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Fall, 2010 SPAN 3000 Advanced Spanish Language Skills Instructor: Office: Office Hours: Phone & e-mail: Course Description: Spanish 3000 is a bridge course designed to move students beyond the intermediate level toward an advanced command of the language appropriate for carrying out academic research and professional interactions. With those goals in mind, the course activities focus on helping students solidify and deepen interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication skills in order to prepare them for upper-division content courses in literature, linguistics, culture, and business. It is the first required course for the Spanish Major and is one of the prerequisites for all upper division Spanish courses except SPAN 3001. Course Objectives: Specifically, 1. Students will communicate in Spanish in the three modes: interpersonally (through in-class discussions), interpretatively (through close reading of a variety of non-literary and literary texts, listening to conversations and various audio-visual materials), and presentationally (through brief oral presentations and extensive focused, researched and documented, academic style essay and journal writing). They will develop strategies for reading and interpreting different genres. They will refine their use and understanding of the full range of verb tenses and moods as well as pertinent vocabulary and they will develop sufficient accuracy in spelling and pronunciation so as to be understood by persons not accustomed to dealing with students of Spanish. 2. Students will deepen their understanding of some cultural perspectives (belief systems) and practices (traditions) as well as products of Hispanic cultures (literature, art, technology) addressed by the readings. 3. Using their Spanish, students will acquire new information, reinforce and further their knowledge on the topics referred to above, and will recognize some distinctive viewpoints only available in Spanish. The library research orientation session will provide them with tools for finding peer-reviewed research in Spanish as well as strategies for evaluating nonpeer-reviewed sources of information in Spanish. 4. Students will be able to make linguistic and cultural comparisons between what they learn in this class and similar elements of English and their native culture. Required Texts: Mujica, Bárbara. El próximo paso, 2nd. Edition Thomson& Heinle A good monolingual Spanish/Spanish dictionary (El pequeño Larousse, Maria Moliner, El diccionario de la lengua española de la Real Academia Española) A good bilingual dictionary (Collins, Simon & Schuster International, Larousse or Oxford) MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th edition.

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Required on-line materials: YABLA All students must sign up for an account with the Yabla on-line video service; instructions for sign-up are available at http://docs.google.com/fileview?id=0BxztpQ4xDpShYTJjYTY3MTYtZThiOC00ZDY0LTkyYzEtM TRiYWRlMjMzNmNk&hl=en&authkey=CL6Ur8gC. Instructors may assign the viewing of Yabla videos, they may show them in class, and students can watch them at any time. These videos are student-friendly in that they offer authentic language spoken by native speakers, viewers can slow down or repeat any segment, viewers can see a transcript of the spoken word, there is a glossary with English translations of any word, and there are comprehension exercises included. Administrative Information: Students enrolled in this class must have completed SPAN 2120 or 2150 (or the equivalent at another institution) and earned a grade of a C- or better. If you have any doubt about the appropriateness of your placement in this level, you should take the on-line placement exam (http://webcape.byuhtrsc.org/?acct=colorado the password is ralphie1) and/or speak with the course coordinator Dr. Mary K. Long (see contact information below). SPAN 3000 is one of the prerequisites for all upper division classes in the Spanish Department (some courses also have other prerequisites; consult the course catalog for complete list). In order to move on to the next courses, you must earn a C- or better in this class. SPAN 3000 is a multi-section course with multiple instructors and one coordinator/supervisor. If you have a question or problem, please speak with your instructor first. If this does not work, or if there is a problem a student does not wish to discuss with the instructor, then the student may always contact the course coordinator. Dr. Mary K. Long, at MKNA 132B, Phone: (303) 735-4888, e-mail: mary.long @ colorado.edu

Course Requirements: 1) Class Participation (includes homework and attendance): This portion of the grade is worth 10% of the final grade and will be divided as follows: 5% for participation, 5% for homework. Each instructor will explain to the class his/her process for evaluating participation and homework. Attendance will impact the final participation grade as follows: Daily interaction with the instructor and classmates is an integral part of achieving language fluency. Therefore perfect attendance is expected and only 3 absences are permitted. More than 3 absences will adversely affect this portion of the grade as follows: beginning with the fourth absence, each absence will reduce the final participation grade (homework and class participation final scores) by 1%. If you have an unexpected crisis of any kind which will lead to more than 3 absences it is imperative that you communicate immediately with your instructor and the coordinator of the course. 2 Assessment: (No use of dictionaries is allowed during exams or quizzes.) Specific dates are listed on the course calendar. A. Quizzes: These will focus on specific grammar and vocabulary points studied for each chapter. There will be nine chapter quizzes. They will be created by each instructor for his/her section.

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B. Exams –These will require that students demonstrate their abilities in a variety of areas which will include: listening and reading comprehension, content questions about class readings, grammatical analysis of passages and in-class compositions. There will be two mid-terms and one final exam. The mid-terms will be administered over two class periods. The final exam will be administered according to the University designated common final schedule. Mid-term and final exams will be the same for all sections and will be created by a panel of instructors for the course. Please take exams and quizzes at the designated time. There will be no make-ups. In the event of an emergency, please notify your instructor and present documented evidence of the emergency. 4) Homework: The instructor will assign work from the book, handouts, or the web. 5) Spanish Diary: In order to improve writing at this level, it is essential to be writing in Spanish on a daily basis. The Spanish Diary will be used in two ways: 1) Upon the teacher’s indication, students will be required to arrive and begin writing in their diary from the time they arrive and through the first five minutes of class. The teacher will suggest a topic. Students will then share briefly from what they have written as a beginning conversation activity. 2) As homework, there will be writing assignments. These assignments will be related either to the section on Composición, to the readings, to the YABLA videos or will be rough drafts of the graded essays. Frequently you will be asked to summarize a reading or other activity (discussion, film). The ability to recognize and concisely summarize the central points of a reading will be essential to your success in future Spanish classes and more importantly, to your ability to analyze and think critically about political, professional and personal situations that you will encounter throughout your life. These writings will count as participation/homework. 6) Compositions: You will write several one page (250 word) essays focusing on a different essay style and one 4-5 page research paper (1000 words). You will be given the opportunity to re-write three of the one page essays. Your instructor will indicate errors on the first version. You will correct these errors and return the first version with the second one. The final grade for each of these compositions will be a combination of grades from the first draft and the re-write. The first draft will be weighted 70% and the re-write will be weighted 30%. You will be given the opportunity to rewrite the three short compositions. We thus view the compositions as part of your work to gain an active command of Spanish, rather than as exercises that merely repeat old mistakes. The final research paper will not have a rewrite. The compositions and research paper should be typed and double-spaced. Research paper: Length: 4-5 pages (1000 words) Topic: Your instructor must approve your topic. The topic should be related to a theme, author, or work of fiction presented in the text book. For example, you may choose to expand on one of the non-fiction topics, research the life and importance of one of the authors of the fictional works, or analyze one of the stories in relation to published analyses of the story. Research resources: You will have an orientation session with Alison Hicks, the Latin America/Spain bibliographer in Norlin library to learn about how to find solid academic sources of research information and how to evaluate the reliability of other kinds of material in both

