You are on page 1of 5

Matty 1

Sara Matty

Dr. Bruce

English 363-02

10th May , 2018

Infant Microbiota Review Annotated Bibliography

Title:

A Review of the Delivery Mode and Infant Diet Effects on the Infant Microbiome Development

Purpose:

We aim to compose a well-rounded summary of current infant microbiota development research

and it’s benefits for mother and infant health during and after pregnancy.

Introduction :

The human microbiome plays a fundamental role in our overall wellbeing by contributing

to our neurological development, metabolic processes, and immunity. Scientists have traced back

the initiation and acquisition of our microbial habitats to as early as delivery. Current research in

the field raises the possibility that the gut microbiota is even acquired prenatally. The mother’s

microbiome constitutes the fetus/ infant’s initial exposure to microbes and that establishes a

foundation for the development of the infant’s own microbiome. Through this article, we review

current research on the two largest contributors to the development of the infant microbiome:

mode of delivery and diet. We will compare the benefits and shortcomings of natural birth to

cesarean birth as well as breastfeeding to formula feeding.

Sources:

• Building a Beneficial Microbiome from Birth


Matty 2

a) Castanys-Muñoz, E., Martin, M. J., & Vazquez, E. (2016). Building a Beneficial

Microbiome from Birth. Advances in Nutrition, 7(2), 323-330.

doi:10.3945/an.115.010694

b) Explores the influence of human milk on development of gut microbiota structure and

function. The composition of microbiota plays a critical role in preventing dysbiosis-

related disease.

c) This source can be used for background information needed to introduce our topic. It

can also be along with other sources such as Martín et al., 2017 (article 2) to compare

the benefits and shortfalls of breastfeeding. Lastly, as a review article this source can

be used as a reference and a guide to how a review article of this topic can be

organized.

• Human gut colonization may be initiated in utero by distinct microbial communities in

the placenta and amniotic fluid

a) Collado, M. C., Rautava, S., Aakko, J., Isolauri, E., & Salminen, S. (2016). Human

gut colonisation may be initiated in utero by distinct microbial communities in the

placenta and amniotic fluid. Scientific Reports, 6(1). doi:10.1038/srep23129

b) Researchers suggest that gut microbiota development begins prenatally from mother’s

distinct placenta and amniotic fluid microbiota. The infant’s microbiota is further

influence postpartum by the mother through breastfeeding.

c) While this source doesn’t directly fall under the two categories we plan to focus on, it

can still be used in the introduction or conclusion. This source can be along with other

sources such as Dunn, et al., 2017 on informing and training new mothers of healthy

practices and habits that can affect their infant’s health during and after pregnancy.
Matty 3

• Delivery mode shapes the acquisition and structure of the initial microbiota across

multiple body habitats in newborns

a) Dominguez-Bello, M. G., Costello, E. K., Contreras, M., Magris, M., Hidalgo, G.,

Fierer, N., & Knight, R. (2010). Delivery mode shapes the acquisition and structure

of the initial microbiota across multiple body habitats in newborns. Proceedings of

the National Academy of Sciences,107(26), 11971-11975.

doi:10.1073/pnas.1002601107

b) By sampling different body habitats of mothers and infants born naturally or via C-

section, researchers establish baseline data for delivery mode influence on the

acquisition and initiation of the microbiome.

c) Information from this source can be used in our delivery mode section. Examples of

(1) the different bacteria strains acquired from natural birth vs. C-section, (2) the

similarity between the mother’s microbes and the infant’s initial microbiota, and (3)

statistical data that proves that delivery mode influences for example the infant’s

immunity can all be used in our review. This source can be used along with other

sources such as Brumbaugh et al., 2013 or Tun et al., 2018 which compare the effects

of delivery mode on specific body habitats such as the neonatal pharyngeal bacteria

or the transmission of obesity from mother to offspring.

• Diversity of the Lactobacillus group in breast milk and vagina of healthy women and

potential role in the colonization of the infant gut


Matty 4

a) Martín, R., Heilig, G., Zoetendal, E., Smidt, H., & Rodríguez, J. (2007). Diversity of

the Lactobacillus group in breast milk and vagina of healthy women and potential

role in the colonization of the infant gut. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 103(6),

2638-2644. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2672.2007.03497.x

b) Researchers use 16S rRNA sequencing methodology on breast milk and vaginal

samples to expose potential source of lactobacillus bacteria, a probiotic bacteria

capable of preventing a variety neonatal pathogens.

c) We can use this source to (1) compare and contrast the different methods of studying

microbiota, (2) talk about the benefits of breastfeeding, and (3) transition from diet to

delivery mode or vise versa since this source suggests a direct correlation between the

two.
Matty 5

References:

Brumbaugh, D. E., Arruda, J., Robbins, K., Ir, D., Santorico, S. A., Robertson, C. E., & Frank,
D. N. (2016). Mode of Delivery Determines Neonatal Pharyngeal Bacterial Composition
and Early Intestinal Colonization. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition,
63(3), 320-328. doi:10.1097/mpg.0000000000001124
Dunn, A. B., Jordan, S. J., Baker, B. S., & Carlson, N. (2017). The Maternal Infant Microbiome:
Considerations for Labor and Birth. MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child
Nursing, -.
Tun, H. M., Bridgman, S. L., Chari, R., Field, C. J., Guttman, D. S., Becker, A. B., ... & Scott, J.
A. (2018). Roles of Birth Mode and Infant Gut Microbiota in Intergenerational Transmission of
Overweight and Obesity From Mother to Offspring. JAMA pediatrics.