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[Frankenstein Unit]

[English/Grade 10]
Cristina Almeida
EDHM 335-X01

This five week unit on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein will focus on helping students learn to create a clear and organized argument, support their
claims with evidence, participate in class discussions, examine the development of themes and characters throughout the text, make connections
between literature and the real world, use proper spelling and grammar, and revise their work. The performance assessment for this unit will test all
of these skills by having students plan out, write, and revise an essay in which they compare Frankenstein’s monster to another monster of their
choice from pop culture (T.V. show, movie, book, cartoon, etc.) within the last 30 years. In the essay, students will explain how society’s ideas about
monsters have changed and/or stayed the same and what these similarities and/or differences say about society today.

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Table of Contents
Unit Plan ……………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………… 3
Sample Lesson 1 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..………....... 7
Sample Lesson 2 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……… 11
Sample Lesson 3 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15
Sample Lesson 4………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 20
Unit Resources …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……………… 24
CEPAs …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………… 25

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Stage 1 Desired Results
ESTABLISHED GOALS G Transfer
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.1 Cite strong Students will be able to independently use their learning to…
and thorough textual evidence to support  Create clear, organized, thorough, and well-supported arguments based on a
analysis of what the text says explicitly as text’s themes, relevance to real life, and character development.
well as inferences drawn from the text.  Effectively contribute to multiple forms of group discussions (presentations,
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.3 Analyze how small group discussions, class discussions, teacher-led discussions, etc.).
complex characters (e.g., those with  Plan and edit their written work.
multiple or conflicting motivations) T
develop over the course of a text, interact Meaning
with other characters, and advance the plot UNDERSTANDINGS U ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Q
or develop the theme. Students will understand that… EQ 1. How do we define what a monster
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.1 Write U1. Literature has timeless connections to is?
arguments to support claims in an analysis modern day life. EQ 2. How do we support our definition of
of substantive topics or texts, using valid U2. Character development contributes to what a monster is?
reasoning and relevant and sufficient the themes of a text.
U3. Arguments must be supported by EQ 3. In what ways is defining the term
evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.4Produce clear evidence in a clear, organized, and “monster” complicated?
and coherent writing in which the thorough manner. EQ 4. How have perceptions of what a
development, organization, and style are U4. Planning and editing are important monster is changed over time?
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. steps in the writing process.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.5 Develop and U5. A successful discussion involves
strengthen writing as needed by planning, providing evidence for arguments, staying
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new on task, respectfully responding to their
approach, focusing on addressing what is peers, and elaborating on significant
most significant for a specific purpose and issues.
audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.10.1 Initiate and Acquisition
participate effectively in a range of Students will know… Students will be skilled at… S
collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in K1. The historical context of Frankenstein S1. Planning and editing their work.
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse in terms of what was considered monstrous S2. Developing and organizing justifiable
partners on grades 10 topics, texts, and at the time the book was published such as arguments.
issues, building on others’ ideas and scientific advancements and rebellion S3. Supporting their ideas with evidence.
expressing their own clearly and against gender norms. S4. Analyzing a text in terms of character
persuasively. K2. How to plan and edit their work using development, theme, and real world
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.1 Demonstrate graphic organizers, diagrams, dialectic connections.

