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timely dissemination of this information in an accurate manner to the public.

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“The Right to Information, The Right to Live” “Step Out From the Old to the New”

IS 807 (2006): Design, erection and testing (structural
portion) of cranes and hoists - Code of practice [MED 14:
Cranes, Lifting Chains and Related Equipment]

“!ान $ एक न' भारत का +नम-ण”
Satyanarayan Gangaram Pitroda
“Invent a New India Using Knowledge”

“!ान एक ऐसा खजाना > जो कभी च0राया नहB जा सकता ह”
है”

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“Knowledge is such a treasure which cannot be stolen”

—.-— Indian Standard DESIGN.020. ERECTION AND TESTING ( STRUCTURAL PORTION ) OF CRANES AND HOISTS — CODE OF PRACTICE (Second Revision ) ICS 53. 9 BAHADUR SHAH ZAFAR MARG NEW DELHI 110002 April 2006 Price Group -15 .20 0 BIS 2006 BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS MANAK BHAVAN.

Lifiing Chains and Its Related Equipment Sectional Committee had been approved by the Mechanical Engineering Division Council.Cranes. In the first revision the permissible stresses for members subjected to fluctuations of stress have been aligned with IS 1024: 1999 ‘Code of practice for use of welding in bridges and structures subject to dynamic loading’. This standard is the first in the series of standards relating to cranes and covers the structural design. and AWS D 14. [n the current revision. t) The design of bolts. quality of bolts. The composition of the Committee responsible for formulation of this standard is given in AnnexC. bolts tightening and effective friction surface has been dealt elaborately.’. c) The various loads have been explained elaborately and notch effect. and . d) The fatigue and notch effect have been dealt elaborately. the following points are added: a) The classifications of the cranes are based on operating time and load spectrum and classification from Mlto M8. cranes have been broadly classified into eight classes depending upon their duty and number of hours in service per year. In order to ensure economy in design in reliability in operation: To deal with the subject conventional Iy. in the current revision. b) State of loading is based on the hoist spectrum. .1 introducing the number of cycles of operation for fatigue calculations. Lifting Chains and Its Related Equipment”Sectional Committee. The correct classification of a crane is important and should be joint responsibility of the producer and the manufacturer. The limits of camber have also been specified. ME 14 FOREWORD This Indian Standard ( Second Revision) was adopted by the Bureau of Indian Standards. The other standards covering the mechanical and electrical portion are as follows: 1s3177: 1999 Code of practice for overhead traveling cranes and gantry cranes other than steel work cranes ( second revision ) 1S4137 :-1985 Code of practice for heavy duty electric overhead traveling cranes including special service math ines for use in steel work (first revision ) . This standard was first published in 1963.permissible stresses and other details of design. after the draft finalized by the Cranes. e) The welding joint design. welding procedures and inspection of welding for industrial cranes have been explained in detail. This standard covers design of structural portion of cranes and hoists and specifies .

1S 807:2006 CONTENTS Page Scope 1 References 1 Terminology 2 Materials -4 Classification of Cranes 4 5.5 Transportation and Erection 14 9 Allowable Stress 14 9.3 Rivets.4 Case of Loading (Combination of Loads) 13 .1 Class of Operating Time 5 5.1 Stresses on Joints under Tension.2 Safety against Movement by the Wind 21 11 Calculation of Tension Members 21 12 Calculation of Compression Members 26 13 Calculation of Box Girder Subjected to Bending and Torsional Stresses % 13. Bolts and Pins 9..1 Bending 26 13.3 Amplification of Load . .4 Conventional Number of Cycles and Stress Spectrum 14 10 Stability against Overturning 21 10..1 Loads to be Considered 5 7 Loads Due to Climatic Effects 10 8 Miscellaneous Loads 12 8.3 State of Stress — Stress Spectrum 5 6 State of Loading 5 6. Compression or Shear Force 27 15.2 Structural Members and Welds 14 9.2 Load Spectrum 5 5.2 Seismic Load 12 8.2 Combined Stresses on Joints under “Bending and Shear Moment 27 i .2 Torsion 27 14 Calculation of Members Subjected to Bending by Force in the Direction of Axis 27 15 Calculation of Welded Joints 27 15. 8.1 Fundamental Allowable Stress 14 9.1 Special Measures 21 10.1 Loads Carried by Platforms 12 8. 13 8.

42 22 Diaphragms and Vertical Stifl%ess 22.3 Compression Stress 44 A?WEX A Classification of Joints 45 A-1 Design of Bolted Joints 45 A-1.1 Rivets or Bolts for Joining Girder 38 18.1 Diaphragms 42 23 Girder and Connection 42 24 Bridge Trucks 42 24.1 Ratio of Crane Span to End Carriage Wheel Base 42 24.2 Height — Thickness Ratio of Web Plate 44 25.1 Girder Proportion 44 25.2 Bolts Tightening 45 A-l. 1 Co-efficient of Friction (p) 45 A-1.2 Slenderness Ratio 29 17..3 Limit for Slenderness Ratio 36 17.3 Value of the Tensile Stress Area of the Bolts 45 A-1.3 Web Joint of Plate Girder Receiving Bend 40 19 Welding of Industrial and Mill Cranes 42 20 Limiting Deflection 42 21 Camber~ 42 .IS 807:2006 Page 16 Calculation of Local Buckling of Plates 28 16.1 Compressive Stress or Shear Stress Acts Independently 28 16.2 Normal Stress and Shear Stress Acts Simultaneously 29 17 Designs of Structural Members Subject to Axial Forces 29 17.6 Shear Stress Acting on Combined Compressive Members 38 18 Detailed Design of Girders Subjected to Bending 38 18..1 Net Sectional Area of Tension Member 29 17. Bolts or Welded Directly Subjected to Wheel Load 40 18.2 Rivets. .5 Combined Compressive Members 37 17. Welding Procedures and Inspection of Welding for 48 Industrial and Mill Cranes ii .4 Quality of Bolts 45 ANNEX B Weld Joint Design.2 Bridge and Gantry Rails 42 25 Welded Box Girders 42 25.4 Compressive Members with Variable Height 36 17.

IS 807:2006 Page B-1 Allowable Stress 48 B-2 Base Metal 48 B-3. m .3 Intermittent Groove Welds 48 B-5..1 General Requirements 48 B-5..4 FiIlet Welds 48 B-5.7 Plug and Slot Welds 55 B-6 Weld Joint Categories 55 B-7 Welding Process 55 B-7.2 Groove Welds 48 B-5.6 Staggerad Intermittent Fillet Welds 55 B-5.5 Intermittent Fitlet Welds 48 B-5. WeJd Metal 48 B4 Fatigue 48 B-5 Weld Joint Design 48 B-5.1 Tolerances for Groove Weld Joint Preparations for Arc Welding 66 B-8 Control of Distortion and Shrinkage Stresses 66 B-9 Nominal Number of Loading Cycles 66 ANNEX C Committee Composition 69 .

