2 007

TP-2 Report Roadmap
Towards a Written Deliverable
Welcome to the TP-2 Report Roadmap, a blueprint designed to develop a tightly edited and extremely well-written and academically researched document.

Shawna Pandya ISU - MSS07 4/20/20071

Contents
0 REPORT CONSOLIDATION PROCEDURES AND TASKS.......................... .........5 CHAPTER MANAGERS/RESEARCH DIRECTORS – PLEASE READ THIS CHAPTER BEFORE YOU BEGIN....................................................................................5 1.0 NOTES:...................................................................................................................5 1.1 INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHAPTER MANAGERS..................................................................... 5 0.1 REPORT STATUS........................................................................................................6 0.2 CHAPTER MANAGEMENT WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE............................................ .6 0.3 PART I: BUILDING THE CHAPTER FRAMEWORK..............................................................7 0.4 PART II: PROCEDURE FOR PULLING TOGETHER A PROPER CHAPTER................................. 8 0.5 REPORT COMPLETION WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE................................................11 0.6 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE...............................................12 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................... ............13 1.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................13 CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION.................................................... ...........................14 CHAPTER 2 – THE PLAN/OVERVIEW (MAKE IT CLEAR TO THOMAS THAT THIS IS AN INTRODUCTION TO OUR ENTIRE REPORT, NOT JUST THE TWO TECHNICAL CHAPTERS)............................................... .......................15 2 PROJECT G.A.S. P.U.M.P...................................................................... ...................17 2.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................17 3 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. ARCHITECTURE & ITS OPTIMIZATION: STORAGE...........18 3.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................18 CHAPTER 3 – THE DETAILS.................................................................... ................18 4 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. ARCHITECTURE & ITS OPTIMIZATION: DELIVERY.........21 4.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................21 CHAPTER 4 – TO MAXIMIZE THE PERFORMANCE, DURABILITY & UTILITY OF OUR PRODUCT.......................................................... ..........................21 5 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. – THE BUSINESS PLAN.................................................. ..............23 5.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................23 [JUN NEEDS DATA FROM STORAGE AND DELIVERY THE NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS (E.G. WRT STORAGE & DELIVERY, BY-PRODUCTS, MARKET DEMAND BEFORE HE CAN COME UP WITH NUMBERS].................................23 CHAPTER 5 – THE BUSINESS CASE................................................................... ...23 6 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. - THE POLITICO-LEGAL PERSPECTIVE...............................25 6.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................25

2

CHAPTER 6 – OVERCOMING THE POLITICAL & LEGAL BARRIERS (CHANGE TITLE)......................................................................................................... 25 7 CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS............................... ...........................27 7.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................27 CHAPTER 7 – CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS (SHOULD BE A ‘GRAND SYNTHESIS’).................................................................................... ............27 8 EXTRAS............................................................................................ ..........................28 8.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................28 8.2 STUDENT PREFACE..................................................................................................28 12 TEAM MEMBER NAMES & AFFILIATION........................... ............................33 14 ACKNOWLEDGMENT TRACKER................................................................... ....34 15 ACRONYM TRACKER.......................................................................... .................35 16 PROOF OF PERMISSION SHEET FOR USE OF COPYRIGHTED FIGURES ................................................................................................................... ......................37 17 REQUEST FOR PERMISSION OF USE FORM............................................... ....39 APPENDIX TRACKER........................................................................................... .....40 18 INDEX OF TERMS TO BE CROSS-REFERENCED...........................................41 19 9 – REFERENCES.................................................................................... ................43

29

29

_____________________________________Chapter 0

0 Report Consolidation Procedures and Tasks

Chapter Managers/Research Directors – PLEASE READ THIS CHAPTER BEFORE YOU BEGIN 1.0Notes:
1. If you only read 2 sections, make sure it is this one and the one you are in charge of. These are cross-referenced within the Table of Contents and the Work Breakdown Structure table, so hit ‘ctrl+click’ to get there without scrolling through the document. 2. So far I have only copy-and-pasted the outline with minor edits into the relevant sections. EXPECT THESE TO CHANGE QUITE A BIT. 3. The research submissions are compiled in a separate document called ‘Compiled Submissions round 1.’ 4. Let me know if you have questions!

1.1Instructions for Chapter Managers
Welcome to the wonderful world of Chapter Management! ;) Basically, in order to pull together a first rough draft for Tuesday, I am putting you all in charge of a chapter for Tuesday (see next section for Chapter assignments). It is a lot of work, so make sure you ‘contract it out’ – i.e. delegate in order to meet your deadline! If you are too busy, delegate the Chapter Manager role to someone in your group to take care of it – but you are still responsible for having something for me by Tuesday, April 21, 2007. N.B.: There is a lot to be done, so I will try to assist you as much as possible. I have identified my general role within the chapters as noted in the table entitled ‘Report Integration Duties.’ N.B.-2: For SUBMISSIONS: Only send me your sections, not the entire document!! Delete the rest.

