You are on page 1of 6

FINDINGS AND

RECOMMENDATIONS: 
YOUTH VIOLENCE PREVENTION

April 2018 

Prepared by:
Winnebago County Crime & Public Safety
Commission
Introduction
The general term "Youth Violence" is used to describe when youth between the ages of
10 and 24 years intentionally use physical force or power to threaten or harm other people.
Youth violence can take different forms. Examples include fights, bullying, threats with
weapons, and gang‐related violence. Youth violence typically involves young people hurting
other youth. All communities and all young people are affected by youth violence. Specific
types of youth violence vary across locations and groups, but no place or person is immune.
Youth can face violence from their peers in their neighborhoods, on the streets, online, and at
their schools. Regardless of where youth violence happens, the consequences are felt by
everyone‐young victims, their friends, families, neighbors, schools, communities, and local
organizations. (1)
As stated by the Centers for Disease Control (1), research on youth violence has
increased our understanding of factors that increase the likelihood that a young person will
become violent. However, risk factors are not direct causes of youth violence; instead, risk
factors contribute to youth violence.  These risk factors include:
    History of violent victimization
    Attention deficits, hyperactivity or learning disorders
    History of early aggressive behavior
    Involvement with drugs, alcohol or tobacco
    Poor behavioral control
    Deficits in social cognitive or information‐processing abilities
    High emotional distress
    History of treatment for emotional problems
    Antisocial beliefs and attitudes
    Exposure to violence and conflict in the family
    Authoritarian childrearing attitudes
    Harsh, lax or inconsistent disciplinary practices
    Low parental involvement
    Low emotional attachment to parents or caregivers
    Parental substance abuse or criminality
    Poor family functioning
    Poor monitoring and supervision of children
    Association with delinquent peers
    Involvement in gangs
    Social rejection by peers
    Lack of involvement in conventional activities
    Poor academic performance

1
    Low commitment to school and school failure
    Diminished economic opportunities
    High concentrations of poor residents
    Low levels of community participation
Protective factors buffer youth from the risks of becoming violent. Identifying and
understanding protective factors are equally as important as risk factors. Protective factors
include:
    Intolerant attitude toward deviance
    High grade point average (as an indicator of high academic achievement)
    Positive social orientation
    Highly developed social skills/competencies
    Highly developed skills for realistic planning
    Religiosity
    Connectedness to family or adults outside the family
    Ability to discuss problems with parents
    Perceived parental expectations about school performance are high
    Frequent shared activities with parents
    Consistent presence of parent during at least one of the following: when awakening, when
                arriving home from school, at evening mealtime or going to bed
    Involvement in social activities
    Commitment to school (an investment in school and in doing well at school)
    Close relationships with non‐deviant peers
    Membership in peer groups that do not condone antisocial behavior
    Involvement in prosocial activities
   
Statistics
Nationally, in 2016, 3,028 young people age 21 and under were victims  of homicide—an
average of 8.3 each day.  Those under the age of 18 accounted for 38% (1,157) of the 3,028
homicides.  Among homicide victims age 21 and younger, 74% were killed with a firearm.
Juveniles (<18 years) accounted for 10.2% of all violent crime arrests in 2015.  (2)
Data from the Rockford Police Department indicates that, from 2009‐2016, about 40%
of both victims and arrestees in aggravated discharge of a firearm were age 18 or younger, as
well as 25% of those arrested for aggravated assault/battery. (3) Additionally, about 40% of all
arrests were youth aged 24 and younger.  Almost half of all murder victims were aged 24 and
younger. (3)  During 2016, about 8‐9% of jail inmates were 18‐21 years of age. (4)
In Sticker Shock: Calculating the Full Price Tag for Youth Incarceration, the Justice Policy
Institute (JPI) showed that many states and jurisdictions, including Illinois ($111,000)  pay more

2
than $100,000 a year to confine just one child. Incarcerating youth also produces poor
outcomes over a lifetime, with youth earning less and becoming more dependent upon
government assistance. Also, it is likely that youth will commit another crime or be a victim. 
The JPI recommended shifting resources from incarcerating youth to prevention (5).
As stated by the JPI, “Preventing youth violence has far reaching benefits for our health,
safety, and prosperity. The prevention of youth violence can lower the risk for other
youth‐related problems, such as alcohol and substance abuse, obesity, and academic failure,
and can result in cost savings for our justice, education, and health service systems. That is why
it is so important for communities to take action to prevent youth violence. Youth violence is
not just a law enforcement problem; it is a public health problem.”