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command of the conventions of standard journals, guiding questions, etc. S5. Participating in multiple forms of
English grammar and usage when writing K3. How to participate in different forms discussion.
or speaking. of discussion in an effective and respectful
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.2 Demonstrate way.
command of the conventions of standard K4. How to create clear, organized,
English capitalization, punctuation, and thorough, and well-supported arguments
spelling when writing. K5. How to analyze text in terms of
themes, relevance to real life, and character
development.
Stage 2 – Evidence
Evaluative Criteria Assessment Evidence
 The use proper spelling, grammar, CURRICULUM EMBEDDED PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (PERFORMANCE TASKS) PT
and punctuation. Students will write an essay in which they will compare Frankenstein’s monster to
 The degree to which the argument another monster of their choice from pop culture (T.V. show, movie, book, cartoon, etc.)
is developed, supported, relevant, within the last 30 years. In the essay, students will explain how society’s ideas about
and clear. monsters have changed and/or stayed the same and what these similarities and/or
 The extent to which the two differences say about society today.
monsters were equally and Level 2:
thoroughly compared and  Compare and contrast Frankenstein’s monster and their chosen monster using a
contrasted. Venn diagram.
 The amount to which the peer Level 3:
critique is complete, thorough,  Develop and organize their thesis, main ideas, evidence, etc. using a graphic
clear, and specific. organizer.
 The level to which each part of the Level 4:
essay is logically organized and  Write an essay using their comparison of the two monsters to explain how
clearly connected to the argument. monsters are a reflection of society.
 Participate in a peer review using a worksheet with guiding questions.

 The use of proper spelling, OTHER EVIDENCE: OE


grammar, and punctuation.  Defining Monstrosity Presentation
 The degree to which ideas are  Dialectic Journal
developed, supported, relevant, and  Timeline
clear.  Writing assignments
 Court Case
 The level to which each part of the

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assignment is logically organized
and clearly connected to the main
idea(s).
 The degree to which all the basic
steps or instructions of the
assignment were completed.
 The extent to which students
actively participate.
Stage 3 – Learning Plan
Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction

Lesson 1: Defining Monstrosity Presentation. In groups, students will create a brief presentation, using the Book Creator app, in
which they define the term "monster" based on their own experiences. Students must support their definition using three pop cultural
monsters as examples. As a class, students will discuss the similarities and differences of each group’s presentation. This discussion
will lead to a lecture on important themes and historical information in Frankenstein.
(This lesson would most likely take up to about three class periods.)

Lesson 2: Dialectic Journal Discussion. Students will come into class with quotes from the pages of Frankenstein that they were
assigned to read. Students will use the note taking app, Evernote, which allows the use of audio files, photos, sketches, etc. This app
will allow students to turn in their notes for a grade without having to wait to get their notes back. In small groups, each student will
share a quote they found interesting or confusing. Each group will share their quotes with the class. This will lead to a class discussion
and an opportunity for the teacher to elaborate on certain points. Students would repeat this lesson with different groups until the book
is complete.
(This lesson would repeat until the book was completed. During this time, lessons may also be dedicated to teaching students
more background information.)

Lesson 3: Frankenstein and Monster Timeline Comparison. After completing the book, students will work in groups to create two
timelines using the Book Creator app; one timeline for Victor and one for his creation. The timelines will focus on significant
moments that contribute to our understanding of the two characters and the theme of monstrosity. They will present their finish
products to the class. Students must support their choice of significant moments with evidence from the text. They must also explain
what the similarities and differences between the timelines reveal about the characters. Students must explain how their analysis of
these timelines connects to the theme of monstrosity.
(Together, the creation and presentation portion of this lesson would take up to two to three class periods).

Lesson 4: Frankenstein vs. Monster Court Case. Students will participate in a mock court case to determine who should be held

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responsible for the murders in the book; Victor or his creation. Students will be assigned to groups where they will defend either one
of the characters as lawyers, fact checkers, or characters from the novel. Students must work together to prepare opening and closing
statements, questions, answers, counterarguments, and textual evidence for the case. Students will vote at the end for the group that
had the most convincing argument.
(The planning and presentation of this lesson would take up to three to four class periods).

Lesson 5: Curriculum Embedded Performance Assessment. Students will write an essay in which they will compare
Frankenstein’s monster to another monster of their choice from pop culture (T.V. show, movie, book, cartoon, etc.) within the last 30
years. In the essay, students will explain how society’s ideas about monsters have changed and/or stayed the same and what these
similarities and/or differences say about society today. Along with writing an essay, students will compare and contrast Frankenstein’s
monster and their chosen monster using a Venn diagram, develop and organize their thesis, main ideas, evidence, etc. using a graphic
organizer, and participate in a peer review using a guided worksheet. Lessons will also involve critiquing past students’ work,
reviewing the different parts of writing an essay, brainstorming a list of monsters that could be used, and more.
(Depending on the students’ comfort with writing an essay, this lesson may take up to five to seven class periods.)

