any means possible.
doing so, the teacher will be allowing
students to make entries even if they
are struggling with their writing.

Process – Multiple Senses: Process – Multiple Senses:


• The teacher will ensure that the lesson • The student will be able to process the
includes manipulatives, visual aids, information through various senses.
and auditory instruction. The student will receive a deeper
understanding of the content as a
result.
48

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
49

Date: March 4th 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy – Soil.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 45 minutes - 1 hour.

New Brunswick Science Curriculum Outcomes


• Grade 4 GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in
life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply
these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their
knowledge.
• Grade 3 SCO 100-36: Explore and describe a variety of soils and find similarities and
differences among them.
Grade 3 SCO 100-38b: Compare the absorption of water by different soils
Learning Objectives:
I can…
• tell that soils are all different and that soil is affected by water.

Tools Location

KWL Chart (1 per pair of students). On desk, attached in Appendix U.

Soil samples (sand, soil, and clay; 1 set per Back of classroom.
table).

Science Journals. Back of classroom in bin.

Plastic containers with lids (3). Back of classroom.

Magnifying lens (1 per student if possible). Back of classroom with soil samples.

4 individual cups of water. In cupboard by desk.


50

Engagement: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Hand out the KWL charts. Explain • The students receive a KWL chart for
that this will display what students their pair.
know, want to know, and learned • If they know what a KWL is, they can
about soil, erosion, and Hopewell raise their hand and come draw it on
Rocks/ Bay of Fundy over the next the whiteboard.
few lessons. • Think and share with their partner
• Ask if anyone knows what a KWL what they know about the topic, and
chart is. start writing the list.
• If no, explain: • The students can conference with you
K – what you know about if they have difficulty expressing their
soil/erosion thoughts in writing.
W – what you want to know about
the topic
L – what you learned at the end

Exploration: 15-20 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Distribute prepared soil samples to • Use the magnifying lens to have a


each table. Tell students the soil better view of the soil. Talk about the
stays in the cups, but they can use the samples with their table groups.
magnifying lens to examine the • When students get their journals:
samples. Write what they noticed about the
• While students are working, samples (e.g., what do the different
distribute science journals. Instruct soils look like? How are they the
students to start writing their same/different? Where do you think
observations (e.g., what do the they came from?)
different soils look like? How are • Offer students the chance to type their
they the same/different? Where do observations if they need or want to.
you think they came from?) • It is okay if not everyone finishes their
• Time students for 10 minutes of paragraph as it will not be assessed.
writing and then ask students to Students can finish it after the next
share what they found. phase if they wish.
• Example: The soils are all different.
The first one is brown and has small
clumps of dirt and some twigs in it.
51

The other looks like dark sand that


could be found at the beach. It is more
grey than brown. The third one is soft
and reddish, it might be from PEI.
• Students briefly share one thing they
wrote in their journals.

Explain: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Present an image of Hopewell • Students can add any questions or ideas


Rocks, or the following Google to their KWL chart if they want to.
Maps link. Ask if they think any of • Think-Pair-Share with table groups for
the soil samples look like the soil 5 minutes about why the soil is clay-like
samples. in this area of New Brunswick.
• Share ideas with the class.
https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.8213959,-
64.5731125,3a,75y,73.72h,95.97t/data=!3m
8!1e1!3m6!1sAF1QipNL6Qa7gaNOD6Mw
UTVpveLfb91WvgjoBUWTi24M!2e10!3e1
1!6shttps:%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.co
m%2Fp%2FAF1QipNL6Qa7gaNOD6MwU
TVpveLfb91WvgjoBUWTi24M%3Dw203-
h100-k-no-pi-0-ya199.96373-ro0-
fo100!7i4186!8i1778?hl=en
• Explain that soil in the Bay of Fundy
is very clay-like, and the rocks are
weathered and eroded mostly as a
result of the tides.
• Have students do a Think-Pair-Share
about the soil in the Bay of Fundy.
After 5 minutes, have them share
their ideas with the class.
52

Elaborate: 20 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Do a quick demonstration of what • Students sit a safe distance from the


happens when water and soil demo, and watch while the teacher
interact. Pour some water into the does the demo. This gets them
first soil sample and think a-loud thinking about the effect of water on
what is happening. Shake the rocks and soil in the bay.
mixture students can see what
happens underwater in the bay when
waves crash against the
shoreline/beach.