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English and Spanish. You are expected to use academic sources for your research, not just whatever comes up in a “google” search. Wikipedia is not an acceptable source. Documentation style: You will use the Modern Language Association (MLA) standards for citations and lists of works cited. You should own a copy of the most recent MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers which is available in the UMC bookstore. Honor Code: On the title page you should include the text of the Honor Code with your signature. Please carefully read the information about the honor code listed below. Due dates for compositions and final research paper are listed on the course calendar

University Honor Code and class policies in regard to compositions: Please consult Honor Code heading under University and Spanish Department policies for general information about the Honor Code. What follows are additional policies specific to this class. Compositions are an integral part of learning to master a second language. It is assumed that students will write their own work and cite appropriate sources or direct quotations as they would with any composition or research paper. (Consult the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers for the standard formats for citations and lists of works cited) Compositions are graded both for content and Spanish language skills. Because there are many human and electronic resources available outside the classroom to aid students with their Spanish language skills, the following information is provided in order to clarify how students can best represent their own Spanish language skills in their composition.

PLEASE DO NOT GET ANY OUTSIDE HELP (INCLUDING FROM TUTORS OR OTHER INSTRUCTORS/PROFESSORS IN THE DEPARTMENT OR AT THE UNIVERSITY WRITING CENTER) ON YOUR COMPOSITIONS OR RESEARCH PAPER. ALL QUESTIONS ABOUT COMPOSITIONS SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO YOUR INSTRUCTOR. GETTING OUTSIDE HELP WILL BE CONSIDERED CHEATING AND WILL RESULT IN AN F ( 0 ) FOR THE ASSIGNMENT. Papers submitted by any student, written in part or in whole by someone other than that student (except in the case of clearly documented quotations and including having someone other than the instructor offer advise about or correct the Spanish), or which have been created with the use of an electronic translation program shall be considered to constitute fraud under the University Honor Code, and will result in the assignment of an 'F' (0) for the paper. Electronic resources: It is acceptable to use the standard word processing tools (spell check, etc) available with standard word processing programs in the final drafts of the compositions. It is acceptable to use standard and/or electronic dictionaries to look up single words. It is not acceptable to use translation programs to translate part or all of the composition into Spanish. In keeping with the University Honor Code, students will include the following signed statement at the end of all compositions and research papers (rough draft and final version): “On my honor, as a University of Colorado at Boulder student, I have neither given nor received unauthorized assistance on this paper.” Student’s signature

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7) Readings and video or web activities: Each week you will be assigned one or more readings from the textbook. Your instructor may supplement these readings with video or web-related activities from YABLA or other sources. 8) Service Learning: The rewards for Service Learning come primarily from the cultural, linguistic, and human enrichment of interacting with Spanish speaking members of local communities. In addition, students may substitute participation in the Service Learning program for 3 quiz scores. Please consult the service learning web-site http://www.colorado.edu/spanish/servlearn.htm for information about service learning for this course. To get started you should attend one of the information meetings or contact the representative of the program that most interests you from the list. You must inform your instructor within the first two weeks of classes if you intend to do service learning. Grade Distribution: 2 mid-term exams:………………….30% 1 final exam……………………………20 % 9 quizzes (15 min) …………………….15% 3 compositions …………………………15% 1 research paper (and prep work)…….10% Homework and participation …………..10% Grading Scale: A….94-100 B - …..80-83 A-…90-93 C+……78-79 B+…88-89 C……...74-77 B…..84-87 C-……70-73

D+…68-69 D … 64-67 D - …60-63 F …… 0-59

University and Spanish Department Policies (1) Add / Drop / Waitlist If you are waitlisted for this class, it is IMPERATIVE that you familiarize yourself with departmental policies and deadlines. For this, please visit http://www.colorado.edu/spanish/waitlist.htm (2) Prerequisites not met If your professor informs you that the system has flagged you as having not met the prerequisites for this course, you should meet IN PERSON with Andres Prieto, the Associate Chair for undergraduate studies, or the Coordinator for your class level. If you fail to do so, you may be dropped from the class. Your Professor will inform you of the date and time to meet the Associate Chair or the Coordinator for your class. (3) Honor Code All students of the University of Colorado at Boulder are responsible for knowing and adhering to the academic integrity policy of this institution. Violations of this policy may include: cheating, plagiarism, aid of academic dishonesty, fabrication, lying, bribery, and threatening behavior. All incidents of academic misconduct shall be reported to the Honor Code Council (honor@colorado.edu; 303-725-2273). Students who are found to be in violation of the academic integrity policy will be subject to both academic sanctions from the faculty member and non-academic sanctions (including but not limited to university probation, suspension, or expulsion). Other information on the Honor Code can be found at http://www.colorado.edu/policies/honor.html and at http://www.colorado.edu/academics/honorcode/