(Part l): 1987 Dead loads — Unit weights of screws and studs ( third revision ) building material and stored materials ( second revision ) ( Part 2 ): 2002 Tolerances for fasteners – Bolts. screws and threaded fasteners not under tensile nuts of product grade ‘C’: stresses ( third revision ) ( Part 1 ) :2002 Hexagon head “bolts ( size range (Part 6): 1994 Mechanical properties and test M 5 to M 64 ) (fourth revision) methods for nuts with specified proof loads ( third revision) ( Part 2 ) :2002 Hexagon head screws ( size range M 5 to M 64) (fourth revision) (Part 7): 1980 Mechanical properties and test (Part 3):1992 Hexagon nuts ( size range M 5 to methods for nuts without specified M 64 ) ( third revision) proof loads ( second revision) 1 . 1364 Hexagon head bolts. the editions indicated were valid.fasteners (Part 4):1987 Snow loads ( second revision ) made of carbon steel and alloy steel — Bolts. ( Part 1 ): 2002 Hexagon head bolts ( size range 2 REFERENCES M 1.5 to M 64 ) ( third revision ) 1S No. erection and testing ( structure) of EOT nuts of product grades A and B: cranes. scf. Title This standard covers the code of practice for design. screws and manufacture. Title 800:1984 Code of practice for generaI ( Part 5 ): 2002 Hexagon thin nuts ( unchamfered ) ( size range M 1. ERECTION AND TESTING ( STRUCTURAL PORTION ) OF CRANES AND HOISTS — CODE OF PRACTICE (Second Revision ) 1 SCOPE IS No.5 to revision and parties to agreements based on this M 64 ) ( third revision ) standard are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the most recent editions of the standards ( Part 4 ): 2002 Hexagon thin nuts ( chamfered ) indicated below: ( size range M 1. All standards are subject to (Part 3):2002 Hexagon nuts ( size range M 1. which (Part2 ):2002 Hexagon head screws ( size range through reference in this text constitute provisions M 1.5 to M 64 ) ( third revision ) The following standards contain provisions.5 to-M 4 ) ( third revision ) of this standard. B and C ( third revision) (I?art 3): 1987 Wind loads ( second revision ) ( Part 3 ): 2002 Mechanical properties of. goliath. IS 807:2006 Indian Standard DESIGN. screws. shear legs and derricks.5 to M 64 ) ( third construction in steel ( second revision ) revision ) 875 Code of practice for design loads 1367 Technical supply conditions for ( other than earthquake ) for threaded steel fasteners: buildings and structures: (Part 1): 2002 General requirements for bolts.ews and studs (Part 5):1987 Special loads and load (fourth revision ) combinations ( second revision ) ( Part 5 ): 2002 Mechanical properties of fasteners 961:1975 Structural steel ( high tensile ) made of carbon steel and alloy ( second revision) steel — Set screws and similar 1363 Hexagon head bolts. studs and nuts – Product ( Part-2): 1987 Imposed loads ( second revision) grades A. At the time of publication.

trucks. Title IS No Title ( Part 8 ): 2002 Prevailing torque type steel 1893:1984 Criteria for earthquake resistant hexagon nuts — Mechanical and design of structures ( fourth performance properties ( third revision ) revision ) 1929:1982 Specification for hot forged steel ( Part 9/See 1 ) : Surface discontinuities. connected to one girder. if more than tensile stress ( third revision ) one bogie is used per girder). This type of end truck is used when more than four wheels are required on ( Part 6 ) :2002 Designation system for fasteners a crane due to the design of the runway. ( Part 8): 996 Packaging ( third revision ) 3. Section 1 Bolts. screws and studs 3.3 Bogie Fixed — A short end truck which is rigidly ( Part 9): 997 Axial load fatigue testing of bolts. Section 3 Set screws 3.1 . Section 2 Nuts qualities ) —“Specification (.Bogie — A short end truck attached to the end and sim iIar fasteners not under of one girder ( or to a connecting member.2 Bogie Equalizing — A short end truck which ( Part 7): 1996 Inspection. Section 2 purposes — Specification (Jjih 1993 Bolts. walk way and drive torques for bolts and screws with mechanism which carries the trolleys traveling along nominal diameters 1mm to 10 mm the runway rails. screws and studs for general diameter ) (first revision) applications ( third revision ) 2062:1999 Steel for general structural ( Part 9/See 2 ) : Surface discontinuities. end ties. 2 . tempered washers for high screws and studs ( third strength structural bolts and nuts revision ) (first revision ) ( Part 14/Sec 2 ) : Mechanical properties of 8500:1991 Structural steel ( microalloyed ) 2002 corrosion-resistant stainless ( medium and high strength steel fasteners.firsf ( third revision) revision ) ( Part 14/Sec 3 ) : Mechanical properties of 3 TERMINOLOGY 2002 corrosion-resistant stainless steel fasteners.IS 807:2006 IS No. sampling and is flexibly connected to one girder ( or connecting acceptance procedure ( third member ) by means of a pin upon which the truck revision ) can oscillate to equalize thq loading on the two truck wheel.4 Bridge — That part of a crane consisting of ( Part 20 ) :1996 Torsional test and minimum girders. ( third revision) 3. Section 1 rivets for hot closing ( 12 to 36 mm 1993 Bolts. screws and studs for special revision ) applications ( third revision ) 2155:1982 Specification for cold forged solid ( Part 10): 2002 Surface discominuities — Nuts steel rivets for hot closing ( 6 to (~hird revision) 16 mm diameter ) (first revision) (Part 11 ):2002 Electroplated coatings ( third 3138:1966 Specification for hexagonal bolts revision ) and nuts ( M42 to M150 ) (Part 12):1981 Phosphate coatings on threaded 3737:1966 Leather safety boots for workers fasteners ( second revision ) in heavy metal industries (Part 13):1983 Hot-dip galvanized coatings on 6610:1972 Specification for heavy washers threaded fasteners (second for steel structures revision) 6623:1985 Specification for high strength (Part 14):1984 Stainless-steel threaded fasteners structural nuts (first revision ) ( second revision) 6639:1972 Specification for hexagon bolts for ( Part 14/Sec 1 ) : Mechanical properties of steel structures 2002 corrosion-resistant stainless steel 6649:1985 Specification for hardenetf’ and fasteners.

controlled by means of suspension from the crane with the operator on the floor or on an independent 3.28 Hoist Auxiliary — A supplemental hoisting unit used to handle light loads.15 Crane.27 Hoist — A machinery unit that is used for Iiftiug crane except that the bridge is rigidly supported in and lowering a load. consisting of structural members.14 Crane. 3. runway.7 Cab — The operator’s compartment on a crane.32 Live Load — A load which moves or varies traverse motion. 3. axles.20 Deflection ( Live Load ) — The vertical reaches the end of its permitted travel. etc. 3.16 Crane. Semi-gantry — A gantry crane with one (-or columns ) at the end of the building. perpendicular to the runway. centre-to-centre of the bridge rails.8 Camber — The slight.13 Crane. between the centre line of a hook ( main or auxiliary ) and the centre line of the runway rail.21 Diaphragm — A vertical plate ( or channel ) equipped with mechanical means for moving a load between the girder webs. paral Iel to the runway between the centre line of the hook(s) and theface of the wall 3.23 End Tie — A structural member. all material fastened there to and supported permanently.An energy absorbing and control panels. 3.9 Clearance — The minimum distance from any end truck. wheels. which serves to support by raising and lowering by electrical or manual the top cover plate and bridge and to transfer the operation and whilst the load is in such a state ofmotion forces of the trolley wheel load to the webs rail. The dead load deflection is fully bumper or energy dissipating ( buffer ) device for compensated for in the girder camber. 3. caused by inertia or sudden load application such as 3. other than the 3.6 Cranes — A specially designed structure 3.31 Hook Approach ( Side ) — The minimum connected to the girders and running on an elevated horizontal distance.12 Crane. 3. Gantry — A crane similar to an overhead 3. such as foot walk. Floor Operated — A crane which is purpose. 3. 3. due to rated load and weight of the crane parts.30 Hook Approached ( End ) — The minimum operation.17 Cross Traverse Motion — The motion of the trolley or crab across the crane span is known as cross 3.5 Bumper ( Buffer ) –. Manually Operated — A crane whose hoist and travel mechanism are driven by manual 3. the trolley plus the rated load. the live load steel work moving on crane runway girder with consists of the rated load plus the weight of the trolley.33 Over Load — Any hook load greater than the rated load.25 Foot Walk — A walk way with hand rail and toe boards. Hot Molten Material Handling ( Ladle ) — An overhead crane used for trans. bearings. 3.22 Dynamic Effect — The effects on the structure 3. the live load consists of the rated load plus 3. relative to the member being considered. 1 . or suspension transporting it.24 End Truck ( End Carriage) — An assembly girder.26 Gauge — The horizontal distance between platform. For the trolley.-18 Dead Load — The weight of the crane structured the weight of the block.of the crane to the point of nearest obstruction.29 Hoist ‘Main — The primary hoist mechanism porting or pouring molten material. attached to the bridge or trolley for access 3. maintain the squareness of the bridge. which supports the bridge girders. reducing impact when a moving bridge or tralley 3. drive mechanism. 3. two or more legs. 3. 3. 3. For the bridge. which connects the ends of the girders to part .34 Longitudinal Travel Motion — The motion of plus the weight of parts permanently attached the whole crane on its gantry or tracks is known as thereto.11 Crane Cab Operated — A crane controlled by an operator in a cab attached to the bridge or trolley.10 Cover Plate — The top or bottom plate of a box 3. upward. horizontal distance. vertical curve retardation/acceleration breaking impact due to given to girders partially compensate for deflection collision.19 Deflection ( Dead Load ) — The vertical displacement of a bridge girder due to its own-weight 3. This device displacement of a bridge girder due to the weight of may be attached to the bridge trolley or runway stop. end of the bridge supported on one or more legs and other end of the bridge supported by an end truck 3. 3. provided for lifting and lowering the rated load of the crane. IS 807:2006 3. motor the longitudinal travel motion.