Adapted from Understanding by Design 2.0 © 2011 Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe Used with Permission
July 2012

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Lesson 1
Defining Monstrosity Presentation

Standards-based Lesson Plan

Subject: English Unit: Frankenstein Unit

Grade: 10 Instructor: Cristina Almeida

Framework Standard/s:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid
reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing
or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.

Essential question:

 How do we define what a monster is?


 How do we support our definition of what a monster is?

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Intended learning outcome/s:
Students will be able to…
 Design an organized presentation that clearly and thoroughly conveys their group’s idea of what it means to be a monster.
 Support their definition of the term “monster” with monsters in pop culture.
 Discuss the characteristics of a monster with other students.
 Identify traits often associated with monsters.
 Develop a definition for the term “monster.”

Overview of lesson/topic
In groups, students will create a brief presentation, using the Book Creator app, in which they define the term "monster"
based on their own experiences. Students must support their definition using three pop cultural monsters as examples. As a
class, students will discuss the similarities and differences of each group’s presentation. This discussion will lead to a lecture on
important themes and historical information in Frankenstein.

Activity/ies (time needed)

 Students will begin class by individually writing a 4-5 sentence paragraph in which they describe their definition of the
term “monster.” (5 minutes)
 The teacher will hand out and explain the instructions, goals, and expectations. The teacher will also model the
assignment by using one student’s reflection as an example on the Book Creator app. (10 minutes)
 Students will be broken up into groups where they will work together to create a presentation that defines the term
“monster” and uses three examples of pop cultural monsters to support this definition. (40 minutes)
 During the following class, students will present their work. Afterwards, there will be a short discussion about the
similarities and differences of each group’s presentation (30 minutes).
 This discussion will lead to a lecture with a PowerPoint about the themes and historical information concerning
Frankenstein. (30 minutes)

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How is assessment embedded in the lesson?

 The short individual writing assignment and presentation will serve as ways to assess the students’ ability to formulate an
argument, defend and explain their claims, and use proper spelling and grammar.
 By participating in class and group discussions, students demonstrate their discussion skills.
 By using their knowledge of pop cultural monsters to defend their definitions, students will show their ability to relate
classroom assignments to real life.

What instructional strategies will be used?

 During the lecture portion of the lessons, students should be a given a guided note taking sheet.
 Each group can designate which members will present the material to the class.
 If students are unfamiliar with the app, time should be dedicated during the modeling process to discussing each of the
app’s features.
 The individual writing assignment should be graded on thoroughness, evidence, and clarity. Grammar and spelling should
be corrected but not graded.
 Students should be split into purposeful groups in order to balance the strengths and weaknesses of each student.
 The Google Docs app would be useful for students to use to write down presentation notes at the same time.
 A mini lesson might be necessary if students are unfamiliar with how to create a dialectic journal.

What resources are needed?

 Assignment sheet
 Projector
 Tablet/Smartphone
 Guided worksheet

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What extension activities will be assigned?

 Students will begin reading Frankenstein for homework. As they read, students should jot down notes in their dialectic
journals. Students should focus on character development, the theme of monstrosity, and relevance to real life by using
what they know from the lecture and from the presentations. Essentially, students should compare their definition of the
term “monster” to the novel’s definition in order to analyze the text.

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Lesson 2
Dialectic Journal Discussion

Standards-based Lesson Plan

Subject: English Unit: Frankenstein Unit

Grade: 10 Instructor: Cristina Almeida

Framework Standard/s:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop
over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid
reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing
their own clearly and persuasively.

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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing
or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.
Essential question:
 How do we define what a monster is?
 How do we support our definition of what a monster is?
 In what ways is defining the term “monster” complicated?