Evaluation:

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Observe students during the • Verbally explain their answers to the


Exploration phase. teacher if asked. They also will have
• Read KWL charts and journal written at least 3 sentences in their
entries. (Appendix U) science journal.
• Use Journal Entry rubric to assess. • Have KWL charts finished for the day.
(Appendix C)
Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs check.
instructions.
Flexible Representations:
Flexible Representations: • The students will demonstrate their
• The teacher will include understanding according to their academic
conversations that they have with strengths.
their students in their assessment.
Process – Multiple Senses:
Process – Multiple Senses: • The student will be able to process the
• The teacher will ensure that the information through various senses. The
lesson includes manipulatives, student will receive a deeper understanding
visual aids, and auditory of the content as a result.
instruction.
53

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
54

Date: March 5th 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy – Erosion.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 45 minutes.

New Brunswick Science Curriculum Outcomes


GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in
life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply
these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their
knowledge.
SCO: describe the effects of wind, water, and ice on the landscape (301-5)
demonstrate a variety of methods of weathering and erosion (301-6)

New Brunswick Language Arts Curriculum:


GCO 8: Students will be expected to use writing and other forms of representation to explore,
clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings; and to use their
imaginations.
SCO: Experiment with language, appropriate to purpose, audience, and form, that enhances
meaning and demonstrates imagination in writing and other ways of representing

Learning Objectives:
I can…
• talk about how ice changes Hopewell Rocks
• tell the difference between weathering and erosion
• use creative language to show my understanding.

Tools Location

Printed copies for each student: Teacher desk.


https://globalnews.ca/news/2578029/iconic-
new-brunswick-rock-collapses/

Activity sheet for news article (one per Desk, with the article.
student). Attached in

Soil samples. Back of classroom.

Water. Back of classroom.

KWL chart. Back of classroom.

Venn Diagram. Teacher’s desk.


55

Engagement & Exploration: 15-20 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Demonstrate how water and different


soils interact.
• Pour some water into each container
of soil. • Students observe and offer suggestions
• Ask students what they see about what the water is doing in each
happening and why they think it is soil sample.
occurring.

Explain: 15 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• To further explore how water effects • As this is exploration, students will


the soil and rocks, the terms participate by asking questions when
weathering and erosion need to be they feel they need to.
introduced.
Weathering: when rocks break
into smaller pieces because they have
been changed by the environment.
Erosion: the transportation of
rocks and other materials. Typically,
rocks that have eroded cause
weathering to occur. • Students turn and talk for a minute with
• Relating these concepts back to the an elbow partner about each question.
demo, ask students to turn and talk
about the following:
1. Is it weathering or erosion that happens
when we shake the container?
2. Does weathering happen quickly or over a
long period of time?
3. How long would we have to shake the
container for our rocks to become smoother?
It takes years of repeated crashing of
waves onto rocks to break them down.
Also, when water freezes and thaws quickly,
it weathers the rock (why we get potholes),
so it makes sense that ice would also cause a
56

lot of damage to rocks – especially in


Atlantic Canada!
• Play clips about Elephant Rock
• Students think about what happened to
collapsing in March 2016. Suggested
Elephant Rock in preparation for the
links include:
activity sheet coming up.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-
brunswick/hopewell-rocks-elephant-
collapse-1.3492174
https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=mXpoqe66Lm4

Elaborate: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• To build on and present the effects • Students will read with a partner and
that water has on the rocks, we will then work together to answer the
examine what happened in our own questions about what happened to
backyard. Elephant Rock.
• Read the article as a class, and ask
students to complete the attached • Students can also add to their KWL
chart if they wish.
activity sheet. (Appendix H)
https://globalnews.ca/news/2578029/iconic-
new-brunswick-rock-collapses/ (print this
one off for students to read and respond to)

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Oral Exit Slip: Ask students to • Partner up at their tables and describe
describe the differences between weathering and erosion with an
weathering and erosion using an example.
example to a partner at their table.
• Walk around and ask students to • Alternative: write how weathering and
explain what their partner said. erosion are different and the same.
Record answers in anecdotal sheet Items that are the same go in the
(Appendix B). middle section, and things just about
57

o Alternative: Hand out a Venn erosion go in that circle, and the same
diagram (Appendix V) for for weathering.
students who prefer writing
to write the similarities and
differences.
• Also use the anecdotal sheet to note
who can give examples of how they
are alike and different.