4 Material characteristics shown in Table 2 may be used for design purpose.36 Radius — The horizontal distance from the strength bolts and nuts shall be as given in Table 1. 4. that is: 4.85 weight. (1) (2) (3) 3. grabs.5 ) upper and lower flanges or cover plate of a girder.44 Web Plate — The critical plates. Product Ref to Fndian 3.4 and4. rivets and bolts including high 3. high strength bolts and nuts..35 Rated Lifted Loads — The rated lifted load 4. girders.3 and4. connecting the ( Clauses 4. Parameter Values 3. This member is rigidly attached 6649 to a fixed structure and normally does not have energy 3757 absorbing ability.38 Runway — The assembly of rails.1 The mat~rial of structures shall be in the form of a) Class of operating time. centre line of the lifting hook before loading to the centre about which the jib slews.. brackets characteristics of steel are given in Table 2. trolley weight and bridge v) Specific gravity (y) 7.42 Stability Reach — The distance of the jib head i) Rivets 2155 pin from the point of intersection of the nearest base 1929 line and vertical plane passing through the center line ii) Pins and bolts 1364 ( Parts 1 to 5 ) of the jib.IS 807:2006 3.2X 10-f ( without impact) produced on any bridge wheel by expansion (a) the sum of the rated load.48 Wheel Load Trolley — The vertical force There are two factors to be taken into consideration ( without impact) produced on any trolley wheel by for Ihe purpose of determining the group to which the sum of the rated load and trolley weight.40 Span — The horizontal distance between centre. Table 2 “Physical Properties of Steel 3.. and frame work on which the crane operates. 3. (1) (2) (3) measured parallel to the rail. IXI05 elasticity ( E ). 5 CLASSIFICATION OF CRANES 3.47 Wheel Load Bridge — The vertical force iv) Co-efficient of linear 1. but shall exclude wind load. Table 1 Rivet and Bolts 3. sheet and rolled sections. the material used. permissible stress shall be related to yield stress of lifting tackles such as magnets.45 Wheel Base — The distance from centre-to- centre of the outer most wheels of the bridge or trolley. 3. to the end truck of a bridge or trolley. NOTE— No black bolts shall be used forthe principal 3.5 Table 1 contains the different material grade for under frame with respect to hook. 3138 iii) High strength bolts and 6639 . S1 No.43 Stop — A member to physically limit the travel nuts 6623 of the trolley orbridge. with the trolley so positioned on the bridge as to give maximum loading.41 Stability Base — The effective span of the Standard supporting base. lifting beams. in N/mm2 3. pins and bolts.39 Rail Sweep — A mechanical device attached load bearing members in the crane. principal load bearing members and also rivets. the cranes belong are the class of utilization and the 4 MATERIALS state of loading. 4 .37 Reach — The horizontal distance from the centre line of the laden hook to the nearest point of the chassis/ 4.3 Materials for pins. 4. iii) Poisson’s ratio (I/m) 0. in N/mmz horizontally. S1 No. and plate.2 Structural steel shall conform to IS 2062 or IS 8500 from the mechanism design consideration shall as per designers suitability or as mutually agreed to mean the external load lifted and handled by the crane between the purchaser and the manufacturer and shall include in addition the safe working load. The physical 3.3 3. i) Modulus of longitudinal 2.1 x104 velocity of the wind which is assumed to act shear (G). b) Load spectrum.46 Wind Load — The forces produced by the ii) Modulus of elasticity in 8.5 ) to-centre of the runway rails. ( Clauses 4.

normally.2 Lifted Loads a lesser load. which the crane would 6.1) S1 No.1 The loads due to the dead weight of the 5. P= 1/3 and P= Oare shownon a) Class of operating time indicates the average the curves. very Iight loads ii) Light Cranes which only hoist the SWL and P= 1/3 normally loaded about one-third of SWL iii) Moderate Cranes which hoist the SWL fairly P = 2/3 frequently and normally loads between 1/3 to 213 of SWL iv) Heavy Cranes which are regularly loaded close P=l to the SWL 5 . be considered. to which the crane lifts the maximum load.1 State of Hoist Loading — Hoist Load components ( crane girders.1. P=213.1. calculation of the steel structural parts of the cranes.1.I.1 Loads to be Considered accomplish during its life ( see Table 3 ). resistance The state of hoist loading determines the extent boxes ). . for example. This concept could be represented by the 6 STATE OF LOADING number of working cycles. proportion of the carrying means such as ropes. end carriage.3 X 104 idle periods ii) B ‘Regular use on intermittent duty 2 x 105 iii) c Regular use on intensive duty 6.1.1 Principal Loads Exerted on the Structure 5. conventional spectra corresponding to the number b) Two hundred fitly working days per year shall of cycles to class of utilization are shown in Table 4. the bottom block important factors determining the severity of the spreader bar. It is one of the carry the useful load. and 5.1 Class of utilization takes account of the according to Table 5. The state of stress are defined in the same manner on those of the hoisted loads with same -spectra 5.l ) S1 No.. . 6. Table 3 Classes of Utilization (Clause 5.2.. The classes of utilization are used as a basis for the design of the The following loads shall be considered in the structure.I ) (2) (3) (4) 0 A Irregularoccasionaluse followed by long 6.2. This idea is illustrated by a spectrum of hoist loads showing the number of cycles of The lifted loads ( hook loads ) comprise the useful operation during which a certain fraction of the load and the self weights of members designed to maximum load is reached or exceeded. IS 807:2006 5. plate forms. Table 6 and Table 7. L~a or only 6. Spectrum LT machinery and electrical items panel.3 State of Stress — Stress Spectrum c) Higher classes of operating time for more than one shift per day.2 Load Spectrum 6J. designated by the vahres P= 1. frequency of one of the cranes as a whole when in service. heavy duty more than one 2x 106 shiftlday Table 4 State of Loading “ ( Clause 5. Class of Utilization Frequency of Utilization of the Conventional Number of Hoisting Motion Hoisting Cycles (. State of Loading Definition Corresponding Spectrum (1) (2) (3) (4) O Very light Cranes which hoist SWL exceptionally P=o and. the grab. the lifting magnet and also a duty of the cranes.3 X 10s iv) D Intensive.1 Class of Ope&ing Time There are four states of loading. These curves represent the four sets of period per day. L.

0 1.2 0.3 x 105 CYCLES UTILIZATION UTILIZATIOND 2 x 106 CYCLES Table5 States of Stress ( Clause 5.8 0.6 0.6 0.0 1.6 0. 3 GRAPHICALREPRESENTATIONOF CLASSOF FIG. 1.8 0.3 x 104CYCLES UTILIZATIONB 2 x 105 CYCLES L/L max.2 o 0 1 10 102 103 104 1 10 102 103 104 1(-)5 FIG.0 0. L/L max.4 \ F& 0.4 0. 1 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATIONOF CLASS OF FIG. 2 GRAPHICALREPRESENTATIONOF CLASS OF UTILIZATIONA 6.2 0. 1.0 P=’ 0. subjected to its P = 2/3 maximumstress and normally stress vary from 1/3 to 2/3 of the maximumstress iv) Heavy Components regularly subjected to its P=l maximumstress 6 .IS 807:2006 LIL max. L/L max.4 ‘0.3) S1 No.8 0. 4 GRAPHICALREPRESENTATIONOF CLASS OF C 6.4 0.2 o 0 1 10 102 103 104 105 1 10 102 103 104 105 106 FIG.6 0. State of Loading Definition Spectrum (1) (2) (3) (4) i) Very Iight Components subjected exceptionally to its P=o maximumstress and normally to light ii) Light Components rarely subjected to its maximum P = 113 stress but noskslly about 1/3 of maximum stress iii) Moderate Components frequently .8 0.