29

0.1Report Status
Research Group Drivers & Constraints Storage Transport Practical Implementation ~80% 20% (aiming for Thursday, April 26) Unknown 50-60% 100% by Status

Tuesday, April 24, 2007 9AM – Deliverables from Groups: • • Complete & edited detailed synopses for each chapter from each chapter manager Submit to me what you have in terms of ACTUAL chapter content at this point so I know what you are Edited & complete synopses from Shawna & Brian (?)

Wednesday, April 25, 2007 9AM – Deliverables •

0.2Chapter Management Work Breakdown Structure
Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP! Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Project G.A.S. P.U.M.P. Chapter Manager Tentative Page Allocation

Dag Shawna Rodolphe & Shawna

&

3 20 20 20 25 15 6

Chapter 3: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. Architecture & Dave Its Optimization: Storage Chapter 4: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. Architecture & Thomas Its Optimization: Delivery Chapter 5: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. – The Business Chapter 6: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. - The PoliticoLegal Perspective Chapter 7: Recommendations Conclusions Jun Jun & Shawna

& Shawna

29

Chapter 8: Extras (Table of Shawna Contents/Figures/Tables, Appendices, Index, Acronyms, Acknowledgments, Disclaimer, Authors’ List) TOTAL

25

Approx. 150

0.3Part I: Building the Chapter Framework
1. Shawna Assembles Chapter Objectives: I will start filling in the Chapter Objectives in list format based on the outline, submissions and presentations you gave on Wednesday, noting which group is doing what. It is up to you to build the chapter synopsis around it. Please note that within the objectives: a. Missing content is hi-lighted in yellow; b. New content that has been assigned to a group is hi-lighted in turquoise c. Redundant content is hi-lighted in pink d. Research that has been determined to be COPY AND PASTED is high-lighted in green. This is a huge problem and you, as RDs, are responsible for dealing with this. Andreea & Violetta have determined that all 4 research group submissions were heavily guilty of this. If this is not dealt with, I am reporting the offending parties to faculty, NO EXCEPTIONS. (note: we’ll deal with it internally first if possible) e. Chapter Managers: You are responsible for filling in the gaps, meeting with the other groups to determine who will cover the redundancy identified within your group and ‘de-plagiarizing’. Contact Shawna and let her know when you have addressed these so she can update this document. 2. Chapter Managers Build Chapter Synopsis: Fill in the Chapter Synopsis in as much detail as you can. Please see the Synopsis example that I am working on for the Introduction to see what I want (included at the end of this document). Basically, the synopsis is a blueprint as to the content and organization of each chapter. Include headings if you can. Example: Chapter 1: Introduction - Synopsis & Objectives Shawna fills in Objectives: ‘Within this chapter, we will state the following: As part of this discussion, we will define the scope of our project, stating:

29

(i)

How we defined this topic, summarizing our previous work and defending the decision to move away from Helium-3 Justify the decision to disclude Low Lunar Orbit and limit the discussion to the Lunar surface Our focus is on Hydrogen, Oxygen and H2O, but we will explore uses for by-products in later chapters, as part of our business case. The timeframe to which our project applies’

(ii) (iii)

(iv)

So whoever is in charge of this section builds the Synopsis around these Objectives, for example: ‘This chapter is intended to “set the stage” for our report. Specifically, it will start on the broad scope of human lunar exploration, what it was (a space-race for glory and national superiority, what it has become (lunar missions driven by scientific and economic return) and how we have evolved to the current framework (what drivers led us there? Mention science and the emergence of private sector interest in field). From here, we will explore the needs of the current framework (multiple needs: e.g. sustainable base, lunar transport, extraction process for fuels, fuel itself), leading into a specific discussion on the importance of transport & fuel, what research has been conducted thus far and concluding by exposing the existing literature gap that our report will address, allowing us to underline the importance of meeting this need, thereby explaining why our report is relevant and timely…’ 3. Where to Find the Content: For your reference, I compiled the submissions you gave me this week in a single 137-paged document. The content has been roughly ordered within chapters according to our outline. The full outline is at the beginning of the document while each chapter is also preceded by the outline content for that specific chapter.

0.4Part II: Procedure for Pulling Together a Proper Chapter
Please follow the procedure outlined below for making it a polished product. N.B.: When submitting to the faculty, include this list as checklist to inform them as to the chapter’s progress, so they know what level of feedback to give you (i.e. if you have only completed the first 3 steps, indicate as such so they don’t ream you for something that seems like patchwork). 1. Read the Chapter Synopsis. 2. Access the research submissions and pull together the appropriate content to reflect the Synopsis. N.B. It is up to the