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(4) Final Exams Final exams are to be taken on the day determined by the university and the department. No excuse such as family meetings, employment, travel, etc. will grant an exception to this.If you have three or more final exams scheduled on the same day, you are entitled to arrange an alternative exam time for the last exam or exams scheduled on that day. To qualify for rescheduling final exam times, you must provide evidence that you have three or more exams on the same day, and arrangements must be made with your instructor no later than the end of the sixth week of the semester. For the complete final examination policy, see the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog. (5) Use of electronic devises in the classroom No text messaging or e-mailing will be tolerated during class. Cell phones must be turned off or on silent and kept in your backpacks or pockets during class. Laptops may only be used to take notes, and/or only with the consent of the instructor. Failure to comply with these rules will be result in a loss of all participation points for the day. In other words, that day will be counted as an unexcused absence. (6) Classroom Behavior Students and faculty each have responsibility for maintaining an appropriate learning environment. Those who fail to adhere to such behavioral standards may be subjected to discipline. Professional courtesy and sensitivity are especially important with respect to individuals and topics dealing with differences of race, culture, religion, politics, sexual orientation, gender, gender variance, and nationalities. Class rosters are provided to the instructor with the student's legal name. I will gladly honor your request to address you by an alternate name or gender pronoun. Please advise me of this preference early in the semester so that I may make appropriate changes to my records. See polices at http://www.colorado.edu/policies/classbehavior.html and at http://www.colorado.edu/studentaffairs/judicialaffairs/code.html#student_code (7) Disability Services If you qualify for accommodations because of a disability, please submit to me a letter from Disability Services during the first two weeks of class so that your needs may be addressed. Disability Services determines accommodations based on documented disabilities. Contact: 303-492-8671, Willard 322, and http://www.colorado.edu/disabilityservices/ (8) Religious Observances Campus policy regarding religious observances requires that faculty make every effort to reasonably and fairly deal with all students who, because of religious obligations, have conflicts with scheduled exams, assignments or required attendance. In this class, please contact your instructor during the first two weeks of class to let him/her know of any possible conflicts in order to reschedule the work. See full details at http://www.colorado.edu/policies/fac_relig.html (9) Discrimination and Harassment The University of Colorado at Boulder policy on Discrimination and Harassment, the University of Colorado policy on Sexual Harassment and the University of Colorado policy on Amorous Relationships apply to all students, staff and faculty. Any student, staff or faculty member who believes s/he has been the subject of discrimination or

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harassment based upon race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status should contact the Office of Discrimination and Harassment (ODH) at 303-492-2127 or the Office of Judicial Affairs at 303-492-5550. Information about the ODH, the above referenced policies and the campus resources available to assist individuals regarding discrimination or harassment can be obtained at http://www.colorado.edu/odh

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COMPOSICIÓN No. _____ Nombre_______________________________________ Contenido 10 9 8 5 7 4 6 3 Las ideas son complejas y la argumentación es excelente. Las ideas se adecuan al tema propuesto y la argumentación está bien sostenida. Las ideas están mal organizadas y no tienen mucha relación con el tema.

Advertencia: Si la composición no corresponde al tema propuesto por el instructor, esta composición no será revisada y tendrá una nota F.

Ortografía, puntuación y (en el caso del trabajo de investigación) el uso correcto (estilo MLA) de las referencias (sources). 10 No hay errores. 9 7 4 8 6 5 5 3 Hay algunos errores pero no son significativos. Hay varios errores pero no dificultan la lectura. Hay demasiados errores y dificultan la lectura.

Vocabulario 15 14 12 10 7 13 11 9 6 11 8 5

El vocabulario es avanzado y corresponde o supera el nivel de SPAN 3000. El vocabulario es avanzado pero hay errores de precisión léxica. El vocabulario es de nivel mediano. Hay algunos anglicismos. El vocabulario es deficiente. Hay muchos anglicismos. El vocabulario es muy deficiente. Hay muchos anglicismos.

Estructura de párrafos y organización 15 14 12 9 13 11 8 10 7 Los párrafos están debidamente organizados en torno a una idea. Hay sustantivos e ideas repetidas. El párrafo no es fluido porque hay interrupciones. No se usa los pronombres. Los párrafos están mal organizados. Las ideas se repiten con mucha frecuencia.

Gramática 50 49 48 47 46 Se usa la gramática más avanzada. No hay errores. Se usa la gramática más avanzada. Hay muy pocos errores no significativos. 45 41 37 33 29 25 44 40 36 32 28 24 43 39 35 31 27 23 42 38 34 30 26 22 Se usa la gramática más avanzada. Hay algunos errores significativos. Se usa la gramática más avanzada. Hay varios errores significativos. Es necesario adecuar la gramática a lo desarrollado en clase. Es muy necesario adecuar la gramática a lo desarrollado en clase. No se aplica la gramática aprendida en clase. No se aplica la gramática aprendida en clase y hay algunos errores básicos. 21 20 19 18 No se aplica la gramática aprendida en clase y hay varios errores básicos. 17 16 15 14 Hay muchos errores básicos.