cranes for power A cranes o-1 MI-M2 station. workshop B-C 1-2 M4-M5-M6 cranes 4. Cranes for warehouse. P = O Ml M2. M4 M5 M6 iii) Moderate. Stripper cranes. Unloaders D 3 M7-M8 5. machine and assembly shop and cranes for general use 3. P = 2/3 M3 M4._ _.M7-M8 “’’” 3 cranes. Cranes for stocking yard B-C 1-2 M3-M4 iii) Gantry cranes 1. A B c D 6. Ladle cranes C-D 3 M7-M8 7. Stocking yard cranes. assembling shop 2.. Floating grabbing crane A-B 3 M5-M6-M7 7 . Derrick for heavy load A-B 0-1 MI-M2 2. magnets B-C-D 3 M7-M8 iv) Jib cranes 1. M3 M4 M5 ii) Light. Floating cargo crane A-B 2 M5-M6 4. M5 M6. P = i/s M2 M3. Grabbing and magnet cranes C-D 2-3 M5-Mti-M7 4.. M7 M8 iv) Heavy. . magnet cranes 5. Cranes for building construction B 1-2 M1-M3 v) Derrick 1. A I -2 M2-M3-M4 stocking yard..3) S1 No Type of Cranes Applications Class of State of Group Utilization Loading (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) O Over head travei]ing 1. Cranes for power station A o-1 M1-M2 and cranes for repair shop 2.3 X 10s 2 x I ()(’ (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) i) Very light.3 X 104 2x Iof 6.!_ —_________ __ IS 807:2006 Table 6 Group Classification of Cranes ( Clause 5. Store room cranes. soaking pit D 3 M7-M8 cranes 8. Cranes for-container handling B-C 2 M4-M5-M6 2. P = I M4 M5 M6.3) S1 No. State of Hoist Loading Class Utilization and Number of Hoisting Cycles or State of Stress A “ r . Cranes for steel works C-D 3 M6-M7-M8 6. Wharf cranes B-C 2-3 M3-M4-M5 3. Charging cranes C-D’ 3 M7-M8 9. repair A-B 1-2 MI-M3 shop. Forging cranes D 3 M7-M8 ii) Gantry cranes 1. Cranes with grab. Hot cranes. cranes for repair shops 2. ——-. Derrick for construction and B 2-3 M3-M4 -building 3. Grabbing over head traveling C-D M6. M7 M8 Table 7 Examples of Classification of Cranes ( Clause 5.

2 0. according to the speed The forces of inertia resulted from the acceleration and radius. travel motion. These effects can be b) Cranes of moderate and high speed for normal calculated in terms of the value of acceleration application. in rn/s2.3 The loads due to horizontal motion areas follows: to the speeds to be reached maybe chosen according to the three following working conditions: a) Inertia effects due to acceleration ( . F =& gR However. ~ = 0.3 0. in m/min.15 4.064 — — — — 8 .0 0..3 Effects of centrlfixgalforce by the following formula: The centrifugal force shall be the force. wldch is acting For level luffhg motion.67 ii) 3. the jib head so that an acceleration time of 5 to level luffing motion and slewing motion of the crane 10 second @achieved.40 4.2 Force due to slewing and luffing motion b) Effects of centrifugal force.6 0.3 0.16 — — ix) 0.52 iv) 2.0 9.IS 807:2006 6.5 0.1.00 — — 8. Acceleration Acceleration.33 vii) 0. may be chosen for the acceleration at and deceleration of the traverse motion.19 5.3. The rates of acceleration shall depend 6. 6. Acceleration Acceleration.2 0.15 — — 7.6 0. in s in mls2 Time.2 0.50 8. the load of the driving wheel at maximum.00 6.1 fnertia force upon the cranes. to be with Long Travel ( Normal Applications) High Acceleration Reached. and shall be based on the acceleration ( or deceleration ) torque applied to the motor shaft of the d) Buffet effects. it shall be considered g = acceleration of free fall.1 0.098 2. . ~ = 0.3.35 4.1 m/s2 and 0. and NOTE— If the speed and acceleration values are not specified by the user. or luffing motions. ins in m/s2 Time. it shall be taken as 15 percent of .0 0.5 — — 6.2 0. in kgf or N.3.1.1.39 4.or a) Cranes of low and moderate speed with great length deceleration ) of the traverse. in mls. R = slewirtg radius.32 3.47 v) 1.1 0.6m/s2. in m/s Time.25 3.19 —.1.58 iii) 2. shall generally be considered as ~ times of the weight of the moving parts and the hoisting load. For a normal crane a value between 0. F = centrifugal force. for the slewing motion. resulted For transverse travel motion.4 0.3 ) SI Speed Low and Moderate Speed Moderate and High Speed High Speed with No. W = hoisting load.12 3. in m.8 0. in kgf or N.43 vi) “1. Moreover. Table 8. that the load is acting at the end point of the jib. ~ = 0. mechanism.0 -0.1 h outwards in the direction of slewing radius.50 6. c) Transverse horizontal reaction resulting from For slewing and luffing motions the calculation rolling action.16 2.0 0. in case of traverse motion and travel motion where by the wheel drive. Acceleration Acceleration.01 W tlom the slewing radius and slewing motion and shall be obtained from the following formula: For slewing motion. slewing of travel.63 5.0 “0. — viii) 0..1. in s in m/s2 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) i) 4. acceleration times corresponding V = peripheral speed. travel.078 — — — — x) 0.5 0.25 3.006 W where v is the speed of respective motion.22 5.7 0. and be given 6. Table 8 Acceleration Time and Acceleration Value ( Clause 6. and (or deceleration ) and its values are given in c) High speed cranes with high acceleration.1 0.44 5.

6. in kgf or N.15 a) The case in which the suspended load can swing. Impacts due to collision between the load and fix. in kgf or N. Moreover.5 Buffer effects the wheels and shall be given from Fig.1.3. 6C. the centre distance between capable of causing two of the crab wheels to lift.1. A distinction maybe drawn between: t 0.05 For horizontal speed below 0.eapplied on the structure or on the suspended load. for higher speed ( greater a % than 1 m/s) the use of decelerating device which Fi~. The effective wheel base shall be taken from Fig.4 Transverse reactions due to rolling action the outer two guide rollers shall be tpken as the effective wheel base. However. The impact due to collision with buffers may b. 02468 ~ For speed exceeding 0. no account shall be taken of buffer effect. 6 METHOD FOR TAKING EFFECTIVE WHEEL BASE 9 . wheel load.3.6A. .3. in m. when the load is rigidly guided.3. the buffers are reached.ad 1= span.5(a) the following rules shall be applied: 0. L= side force constant on wheel.10 For 6. and b) That in which rigid guides prevent swing.6 Collision effects on the suspended load //.7 m/s.— —— - I I I I I a a 6A Four Wheels on a Rail 66 Eight Wheels on a Rail I I I I I I I I 1 I —. 5 RATIOOF SPA:. = lateral force on wheels.-I. AND EFFECTIVE WIIEEL BASE act upon approach to the ends of the track is versus SIDE FORCE CONSTANTON WHEELS permitted provided the action of these devices is automatic and they produce an effective SF=X. The lateral force on wheel shal I be the horizontal force acting at right angles with the traveling direction of 6. account shall be taken of reactions set up in the structure by collisions I with buffers.R deceleration on the cranes which always reduces where the speed to the predetermined lower value before s. I I I I I I .7m/s. 5 by the ratio of the span and the effective wheel base. 6B and Fig. in m. 1S807 :2006 6. —— —— — I a 6C Over Eight Wheels on a Rail FIG. and obstructions are taken into account only for cranes a= wheel base.1. The loads can be computed by considering that Fig. when the horizontal horizontal force applied at the level of the load is guide rollers are provided. —.— — . 0.