29

Chapter Manager to ensure that the content reflects this synopsis. 3. Integrate the research material in a logical and coherent manner, taking care to eliminate redundancies. 4. Add the essential chapter elements: Introduction, Conclusion, transition paragraphs, discussion, etc. 5. Hi-light research gaps and changes you’d like to see in the Chapter Synopsis and resubmit to the Report Manager and PFs, who will review the changes and reassign gaps to the appropriate research group. 6. Once you have a chapter that reads coherently, POLISH IT by taking it through the edits outlined below. N.B.: Do not attempt to carry all these edits out on your own. Delegate these tasks out to other TP members, give them a deadline that allows you to complete your own work on time, and note which TP member is in charge of what. Report Integration Duties – Work Breakdown Structure Task PART I Chapter Objectives Chapter Synopsis Create a technical list of specific content the chapter needs to address A summary of how the chapter will be organized to incorporate and present the objectives Shawna Description Responsibility Deadline

Chapter 1: Dag & Shawna Chapter 2: Rodolphe Chapter 3: Dave Chapter 4: Thomas Chapter 5: Jun Chapter 6: Jun & Shawna Chapters 7&8: Shawna

PART II Transforma tion from Research Group Submission into Report Material Take the patchwork of research group submissions and weave it together into a coherent and complete chapter that flows with an introduction, conclusion and discussion [Unknown; Suggested TP members: Shawna, Scotty Rocket, Brian, Renee, Thiago, Dag]

29

Content Audit

Read and edit the Chapter from beginning to end for flow and readability, ensuring that the chapter does not seem like a patchwork Edit for spelling, grammar, punctuation and sentence structure. Check that the work complies with the formatting specification with respect to font, margins, spacing, indentation, etc. Check that citations that appear in the text appear in the final reference list and vice-versa. Check that formatting specifications are met. Randomly cross-check references to check for copy-and-pasting. Note where citations are needed and/or are excessive. Edit any data, calculations & equations; doublecheck both the equations as well as the final formatting of the numbers. Also check that SI units have been used throughout and that any conversions have been done accurately. Check that all figures are legible, relevant in grayscale, and add value to the text. Check that the correct captioning protocol has been followed for figures & tables and that the content of the figures and tables are both accurate and relevant to the text.

Language Technical Edit Formatting Technical Edit

Reference Editing

Numerical Edit

Figures & Graphics Edit

29

Appendices , Acronyms, Indexing & Acknowled gments Edit

Acronyms: ensure that the acronyms that have been defined appear more than once in the text, are common acronyms and also that any acronyms in the acronym list appear in the text. Index: Check that indexed terms that are relevant. Acknowledgments: Check that persons listed for the acknowledgments list have contributed significantly to the development of the project and research. Appendices: Check that any appendices listed for inclusions actually appear in the final report, and have been thoroughly edited. Once you have completed the above, assign a TP member to read your Chapter and the Chapters immediately preceding and following for flow, consistency and redundancy. N.B.: The RM and PFs will be reading through the entire document to audit it as well.

Global Edit for Readability

0.5Report Completion Structure
[For Shawna’s Reference Only] Task Executive Summary Cover Design Mission Statement Project Name Online Accessibility to Research Submissions Appendices Index Acronyms Table Global Formatting Table of Contents, Figures, Tables Completion Strategy [See below]

Work

Breakdown

Progress [Date]

as

of

29

Extra pages: Title page, copyright page, etc. Acknowledgments Table Student Preface Faculty Preface Authorship Table Abstract Global Reference Edit Guide to the Report Structure for the Reader [JF’s suggestion; for us to decide – Shawna]

0.6Executive Summary Structure
[For Scott & Shawna’s Reference Only] Task Template Design Title Page Design CD Cover Design Text Creation & Integration Figures Integration Text Editing Global Edit of Layout, Text & Figures Submission to Faculty for Feedback 3 days before deadline Submission Hermann to Joel

Work Breakdown

Completion Strategy

Progress [Date]

as

of

29

_____________________________________Chapter 1

1 Introduction

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP! Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

Dag Shawna

&

3

1.1Synopsis & Objectives
[Note to self: define headings within this chapter: Make this a broad overview; have a diagram of where we progress; look at previous reports’ introductions; talk about Why the Moon – the Symposium and this is our solution – also distinguish what goes into the Student Preface and what goes into the intro] [Make the report direction and content clear] This chapter is intended to “set the stage” for our report [and to what extent the project itself?]. Specifically, it will start on the broad scope of human lunar exploration, what it was (talk about the Cold-War era – a space-race for glory and national superiority, what it has become (lunar missions driven by scientific and economic return – but keep it brief! 1-2 sentences max!) and how we have evolved to the current framework (what drivers led us there? Mention science and the emergence of private sector interest in field). From here, we will explore the needs of the current framework (multiple needs: e.g. sustainable base, lunar transport, extraction process for fuels, fuel itself), leading into a specific discussion on the importance of transport & fuel (and how they are necessary for ALL these activities), what research has been conducted thus far (here we bring our mini-lit review) and concluding by exposing the existing literature gap that our report will address, allowing us to underline the importance of meeting this gap, thereby explaining why our report is relevant and timely. [N.B.: In addition to external literature, here we will also specifically refer to past ISU design projects and wha will allow us to develop and how other areas have been extensively covered: for example the 2000 MSS Team Project designed a lunar surface transport system entitled “Autonomous Lunar Transport Vehicle” while the 2006 Masters’ class extensively explored in-situ resource extraction and utilization with “FERTILE Moon.” NOTE TO SELF, FINISH THIS.