Intended learning outcome/s:


Students will be able to…
 Identify quotes that are significant in terms of connections to real life, contributions to the theme of monstrosity, and
character development.
 Defend their choice in significant quotes.
 Relate significant events to the book as a whole.
 Discuss the similarities and differences of the quotes chosen by each group member and each group.

Overview of lesson/topic
Students will come into class with quotes from the pages of Frankenstein that they were assigned to read. Students will use the
note taking app, Evernote, which allows the use of audio files, photos, sketches, etc. This app will allow students to turn in their
notes for a grade without having to wait to get their notes back. In small groups, each student will share a quote they found
interesting or confusing. Each group will share their quotes with the class. This will lead to a class discussion and an
opportunity for the teacher to elaborate on certain points. Students would repeat this lesson with different groups until the book
is complete.

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Activity/ies (time needed)
 The teacher will go over the goals, instructions, and expectations of the discussion. (10 minutes)
 In small groups, each student will share a quote that they found interesting (in terms of relevance to real life and
contribution to the theme of monstrosity and character development) or confusing. The group members who are listening
will try to clear up any confusion or share their own analysis of the quote. (15 minutes)
 Each group will share their quotes and analyses with the class. The teacher will use these quotes to initiate class
discussion and to elaborate on points that students may have overlooked or are unfamiliar with. The teacher will project
each group's entries so that other students may copy down these entries. (30 minutes)
 At the end of class, the teacher will summarize the important points and connect these points to the story as a whole. (5
minutes)

What instructional strategies will be used?

 The teacher would model how to create a dialectic journal beforehand by creating example entries as a class.
 Each group will assign a member(s) to share the group’s entries with the class.
 Journals entries should be graded periodically throughout the unit based on completion. Completion means writing down
one significant quote every 10 pages. Grammar and spelling should be corrected but should not be used to determine a
student’s grade.
 This lesson would be repeated until the book is complete. Students should be placed in different groups with each lesson.

What resources are needed?

 Projector
 Tablet/Smartphone

What extension activities will be assigned?

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 As students continue to read Frankenstein, they can look back at their notes to refresh their memory. This is extremely
useful since this epistolary novel often switches perspectives.
 This organized collection of quotes will be convenient to refer back to when completing future assignments such as the
timelines, court case, and essay.

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Lesson 3
Frankenstein and Monster Timeline Comparison

Standards-based Lesson Plan

Subject: English Unit: Frankenstein Unit

Grade: 10 Instructor: Cristina Almeida

Framework Strand/s and Standard/s:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.2: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop
over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid
reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.10.1:Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their
own clearly and persuasively.

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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing
or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.

Essential question:

 In what ways is defining the term “monster” complicated?

Intended learning outcome/s:


Students will be able to…
 Identify significant moments in the book that contribute to their understanding of these two characters and the theme of
monstrosity.
 Support their selection of these significant moments with thorough explanations and evidence from the text.
 Compare and contrast the characteristics of Victor and his creation.
 Organize the events of the text.
 Recognize how both characters have complex traits.
 Design a timeline that depicts the development of Victor and his creation throughout the novel.

Overview of lesson/topic

After completing the book, students will work in groups to create two timelines using the Book Creator app; one timeline for
Victor and one for his creation. The timelines will focus on significant moments that contribute to our understanding of
the two characters and the theme of monstrosity. They will present their finish products to the class. Students must support
their choice of significant moments with evidence from the text. They must also explain what the similarities and differences

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between the timelines reveal about the characters. Students must explain how their analysis of these timelines connects to the
theme of monstrosity.