Vw= wind velocity. density. Vw Aerodynamic Pressure. q is given by the general calculated in accordance with the formula P = ‘rl. Table 9 Wind Velocity and Pressure ( Clause 7. of the wind is given by the relation: 7.A. 8. formula: The value of this coefficient ‘q’ is depends upon ‘b’ and ‘h’ and on the ratio of A/Ae ( see Fig.IS 807:2006 7 LOADS DUE TO CLIMATIC EFFECTS component parts of the girder on a plane perpendicular to the direction of the wind. = enveloped area ( solid portion + voids ). 1 I S1 No. The configuration of girders The wind exerts a force against a girder. q mls kmlh kgf/m2 or mls kmth kgf/m2 or & ii) iii) 20 to 100 Over 100 (3) 20 doldoldo do I (4) 72 do I N/m* (5) 25 do (6) 36 14211501 I 46 I (7) 130 165 I N/m2 (8) 80 110 130 10 . C.2 Values of the Reducing Coefficient (q) P= A.1.1 Wind Load for Suspended Load where p. and b= distance between the surfaces facing each . 9= pressure.1. 7 and values of coefficient are given component of this force resolved along the direction in Table 11. aerodynamic pressure.2. in kg/m”2. in m/s.1. . 7.1. The values of horizontally in all directions.3 Calculating Wind Effects as that for a solid girder.2.1 The loads due to climatic effects are those resulting from the action of the wind. gravitational acceleration. P h= depth of the girder. Height of Member Above Ground Limiting Working Wind I Maximum Wind (Crane Out of Service) I m Velocity.1. C 7. and temperature variations. aerodynamic coefficient which takes the increased and reduced pressure on the 7.6. other. the projected area of the given in Fig. 7 ).awter than 0. in kgffmz. from snow loads and from 9= aerodynamic pressure. and the is given in Fig. p 9=— 16g where & where A= visible area ( area of solid portions ). the wind force on the protected part of the girder is determined 7. 9 The values of wind velocity and pressure are given in Table 9. Vw Aerodynamic Velocity.1 The wind action on the suspended load resultant load.1 Wind Action various surface and depends upon the a) It shall be assumed that the wind can blow configuration of the girder. The action of C are given in Table 10. the reducing coefficient shall be the same 7. the ratio Q = A/Aeis.q. in kgfi shall be determined by taking account of the A= area presented to the wind by girder greatest area which can face the wind and its values ( in m-2)that is. (J. in kgf/m2.2) I .1. 7. In case of lattice girders.4 Case of Several Girders Located Behind One shape of the cranes. A.q. and g . in kglm~. in m/s2. and Another b) It res-ults in increased and reduced pressure whose magnitude are proportional to the When a girder or part of a girder is protected from aerodynamics pressure.2 Wind Pressure by applying a reducing coefficient ‘q’ to the force The aerodynamic pressure. VW2. the wind by the presence of another girder. the wind will depend essentially upon the 7. q Pressure.

. for the handling of miscellaneous loads pressures for different regions in India shall be taken less than 25 t.. ——..5m2 per t for that part from 5 t to 25 t. 0. Variable c (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) i) Truss of rolled sections — 1...7 I d t 11 b FIG. . 11 . where the wind facing area cannot fkom 1S875 ( Part 3 ). 7 DISTANCEOF CONFORMITYGIRDERS The resulting force shall be calculated taking C = 1 be-precisely determined by the user. \ GLUUJC n~ 1 9 J\ /. 1S 807:2006 Table 10 Values of the Aerodynamic Coefficient C lrl”.6 i h ii) Plate girder or box girder L h~ @ iii) c ylindrical member or truss d in m where q in kgf/m2 d~<l 1. Type of Girder Type of Girder .J S1 No. be assumed as lm2per t for the part up to 5 t. .. The basic wind Ho-wever.2’”’ of cylindrical member d~>l 0.l. the values may for the value of aerodynamic coefficient.

3 0.8 0.75 0.6 0.6 0. .43 0. such as traveling or fixed cranes. 8 RELATIONDIAGRAM BETWEEN q ANDq 7..5 0.88 0.63 0.25 0.95 0. \ \ blh=l b/h=O.75 0.5 0. L\ \ \ 0.2.3 0. and b/h ( Clause 7.5 0.21 0. considered only in special cranes such as when members exerted on hand rails and toe-guards.1 0. 5 [ 0.55 0.4 0.1 0.0 FIG. the Access gangways. 8.15 0.45 0. platform where materials may be placed. driver’s cabins and platforms horizontal load of the hoisting load suspended by the 12 .4) Q=A/Ae 0.68 0. shall be taken to be – 20”C to + 45°C.9 1.45 b/h = 5 1 0.2 I .3 Temperature Variation b) 150 kg for gangways and platforms intended only for access of personnel.81 0.05 0.0 r\\mL \ I h BEs b/h=6 \ 0.59 0.2 blh = 4 1 0.68 1.5 0.2 0.75 0.8 0.32 0.7 0.0 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) b/h = 0.2 0.2 0.45 0. the maximum temperature fluctuation for girders.1.1 0.4 0.6 t T-1 0.2 Seismic Load 8 MISCELLANEOUS LOADS The horizontal load of 20 percent of the self-weight 8.95 0.2 Snow Load shall be designed to carry the following concentrated loads: Snow load shall be neglected in the design calculations for over head traveling cranes. which may be.1 blh = 2 0.4 0.76 0.05 blh = 1 0.1 0. bridge cranes and jib a) 300 kg for maintenance gang ways and cranes.8 1. 7.92 0.33 0.2 !). However. NOTE— These loads are not used in the calculations In such cases.05 0.8 b .2.66 0. Stresses due to temperature variation shall be c) 30 kg as the horizontal force. are not free to expand.88 0.68 0.IS 807:2006 Table 11 Values of Coefficient q in Terms of Q =A/A.1 Loads Carried by Platforms shall be taken as seismic load irrespective to types.4 \ 1 \ \ \ 1 k b/h=3 \ \ \ b/i=2 0..

the hoisting load is different in sign. and hoisting load shall be taken into consideration of the c). W ( Clause-8. b) Working with limiting working wind. Table 12 Impact Factor. IS 807:2006 rope may be neglected.3. and SL = safe working load.12 1. The height of the following combination shall be 8.2 . a load multiplied by ( 1 – V )/2 to the tests.4 Case Loading ( Combination of Loads ) highest of the-two loads YP. 8. of loading are to be considered: P* = coefficients which the safe working load a) Working without wind.Factors (Y) load ) ] + ( wind load in services ) + ( load due to The impact Ioads caused in the hoisting operation heat ).S~ and P&.2) Group of Ml M2 M3 M4 MS M6 M7 M8 Classification (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) M 1 1 1 1. from that of the b) Cranes undergoing static as well as dynamic self-weight. Exceptional loading occurs in the following cases: For a structural member.1 Cranes Working Without Wind The seismic load coefficient in some important town The following shall be taken into consideration [ ( static in India and map of India showing seismic load are load due to deadweight)+ ( working load) x ( dynamic given in IS 1893. and are given 8.4 1.1 1.3.1) Group of Cranes Ml M2 M3 M4 MS M6 M7 M8 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Y 1. 8.2 Cranes Working with Wind M [ ( self weight ) + Y ( hoisting load ) + ( horizontal 8. the stress caused from a) Cranes out-of-service with maximum wind. The b) Loads due to dead weight and working load main loads shall be multiplied by the duty factors due to the service load plus the greatest buffer given in Table 13 considering the working conditions effect. to the hoisting loads. and c) For exceptional loadings. coefficient. where M is the duty factor.05 1. where In the calculation of stresses.06 1.40 1. deflection of the girder.2 Choosing the Ampljjication Coefficient (M) considered: or Duty Factors a) Loads due to the dead weight plus the load The value of the ampli~ing co-efficient M depends due to the maximum wind.25 1.3. is multiplied for the static test.4. Cranes working and subjected to a buffer impact load caused by setting the load down on the effect. upon the group classification of the cranes. factor.18 1. S~ = maximum permissible load.3 Amplification of-Load 8. W )].06 1. rope length.4.12 1. and and the importance of the duty. The three different cases is multiplied for the dynamic test. ground. = coefficients by which the safe working load combination shall be applied.3 Cranes Sutjected to Exceptional Loadings by multiplying the impact factor specified in Table 12.1 Impact .3.5 Table 13 Duty Factor (Clause 8.4. the most unfavorable P. c) Loads S~ due to the dead weight plus the 8. Y is -the impact are different in value according to the hoisting speed.32 1.