29

This will lead us in into the discussion of what we will be specifically addressing: facilitating ‘post-storage’ accessibility to specific propellants necessary for lunar mobility: Hydrogen, Oxygen & H2O. As part of this discussion, we will define the scope of our project, stating: (i) (ii) (iii) How we defined this topic, summarizing our previous work and defending the decision to move away from Helium-3 Justify the decision to exclude Low Lunar Orbit and limit the discussion to the Lunar surface Our focus is on Hydrogen, Oxygen and H2O, but we will explore uses for by-products in later chapters, as part of our business case. The timeframe to which our project applies

(iv)

In the next section, we will expand upon the drivers, taking into account: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) The Exploration roadmaps of the major space agencies (Note to self: Place in Chapter 2) NOTE: When elaborating upon the plan, talk more about Brian’s idea about analogizing to Earth gas stations…. NOTE: Look into what other reports have done for other introductions and model this upon that CHAPTER 1 - Introduction A. Introduction: Setting the Stage for the Project Scope a. What is the purpose of this report? Why is there a need? What are the drivers? (To be determined) i. Why do we need Oxygen and Hydrogen, who needs it, in what format and in what quantity? (D&C) b. The timeframe of the project (Seun, D&C) c. Plans & Roadmaps of the major Agencies d. What has been done? Explain extraction here (D&C) i. Refer to previous ISU reports (Use the spreadsheet on shared drive that refers to how previous reports relate to our project) ii. Mapping the location of Oxygen and Hydrogen deposits (Wale, D&C) iii. Identifying the difficulties involved with location (sun exposure, eclipse frequency, temperature variations, etc) (Wale, D&C) iv. Identifying the exploitation methods possible (Hubert, D&C) v. Identifying the production methods possible (Hubert, D&C) e. Gap Analysis (To be determined) i. What is missing in this frame work? ii. A Market Analysis, seeking to (D&C): 1. Identify the Customers and their nature 2. Evaluate their demand, needs and interest

29

3. Brief overview of constraints (this is explained in more detail in the relevant Technical, Legal and Business sections) f. Definition of Scope & Justification (D&C & PI) i. What is included ii. What is excluded (include Helium-3, Low Lunar orbit, and explain why) g. Limitation to Storage, Transport & Delivery of HOx (D&C) i. Product & Service Overview (Carlos, Kieran, Isra, PI ) [Note – this is different from the detailed description to be provided in the Business Analysis Section] CHAPTER 2 – The Plan/Overview (make it clear to Thomas that this is an introduction to our entire report, not just the two technical chapters) A. Our proposed solution i. Definition of mission development Phase (PI) 1. Exposition of typical mission architectures and where we fit into it a. How many infrastructures will we need? (including the factory storage, delivery, gas station, etc.) b. What about Launch Vehicles? c. Description of the Lunar Surface 2. Where our customers (agencies/companies) plan to land (Seun, D&C) 3. With what vehicles (Dimitrios, D&C) 4. With which accuracy (Dimitrios, D&C) 5. Which resources (Oxygen/Hydrogen) they need (Dimitrios, D&C) 6. For which purposes (Dimitrios, D&C) 7. In what format (gases/liquid) (Dimitrios, D&C) 8. In which quantity (volume/mass) (Dimitrios, D&C) 9. Of which quality (purity) (Dimitrios, D&C) a. Assumptions (Which groups will be taking part in this?) i. Assumption of reliable technology for extraction, production & supply (D&C) ii. Not storing gaseous form, no density (Stor.) [Figures & Tables:  Timeline of our proposed project (Seun, D&C)  Lunar maps identifying zones of future hotspots of activity (Seun, D&C)  Quantification of customer needs (Seun, D&C  This section will include a Lunar Map ID’ing Deposits & byproducts (Wale, D&C)  This section will include a Lunar Map ID’ing proposed production sites (Wale, D&C)

29

This section will include a database encompassing all Oxygen and Hydrogen exploitation and production methods according to desired QUANTITY and LOCATION (Hubert, D&C)]

B. Explanation of Approach & Methods for Technical Design (Stor. & Trans.) (This section needs development) a. The Data (Trans.) i. input standards for sample “day in the life of a refuelling company” on Earth b. Models (Trans.) i. requirements for inputs to “set the stage” – predictions of production, storage and product user locations, other customer requirements

29

_____________________________________Chapter 2

2 Project G.A.S. P.U.M.P

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP! Chapter 2: Project G.A.S. P.U.M.P.

