You are on page 1of 2

 

Learning Outcome: ​ Examine one evolutionary explanation of behaviour 
 
Thesis: ​ This paper will examine one evolutionary explanation of behaviour such as natural selection, specifically, 
emotion, as demonstrated in studies by Fessler (2006) and Curtis (2004) 
 
Last Sentence: ​ Due to the reasons listed above, natural selection, and more specifically emotion is an evolutionary 
explanation which were demonstrated by both Fessler and Curtis. 
 
Darwin’s theory of natural selection:  
● Those who adapt best to the environment will have a greater chance of surviving, having children, and 
passing on their genes 
● Explains how species acquire adaptive characteristics (over several generations, the result of natural 
selection that causes the species to develop characteristics that make it more competitive in its environment) 
to survive in an ever­changing environment 
● For example, when Darwin travelled to the Galapagos Islands, he noticed finches on different islands had 
different type of beaks, that was the most advantageous for the food available in each particular habitat 
 
Fessler ­ (2006) 
 
Define Key Terminology 
Evolution:​  ​
Changing in the inherited traits of a species over time 
Genetic Mutation:​  Change in the genetic code or base sequence of certain genes 
First Trimester​: The first three months of a pregnancy where the body undergoes major changes and the baby’s body 
structure and organ systems develop  
Confirmation Bias:​  When researchers see what they expect to see 
 
Research method: Semi­structured Interview  
 
Aim: To investigate nausea experienced by women in their first trimester of pregnancy 
 
Procedure: 496 healthy pregnant women between ages 18 and 50 years were gathered and asked to consider 32 
potentially stomach­turning scenarios such as walking barefoot, stepping on earthworms, someone accidentally 
sticking fish hook through a finger, and maggots on meat in an outdoor waste bin. Before asking women to rank how 
disgusting they found the scenarios, he posed series of questions designed to determine whether they were 
experiencing morning sickness.  
 
Findings: Women in first trimester scored much higher across the board in disgust sensitivity than the second or third. 
However, when he controlled the study for morning sickness, the response only held for scenarios involving food 
(maggots, etc).  
 
Conclusions: Many diseases which are the most dangerous are food­borne, but ancestors could not afford to be picky 
about what they ate. Natural selection helped compensate for the increased susceptibility to disease during this period 
in pregnancy, by increasing the urge to be picky. Sensitivity diminishes as the risk of disease/infection decreases. To 
conclude, disgust is a form of protection against disease.  
 
Applications:  
● Reinforces the principle of evolutionary psychology that as genes mutate, those that are advantageous are 
passed down through a process of natural selection 
● Helps evolutionary psychologists explain how certain human behaviours are testimony to the development of 
our species over time.  
● Supports the idea of disgust as a key to successful reproduction.   
 

 
Evaluations (McFG = Methodology, Culture, Ethics, Gender) 
Limitations 
● The data was collected through questionnaires. Self­reports may not be reliable, as researchers may be 
susceptible to confirmation bias 
● This is not an effective way of measuring disgust, as it would have been more reliable to confront participants 
with real disgust­eliciting objects 
● Little is known about the behaviour of early ​ Homo sapiens,​  so statements about how humans “used to be” are 
hypothetical 
● Evolutionary explanations tend to focus on biological factors and tend to underestimate cultural influences  
Strengths 
● The effect sizes were not big but significant. The findings are supported by other studies (Curtis 2004)  
● Since the ages of the participants range from 18­50 it encompasses a fairly large spectrum of participants   
 
Curtis ­ (2004) 
 
Define Key Terminology 
Evolution:​ ​
Changing in the inherited traits of a species over time 
Genetic Mutation:​  Change in the genetic code or base sequence of certain genes 
Confirmation Bias​ :  When researchers see what they expect to see 
 
Research method: Online survey  
 
Aim: To investigate whether there are patterns in people’s disgust responses 
 
Procedure: ​ 77 000 participants were gathered from 165 countries who completed an online survey. Participants were 
asked to rank their level of disgust for 20 pictures.​
 Within the 20 pictures were 7 pairs of images where one was 
infectious or potentially harmful to the immune system, and the the other was visually similar but non­infectious. For 
example, one pair was a plate of bodily fluids and a plate of blue viscous liquid.  
 
Findings: ​
The disgust reaction was strongest for images which threatened the immune system. Disgust decreased 
with age and women had higher disgust reactions than men.  
 
Conclusions: Disgust is the key to successful reproduction 
 
Applications: 
● Reinforces the principle of evolutionary psychology that as genes mutate, those that are advantageous are 
passed down through a process of natural selection 
● Helps evolutionary psychologists explain how certain human behaviours are testimony to the development of 
our species over time.  
● Supports the idea of disgust as a key to successful reproduction.   
 
Evaluations (McFG = Methodology, Culture, Ethics, Gender) 
Limitations 
● The study was conducted online, so the validity of the data can be questioned  
● No right to withdraw after submitting 
● Protection from physical and psychological harm after viewing the images 
Strengths 
● Since this research uses both men and women, it is more applicable to human species as a whole. 
● The sample population is very large, and is from multiple countries. Therefore, the study had high cross 
cultural validity