channels.5 Concentrated and uniformly distributed load imposed by the dead weight. the trolley shall be whichever is the smaller. failure: corrosion. beam. 2 The quality of steels used shall be stated and the physical properties. the value of Y should The fundamental allowable stress. bolts and pins shall at a designated position with no load when out of service.5 Transportation and Erection i) I 1. chemical composition and welding qualities Table 14 Load Factor shall be guaranteed by the manufacturer of the material. If there is no designation.. condition mentioned in the combination of loads.3 and 8. Bolts and Pins NOTES 1 In the case of the slewing crane the jib shall be placed The allowable stresses for rivets.2. 3 When the crane is out of service. and coefficient ‘-y’ in respect of the critical stresses.IS 807:2006 NOTES b) Exceeding the critical-tripping or buckling 1 Alltheloads aretobe selected intbemostunfavourable iodd. considering the following three possible causes of d) Protection against stress concentration.2 Allowable stresses for structural members and welds ii) Transportation by road 1. working wind. shall be taken be taken as 1. the value of Y may be taken as 1.15 1. 9. o. Table 15 Safety Factor 4 in case of the slewing crane. the jib shall be placed at a designated position with no load when out of service. residual stress and a) E-xceeding the elastic limit.2. 8. Table 14 is to be considered.1 9.8 ii) 11 1.5 1.3 Rivets. it shall be assumed that the jib is against the wind in its most unfavorable direction. The number of cycles of variation of loading and the 2 The application of load due to heat and seismic load spectrum of stresses to be taken into consideration shall be applied respectively (see 7. If this cannot be angles and rails ) shall be used for the principal loading determined. are determined for the case of loading ( the working b) A large enough variation or fluctuation in case without wind. For instance. i) Erection loads 1.2 percent strain) or the tensile combination of loads which may happen simtdtaneously of the loads. 5 The application of load due to temperature and seismic load shall be referred to 7.4 Conventional Number of Cycles and Stress If it is clear that the job is unable to be slewed by the Spectrum wind. Suitable provision shall be made in the design of the structural member to the protection 9 ALLOWABLE STRESS against cause of the following fatigue failure: 9. if the value not multiplied by Y is larger than multiplied by W. 1 Type 1 Factor (1) (2) (3) 9. consideration. for fatigue stresses.3 are given in Table 16. the working case with limiting the applied stress. 14 . metallurgical structure. as the value obtained by dividing either the yield point 2 The horizontal loads shall be considered over the worst (or yield strength at 0. [ .. the case of exceptional loading) and a c) A sufficiently large number of cycles of the check is made to ensure that there is a sufficient safety applied stress. iii) I Transportation by rail and ship I 1.3 1. combined stress. if crane structures in the course iii) 111 1.2. it shall be assumed that the trolley is placed members. conform to the specification as given in Table 17. I S1 No..4 I of transportat ion and erection at the site. depending upon the respective loading motions.2). at the most unfavorable position.2 Structural Members and Welds . . and position and magnitude for the member under c) Exceeding the limit of endurance to fatigue. However if itis clear that the horizontal strength of the material by safety factor as per motionsdo not occur at the same time with the hoisting Table 15.3 and 8. placed at a determined position with no load. temperature. it shall be assumed that the jib is located at the most unfavorable position. over load.1 Fundamental Allowable Stress a) Failure due to maximum tensile stress of The stresses set up in the various structural members sufficiently high value. To take care NOTES of the above condition the load factor as given in 1 Only tested quality materials ( plates.

21aa Diameterof bolt stem I bolt High tensile IS 3138 Apparent shear 0. a plot of stress ‘S’ at high number of cycles ( N > 105cycles ). compression Shear Is.35 Cra 9.lfi Throat NOTES 1 Net section shall be located at the position of minimum section excluding holes of rivets and bolts.1 Gross and net Welds Butt weld Tension o. Diameter of bolt stem Pin joint IS 6623 Shear 0. ii) In case of presence of defects of class Ml to M4.60.3) . Kind of Material Kind of Stresses Allowable Remarks: Diameter I Joint Stresses Used in Calculation.1 Fatigue Curve for Ferrous Metal against the number of cycles ‘N’. 15 . Diameter of bottom screw Shear 0.40. Bolts and Pins ( Clause 9. 2 The welds shall conform to the followingconditions in the testing methods: i) The weld shall be free from the defects for class M5 to M8. Table 17 Allowable Stresses for Rivets.15 Gross Buckling As given in 12 Shear 0. The basic method of presenting engineering fatigue S– N curve is ccmcerned chiefly in the fatigue failure data is by means of S – N curve. slightly only the allowable stress for [S 6649 Bending tra “ bearing -pressure shall be given as 50 percent of the left described Anchor bolt Tension 0./43 Diameter of rivet hole IS 1364 Bearing 1. 1S 807:2006 Table 16 Allowable Stresses for Structural Members and Welds ( CIause 9.4 Oa I IS 1367 pressure I 1S 1929 -Fields Shear 80% of the above I Bearing pressure I High tensile IS 2155 Apparent shear o. Shear Oalfi Fillet weld Tension in the direction oa of-bead. Compression 0.10 Gross Bending As given in ‘13. etc Rivet IS 1363 Shop Shear 0.2IGl Diameterof bolt stem grip bolt Reamed Is 3737 Shear CiaI J3 Diameter of bolt stem bolt 1s 6610 Bearing pressure 1. the allowable value shall not be more than !4 of the allowable value./ d3 Diameter of pin when the pin slides IS 6639 Bearing pressure 1.40.4./1.2 ) Kind of Stresses Allowable Stresses Section for Calculation Structural members Tension Ua Oross Compression 6...

..02 .4.6 .6 .7 . 10 NOTCH EFFECT 16 ....03 .~5 .——. The endurance limit ) the material can endure an infinite fatigue strength of the structural members depends number of cycles without failure.6 10 NUMBER OF CYCLES ~ FIG. high stress.. \ \ - FATIGUELIMIT .09 NUMBEROF CYCLESTO FAILUREN ~ . IS 807:2006 S – N curve becomes horizontal at a certain limiting the quality of the material used. 9.given graphically in Fig. considerably reduces the fatigue strength of the Representation is.2 Material Used and Notch Effect joints to their degree of stress ‘concentration The fatigue strength of member depends upon (or notch effect ) is given in Annex A. ——. —:-——.. below this limiting stress ( fatigue limit or ratio for steel shall be around 0. The failure is at high upon the shape and the method of making the stress in a short number of cycles. The shapes of the parts joined and the While designing the structural member. Classification of various 9. 9 FATIGUECYCLES 1400 1200 u) (n Lu lx 600 1- U-J 400 200 0 ..04 .. joints. 10.. The fatigue stress. Representation is given graphically in Table 18 and Fig.2 to 0.. stress concentration ( notch effect )“ which high number of cycles and load spectrum. . FIG.3.8 . member. 4/. due means of doing it have the effect of producing consideration shall be given to fatigue limit.7 .05 .. .

..~. = . “. IS 807:2006 Table 18 Classification by Notch Strength ( Clause 9. Explanation Figure Classification by Remarks Notch Strength As Welded Bead Finished (}) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) Parent metal a O Butt joint at Butt joint of fiat piates c a Taken as d.. & d d c *— 0“ ii) Butt joint of Asymmetrical slope c d plates of different thickness at _ [_~-. “. / ..<.2) S1 No. =.4. .. right angles when a to the force backing ~y~y strip is used d Butt joint of shapes c b Confirm absence of / lamination .. - right angles to the force Asymmetrical joint d c .. ---”./ d e Cruciform joint . ~-t-l - Symmetrical slope c b * :---=z~~ ------- Symmetrical joint d c 17 .

K. fillet weld ( spot) c b member joint / /& Butt Weld — — d c [— 1~i A*> w vii) With necessary Fillet weld. IS 807:2006 Table 18 ( Continued) . Explanation Figure Classification by Remarks Notch Strength . d c member joint ~ R’ “\..– S1 No. ..’) /’ Q d / / @ / / iv) Continuous butt Butt weld b b weld and fillet / weld parallel to the force @ / Fillet weld / / @ . @ v) Discontinuous c c -R-L -D-L vi) With necessary Fillet weld. =..x. ... As Welded Bead Finished (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) iii) Fillet weld at d c Confirm right angles to \ P absence of the force lamination . & @ .