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

Rodolphe

20

2.1Synopsis & Objectives
NOTE: When elaborating upon the plan, talk more about Brian’s idea about analogizing to Earth gas stations… (what are the technical & economic drivers for this) (start with a diagram) (define & rationalize the project based on this) (basically have this section as detailed background information about our project) (assumptions, drivers & consumptions)

29

_____________________________________Chapter 3

3 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. Architecture & Its Optimization: Storage

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP!

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

Chapter 3: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. Architecture & Dave Its Optimization: Storage

20

3.1Synopsis & Objectives
Update from Dave: STORAGE Abstract 1. Introduction 1.1 Problem Identified 2. Challenges and Potential Solutions 2.1. Technologies to Address 3. Short Term Solution 3.1 LSAM Modifications 3.2 Operational Usage 4. Long Term Solution 5. Discussion and Conclusions CHAPTER 3 – The Details A. Gap 1: Storage [D&C will output storage vehicle specifications to Stor.] [Figures:  Table of Tanks for different uses] a. Introduction (Dave, Stor.) b. Materials i. Hydrogen (LH2) (Scott, Stor.) ii. Oxygen (LO2) (Alma, Stor.) iii. Form of storage (water?) (Dave, Stor.)

29

iv. Liquid 02 and H2 tanks (fixed and mobile) (Scott, Alma, Stor.) v. (Construction? Lifetime? Strength?) (To be determined) vi. Table of Tanks for different uses: (To be determined) Tank Tank Tank Duratio Tank Reliabili Designed for Capacit Usag Materi n ofShap ty Atmosphere/Vacu y e al Storag e um e

c. Subsystems i. Outgassing / Venting / Boil Off (Liquid volatiles can't be stored in open topped craters? Can they? (Not yet assigned, Stor.) ii. Thermal Control (Not yet assigned, Stor.) iii. Standardized Interfaces (valves, mechanisms) (Andreea, Stor.) iv. Storage Specifications (To be determined) 1. Design (Calculated capacity, chosen materials) 2. Capacity 3. Location [To be defined later by Stor.] vii. Other Issues 1. Quality Control (Not yet assigned, Stor.) 2. Maintenance (Not yet assigned, Stor.) B. Heading 2 Gap 2: Delivery & Distribution Design (Trans.) [D&C will output delivery vehicle specifications to Trans.] [Allocation of Trans. Researchers to be inputted] a. Introduction & Possible Alternatives i. Fixed Infrastructure ii. Aerial VS ground ways. iii. Supporting carriage (rail, conveyor, gondola) b. Mobile Platforms i. Wheeled vehicles ii. Tracked Vehicles iii. Ballistic Vehicles iv. Walkers v. Hoppers c. Criteria for Selection and Trade-Space Analysis i. Cost ii. Matching of Customer Needs (delivery time and frequency, volumes required…)

29

iii. Level of Autonomy iv. Technical Readiness and Feasibility d. Design Parameters i. eg. distance between storage facilities and product users ii. Energy Supply iii. Propulsion Alternatives iv. Other v. [From Shawna: Put a note for content to include: criteria used as inputs for the system optimization tool & reasons for selection] e. Design of the Delivery System i. Propulsion System ii. Energy Supply System iii. Communication System iv. Tank & Interface v. Other

29

_____________________________________Chapter 4

4 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. Architecture & Its Optimization: Delivery

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP! Chapter 4: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. Architecture & Its Optimization: Delivery

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

Thomas

20

4.1Synopsis & Objectives
CHAPTER 4 – To Maximize the Performance, Durability & Utility of Our Product A. Trade-off Studies & Options for System Optimization (Stor. & Trans.) a. Optimization as a Design Aid; Using Optimization for Operations (Stor. & Sport) i. Purpose of optimization: Needed to overcome limitations of current technology, maximize performance, etc. (Which group will do this?) ii. how [computer] modeling is useful for this application to choose between disparate [storage and] delivery systems (fixed and mobile, manned and unmanned) b. Location Optimization (Stor.) i. methods for comparing storage locations based on predicted production facility and customer locations c. The Engine: Preferred Algorithms i. describes algorithms suitable for continuous surface with fixed and moving locations d. Route Optimization (Trans.) i. methods for comparing delivery system designs based on predicted routes e. Trade-offs for Financial, Technical, Mass & Performance Optimization (formerly: Optimization Applied to the Business Case) (Stor. & Trans.)