Calificaciones: Primera versión_______ (70%) Segunda versión_____ (30%) Nota final_____ Revise: Concordancia ___ Pretérito____ Imperfecto____ Pronombres____ Subjuntivo___ Potencial____ Consecución de tiempos____ Vocabulario____ Preposiciones _____ Comentarios y sugerencias___________________________________________________________________________

SPAN 3000 001‐010  Calendario. Su instructor o instructora le dará la tarea específica de cada semana    Semana  1:23‐27  agosto  lunes  Intro. al curso;  presentación  del documento  de auto‐análisis  martes  Cap 1:  Composición:   “Como se  narra una  historia en el  presente”(34)  (Repasar los  temas  gramaticales y  las  expresiones  problemáticas  (14‐27)      Prueba 1;     Entregar: La  narración en  el presente    Intro al  Capítulo 2  Cap 2  Taller de  actividades/  compartir el  borrador del  ensayo  peruasivo  miercoles  Cap 1 Lectura:  “¿Viva la  independencia?”  (11)   jueves  Cap1 Lectura:  “El vigilante” de  Mario Bencastro  (27)  viernes  Compartir  y  entregar auto‐  análisis y metas  individuales     Cap. 1 Lectura:  “El vigilante”  de Mario  Bencastro (27)  

Cap 1  2:   30agosto‐3  Taller de  septiembre  actividades/  compartir el  borrador de la  narración en el  presente 

No hay clase   3:     Labor Day  6‐10  septiembre  Holiday 

Cap 2  Composición:  “Escribir para  persuadir” (65)  (Repasar los  temas  gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (47‐62))    Prueba 2;    Entregar: el  ensayo  persuasiva    Intro al   Capítulo 3 

Cap 2   Lectura:  “Este auto es  una lata” (44) 

Cap 2  Lectura:   “Peripecias  aéreas” de  Mariano  Grondona (62) 

Cap 3  4:     Lectura: “Un  13‐17  septiembre  viaje o el mago  inmortal” de  Adolfo Bioy  Casares (95) 

Cap 3  Lectura: “Un  viaje o el  mago  inmortal” de  Adolfo Bioy  Casares (95) 

Cap 3  Taller de   actividades                  

Cap 3  Composición:  “Como corregir  su composición”  (95)  (Repasar los  temas  gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (82‐93))    Prueba 3    Empezar el  repaso para el  primer examen 

Cap 3  Lectura: “El  desarrollo del  turismo en  Latinoamérica”  (78) 

Repaso 

SPAN 3000 001‐010  Calendario. Su instructor o instructora le dará la tarea específica de cada semana      5:  Examen 1   20‐24  septiembre  1ª parte    Examen 1   2a parte  Cap 4  Entregar: Las  correcciones de  los ensayos uno  y dos.  Composición:  “Cómo se narra  una historia en  el pasado” (160)  (Repasar los  temas  gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (124‐145) )    Prueba 4    Entregar: una  narración en el  pasado    Intro al Cap 5  Cap 4  Lectura: “La  familia  latinoamericana  en transición”  (117)  Cap 4  Lectura: “Frio  de Hogar” de  Ramón Nieto  (145) 

6:   27 sept‐   1 octubre 

Cap 4  Lectura: “Frio  de Hogar” de  Ramón Nieto  (145) 

Taller de  actividades/  Compartir el  borrador de  “Narración en  el pasado”   

7:  4‐8  octubre 

Cap 5  Lectura: “El  medio‐niñero”  de Bárbara  Mujica (188) 

Cap 5  Lectura: “El  medio‐niñero”  de Bárbara  Mujica (188) 

8:  11‐15  octubre 

Cap 6  Lectura:  “Encuesta:  Hablan los  jóvenes” (221) 

Cap 5  Taller de  actividades,  Compartir  “Causa y efecto”  versión final (no  se entrega esta  vez)  Cap 6  Cap 6  Lectura:  Lectura:  “Ciudadanía,  “Ciudadanía,  globalización y  globalización y  migraciones”  migraciones” de  Margarita  de Margarita  Barretto (235)  Barretto (235) 

Cap 5  Composición:  “Causa y efecto”  (203)  (Repasar los  temas  gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (177‐188))    Prueba 5    Intro al Cap 6 

Cap 5  Lectura: “El  futbol sigue  siendo rey,  pero…” (172) 

Cap 6  Taller de  actividades/  Compartir “La  exposición” (no  se entrega esta  vez) 

Cap 6  “La exposición”  (246)  (Leer los temas  gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (227‐235))  Prueba 6     Entregar: la  corrección de  una narración  en el pasado     Intro Cap 10               

SPAN 3000 001‐010  Calendario. Su instructor o instructora le dará la tarea específica de cada semana    9:  18‐22  octubre  Cap 10  Visita a la  biblioteca:   Secciones: 004  10:00 a.m./005  11:00/006  12:00  “Como se  prepara un  trabajo de  investigación”  (416)         Prueba 7   Entregar: tema  y lista de  fuentes del  trabajo de  investigación  Cap 10  Visita a la  biblioteca:  Secciones: 001  8:00/003 9:00   Lectura: “La  educación en  Latinoamérica:  Desafío para  el  futuro”(382)    Cap 10  Visita a la  biblioteca:  Secciones: 008  2:00/009  3:00/010 4:00  Lectura: “Los  proyectos  educativos del  DF” de Gilberto  Guevara Niebla  (413)  Cap 10  Visita a la  biblioteca:  Secciones: 002  8:00/007 1:00  (Distribuir las  lecturas según el  día de visita a la  biblioteca)    Cap 10  Taller de  actividades 

10  25‐29  octubre 

Cap 7  Composición:  “Cómo escribir  una carta en  español” (285) (Repasar los  temas  gramaticales y  las  expresiones  problemáticas  (268‐281))    Prueba 8/  Repaso 

11  1‐5  noviembre 

12  8‐12  noviembre 

Cap 7  Taller de  actividades/  Compartir “una  carta” (no se  entrega esta  vez)    Cap 9  Entregar: el  bosquejo del  trabajo de  investigación  Composición:  “Introducciones  y conclusiones”  (370)   (Repasar los  temas 

Cap 7  Lectura: “La  pega” (262)    El/la  instructor/a  regresará el  tema y la lista   de fuentes de  los trabajos de  investigación— aprobados  o  con sugerencias.  Repaso 

Cap 7  Lectura:  “Cosmopolitan”  de Germán  Castro Ibarra  (281) 

Cap 7  Lectura:  “Cosmopolitan”  de Germán  Castro Ibarra  (281) 

  Examen 2   1a parte 

  Examen 2   2a parte 

Cap 9  Cap 9  Lectura: “La  Lectura: “La  compra” (349)  costurera de San  Petersburgo” de  Marjorie Agosín  (366) 