• Collect the activity sheets and assess


with checklist & key. (Appendix W)

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs check.
instructions.
Flexible Representations:
Flexible Representations: • The students will demonstrate their
• The teacher will include understanding according to their academic
conversations that they have with strengths.
their students in their assessment.
Process – Multiple Senses:
Process – Multiple Senses: • The student will be able to process the
• The teacher will ensure that the information through various senses. The
lesson includes manipulatives, student will receive a deeper understanding
visual aids, and auditory of the content as a result.
instruction.
58

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
59

Date: March 6th 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy – Weather.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 45 minutes - 1 hour.

New Brunswick Science Curriculum Outcomes


GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in
life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply
these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their
knowledge.
SCO: Describe the effects of wind, water, and ice on the landscape (301-5)

Learning Objectives:
I can…
• describe how weather events can change the shoreline

Tools Location

Videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v= YouTube .


G5Rp9MJJGCU (erosion)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
EnDJ6_XpGfo (timelapse)

Mini-whiteboards and markers (1 of each Front of classroom, by smartboard.


per table).

Small cups of water. Back of classroom.

Shale samples for each table of students. Back of classroom, on trays.

Plastic container for the samples. Back of classroom.

Lego. Bins on bookshelf.

Science Journal. Back of classroom.


60

Engagement: 10-15 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Start by playing this timelapse of • Watch the video and think about what
Hopewell Rocks: happens in the winter.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
EnDJ6_XpGfo • Students will Turn and Talk with their
tables and write or draw a response on
• Ask students to think about how the their mini-whiteboards
water and rocks interact in winter
while watching the video.
• Distribute the mini-whiteboards and
markers to each table.
• Explain that students can draw or
write what the table thinks will
happen in the winter when ice and
the rocks have to interact.
• After 5 minutes, invite groups to
share with the class what they think
will happen. This is a time where all
ideas are welcome, and we will find
out together, what the effect of ice on
the Hopewell Rocks is during the
winter months.

Exploration: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Explain that students will be doing • One student (at each table) will pour
an experiment over the next few the water over the rock.
days. They will have a rock sample • All students will record their
covered with water that will be hypotheses in the journal.
frozen and thawed. Each group will • One student will bring the wet rock up
receive a small cup of water to pour to the container by the teacher.
onto their rock. They will then place
the rock in a container which the
teacher will put in the freezer
overnight. The next class, we will
explore what happens when the rock
is shaken and thaws.
61

• Instruct students to make a prediction


(hypothesis) about what will happen
in their Science Journals.
• Explain that the water is to only go
on the rock, add it slowly and
carefully so as not to spill any.
• Put the rocks in the freezer
overnight.

Explain: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Ask students to explain the • Students share what they remember


difference between weathering and from last day:
erosion at their table groups. Weathering: when rocks break into
smaller pieces because they have been
• Explain to students that: changed by the environment.
• Water in the Bay of Fundy is Erosion: the transportation of rocks
constantly moving, even in the and other materials. Typically, rocks
winter when it appears to be frozen. that have eroded cause weathering to
In the video, we saw how high the occur.
water reached, and where the water
interacts the most with the rock. The • Students should notice that the curved
tides in the area cause the water to parts near the middle of the rock is
move, and when frozen, the ice rubs where water/ice has weathered the
against the rock. This weathers the most.
rock, breaking pieces off. Ask
students if they can see where more
of the rock is weathered away.
• The erosion that occurs is a result of • Students can think-pair-share on the
pieces of rock hitting against mini-whiteboards why they think a
different rock. This changes the certain part of the rock is more prone
shape of the Flowerpot Rocks. to erosion and weathering.
• Ask students which part they think is • Possible responses can include the
most vulnerable to weathering and high/low water mark, ice, larger pieces
erosion. of rock, etc.
• Remind students we have our
freezing rocks to help explain this as
well.
62

Elaborate: 5-10 minutes


What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• To present how wind can possible • Partners are found by raising one hand
affect the rocks in the Bay of Fundy, and making eye contact with someone
tell students they will have 5 minutes at a different table.
to build a rock out of Lego with a • Students will cooperate to build a
partner. Lego rock (can be in the shape of a
Flowerpot rock, but not required).
• To simulate the wind, students will
blow onto the rock to see if it topples
over. This is unlikely, but it shows
how rocks are strong, but wind is also
powerful.

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Note students’ ability to distinguish • Be able to describe how weathering,


between weathering and erosion, as erosion, and ice affect the rocks and
well as how they explain the impact therefore, the coastline, in the Bay of
of ice on the rocks. (Appendix C) Fundy.