29

i. leads back to the business plan and how this method will help management with risk assessment and predictions ii. Groups, please note the change to this section’s title – it will require more analysis – S. B. Technical Risk Assessment & Mitigation Strategies (Stor. & Trans.) a. Intro to Risks considered (Stor. & Trans.) b. Reliability & Maintenance Operations i. System design life ii. Failure prediction and mitigation through planned maintenance c. Health & Safety Issues i. Health Monitoring (Sensors, Gauges) (William, Stor.) ii. Managing Human Safety on the Road (Trans.) iii. describes specific hazards to astronaut health from cargo and delivery system and mitigation strategies [Note: this section may be unnecessary if we choose un-crewed transportation] iv. Environmental Issues (Spill Management) (LaureHelene, Stor. & UNKNOWN from Trans. – who?) 1. describes potential for harm to the lunar environment and mitigation, specifically spills, ground-breaking and waste management

29

_____________________________________Chapter 5

5 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. – The Business Plan

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP! Chapter 5: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. – The Business Plan

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

Jun

25

5.1Synopsis & Objectives
[Jun needs data from Storage and Delivery the numerical solutions (e.g. wrt Storage & Delivery, by-products, market demand before he can come up with numbers] CHAPTER 5 – The Business Case A. Business Analysis a. Business Case Assumptions (Henrik, Kenneth, PI) i. Private Companies ii. National Government and Private Corporate Entity iii. Multinational Government and Private Corporate Entity iv. Multinational Government, Private and Venture Capital v. Agencies vi. IAC (Note to PI – please clarify what you mean) b. Consider their evolution over time (Note to PI – please clarify what you mean) c. Marketing Analysis (D&C & PI) i. Industry Overview (Sebastian, D&C & Pierre, PI) 1. Perform a Competitors’ Analysis d. Detailed Description of Products/By products/Service/Spinoff definition (as opposed to general description in the introduction) (PI & D&C) i. Product definition: H2, O2, H2O (Carla, Kieran and Isra)

29

ii.

iii.

iv.

v. vi.

1. Byproduct (Analysis of which ones: Platinumfuel cells catalyst, CO-atmosphere control, He4-Pressurization) (Hubert, D&C) 2. Spin-off definition (PI) 3. Service definition: (Carla, Kieran and Isra, PI) 1. Self service gas station analog 2. Full service gas station analog 3. Storage of H2 or O2 4. Spin-Off Services Commercialization plan (Carla, Kieran, and Isra, PI) 1. Partnerships (spin-ins\spin-offs) products use and service provision (with GM, Honda, Chrysler, Texaco, Energia, space tourism industry-offering stay for Astronauts) Price & Cost Analysis (Henrik, Kenneth, PI) 1. Cost Category 2. Cost Breakdown Structure 3. Cost Model (FERTILE Model from MSS/MSM 2006 TP) 4. Total Cost Estimation (Interface with other groups) 5. Financial Analysis 1. Revenues 2. Net Present Value 3. Capital Expenditures 6. Price Determination Risk Assessment (Carla, Kieran and Isra, PI) 1. Political 2. Business 3. Policy (Public Support) Place and Distribution (Carla, Isra) Promotion (Carla, Isra)

29

_____________________________________Chapter 6

6 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. - The PoliticoLegal Perspective

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP! Chapter 6: G.A.S. P.U.M.P. - The PoliticoLegal Perspective

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

Jun & Shawna

15

6.1Synopsis & Objectives
CHAPTER 6 – Overcoming the Political & Legal Barriers (change title) A. Barriers to Implementation (D&C) (change title to something more along the lines of “Short overview of the Existing Legal Regime)) a. Policy (Violetta, Carlos, PI) i. Objective of the policy ii. Political issues iii. Economic iv. Scientific v. Societal (Kieran) vi. Private involvement policy issues b. Politico-Legal Considerations i. Property rights vs. national property ii. International Legislation (e.g. OST, Moon Treaty) (Pierre, D&C) iii. National Trade & Export control regulations. ITAR as an example (Pierre, D&C) B. LEGAL PROPOSAL (Violetta, Carlos, PI) a. International Cooperation i. Company structure ii. Equity share and funds b. Commercial utility i. Short overview of the existing legal regime for Lunar resources exploitation c. Enabling legality of the project i. Exclusively scientific purposes exploitation

29

ii. Adoption of temporary national legislation iii. Amendment of the Outer Space Treaty iv. Ratification of the Moon agreement, Establishment of international regime for exploitation of resources v. New treaty for exploitation of lunar resources d. Establishing the framework of contracts awarded to subcontractors (Eg for Production) (Pierre, D&C) i. Sample Contract to be awarded to sub-contractors (PI) C. Business Law (PI) (change title to something more reflective, e.g. “Other Legal Considerations”) i. Liability ii. Insurance iii. Warrantee iv. Taxes v. Contracts (Models) (P. Imp & Pierre, D&C) 1. Clients 2. Sub-contractors vi. Certification (PI) c. Ethical Considerations i. Planetary Protection Issues

29

_____________________________________Chapter 7

7 Conclusions & Recommendations

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP! Chapter 7: Recommendations Conclusions

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

& Shawna

6

7.1Synopsis & Objectives
CHAPTER 7 – Conclusions & Recommendations (Should be a ‘grand synthesis’) A. Conclusion: The Result (Writer To be determined) a. Summary of Needs, Technical Plan, Legal/Technical Constraints, Plans to overcome Constraints, Benefits) b. Future Directions & Recommendations c. Concluding Statement

29

_______________________________________Chapter 8

8 Extras

Chapter Title Note: These are only working titles only! Our project is not actually named GAS PUMP!