Cap 9  Lectura: “La  costurera de San  Petersburgo” de  Marjorie Agosín  (366) 

Cap 9  Taller de  actividades     Entregar la  introducción  del trabajo de  investigación 

SPAN 3000 001‐010  Calendario. Su instructor o instructora le dará la tarea específica de cada semana    gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (354‐366))      Prueba  9    Intro Cap 8 

13  15‐19  noviembre 

14  22‐26  noviembre 

15  29 nov‐3  diciembre 

16  6‐10  diciembre 

Examen  Final 

No hay clase  Fall Break        Cap 11  Composición:  “Cómo se  escribe una  descripción”  (476) (Repasar  los temas  gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (431‐455))  Cap 12  Composición:  “Comparación  y contraste”  (521) (Repasar  los temas  gramaticales y  las expresiones  problemáticas  (493‐512))  Lunes,   13 de  diciembre  10:30 a.m‐1:00  p.m. 

Cap 8  Composición:  “Como dar  indicaciones”  (339) (Repasar  los temas  gramaticales y  las  expresiones  problemáticas  (312‐325))  No hay clase  Fall Break 

Cap 8  Lectura: “Cómo  agua para  chocolate”  (fragmento) de  Laura Esquivel  (325) El/la  instructor/a  regresará los  bosquejos y las  introducciónes  No hay clase  Fall Break 

Cap 8  Lectura: “Cómo  agua para  chocolate”  (fragmento) de  Laura Esquivel  (325) 

No hay clase  Thanksgiving 

Cap 8  Lectura: “De  España:  Recetas para  todos los días”  (307)  Traer receta o  indicaciones  relacionados a  la tradición de  Thanksgiving   No hay clase  Thanksgiving 

Cap 11  Lectura:  “Cómo perdió  el Chivo la  cola” (425) 

Cap 11  Lectura: “Paseo”  de José Donoso  (455) 

Cap 11  Lectura: “Paseo”  de José Donoso  (455) 

 Entregar el  trabajo de  investigación    Taller de  actividades 

Cap 12  Lectura:  “Noticiero”  (479) 

Cap 12  Repaso y  actividades 

Cap 12  Repaso y  actividades 

Repaso y  actividades 

 

 

 

 

SPAN 3000 001‐010  Calendario. Su instructor o instructora le dará la tarea específica de cada semana       

Appendix 2 Self-assessment checklists from the Swiss version of the European Language Portfolio
These checklists are based on the common reference levels elaborated in the Common European Framework; they are thus closely related to the illustrative scales set out in Appendix 1. The Swiss ELP explains that the checklists can be used in two ways: (i) to review one’s overall proficiency in a particular language prior to updating one’s language passport at the beginning or end of an extended period of learning; and (ii) to monitor one’s learning progress, perhaps in relation to a particular skill or skills. Like the illustrative scales, the checklists can also be used to plan a course of learning and to identify appropriate learning tasks.

Self-assessment Checklist
Level

Language:

A1
My teacher/another

2
3.1

Use this checklist to record what you think you can do (Column 1). Ask someone else, for example your teacher, to also assess what they think you can do (Column 2). Use Column 3 to mark those things that you cannot yet do which you feel are important for you (Column 3 = Objectives). Add to the list – perhaps with your teacher – other things that you can do, or that are important for your language learning at this level.

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Listening
I can understand when someone speaks very slowly to me and articulates carefully, with long pauses for me to assimilate meaning. I can understand simple directions how to get from X to Y, by foot or public transport. I can understand questions and instructions addressed carefully and slowly to me and follow short, simple directions. I can understand numbers, prices and times.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A1.

1

2

Reading
I can understand information about people (place of residence, age, etc.) in newspapers. I can locate a concert or a film on calendars of public events or posters and identify where it takes place and at what time it starts. I can understand a questionnaire (entry permit form, hotel registration form) well enough to give the most important information about myself (name, surname, date of birth, nationality). I can understand words and phrases on signs encountered in everyday life (for instance “station”, “car park”, “no parking”, “no smoking”, “keep left”. I can understand the most important orders in a computer programme such as “PRINT”, “SAVE”, “COPY”, etc. I can follow short simple written directions (e.g. how to go from X to Y). I can understand short simple messages on postcards, for example holiday greetings. In everyday situations I can understand simple messages written by friends or colleagues, for example “back at 4 o’clock”.

1

2

Spoken Interaction
I can introduce somebody and use basic greeting and leave-taking expressions. I can ask and answer simple questions, initiate and respond to simple statements in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics. I can make myself understood in a simple way but I am dependent on my partner being prepared to repeat more slowly and rephrase what I say and to help me to say what I want. I can make simple purchases where pointing or other gestures can support what I say. I can handle numbers, quantities, cost and time. I can ask people for things and give people things. I can ask people questions about where they live, people they know, things they have, etc. and answer such questions addressed to me provided they are articulated slowly and clearly. I can indicate time by such phrases as “next week”, “last Friday”, “in November”, “three o clock”.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

3

3

3

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Spoken Production I can give personal information (address, telephone number, nationality, age, family, and hobbies) I can describe where I live.

1

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A1.

2

Strategies I can say when I don’t understand. I can very simply ask somebody to repeat what they said. I can very simply ask somebody to speak more slowly.

1

2

Writing I can fill in a questionnaire with my personal details (job, age, address, hobbies). I can write a greeting card, for instance a birthday card. I can write a simple postcard (for example with holiday greetings). I can write a note to tell somebody where I am or where we are to meet. I can write sentences and simple phrases about myself, for example where I live and what I do.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives
3 3 3

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

My teacher/another

Self-assessment Checklist
Level

Language:

A2
My teacher/another

2
3.2

Use this checklist to record what you think you can do (Column 1). Ask someone else, for example your teacher, to also assess what they think you can do (Column 2). Use Column 3 to mark those things that you cannot yet do which you feel are important for you (Column 3 = Objectives). Add to the list – perhaps with your teacher – other things that you can do, or that are important for your language learning at this level.