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs check.
instructions.
Flexible Representations:
Flexible Representations: • The students will demonstrate their
• The teacher will include understanding according to their academic
conversations that they have with strengths.
their students in their assessment.
Process – Multiple Senses:
Process – Multiple Senses: • The student will be able to process the
• The teacher will ensure that the information through various senses. The
lesson includes manipulatives, student will receive a deeper understanding
visual aids, and auditory of the content as a result.
instruction.
63

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
64

Date: March 7th 2018


Topic: Bay of Fundy – Soil.
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 45 min - 1 hour

New Brunswick Science Curriculum Outcomes


GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in
life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply
these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their
knowledge.
GCO: Students will develop the skills required for scientific and technological inquiry, for
solving problems, for communicating scientific ideas and results, for working collaboratively,
and for making informed decisions.
SCO: describe ways in which soil is formed from rocks (301-4)

Learning Objectives:
I can…
• explain how rocks make soil.

Tools Location

Frozen rocks and magnifying glasses. Freezer (rocks) & magnifying glasses are in the
cupboard at the back of the room.

Soil Samples (same as before). Back of the classroom.

KWL Charts & science journals. Teacher desk & bin in the back of the classroom.
65

Engagement: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Distribute soil samples to each table. • Students share what they wanted to
We already know soils are made learn about soil from their group’s
from different things, and one of KWL chart.
those things is sediment. Ask
students to read from their KWL • Students turn and talk with their table
charts what they wanted to learn or elbow partner why different soils
about soil formation. are made from different rocks, and
• Ask students to share with a partner how that effects the habitat.
what they think the different soil
samples are made from and why.
Also, to connect with the habitat,
what type of plants might grow in
each type of soil?

Exploration: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Hand out the rock samples from last • Examine the rock using magnifying
class and magnifying glasses. Ask glass and write what happened as it
students to record in their KWL what thaws. Did the rock crack? Does it
happened to the rocks. look the same? Did pieces break
away?
• So, they can add to the L what
happens when rocks get wet and
freeze.

Explain: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• These soil samples are all made from • As this is being explained, students
different rocks, and rocks are can add to their KWL charts what they
affected by the environment, as we are learning or more questions they
can tell from our small experiment. have (W&L sections).
• Therefore, when rocks get wet and
the water freezes and thaws, the
ice/water carries pieces of rock with
66

it. This leaves holes or cracks in the


rock, which are further affected by
the wind, rain, and elements of
nature. This is what contributed to
Elephant Rock falling apart in 2016
as we saw earlier. Then, pieces of
rock get pushed around and shaped
by the water, breaking down into
miniscule particles or sediment, thus
becoming part of the soil on the crust
of the Earth.

Elaborate: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• To further demonstrate the effects of • Record in Science journal what


the environment on rocks, collect all happened when the rock samples were
the samples and put them in a large shaken and combined with water and
container with water and a lid. pressure.
Shake the container to mimic the
effect of waves, wind, and pressure
on the rocks. Students can take turns
shaking the container if you feel they
can do so without causing a mess. If
not, continue vigorously for 3 or so
minutes. After time is up, separate
the rocks from the water and have
students record what happened.

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Use Journal rubric. (Appendix C) • Write and participate using scientific


• Read KWL to help plan lessons. language (i.e., appropriate use of
• Also, take anecdotal notes as usual weathering/erosion, hypothesis, result)
when students are working, and take in their entries.
note of who has (and does not have)
the ability to respond to questions
about the topic. (Appendix B)
67

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs check.
instructions.
Flexible Representations:
Flexible Representations: • The students will demonstrate their
• The teacher will include understanding according to their academic
conversations that they have with strengths.
their students in their assessment.
Process – Multiple Senses:
Process – Multiple Senses: • The student will be able to process the
• The teacher will ensure that the information through various senses. The
lesson includes manipulatives, student will receive a deeper understanding
visual aids, and auditory of the content as a result.
instruction.

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
68

Date: March 9th 2018.


Topic: Final Project
Intended Grade: Four (4).
Length of Time: 2-3 hours of class

New Brunswick Science Curriculum Outcomes:


(As this is a summative project, students will be assessed on if they achieved the GCO only)
GCO: Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in
life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply
these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their
knowledge.

New Brunswick Language Arts Curriculum:


(The physical product will be how this is assessed)
GCO 8: Students will be expected to use writing and other forms of representation to explore,
clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings; and to use their
imaginations.
SCO: Experiment with language, appropriate to purpose, audience, and form, that enhances
meaning and demonstrates imagination in writing and other ways of representing

Learning Objectives:
I can…
• creatively display what I learned in this unit
• use creative language and images to show my understanding.