Chapter Manager

Tentative Page Allocation

Chapter 8: Extras (Table of Shawna Contents/Figures/Tables, Appendices, Index, Acronyms, Acknowledgments, Disclaimer, Authors’ List, 1-paged abstract & guide to Report Structure for Readers’ Use)

25

8.1Synopsis & Objectives 8.2Student Preface
GAS PUMP (General Architectural Structure: Procedures for Usage of Moon Propellants): The Big Picture During the decades of the Cold War Era, the ‘Space Race’ pushed humanity to farther frontiers, sending the first humans beyond the confines of the Earth, first to near-Earth space and low-Earth orbits, but eventually to the Moon itself. Despite the initial pride and excitement stemming from these monumental achievements, the magnitude of these large-scale ventures proved themselves to be unsustainable, especially without the competition of the Cold War as a driver. As a result, the post-Cold War decades bore witness to a significant decline in interest in ambitious human ventures, amongst the general public and by way of resulting decreases in dedicated funding and resources from national space agencies. This trend has recently reversed itself as political will and public interest have once again come together to reignite an interest in human exploration of the Moon, this time coupled with scientific and economic drivers. For these

29

reasons, NASA, JAXA, and ROSKOSMOS, for example, have all described plans for establishing a human presence on the Moon within the next 20 years. Importantly, amidst these plans lies the emerging realization that these new visions for lunar exploration necessitate pragmatic approaches and meticulous planning if humanity is to move beyond the previous philosophy of lunar exploration for thrill and achievement, and into an era of exploration for scientific and economic gain. The nature of this new exploration calls for elements necessary to sustainable exploratory missions and eventual lunar bases, including, for example, life support systems, communication networks, mobility methods and reliable power sources. The space agencies’ varied reasons for returning to the Moon and the activities planned on-site mean that reliable transportation will be a key element in navigating the Moon. This is a concept that is well-reviewed in the literature in several aspects, but not so much in others. For example, the 2000 ISU design project, “Autonomous Lunar Transport Vehicle,” was dedicated to a lunar transport system for crew and cargo, while the 2006 ISU project, “FERTILE Moon,” explored In-Situ Resource Utilization processes for energy and fuel usage. However, gaps still exist in this field, both within the ISU and the external literature. Realistically, if exploration is to be carried out on a Moon-wide scale, then beyond the issue of simple and accessible transport systems and fuel acquisition lies the issue of propellant accessibility: after all, fuel is of no use if it cannot be properly stored and delivered. The focus of the 2007 ISU design project, then, is exactly that: to design a lunar propellant storage and distribution system that is safe, reliable, costeffective and efficient. The value of this project is two-fold: firstly, the systems, designed with the utmost care by referencing the existing literature and experts in numerous fields, provide a fuel-accessibility architecture that will be crucial to the success of lunar exploration and mobility. Secondly, this project resists obsolescence owing to the development of a systems selection tool that outputs a ‘best’ system based on a comparison of existing technologies, qualities and assumptions – hence it can be modified as technology evolves to continue to generate the most capable and appropriate system for what is required of it. It is the intent of the GAS PUMP design team that this project will be of the utmost value in supporting lunar exploration and mobility, serving as an innovation to the future generations of lunar explorers who boldly and brazenly dare to expand humanity’s reach beyond the Earth.

29

9

10

11

Supporting Documents for Chapter Writing TP-2 Masters’ 07

29

TABLE OF CONTENTS

0 REPORT CONSOLIDATION PROCEDURES AND TASKS...................................... ...5 CHAPTER MANAGERS/RESEARCH DIRECTORS – PLEASE READ THIS CHAPTER BEFORE YOU BEGIN..........................................................................................................5 1.0 NOTES:.........................................................................................................................5 1.1 INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHAPTER MANAGERS........................................................................... 5 0.1 REPORT STATUS..............................................................................................................6 0.2 CHAPTER MANAGEMENT WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE................................................... 6 0.3 PART I: BUILDING THE CHAPTER FRAMEWORK....................................................................7 0.4 PART II: PROCEDURE FOR PULLING TOGETHER A PROPER CHAPTER....................................... 8 0.5 REPORT COMPLETION WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE......................................................11 0.6 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE.....................................................12 1 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................... ......13 1.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................13 CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION................................................................ .....................14 CHAPTER 2 – THE PLAN/OVERVIEW (MAKE IT CLEAR TO THOMAS THAT THIS IS AN INTRODUCTION TO OUR ENTIRE REPORT, NOT JUST THE TWO TECHNICAL CHAPTERS)...................................................................................... ..........15 2 PROJECT G.A.S. P.U.M.P.................................................................................. .............17 2.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................17 3 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. ARCHITECTURE & ITS OPTIMIZATION: STORAGE.................18 3.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................18 CHAPTER 3 – THE DETAILS............................................................................... ...........18 4 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. ARCHITECTURE & ITS OPTIMIZATION: DELIVERY...............21 4.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................21 CHAPTER 4 – TO MAXIMIZE THE PERFORMANCE, DURABILITY & UTILITY OF OUR PRODUCT..................................................................................................... .............21 5 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. – THE BUSINESS PLAN.............................................................. ........23 5.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................23