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A2.

Listening
I can understand what is said clearly, slowly and directly to me in simple everyday conversation; it is possible to make me understand, if the speaker can take the trouble. I can generally identify the topic of discussion around me when people speak slowly and clearly. I can understand phrases, words and expressions related to areas of most immediate priority (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local area, employment). I can catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements. I can understand the essential information in short recorded passages dealing with predictable everyday matters which are spoken slowly and clearly. I can identify the main point of TV news items reporting events, accidents etc. when the visual supports the commentary.

1

2

Reading
I can identify important information in news summaries or simple newspaper articles in which numbers and names play an important role and which are clearly structured and illustrated. I can understand a simple personal letter in which the writer tells or asks me about aspects of everyday life. I can understand simple written messages from friends or colleagues, for example saying when we should meet to play football or asking me to be at work early. I can find the most important information on leisure time activities, exhibitions, etc. in information leaflets. I can skim small advertisements in newspapers, locate the heading or column I want and identify the most important pieces of information (price and size of apartments, cars, computers). I can understand simple user’s instructions for equipment (for example, a public telephone). I can understand feedback messages or simple help indications in computer programmes. I can understand short narratives about everyday things dealing with topics which are familiar to me if the text is written in simple language.

1

2

Spoken Interaction
I can make simple transactions in shops, post offices or banks. I can use public transport : buses, trains, and taxis, ask for basic information and buy tickets. I can get simple information about travel. I can order something to eat or drink. I can make simple purchases by stating what I want and asking the price. I can ask for and give directions referring to a map or plan. I can ask how people are and react to news. I can make and respond to invitations.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

3

3

3

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

I can make and accept apologies. I can say what I like and dislike. I can discuss with other people what to do, where to go and make arrangements to meet. I can ask people questions about what they do at work and in free time, and answer such questions addressed to me.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A1.

Spoken Production
I can describe myself, my family and other people. I can describe where I live. I can give short, basic descriptions of events. I can describe my educational background, my present or most recent job. I can describe my hobbies and interests in a simple way. I can describe past activities and personal experiences (e.g. the last weekend, my last holiday).

1

2

Strategies
I can ask for attention. I can indicate when I am following. I can very simply ask somebody to repeat what they said.

1

2

Language Quality
I can make myself understood using memorised phrases and single expressions. I can link groups of words with simple connectors like ”and”, ”but” and ”because”. I can use some simple structures correctly. I have a sufficient vocabulary for coping with simple everyday situations.

1

2

Writing
I can write short, simple notes and messages. I can describe an event in simple sentences and report what happened when and where (for example a party or an accident). I can write about aspects of my everyday life in simple phrases and sentences (people, places, job, school, family, hobbies). I can fill in a questionnaire giving an account of my educational background, my job, my interests and my specific skills. I can briefly introduce myself in a letter with simple phrases and sentences (family, school, job, hobbies). I can write a short letter using simple expressions for greeting, addressing, asking or thanking somebody. I can write simple sentences, connecting them with words such as ”and”, ”but”, ”because”. I can use the most important connecting words to indicate the chronological order of events (first, then, after, later).

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2  I can do this under normal circumstances   I can do this easily

My teacher/another

3

3

3

3

Self-assessment Checklist
Level

Language:

B1
My teacher/another

2
3.3

Use this checklist to record what you think you can do (Column 1). Ask someone else, for example your teacher, to also assess what they think you can do (Column 2). Use Column 3 to mark those things that you cannot yet do which you feel are important for you (Column 3 = Objectives). Add to the list – perhaps with your teacher – other things that you can do, or that are important for your language learning at this level.

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Listening I can follow clearly articulated speech directed at me in everyday conversation, though I sometimes have to ask for repetition of particular words and phrases. I can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around me, provided speech is clearly articulated in standard dialect. I can listen to a short narrative and form hypotheses about what will happen next. I can understand the main points of radio news bulletins and simpler recorded material on topics of personal interest delivered relatively slowly and clearly. I can catch the main points in TV programmes on familiar topics when the delivery is relatively slow and clear. I can understand simple technical information, such as operating instructions for everyday equipment.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level B1.

1

2

Reading I can understand the main points in short newspaper articles about current and familiar topics. I can read columns or interviews in newspapers and magazines in which someone takes a stand on a current topic or event and understand the overall meaning of the text. I can guess the meaning of single unknown words from the context thus deducing the meaning of expressions if the topic is familiar. I can skim short texts (for example news summaries) and find relevant facts and information (for example who has done what and where). I can understand the most important information in short simple everyday information brochures. I can understand simple messages and standard letters (for example from businesses, clubs or authorities). In private letters I can understand those parts dealing with events, feelings and wishes well enough to correspond regularly with a pen friend. I can understand the plot of a clearly structured story and recognise what the most important episodes and events are and what is significant about them.

1

2

Spoken Interaction I can start, maintain and close simple face-to-face conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal interest. I can maintain a conversation or discussion but may sometimes be difficult to follow when trying to say exactly what I would like to. I can deal with most situations likely to arise when making travel arrangements through an agent or when actually travelling. I can ask for and follow detailed directions. I can express and respond to feelings such as surprise, happiness, sadness, interest and indifference.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

3

3

3

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

I can give or seek personal views and opinions in an informal discussion with friends. I can agree and disagree politely.

Spoken Production I can narrate a story. I can give detailed accounts of experiences, describing feelings and reactions. I can describe dreams, hopes and ambitions. I can explain and give reasons for my plans, intentions and actions. I can relate the plot of a book or film and describe my reactions. I can paraphrase short written passages orally in a simple fashion, using the original text wording and ordering.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A1.

1

2

Strategies I can repeat back part of what someone has said to confirm that we understand each other. I can ask someone to clarify or elaborate what they have just said. When I can’t think of the word I want, I can use a simple word meaning something similar and invite ”correction”.