Activity/ies (time needed)

 After finishing the book, the teacher would ask the students to break up into groups and share their thoughts about the
book. The teacher should have students focus their discussion on some questions that relate to the timeline assignment.
Such questions may include: How do they feel about Victor and his monster? How have these feelings changed over the
course of the novel? After talking in small groups for five minutes, students will share their thoughts to the whole class.
The teacher should also use this time to answer questions regarding confusion about the book. (10 minutes)
 The teacher will introduce and model the assignment by completing one slide on the Book Creator app for one character
as a class. As the teacher models the assignment, the teacher should clearly explain the expectations and goals for this
assignment and how this assignment relates to future assignments. The teacher should use this time to address any
questions concerning the assignment or the app. (10 minutes)
 Students will be split into groups. Each group will create two timelines. Students must explain why they chose to include
each scene using evidence from the text. They must also explain how the two timelines are similar and different and
what these similarities and differences reveal about the characters. Finally, students must also explain how their analysis
of these timelines connects to the theme of monstrosity. This portion of the assignment would most likely extend to the
start of the following class. (60 minutes.)
 During the following class, students would present their work. (30 minutes)
 After everyone has presented their work, the teacher would end class with a discussion of about the similarities and
differences among the groups’ timelines. The teacher would also use this time to reiterate what the goals were for this
assignment and how this assignment relates to future assignments. Finally, the teacher would introduce students to the
short reflection assignment they would do for homework. (10 minutes)

How is assessment embedded in the lesson?

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 Through the implementation of group work and presentations, students will show their discussion skills.
 By organizing the text into a timeline and choosing the most significant moments, students will demonstrate their
basic comprehension of the text.
 Students will demonstrate their ability to support their choices by using evidence from the text and presenting their work
to the class.
 By having students compare and contrast these two characters side-by-side, students will show their ability to analyze
character development and connect this analysis to the theme of monstrosity.

What instructional strategies will be used?

 Each group can designate which members will present the material to the class.
 Timelines should be graded on thoroughness, evidence, and clarity.
 Students should be split into purposeful groups in order to balance the strengths and weaknesses of each student.
 Students should be provided with a guided note taking sheet so that they can note the differences and similarities of
each group’s timeline and analysis as they listen.
 After the presentations are complete, students should fill out a form that asks each student to briefly explain how the
labor was divided for this assignment.

What resources are needed?

 Copies of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley


 Projector
 Dialectic journals
 Tablet
 Assignment worksheet

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What extension activities will be assigned?

 Students will write a 1-2 paragraph reflection for homework about who they believe the true monster of the story is based
on their timelines and on their discussions in class. Students will use the significant moments they chose to include in
their timelines to defend their argument. The reflection will prepare students for the court case in Lesson 4 in which they
will have to defend the actions of Victor or his creation.

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Lesson 4
Frankenstein vs. Monster Court Case

Standards-based Lesson Plan

Subject: English Unit: Frankenstein Unit

Grade: 10 Instructor: Cristina Almeida

Framework Standard/s:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.2: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop
over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid
reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.10.1:Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their
own clearly and persuasively.

Essential question:

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 How do we define what a monster is?
 How do we support our definition of what a monster is?
 In what ways is defining the term “monster” complicated?

Intended learning outcome/s:


Students will be able to…
 Formulate questions and answers to help defend their arguments.
 Support their claims with direct and indirect evidence form the text.
 Use their knowledge of the book to play their assigned role.
 Argue against the claims of opposing group members.
 Discuss their analysis of the book with the class.

Overview of lesson/topic
Students will participate in a mock court case to determine who should be held responsible for the murders in the book; Victor
or his creation. Students will be assigned to groups where they will defend either one of the characters as lawyers, fact checkers,
or characters from the novel. Students must work together to prepare opening and closing statements, questions, answers,
counterarguments, and textual evidence for the case. Students will vote at the end for the group that had the most convincing
argument.