.— _-_c__ —. ix) 3eneath rail Filletweld d d I’illet weld (perfect) c b u h’” ““’” /“’- GY x) rruss Fillet weld d c 19 . Explanation Figure Classification by Remarks Notch Strength . As Welded 3ead Finishe[ (1) (2) (4) (5) (6) viii) loint of curved Fillet weld c c flange and web A -1 -i ! I ! I I IA Fillet weld (perfect) b b I ! ! 1- . . IS 807:2006 Table 18 ( Continued) S1 No.. —.

which varies from +1 to –1. a~/ W with respect to absolute valve.—— .— . and the notch ‘u’ (see 9.2 ). .. IS 807:2006 Table 18 ( Concluded) .) values of the stresses to which the component is shall not exceed the allowable stress and also shal I subjected according to loading condition. ~~are where to be taken from ‘Mm = minimum direct stress. . Cd. / .4... 9.—.’. with respect to the cycles but it depends on the safe side. . . O~aX This ratio.. . —. % .. .. . satisfy the following three formulae: The ratio may vary depending upon the operating ( ~~aX-~~i~ ) S ‘J.~~. . . --- E. FJ. 6d/ w If a~m and c~.5 Amplitude Method This ratio is determined by calculating the extremes The amplitude of the variable Stresses ( o&fax~k~. “ . .... .3 Determination of the Maximum Stress.. ...— Fillet weld E-groove —--- -. or CT~d.n are the algebraic values of these extreme For welds. . .n f o~o.)S ~J..4.4. — JLD --—..... .-rM. S1 No. . . stresses.. without the stresses). I o~. To determine direct stress for this ratio ‘K’ by taking two extreme values which can parent metals.-~lwn )< ~J. in case of shear for welds shall be applied. . the ratio may be written: the shear stress K = ~~. occur during possible operation.. . is positive if the extreme stresses are both of the same sense Maximum stress cr~ti is the highest stress in absolute value that is.. it maybe tension or compression which ( fluctuating stresses) and negative when the extreme stresses are one of the opposite sense (alternating occurs in the member in loading case. application of amplifying coefficients.. .. . . Explanation Figrme Classification by Remarks Notch Strength As Welded Bead Finished (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) xi) Pipe Fillet weld d c \ .4 Ratio (K) between the Extreme Stresses 9. . ‘Max = maximum direct stress.-—. o~aXbeing the extreme stress having higher ( ~Ma.FL. ( ?w. .4... . . M. . xii) Perforated member “---”r:_t”--” c ~~~~ 9.. . 20 .F~.

2 ].750. .K stress. b 1. st-42.1 1. FL. in cm2 or mmz.6 Checking the Members Subjected to /“atigue the coefficient of friction between the clamps and the ‘ The permissible stress for fatigue is derived from the rail shall be taken as 0. a.() lo Where there is danger of movement a mooring device such as a chains.) Independently of the stability against overturning.2 1. I I. For the design of clamps. 10. 10 STABILITY AGAINST OVERTURNING at = tensile stress.3 1.4. shall be provided. st-52 according to the various N= tensile force in axial direction. An = net sectional area. = joint factor given in Table 19. Typical diagram are shown in Fig. 10. N Practical indications based on the results of Ut =—<qa research in this field is given in Annex A on the An determination of permissible stresses for steel where grade st-37.r = maximum shear stress. in kgf/cm2 or appliance being assumed to be horizontal and rigid. in kgf or N: group in which the components are classified and notch effects of the main types of joints used.5) set in motion if maximum wind increased by 10 percent. In case of floating cranes. and Stability against overturning shall be checked by O.2 I. manual or automatic locking pin.1 Special Measures F-.a = allowable tensile stress. clamps. assuming the tipping point to have been a A’4U. 9.2 1. each stress shall not exceed positions of the cranes or of certain of it’s components the al Iowable stress. Graphical the rivets from the following formula: representation is given in Fig. in kgf/cm2 or of the inclination imparted to the crane as a whole. *d = allowable fatigue stress. TMu. and Supplementary means of mooring may be provided to ensure stability when out of service. in kgf/cm2 or reached by increasing the working load and the = maximum direct N/mmz. =1S807:2006 where calculation.4 1. when out of services or alternatively to allow freedom Table 19 Joint Factors (F’. the rail track or the base of the ~A{(n = minimum direct stress. “inkgf/cm2 or N/mmz. corresponds to a 90 percent probability of survival to which a The tension stress shall be calculated by the net coefficient of safety of 4/3 is applied thus: ad of sectional area excluding the holes of the bolts and fatigue = 0. it is permissible to impose definite However. N/mmz. due accounts shall be taken Tli[lll = minimum shear stress. Such measures should only be adopted atler agreement between the user and the manufacturer as they impose conditions on operation.4 1.14 for braked wheels and a Cranes resistance to rolling of 10 kgf/t for unbraked wheels Notches mounted on anti-friction bearing or of 15 kgf/t for (1) (2) (3) (4) (s) (6) (7) (8) (9) bushed wheels.d 1.() lo c.25. This should be taken as 1 000 kgf/cm2 or 100 N/mm2. in kgi7cm2 or N/mm2. Nhnmz.) of movements of the latter ( crane jib for example ).1 ]. at 90 percent -survival. critical stress defined as being the stress which on 11 CALCULATION OF TENSION MEM-BERS the basis of test made with test pieces.7 1. 12 to 16.() 1. etc. = life factor given in Table 20. a check should be made that the cranes shall not be (Clause 9.o ]. Further more.2 Safety against Movement by the Wind Table 20 Life Factors (F. dynamic and weather effects by the factors specified in Table 21. This check shall be carried out assuming a coefficient Group of Ml M2 M3 M4 M5 h46 M7 Mg of friction equal to 0.4.

11 ALLOWABLEFATIGUESTRENIGTH STABILITY REACH STABILITY REACH MEASURED FROM MEASURED FROM BASE LINE TO BASE LINE TO ~ 1/ GIB HEAD PIN ‘“’ * GtB HEAD PIN . $)’’” ● \ . 12 ILLLJSTRATIONm STABILITYBASE STABILITYREACH AND REACHFORNON-SLEWING 3 OR 4 POINI- SUSPENSION CRANES 22 . + ~min. BASE “NE ~ .IS 807:2006 600 400 200 0 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 2000 ~ (Tin= ~m~x. t . A 90° +++% y 0 TABILITY BASE / BASE LINE ~kL’E4 l--STABILllY BASE —1 FIG. ( kgf/cm2) / ( N/mm*) 2 FIG.

‘EACH- FIG. 23 .——.. 13 TYPEMOUNTED MOBILECRANE I-till lrll/ STABILITY BASE RADIUS FT STABILITY BASE . RADIUS r a) b) FIG. I I----=Q 1. 14 TRAWLER TYPEMOBILECRANE . IS 807:2006 STABILITY BASE \ I STABILITY I I REACH —.—.

J .. .. 7 /// / m FIG. 15 PORTAL JIB CRANE .

. —.._ . 1(j TOWER CRANE OR TOWER DERIRC CRANE 25 . . “FIG.A . .. .... .

35 check load b) Twu horizontal effects I c) Limiting working wind 1 D}namic Cranes uudcr a) Safe working load -0. in cm~ The bending stress and torsional stress for the or mm4. in kg flcm~ rsca= allowable compressive stress. <Ta w= buckling coefficient. in kgf/cm2 or N/mm2. F T= —.1 check no-load b) Two horizontal effects I c) Limiting working wind 1 ~ (’hecking for m2i\inlunl tviud a) Safe working load () I ( Storm !vincl ) b) Horizontal effects o c) Maximum wind 1.1 ~ Check for breakage of sling a) Safe working load – 0. 180 for main member and 240 for wind bracing and q. 2 Travel motion used for positioning only and shall bc made separately.1 Bending MM 6.IS 807:2006 Table 21 Stability Requirements ( C/ause IO) Checks ‘to . T= shear stress. in kgfcm or Nmm: TO BENDING AND TORSIONAL STRESSES I= geometrical moment of inertia.2 I An where N= M compression force in axial direction. — <(3.5 b) Horizontal effects o c) Wind o Dynamic Cranes under a) Safe working load 1. 3 Unless calculation juslilj a lower value. where and at = tensile stress along edge. subsidiary members. ‘—.3 b) Two horizontal effect with no load I c) Limiting working wind 1 NOTES I Limiting working wind ill the most unfavorable direction. bending moment. or N/mm2. 12 CALCULATKIN OF COMPRESSION box girder subjected to bending and torsional MEMBERS stresses shall be respectively calculated as follows. = allowable tensile strkss. ‘Ta = allowable shear stress. in the case of the cranes when the ratio The compressive stress shal I be calculated by the gross ( span/width ) of the girder is not more than 40. in kgf/cm2 or N/mmz. The actual values shall be taken from IS 800. the sectional area not excluding the holes of the bolts or lateral buckling due to the bending is not considered. 13 CALCULATION OF BOX GIRDER SUBJECTED A/f. The ratio of the effective length /to the least radius a=c compressive stress along edge. 26 . !“ A = gross sectional area. the rivets frolm the following formula: 13. However. in kgf/cmz of gyration for compression members shall not exceed or N/mm*. in cm2 or mm2. in kgf cJ=— < ~ca c orN.be Made Loads to be Considered Amplifying (1) (2) (3) Static check a) Safety working load 1. An’ Oc = compressive stress.