1

2

Language Quality I can keep a conversation going comprehensibly, but have to pause to plan and correct what I am saying – especially when I talk freely for longer periods. I can convey simple information of immediate relevance, getting across which point I feel is most important. I have a sufficient vocabulary to express myself with some circumlocutions on most topics pertinent to my everyday life such as family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events. I can express myself reasonably accurately in familiar, predictable situations.

1

2

Writing I can write simple connected texts on a range of topics within my field of interest and can express personal views and opinions. I can write simple texts about experiences or events, for example about a trip, for a school newspaper or a club newsletter. I can write personal letters to friends or acquaintances asking for or giving them news and narrating events. I can describe in a personal letter the plot of a film or a book or give an account of a concert. In a letter I can express feelings such as grief, happiness, interest, regret and sympathy. I can reply in written form to advertisements and ask for more complete or more specific information about products (for example a car or an academic course). I can convey – via fax, e-mail or a circular – short simple factual information to friends or colleagues or ask for information in such a way. I can write my CV in summary form.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

My teacher/another

3

3

3

3

Self-assessment Checklist
Level

Language:
Use this checklist to record what you think you can do (Column 1). Ask someone else, for example your teacher, to also assess what they think you can do (Column 2). Use Column 3 to mark those things that you cannot yet do which you feel are important for you (Column 3 = Objectives). Add to the list – perhaps with your teacher – other things that you can do, or that are important for your language learning at this level.

B2
My teacher/another

2
3.4

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Listening
I can understand in detail what is said to me in standard spoken language even in a noisy environment. I can follow a lecture or talk within my own field, provided the subject matter is familiar and the presentation straightforward and clearly structured. I can understand most radio documentaries delivered in standard language and can identify the speaker’s mood, tone etc. I can understand TV documentaries, live interviews, talk shows, plays and the majority of films in standard dialect. I can understand the main ideas of complex speech on both concrete and abstract topics delivered in a standard dialect, including technical discussions in my field of specialisation. I can use a variety of strategies to achieve comprehension, including listening for main points; checking comprehension by using contextual clues.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level B2.

1

2

Reading
I can rapidly grasp the content and the significance of news, articles and reports on topics connected with my interests or my job, and decide if a closer reading is worthwhile. I can read and understand articles and reports on current problems in which the writers express specific attitudes and points of view. I can understand in detail texts within my field of interest or the area of my academic or professional speciality. I can understand specialised articles outside my own field if I can occasionally check with a dictionary. I can read reviews dealing with the content and criticism of cultural topics (films, theatre, books, concerts) and summarise the main points. I can read letters on topics within my areas of academic or professional speciality or interest and grasp the most important points. I can quickly look through a manual (for example for a computer program) and find and understand the relevant explanations and help for a specific problem. I can understand in a narrative or play the motives for the characters’ actions and their consequences for the development of the plot.

1

2

Spoken Interaction
I can initiate, maintain and end discourse naturally with effective turn-taking. I can exchange considerable quantities of detailed factual information on matters within my fields of interest. I can convey degrees of emotion and highlight the personal significance of events and experiences. I can engage in extended conversation in a clearly participatory fashion on most general topics.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

3

3

3

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

I can account for and sustain my opinions in discussion by providing relevant explanations, arguments and comments. I can help a discussion along on familiar ground confirming comprehension, inviting others in, etc. I can carry out a prepared interview, checking and confirming information, following up interesting replies.

Spoken Production
I can give clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to my fields of interest. I can understand and summarise orally short extracts from news items, interviews or documentaries containing opinions, argument and discussion. I can understand and summarise orally the plot and sequence of events in an extract from a film or play. I can construct a chain of reasoned argument, linking my ideas logically. I can explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options. I can speculate about causes, consequences, hypothetical situations.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A1.

1

2

Strategies
I can use standard phrases like ”That’s a difficult question to answer” to gain time and keep the turn while formulating what to say. I can make a note of ”favourite mistakes” and consciously monitor speech for them. I can generally correct slips and errors if I become aware of them or if they have led to misunderstandings.

1

2

Language Quality
I can produce stretches of language with a fairly even tempo; although I can be hesitant as I search for expressions, there are few noticeably long pauses. I can pass on detailed information reliably. I have sufficient vocabulary to express myself on matters connected to my field and on most general topics. I can communicate with reasonable accuracy and can correct mistakes if they have led to misunderstandings.

1

2

Writing
I can write clear and detailed texts (compositions, reports or texts of presentations) on various topics related to my field of interest. I can write summaries of articles on topics of general interest. I can summarise information from different sources and media. I can discuss a topic in a composition or ”letter to the editor”, giving reasons for or against a specific point of view. I can develop an argument systematically in a composition or report, emphasising decisive points and including supporting details. I can write about events and real or fictional experiences in a detailed and easily readable way. I can write a short review of a film or a book. I can express in a personal letter different feelings and attitudes and can report the news of the day making clear what – in my opinion – are the important aspects of an event.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

My teacher/another

3

3

3

3

Self-assessment Checklist
Level

Language:
Use this checklist to record what you think you can do (Column 1). Ask someone else, for example your teacher, to also assess what they think you can do (Column 2). Use Column 3 to mark those things that you cannot yet do which you feel are important for you (Column 3 = Objectives). Add to the list – perhaps with your teacher – other things that you can do, or that are important for your language learning at this level.

C1
My teacher/another

2
3.5

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Listening
I can follow extended speech even when it is not clearly structured and when relationships are only implied and not signalled explicitly. I can understand a wide range of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms, appreciating shifts in style and register. I can extract specific information from even poor quality, audibly distorted public announcements, e.g. in a station, sports stadium etc. I can understand complex technical information, such as operating instructions, specifications for familiar products and services. I can understand lectures, talks and reports in my field of professional or academic interest even when they are propositionally and linguistically complex. I can without too much effort understand films which contain a considerable degree of slang and idiomatic usage.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level C1.