Activity/ies (time needed)

 The teacher will have students break up into groups to share their 1-2 page timeline reflections with each other. Each
group will briefly share their responses with the class. (10 minutes)
 The teacher will introduce the course case assignment by thoroughly going over the instructions, goals, and expectations
on the corresponding worksheet. (10 minutes)

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 Students will be divided into two large groups and begin working on the assignment. Using a guided worksheet, each
group will prepare an opening and closing statement, 4 questions for each character, answers to each of the questions that
are directed towards actors in their groups, 4 counterarguments that the other group may use, and 4 pieces of textual
evidence that support their arguments. This part of the lesson would extend into another class period. (60 minutes)
 Students will begin the court case. Lawyers will present their opening statements, ask characters questions, and present
their closing statements. Fact checkers will look for evidence to support arguments that the opposing group believes is
questionable. Characters will answer the lawyers’ questions as they play their roles. After each round of questions,
students will have two minutes to strategize. (50 minutes)
 At the end, students will vote on who had the most convincing argument. This will lead to a discussion about the main
points of the court case and upcoming assignments. (10 minutes)

How is assessment embedded in the lesson?

 By making claims that need to be supported with evidence, students demonstrate their ability to validate their arguments
with direct and indirect evidence.
 Students will show their analytical skills by developing and supporting claims based on their roles.
 By participating in various group discussions, students demonstrate their discussion skills.
 Students will show their ability to use proper spelling and grammar and to organize their argument by filling out the
guided worksheet.

What instructional strategies will be used?

 Each group can designate which members will present their reflections to the class at the start of the lesson.
 Reflections should be collected after the course case in order for students to use them as needed.
 Students should be reminded to bring in all their notes (dialectic journals, timelines, etc.) beforehand.
 Students should be split into purposeful groups in order to balance the strengths and weaknesses of each student.

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 The teacher should model the process for creating questions, answers, opening and closing statements,
counterarguments, and appropriate evidence by generating examples with the students as a class.
 Students can use the Google Docs app in order to work on the guided worksheet at the same time. The teacher can also
keep track of each group’s progress.

What resources are needed?

 Copies of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley


 Notes (dialectic journals, reflections, timelines, etc.)
 Guided worksheet
 Assignment sheet.
 Tablet/Smartphone

What extension activities will be assigned?

 At the end of class, students will be briefly introduced to their upcoming CEPA. This will be gone over more thoroughly
during the following class; however, students should begin thinking about what well-known monster they might want to
compare to Frankenstein’s monster for their essay. Students will be given the assignment worksheet for the CEPA. On
the back, students will have to list three monsters they would consider writing about. Under each monster, students will
list three main traits they might focus on in their essay.

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List of Unit Resources
List and include resources by lesson sequence

 Monstrosity Presentation Assignment sheet


 Projector
 Tablet/Smartphone (Book Creator, Google Docs, and Evernote)
 Guided lecture worksheet
 Copies of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
 Timeline assignment worksheet
 Notes (dialectic journals, reflections, timelines, etc.)
 Court case guided worksheet
 Court case assignment sheet.

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Curriculum Embedded Performance Assessment (CEPA)
Standard/s:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences
drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.10.3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.10.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)
with diverse partners on grades 10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Intended learning outcomes:


Students will be able to…
 Critique other students’ essays using a guided worksheet.
 Compare and contrast Frankenstein’s monster with another monster in pop culture.
 Support their monster comparison with specific evidence.
 Develop a clear argument that explains how monsters are a reflection of society.
 Investigate how society’s idea of monstrosity has changed over time.
 Recognize how defining monstrosity is complicated.
 Use proper spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

Performance Assessment/Task/s:

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Students will write an essay in which they will compare Frankenstein’s monster to another monster of their choice from pop culture (T.V. show,
movie, book, cartoon, etc.) within the last 30 years. In the essay, students will explain how society’s ideas about monsters have changed and/or
stayed the same and what these similarities and/or differences say about society today.
Level 2:
 Compare and contrast Frankenstein’s monster and their chosen monster using a Venn diagram.
Level 3:
 Develop and organize their thesis, main ideas, evidence, etc. using a graphic organizer.
Level 4:
 Write an essay using their comparison of the two monsters to explain how monsters are a reflection of society.
 Participate in a peer review using a worksheet with guiding questions.