Recommendations
Reducing youth violence needs to be a collaborative, community effort.  We submit the
following recommendations:
Our first, and primary, recommendation is adopted from a study for the City of Rockford
conducted by the Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP) Diagnostic Center,
which made recommendations for reducing justice and crime issues in the City. (6)

A countywide, multi‐agency collaboration to prevent and reduce youth violence and
promote youth development should be initiated.  Stakeholders should include all
county law enforcement agencies, the Winnebago County Health Department, school
districts, Winnebago County, all municipalities, human services agencies serving youth, 
community and faith‐based organizations, parents, youth themselves, and businesses. 
The purpose of this collaborative effort should be to develop and implement a
comprehensive strategy for preventing youth violence, along with intervention
strategies.  
Other recommendations include:
Expand Youth Recovery Court ‐ Youth Recovery Court addresses gaps in services for
youth ages 10‐17 who have non‐violent offenses pending in juvenile court.  Eligible
youth are those with a mental illness and/or substance abuse issue and/or a history of
trauma that is related to their behavior.  The program provides intensive case
management and court oversight in conjunction with home‐based and community
treatment services for the participating youth and their families.  Participation is
completely voluntary and the youth and their parent or guardian must consent to
comply with the requirements of the court in order to be eligible. The Youth Recovery

3
Court is a collaboration among the 17th Judicial Circuit Court, Winnebago and Boone
County Juvenile Probation, and the Rosecrance Berry Center. As of March 2017, the
court had 22 graduates.

Renew funding for Youth Court in RPS #205  ‐ Youth court was initiated in 2014 in all
four Rockford high schools.  Youth Court is a voluntary diversion program that serves as
an alternative from the traditional juvenile justice process. The court uses a restorative
approach to addressing minor legal offenses committed by students.  Student
“respondents” must admit responsibility for the legal infraction and then sit in front of a
panel of their peers and work to repair the harm. The students who serve on the Youth
Court Council create a contract for the offender to complete within 60 days. If the
respondent successfully completes all of their contract requirements in 60 days, they
will not be charged with the initial incident and can have the arrest expunged from their
record.  The court is a collaboration among Youth Services Network, RPS #205, Rockford
Police Department, NIU Law School and Winnebago County. The funding for Youth
Court, which had been through both Winnebago County and RPS #205, will only partially
continue in the 2018‐19 school year.  The court requires funding of about $54,000,
primarily to compensate a Court Coordinator. We believe this is a cost‐effective
program.  Data reveals that of about 60 students who have participated in the program,
just five have re‐offended.  The benefits of Youth Court are many, including:  Keeps
students involved in an after school activity; gives them a second chance to make better
choices; helps the students to make amends; and involves both the parents and the
student.  Additionally, the court teaches court members leadership skills and how to be
positive role models in their schools.

Restore Redeploy Illinois to its original funding level  ‐ Redeploy Illinois is a statewide
initiative that funds a network of services for juvenile offenders who would otherwise
be jailed. Any youngster facing a juvenile detention sentence for a crime less serious
than either murder or a class X felony is eligible. The program has reduced Illinois
Department of Juvenile Justice commitments by 54 percent.  In 2014, a study found that
it cost roughly $6,000 each to monitor and counsel juvenile offenders through Redeploy
Illinois and a staggering $111,000 to house a single youth for a year in a state juvenile
detention center. The Department of Juvenile Justice estimated that Redeploy Illinois
saved the juvenile justice system about $60 million in incarceration costs from 2005 to
2012.  Youth Services Network (YSN) administers Redeploy Illinois in Winnebago County.

4
When the State of Illinois funded Redeploy, YSN received $306,000 and could serve 40
youth.  However, the state has since greatly reduced funding of the program.  For FY17,
YSN received $75,000 from United Way of Rock River Valley and $75,000 from the
Community Foundation of Illinois, and was able to serve 20 youth.  For FY18, YSN has a
commitment for $67,500 in funding from United Way, which means that ten youth will
receive services.

Support and promote programs such as the Fatherhood Encouragement Project, which
promotes and encourages parental involvement in children’s lives.  Parental
involvement is a known protective factor for youth.   The Fatherhood Encouragement
Project focuses on helping to encourage and lift up dads of all backgrounds through
mentorship and authentic relationships. The peer‐mentoring based group now has more
than 80 members and allows fathers to share their problems and fears, while providing
encouragement to one another to be better fathers.  The Fatherhood Encouragement
Project holds meetings three Wednesdays a month and hosts community events such as
Adopt‐a‐Block, cookouts and bowling that bring fathers and their children together.   

References
(1) David‐Ferdon C, Simon T.R.   Preventing Youth Violence: Opportunities for Action.
Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, 2014.
(2) Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States 2016. Uniform Crime
Reports. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, 2016. Available from
https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime‐in‐the‐u.s/2015/crime‐in‐the‐u.s/2016. 
(3) Rockford Police Department.  
(4) Winnebago County Sheriff’s Office. 
(5) Justice Policy Institute (JPI), Sticker Shock: Calculating the Full Price Tag for Youth
Incarceration, December 2014.
(6) Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs (OJP) Diagnostic Center, Diagnostic
Analysis for the City of Rockford Illinois, September 2015.

5