1

2

Reading
I can understand fairly long demanding texts and summarise them orally. I can read complex reports, analyses and commentaries where opinions, viewpoints and connections are discussed. I can extract information, ideas and opinions from highly specialised texts in my own field, for example research reports. I can understand long complex instructions, for example for the use of a new piece of equipment, even if these are not related to my job or field of interest, provided I have enough time to reread them. I can read any correspondence with occasional use of a dictionary. I can read contemporary literary texts with ease. I can go beyond the concrete plot of a narrative and grasp implicit meanings, ideas and connections. I can recognise the social, political or historical background of a literary work. .

1

2

Spoken Interaction
I can keep up with an animated conversation between native speakers. I can use the language fluently, accurately and effectively on a wide range of general, professional or academic topics. I can use language flexibly and effectively for social purposes, including emotional, allusive and joking usage. I can express my ideas and opinions clearly and precisely, and can present and respond to complex lines of reasoning convincingly.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

3

3

3

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Spoken Production
I can give clear, detailed descriptions of complex subjects. I can orally summarise long, demanding texts. I can give an extended description or account of something, integrating themes, developing particular points and concluding appropriately. I can give a clearly developed presentation on a subject in my fields of personal or professional interest, departing when necessary from the prepared text and following up spontaneously points raised by members of the audience.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A1.

1

2

Strategies
I can use fluently a variety of appropriate expressions to preface my remarks in order to get the floor, or to gain time and keep the floor while thinking. I can relate own contribution skilfully to those of other speakers. I can substitute an equivalent term for a word I can’t recall without distracting the listener.

1

2

Language Quality
I can express myself fluently and spontaneously, almost effortlessly. Only a conceptually difficult subject can hinder a natural, smooth flow of language. I can produce clear, smoothly-flowing, well-structured speech, showing control over ways of developing what I want to say in order to link both my ideas and my expression of them into coherent text. I have a good command of a broad vocabulary allowing gaps to be readily overcome with circumlocutions ; I rarely have to search obviously for expressions or compromise on saying exactly what I want to. I can consistently maintain a high degree of grammatical accuracy ; errors are rare and difficult to spot.

1

2

Writing
I can express myself in writing on a wide range of general or professional topics in a clear and user-friendly manner. I can present a complex topic in a clear and well-structured way, highlighting the most important points, for example in a composition or a report. I can present points of view in a comment on a topic or an event, underlining the main ideas and supporting my reasoning with detailed examples. I can put together information from different sources and relate it in a coherent summary. I can give a detailed description of experiences, feelings and events in a personal letter. I can write formally correct letters, for example to complain or to take a stand in favour of or against something. I can write texts which show a high degree of grammatical correctness and vary my vocabulary and style according to the addressee, the kind of text and the topic. I can select a style appropriate to the reader in mind.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2  I can do this under normal circumstances   I can do this easily

My teacher/another

3

3

3

3

Self-assessment Checklist
Level

Language:

C2
My teacher/another

2
3.6

Use this checklist to record what you think you can do (Column 1). Ask someone else, for example your teacher, to also assess what they think you can do (Column 2). Use Column 3 to mark those things that you cannot yet do which you feel are important for you (Column 3 = Objectives). Add to the list – perhaps with your teacher – other things that you can do, or that are important for your language learning at this level.

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Listening
I have no difficulty in understanding any kind of spoken language, whether live or broadcast, even when delivered at fast native speed, provided I have some time to get familiar with the accent.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level C2.

1

2

Reading
I can recognise plays on words and appreciate texts whose real meaning is not explicit (for example irony, satire). I can understand texts written in a very colloquial style and containing many idiomatic expressions or slang. I can understand manuals, regulations and contracts even within unfamiliar fields. I can understand contemporary and classical literary texts of different genres (poetry, prose, drama). I can read texts such as literary columns or satirical glosses where much is said in an indirect and ambiguous way and which contain hidden value judgements. I can recognise different stylistic means (puns, metaphors, symbols, connotations, ambiguity) and appreciate and evaluate their function within the text.

1

2

Spoken Interaction
I can take part effortlessly in all conversations and discussions with native speakers.

1

2

Spoken Production
I can summarise orally information from different sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. I can present ideas and viewpoints in a very flexible manner in order to give emphasis, to differentiate and to eliminate ambiguity.

1

2

Strategies
I can backtrack and restructure around a difficulty so smoothly the interlocutor is hardly aware of it.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2 I can do this under normal circumstances    I can do this easily

3

3

3

3

3

In column 3 ! This is an objective for me !! This is a priority for me

Language Quality
I can express myself naturally and effortlessly; I only need to pause occasionally in order to select precisely the right words. I can convey finer shades of meaning precisely by using, with reasonable accuracy, a wide range of expressions to qualify statements and pinpoint the extent to which something is the case. I have a good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms with an awareness of implied meaning and meaning by association. I can consistently maintain grammatical control of complex language even when my attention is otherwise engaged.

Me

If you have over 80% of the points ticked, you have probably reached Level A1.

1

2

Writing
I can write well-structured and easily readable reports and articles on complex topics. In a report or an essay I can give a complete account of a topic based on research I have carried out, make a summary of the opinions of others, and give and evaluate detailed information and facts. I can write a well-structured review of a paper or a project giving reasons for my opinion. I can write a critical review of cultural events (film, music, theatre, literature, radio, TV). I can write summaries of factual texts and literary works. I can write narratives about experiences in a clear, fluent style appropriate to the genre. I can write clear, well-structured complex letters in an appropriate style, for example an application or request, an offer to authorities, superiors or commercial clients. In a letter I can express myself in a consciously ironical, ambiguous and humorous way.

1

2

These descriptors were developed for the Common European Framework and the Portfolio in the Swiss National Science Foundation project: Schneider, Günther & North, Brian (2000): Fremdsprachen können – was heisst das? Chur/Zürich, Rüegger.

My objectives

Use the following symbols: In columns 1 and 2  I can do this under normal circumstances   I can do this easily

My teacher/another

3

3

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