Directions for Teacher:


 Go over the rubric with students using past students’ work as examples.
 Briefly model how to use the all the worksheets at the start of each lesson.
 Review the key parts of writing an essay (format, citation, etc.) as needed.
 Allow students to work in pairs when completing worksheets.
 Brainstorm ideas with the students for monsters that could be used.
 Allow students to revise their work after grading. Students must have a conference with the teacher prior to revising their work.
 Explain how each part of the CEPA relates to the objectives and essential questions of the unit.

Resources needed:
 Worksheets (essay organizer, Venn diagram, and peer review worksheet)
 Rubric
 Notes (character timelines, dialectic journals, etc.)
 Copies of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
 Tablet/Smartphone/Laptop/etc. (to find direct evidence to support their characterization of their chosen monster)

Performance criteria:
Students will be graded on their ability to…
 Use proper spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

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 Create a clear, developed, and organized argument.
 Support their claims with evidence.
 Compare the two monsters
 Participate in the peer-review.

Based on these criteria, what does proficient look like?


Proficient work will…
 Contain minimal errors in terms of spelling, grammar, punctuation, word usage, and capitalization.
 Consist of a clear, organized, and mostly developed argument supported by an adequate amount of evidence.
 Consist of a completed, clear, thorough, and specific peer critique worksheet.
 Compare and contrast the two monsters equally.
 Relates most parts of the essay back to the main argument.

Analytic Rubric:

Monster Comparison Essay

4- 3- 2-
CATEGORY Above Standards Meets Standards Approaching Standards 1 - Below Standards
Writing There were no There were no There were no more than 8 There were more than 8
Mechanics errors with spelling, more than 4 errors errors with spelling, errors with spelling,
grammar, with spelling, grammar, punctuation, grammar, punctuation,
punctuation, word grammar, word usage, and word usage, and
usage, and punctuation, word capitalization. capitalization.
capitalization. usage, and
capitalization.
Argument The argument The argument The argument does not There is no argument for
clearly states how clearly states how clearly state how the two how the two monsters are
the two monsters the two monsters monsters are a reflection of a reflection of society.
are a reflection of are a reflection of society. Some parts of the Ideas are not developed

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society. Each part of society. Some parts argument are developed thoroughly and/or are not
the argument is of the argument are thoroughly and/or are supported with direct
developed developed supported with direct evidence.
thoroughly and thoroughly and/or evidence.
supported with supported with
direct evidence. direct evidence.
Comparison The student relates The student relates The student relates some It is unclear how many
each point of the some points of the points of the comparison to points are related to the
comparison to their comparison to their their argument in a clear argument. The student
argument in a clear argument in a clear and thorough way. The does not spend equal
and thorough way. and thorough way. student does not spend time discussing each
The student spends The student spends equal time discussing each monster. The essay does
equal time equal time monster. The essay not compare or contrast
discussing each discussing each compares and contrasts the the two monsters.
monster. The essay monster. The essay two monsters.
compares and compares and
contrasts the two contrasts the two
monsters. monsters.
Peer Critique The student's The student's The student’s comments on The student leaves no
comments on their comments on their their peer's work are brief comments on their peer's
peer's work are peer's work are and vague. The student work. The peer review
clear and thorough. clear. The student does not explain each worksheet is not
The student fully does not explain comment completely and/or completed.
explains each each comment does not point to specific
comment and points completely and/or evidence. The peer review
to specific evidence. does not point to worksheet is fully or
The peer review specific evidence. partially completed.
worksheet is fully The peer review
completed. worksheet is fully
completed.
Organization There is a logical There is a logical The essay is somewhat There is no logical
arrangement to the arrangement to the illogical with its arrangement to the essay.

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essay. Each part of essay. Some parts arrangement. Some parts of It is unclear how each
the essay is clearly of the essay are not the essay are clearly part of the essay is
connected to the clearly connected connected to the argument connected to the
argument through to the argument through the use of argument. There are no
the use of through the use of transitional sentences. transitional sentences.
transitional transitional
sentences. sentences.

Date Created: Mar 30, 2017 12:29 pm (CDT)


Created using http://rubistar.4teachers.org. Copyright. © 2000-2008, ALTEC at University of Kansas

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