Tools Location

Bristol board. Art cupboard.

Laptop with internet access (or ipad). Technology cart.

Lined paper. Back of classroom.

Plain white paper. Back of classroom.


69

Engagement & Exploration: 10 minutes

What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Explore the Hopewell Rocks website • Students think about the layout of the
on the smartboard. website.
• Ask students what information it • Students observe and offer suggestions
shares under each heading. about what information the website
shares.

Explain: 10 minutes
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Explain that students will be • Students think about what type of


creating a project that shows what project they want to do.
they learned about the habitat, rocks,
and tides at the Bay of Fundy.
• They may choose a poster (physical
or online), a concept map, or a 1
minute video of themselves.
• Use a piece of paper to record which
students are doing which • Students raise their hand to share their
representation, and if they are choice with the teacher.
working in a pair or not.
• Before students work on their own,
ask the class what they think is
important to include. (what would
visitors like to know?) • Students work by themselves or with
• Take suggestions and model a their partner to think-pair-share what
brainstorm web on the board. ideas they think are important to include
in the project.
o Students who choose the
concept map will need to add
more than what is added as a
class.
o Make sure habitats, rocks,
and tides are included.
70

Elaborate: rest of first class, all of the second/third class.


What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Give students the rest of the class to • Plan project.


plan their project. • If doing a poster, students can plan
• Walk about and answer any where the images and text might go on
questions students may have. a piece of white paper before using
• During classes 2 and 3, it is a work Bristol board.
period, so support students as • Before starting the good copy, bring
the draft to the teacher to proof.
required.
• Use the 2nd and 3rd classes to finish the
• Check student drafts before they start
project.
the final copy.

Evaluation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Students Will Do

• Invite students to co-create a list of • Students will share what the product
important details for a visual should include and look like (e.g.,
representation (content and neatness) well-organized, not messy,
that will be posted in the classroom information from class)
for them to self-assess. • Students can self-asses using the
• Use the attached checklist to evaluate posted list before handing in their final
student work. (Appendix I) product after having class time to
• Students can do a gallery walk when work on it.
everyone is finished to show their
products. (Appendix X)

Differentiation:
What the Teacher Will Do What the Student Will Do
Check for Understanding: Check for Understanding:
• The teacher will ensure students • The students will communicate their
understand the content and the understanding through the thumbs check.
instructions.
Flexible Representations: Flexible Representations:
• The teacher will include conversations • The students will demonstrate their
that they have with their students in their understanding according to their academic
assessment. strengths.
Process – Multiple Senses:
Process – Multiple Senses: • The student will be able to process the
• The teacher will ensure that the lesson information through various senses. The
includes manipulatives, visual aids, and student will receive a deeper understanding
auditory instruction. of the content as a result.
71

Notes for Next Time:


Overall Comments Suggestions
72

References

1G Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from


http://www.onegeology.org/extra/kids/earthprocesses/tides.html

(n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from https://www.flocabulary.com/unit/moon-phases/

Amazing Places. (Director). (2014). Hiking the FBR [Motion Picture].

Arkive, W. (2018). Create a Shoebox Habitat. Retrieved from


https://www.arkive.org/education/fun-stuff
Association, N. S. (2015). 3-LS4-3 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity. Retrieved from
Next Generation Science Standards: https://www.nextgenscience.org/pe/3-ls4-3-
biological-evolution-unity-and-diversity
Association, N. S. (2015). 4-LS1-1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes.
Retrieved from Next Generation Science Standards:
https://www.nextgenscience.org/pe/4-ls1-1-molecules-organisms-structures-and-
processes
B. (2014, March 17). How Do Tides Work? Retrieved February 18, 2018, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ohDG7RqQ9I

[Billy Blue Hair]. (2012, August 12). Billy blue hair – What is erosion? [Video File]. Retrieved

from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5Rp9MJJGCU

Burzynski, M. (1999). Fundy: Bay of the Giant Tides. Alma: The Fundy Guide Inc.