29

[JUN NEEDS DATA FROM STORAGE AND DELIVERY THE NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS (E.G. WRT STORAGE & DELIVERY, BY-PRODUCTS, MARKET DEMAND BEFORE HE CAN COME UP WITH NUMBERS].......................... .............23 CHAPTER 5 – THE BUSINESS CASE.................................................. .........................23 6 G.A.S. P.U.M.P. - THE POLITICO-LEGAL PERSPECTIVE.....................................25 6.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................25 CHAPTER 6 – OVERCOMING THE POLITICAL & LEGAL BARRIERS (CHANGE TITLE).......................................................................................................................... ........25 7 CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS.......................................... ......................27 7.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................27 CHAPTER 7 – CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS (SHOULD BE A ‘GRAND SYNTHESIS’)............................................................................................ ..........................27 8 EXTRAS........................................................................................................ ....................28 8.1 SYNOPSIS & OBJECTIVES...............................................................................................28 8.2 STUDENT PREFACE........................................................................................................28 12 TEAM MEMBER NAMES & AFFILIATION....................................... ......................33 14 ACKNOWLEDGMENT TRACKER................................................. ...........................34 15 ACRONYM TRACKER...................................................................................... ...........35 16 PROOF OF PERMISSION SHEET FOR USE OF COPYRIGHTED FIGURES.....37 17 REQUEST FOR PERMISSION OF USE FORM............................. ...........................39 APPENDIX TRACKER......................................................................... ............................40 18 INDEX OF TERMS TO BE CROSS-REFERENCED.............................. ...................41 19 9 – REFERENCES............................................................................................... ...........43

29

12 Team Member Names & Affiliation

Research Group: ______________________ Instructions: Please have all team members fill in the table below exactly as they would like the information to appear in the report. Name Country Degree University

13

29

14 Acknowledgment Tracker

Research Group: ______________________ Instructions: Fill in the Names & Affiliation/Positions of internal & external individuals who have played a key role in the development of your work. Acknowledgment Name Position & Affiliation

29

15 Acronym Tracker

Research Group: _____________________ Instructions: 1) Define all acronyms the first time they appear in text ONLY IF THEY ARE USED MORE THAN ONCE 2) Use only COMMON acronyms; DO NOT MAKE UP YOUR OWN 3) Verify that each acronym appears in the final version of the text 4) Add rows/delete letters as needed. LEAVE AN EMPTY ROW BETWEEN THE LAST ACRONYM AND THE NEXT LETTER. MAKE SURE ONLY THE LETTER ITSELF IS BOLDED. (See “AU” example below) A AU B Astronomical Unit

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

29

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

29

16 Proof of Permission Sheet for Use of Copyrighted Figures

Research Group: ______________________ Instructions:

29

It is imperative that we obtain permission for all figures and images we borrow, therefore please be impeccable with your permissions tracking by filling in this sheet.

Figure/Imag e

Source

Permission Details: Request Sent In? By Whom?

Permission Granted?

Proof of Permissio n Handed in to Shawna?

29

17 Request for Permission of Use Form

Dear Permissions Editor: I request permission to use the material specified below from …… (title of publication) in a section of a handbook (give title and name of editor) which I am preparing, and in future editions or revisions thereof, to be published by ……(name of publisher). In particular, I request permission to use [Title, author, and what is to be reprinted]. It is understood, of course, that full credit will be given to your publication, either as a numbered reference in the bibliography, where the citation will be given in full, or as a footnote or credit line (from (author’s name), (title of book), (publisher and place), (date of publication), (page numbers)). Your prompt consideration of this request will be appreciated. For your convenience, a release form is given below. The duplicate is for your files. Yours sincerely, ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------I hereby grant permission for the use of the material requested above. Signature ……………………….. Date ………………………….. Publisher ………………………..

29

Appendix Tracker

Research Group: ______________________ Instructions: Please indicate the names of any appendices you wish to be included in the final report

1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

29

18Index of Terms to be Cross-Referenced

Research Group: ______________________ Instructions: 1) Like many previous reports, we will be including an index if our 150page allowance permits. Therefore, please include list of all terms you wish to appear in the final index, so that we may cross-reference later. 2) Make sure that the term actually appears in your final draft. 3) Add rows/delete letters as needed. LEAVE AN EMPTY ROW BETWEEN THE LAST ACRONYM AND THE NEXT LETTER. MAKE SURE ONLY THE LETTER ITSELF IS BOLDED. A Astronomical Unit B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

29

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

29

19 9 – References

29