Carle, E. (1970). The Tiny Seed. New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.
Department of Education. (2008). Science 4 Curriculum. Retrieved from Government of New
Brunswick:
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/ed/pdf/K12/curric/Science/Science-
Grade4.pdf
Earth Science for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from
http://www.ducksters.com/science/earth_science/ocean_tides.php

Facts for Kids about Moon Phases. (2017, August 23). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from
http://easyscienceforkids.com/best-moon-phases-for-kids-video-for-kids/

Google. (n.d.). [Google Maps 360 picture of Hopewell Rocks tourist site]. Retrieved February
19, 2018, from https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.8213959,-
73

64.5731125,3a,75y,73.72h,95.97t/data=!3m8!1e1!3m6!1sAF1QipNL6Qa7gaNOD6MwU
TVpveLfb91WvgjoBUWTi24M!2e10!3e11!6shttps:%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com
%2Fp%2FAF1QipNL6Qa7gaNOD6MwUTVpveLfb91WvgjoBUWTi24M%3Dw203-
h100-k-no-pi-0-ya199.96373-ro0-fo100!7i4186!8i1778?hl=en

Gosner, K. (2014). A Field Guide to the Atlantic Seashore:From the Bay of Fundy to Cape
Hatteras. Boston: Hought Mifflin Company.
Kids, C. C. (Director). (2015). Home Sweet Habitat [Motion Picture].
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Moon Activities for Kids: Phases of the Moon. (2017, January 14). Retrieved February 18, 2018,
from https://www.kcedventures.com/blog/hands-on-science-phases-of-the-moon-
activities-for-kids

Moon Info. (n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://www.thehopewellrocks.ca/learning-


centre/moon-info

N. (2014, September 16). Moon Phases Demonstration. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wz01pTvuMa0

National Science Teachers Association. (2015). Next generational science standards: Grade 4 –

Earth’s system. Retrieved from

http://ngss.nsta.org/DisplayStandard.aspx?view=pe&id=83

[News 1130]. (2016, March 15). Video: New brunswick’s famous site elephant rock collapses

[Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXpoqe66Lm4

New Brunswick Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (1998). Atlantic

Canada English language arts curriculum: Elementary 4-6. Retrieved from

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guageArts-Grade4-6.pdf

New Brunswick Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (2002). Atlantic

Canada science curriculum: Grade 3. Retrieved from


74

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/ed/pdf/K12/curric/Science/Science-

Grade3.pdf

New Brunswick Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (2002). Atlantic

Canada science curriculum: Grade 4. Retrieved from

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/ed/pdf/K12/curric/Science/Science-

Grade4.pdf

Phases of the Moon Kids Encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from
https://kids.kiddle.co/Phases_of_the_Moon

Places, A. (Director). (2014). This Bay of Fundy Estuary is Amazing and Teaming with Life!
[Motion Picture].
Places, A. (Director). (2014). Thousand of Bay of Fundy Shore Birds [Motion Picture].
Sediment [Def. 2]. (n.d.). In Dictionary.com. Retrieved February 19, 2018, from

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/sediment

Snair, K. (2015). Bay of Fundy's Hopewell Rocks. Riverview: Chocolate River Publishing.

Snair, K. [Kevin Snair]. (2010, October 13). The Hopewell rocks – Official time lapse video of

45.6 foot tide [Video File]. Retrieved from

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EnDJ6_XpGfo

Steeves, S. (2016, March 16). Iconic new Brunswick flowerpot rock collapses: Park official.

Global News. Retrieved from https://globalnews.ca

T. (2016, August 02). 360 Degrees – The Hopewell Rocks // 360 degrés des rochers Hopewell
Rocks. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-
ZFopdKVHDw

Theatre NB. (2012). Shorebirds & Wildlife. Retrieved from The Hopewell Rocks:
http://www.thehopewellrocks.ca/learning-centre/shorebirds-wildlife

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75

moon.html

The Phases of the Moon for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2018, from
http://www.ducksters.com/science/phases_of_the_moon.php

Thurston, H. (1990). Tidal Life. Toronto: Nimbus Publishing Ltd.

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centre/tide-tables

Weldon, T. (2016, March 15). Hopewell rocks collapse ‘part of the wonder of nature’: Tourism

minister doesn’t expect elephant rock crash to hurt tourist traffic. CBC News. Retrieved

from www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick
76

Appendix A- Assessment Tools


77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Appendix B
Anecdotal Notes – Plant Demonstration: Date: __________________
Name Observation Notes Reflections

Bill

Jen

Adam

Becky

Peter

Ashley

Steve

Michelle
87

Dan

Lilly

Phillip

Sally

Jason

Angela

Brandon
88

Susan

Nathan

Donna

Lucas

Gwen
89

Appendix C
Assessment – Science Journal
Points
1 2 3 4

Few entries have Some entries have Most entries have Almost all entries
Completed work completed work completed work completed have work
Work throughout the throughout the unit. throughout the unit. completed
unit. Many entries Some entries are FEW entries are throughout the
are missing. missing. missing. unit. NO entries
are missing.
Few drawings and Some drawings and Most drawings and Majority of
written written explanations written explanations drawings and
explanations describe observations describe written
describe clearly. Some observations clearly. explanations
observations sentences reflect the Most observations describe
Keeping clearly. question being use complete observations
Records Incomplete answered (complete sentences. It is easy clearly. Complete
sentences are sentences). Drawings to know which sentences are
used. It is hard to are clear but not experiment is being almost always
know which labeled. observed. Drawings used. Drawings are
experiment the are colored and labeled, colored
observations are labeled. and include
about. Drawings details.
are not clear or
labeled.
Journal entries are Some journal entries Most journal entries Almost all of the
not organized and are organized and are organized and journal entries are
very difficult to easy to follow. Many easy to follow. Few easy to follow.
follow. Numbers, are not. Numbers, are not. Numbers, Numbers, bullet
bullet points and bullet points and bullet points and points and spaces
spaces are spaces are spaces are are ALMOST
Organization RARELY used to SOMETIMES used USUALLY used to ALWAYS used to
separate different to separate different separate different separate different
observations and observations and observations and observations and
answers. answers. answers. answers.
Notebook entries Some notebook Most notebook Majority of
Neatness are messy and entries are easy to entries are easy to notebook entries
difficult to read. read. read. are neat and easy
to read.

Total
90

Appendix D
Assessment – Wildlife Research Report Activity

Students Name: _________________________ Date: _________________________

Item Required Yes No

1. The activity sheet was complete.

2. The student chose a relevant animal.

3. The animal is properly identified.

4. The student was able to follow directions.

Additional Comments
91

Appendix E
Assessment – Animal Habitat

Students Name: _________________________ Date: _________________________

Item Required Yes No

1. The habitat was completed.

2. Effort was made to create a relevant habitat for chosen animal.

3. There was an appropriate level of creativity.

4. The student was able to follow directions.

Additional Comments
92

Appendix F
Assessment – Moon Phase Activity Sheet

Students Name: _________________________ Date: _________________________

Item Required Yes No

1. The activity sheet was complete.

2. The phases of the Moon are in the correct order.

3. The phases of the Moon are properly labeled.

4. The student was able to follow directions.

Additional Comments
93

Appendix G
Assessment – Moon Phase Flipbook
***Evaluate the student using the following three-point system. Place a check mark in the
category that they fall in, according to the amount of quality work that produced***

Student Name: _________________________ Date: _________________________

Requirements Points

Three Points: Had more than eight Moon phases in the correct order.

Two Points: Had more than four Moon phases in the correct order.

One Point: Had more than one, but less than four Moon phases in the correct order.

Additional Comments
94

Appendix H
Article Comprehension Answers: (written as if a student were responding)
1. Kevin Snair said Elephant Rock fell because of the changing temperature in the spring.
2. It was weathering that caused the rock to collapse. I know because no rocks were transported,
they just fell.
3. Tourists need to be careful because rocks could fall at any moment. The rocks are really big,
so they would hurt if they fell on you.
4. Yes, because Kevin Snair said freezing and warming water caused the rock to fall.

Checklist:
____ Did students get 3 or more questions right?
____ Did students explain their thinking?
____ Did students use the article to support their ideas?
____ Did students use proper grammar and punctuation?
For students who did not get at least 3 checkmarks here, or who did not get a check in the first
part (3 or more right on the activity sheet), conference with them individually or in small groups
to check for understanding or to work on how to find important details from a text.
95

Appendix I

Example Assessment Checklist (this should resemble the class list as stated in “evaluation”):

Place a checkmark in the blank if the following information/items are present in the project:

Habitat: _____ Animals that live here.

_____ Location.

_____ Plants found in the habitat.

Rocks: _____ Mention of weathering and erosion.

_____ Interesting fact about the rocks.

Tides: _____ Mention of the moon.

_____ High and low tide information.

Presentation: _____ Images and text.

_____ Easy to read, organized

References: ____ Were they given?

References (what I would expect from a student):

http://bayoffundytourism.com/travel/logistics/

https://imgur.com/qWZVapD

http://www.thehopewellrocks.ca/
96

Appendix J

Wildlife Research Report by: ______________________________


Wildlife Name:
This wildlife animal is a Amphibian Bird Fish Mammal Insect
Reptile
A picture of my animal Facts about my Animal

Where it lives: ___________________________________


What it eats: ____________________________________
Size: _____________________________________________
Color: ____________________________________________
Predators: _______________________________________

Three interesting facts about my animal

My animal’s habitat
97

Appendix K

Two Facts I Learned


Look at someone’s animal habitat. Write down two new facts you have learned about that
animal.

Fact one:

Fact two:
98

Appendix L

Parts of a Flower
Stem
Leaf
Seeds
Flower
Roots
99

Appendix M
Plant Observation
What do you see?

Type of seed planted:

Day 1: Day 2: Day 3: Day 4:

Day 5: Day 6: Day 7: Day 8:

Day 9: Day 10: Day 11: Day 12:

Day 13: Day 14: Day 15: Day 16:


100

Appendix N
..\Downloads\FOUND IN BAY OF FUNDY (2).pdf
101

Appendix O

Student Instruction Sheet

Background Information…

As the Moon circles the Earth, the shape of the Moon appears to change;
this is because different amounts of the illuminated part of the Moon are
facing us. The shape varies from a Full Moon (when the Earth is between
the Sun and the Moon) to a New Moon (when the Moon is between the
Sun and the Earth).
The revolution of the Moon around the Earth causes the Moon to appear
to change shape in the sky. These apparently different shapes are called
"phases" of the Moon.
The Moon passes through a cycle of eight phases which repeats itself
every 29.5 days. There is no definite starting point for the cycle, but
phases follow one behind the other in a strict order.

The diagram above shows what the different phases of the Moon would
look like as seen from Earth.
The Moon repeats certain phases: there are two crescents, gibbous, and
half phases each month (each cycle).

Steps to Follow…

1. Read the background information carefully.


2. Colour the darkened portion of the moon with a pencil or black
crayon/ marker.
3. Cut out each section and staple them in order.
4. Flip through when finished to see how the moon changes phases.
102

Appendix P

Activity Sheet
103

Appendix Q
104

Appendix R
105

Appendix S
Science Journal Insert – Hopewell Rocks
106

Appendix T
107

Appendix U
108

Appendix V

Venn Diagram Sheet:


Name: ______________________ Date: ___________________

Erosion Both Weathering


109

Appendix W

Name:________________________ Date: ___________________

Elephant Rock Collapsed in New Brunswick!


You are going to investigate why this rock in the Bay of Fundy has changed in the past 100
years!
Read the article from 2016 to find out more,
and answer the following questions.
1. Why did a piece of Elephant Rock collapse
according to Kevin Snair?
_______________________________________

_______________________________________

_______________________________________

2. What type of force (weathering or erosion) caused the rock to fall apart? How do you know?
______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

3. Might there be any safety concerns for tourists about rocks falling at Hopewell Rocks?
Explain why you think that way.
______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

4. Do you think water had anything to do with the collapse? Why or why not?
______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________
Image retrieved February 2018 from: https://imgur.com/qWZVapD
110

Appendix X

Summative Project Example:


111

Appendix Y

Learning Centre Application (Enrichment):


The learning centre for this unit will be used as an enrichment station with a wide variety
of activities. The centre introduces the Bay of Fundy, specifically the Hopewell Rocks, as it is
one of the most recognizable places in the area.
As the unit focuses on the habitats, plants, soil, moon phases and tides, the centre
provides students the chance to thoroughly explore each of these topics. There may be images of
animals and plants found in the bay, as well as of the Rocks themselves. In the station, there are a
variety of activities to accommodate each student in the class and everyone will find something
of interest. To present soil, containers of different soil types can be placed at the centre, along
with a container (or spray bottle) of water so students can explore what happens when soil and
water interact. Soils can be further explored with magnifying glasses and by feeling the
soil. The centre features an interactive tide net that demonstrates high and low tide, which are
the highest in the world. There is also a moon phase booklet that students can make for
themselves. Additionally, coloring pages of the habitat, plants, and animals may be
included. Also, to improve understanding of the unit’s vocabulary, students can use the word
wall to solve the crossword puzzles (at different skill levels). There is also the option to include
a plant identification activity that reinforces the parts of a plant. Students can complete a plant
brochure if they are interested. The station is equipped with a variety of books that target specific
topics related to the Bay of Fundy. With their student friendly language and beautiful pictures,
students can immerse themselves into the beauty of Bay of Fundy without even leaving the
classroom.
Due to the wide variety of activities that can be incorporated, as well as the selection of
books (see reference list for suggestions), students can peruse the centre when they finish the
planned activities during any lesson. Providing a stimulating enrichment centre engages students
in the learning process, which is the goal of such a space in the classroom.
See below for an example of this learning centre:

Photo courtesy of Kelsie Poole, 2018