e < ~ta c where A 1 6 = tensile or compressive stress at the weld.9 — . X a. in cm4 0= tensile or compressive stress at the weld. in kgf or N. = bending stress in kgf/cm2 or N/mmz... in cm or mm.W+O. in cm or mm.— P kgf/cm~. e ==distance between the neutral axis and the . I= moment of inertia of the throat around the 27 . An = net section area of member. = net sectional area of tension flanges.1 l~here T. where 1= geometrical moment of inertia.’ = net sectional area of web subjected to shear. “ tensile stress along edge. Moreover. in cm or mm. in kgf-cm or N-mm. 1S 807:2006 . ‘c = shearing stress. ~ . and TO BENDING BY FORCE IN THE DIRECTION 1= effective length of the weld. Compression in cm? or mm2. in kgf/cm2 or N/mm2. p. 15. force acting on the joint.= 15 CALCULATION OF WELD.1 Ta = allowable shear stress.I a o ‘— X a.2.1 Stresses on Joints under Tension. M CALCULATION OF MEMBERS SUBJECTED a= throat of the weld. = torsional moment around the shearing G= tensile or compressive stress at the weld. 0. where M. in kgf/cmz or and flanges in cm? or mmz. M c ‘—”Y N. in cm2 M= bending moment acting at the joint. edge or compression edge. in kgf- or mmz. or Shearing Fcirce 13-. N G=— .in kgf/cm2 or N/mmz.4. = shear stress due to torsional moment in T . OF AXIS 15. cm. A= gross sectional area of member. in kgf or N. in kgf/cm2 or N/mmz. in cmz or mm2.1 Stress Due to Bending Moment crta = allowable tensile stress. A = area surrounded with centre lines of webs ‘r= shear stress at the weld. edge of section. force in axial directicm.’1 = gross sectional area of tension flanges. and A. open section such as 1section member shall 6’= distance between the neutral axis to tension be checked about lateral buckling. t= thickness of web or flange in cm or mm. q =_ <~ P 2. centre in kgf cm or N mm. in kgf/cm2 “O. in kgf/cm2 or N/mm2. or mnd.2 Torsion Stresses at the butt weld or the fillet weld shall be calculated from the following formulae: M.ED JOINTS shear force. where in kgf/cm2 or N/mm2. and or N/mmz. such as the continuous weld connecting a web plate and flange. and N/mmz. 15. [ M = bending moment.A.2 Combined Stresses on Joints under Bending Stress of the members subjected to bending by force and Shear Moment in the axial direction shall be calculated from the following formulae or a precise buckling calculation Composite stress shall be calculated from the following shall be carried out considering the deformation of formula for joints on which the bending moment and the members as required: the shear force act simultaneously. (3= c compressive stress along edge. in kgf or N. in cm2or mm2. vertical or horizontal butt weld of webplates and fiIlet weld connecting l-shape girder to wall surface: M ~s 6.. and in cmz or mm2. in cm or mm.

M. n2. p. a5 a5 1 a = THROAT FIG.1 In such case where OIL. . on both the buckling of a partial panel surrounded .2 Shear . in ligf/cm2 or N/cmz. 17 in which the o. MG = geometrical moment of the area ofa section s = safety factor for local buckling ( see outside of the weld line under consideration Table 22).— a4 ~- l—l-f t R. k= local buckling coefficient and concerning 16. it shall be obtained 16. the allowance stress shall be from Table 23. in cm or mm. modulus of longitudinal elasticity. where 15. and ‘ki ‘t s— Y ==distance from the neutral axis to a point s under consideration.Wress al = absolute value of the maximum compressive stress in k-gf/cm2or N/cm~.. reduced accordingly the moment of inertia of expansion effective ‘Iki section as shown in Fig. Isc = fundamental buckling stress given from the I= moment of inertia. 17 EXPANSIONOF TIiROKI 28 . Concerning the whole surface including stiffeners. thickness of the plate.CI formula 6. in cm or mm..— P A4fG T –— 61k]= local ideal buckling stress given from the I. where local ideal buckling given fi-omthe formula ‘k] = -c= shear stress. about the neutral axis. by the stiffeners and the buckling of the whole panel P including stiffeners where the load acting on the plate t . duty factor. al t’.1 Compressive Stress or Shear Stress Acts the partial panel it shall be in accordance Independently with Table 23... and following formula: a= throat. in cm4 or mm4.1. in Local buckling strength of the plates shall be calculated kgf/cm2 or N/mm2. T= shear stress in kgf/cm2 or N/mm*.IS 807:2006 neutral axis andinthe case of fillet weld.t2 CTc= =( 1378. poisson’s ratio.: )2. = oC. shall be multiplied by the impact factor (~) and the b= width of the panel. ?1 I&f }“1 r \ a3 .. shear force at the joint. in cm or mm.2. in cms or mm3.E. s— s ‘throat is expanded on the joining surface.kgf/cmz 12b2(l -p2) 16 CALCULATION OF LOCAL BUCKLING OF PLATES or N/mm~ E. in cm or mm.. in kgf or N.fit~i exceeds the elastic according to the condition of each stress limit of the material. . /-. in cm4 or mm4.k. ~kl= OCk.

.in kgflcm~or N/mm2 c) In the case where both ends are jointed rigidly vk . . calculated and the local combined stress.~iare separately buckling axis. 17.2 Slenderness Ratio F= gross sectional area of the stiffeners in cm2 The slenderness ratio k of the member shall be or mm~.= alk. four rivets s= ratio of area of the stiffener. and and N2< NI. which is the distance between .= i? ~ki supported not to permit displacement.~i shall The buckling length f~shall be obtained as follows: be obtained from the following formula: As to the buckling in aplane of a truss. a * -t (:)* rivets ) at the ends of the member. be designed taking into consideration the effect. 18. both trusses do not displace perpendicularly s to the plane of truss and the forces of (sVk = reduced combined stress. In Fig. length is taken as lk. SUBJECT TO AXIAL FORCES (1 The structural members and joints shall be of the a =— structure free from eccentricity and special stress h concentration. al = absolute value of the maximum d) In Fig. and k = minimum radius of gyration relating to The two local buckling stress. f~ shall be reduced combined stress Ovk taken as 0. k= lklk where 16. $ = ratio of maximum to minimum stress acting The bend buckling vertical to the plane of the truss perpendicular to a plate. s ‘-— hi 17. members N. in cm or mm. In case where ideal combined stress av~i b) [n thecase where one end of the member is exceeds the elastic limit of the material the joined rigidly to a lateral member having bend allowable stress shall be determined by the rigidity not to displace laterally. in cm or mm.2 Normal Stress and Shear Stress Acts Simultaneously /k = buckling length. + — 3-4) . when the nodal of a and b of compressive stress in kgf/cmz or N/cm*. 17 DESIGNS OF STRUCTURAL M-EMBERS a= ratio of length to width of the panel. ~+3#= ~ 1.and ~. in cm’ or mm4. the buckl. — safety factor for local buckling. J Y. /k = (0. shall be as follows: In special case when ~ = O. the areas of the rivet-or the bolt centre line of the plate to calculate the holes shall be reduced adequately according to the local buckling for the gross section of the position of the rivets or the bolts. a) The distance of nodal points may be taken as /k.75+ 0. ov~. crVk. Ovkl = the centre of gravity of the joining bolts ( including —I+@ _ IS. When a member 4 ‘Ik! (d 4 Clki ) ‘ki intersects the other members.s to the lateral members having bend rigidity where not to displace laterally.092 i5t3 In order to obtain the effective net sectional area of J= geometrical moment of inertia about the the tension member.i~g . o.. if the stiffeners. ol~. IS 807:2006 a= length of the panel. /k shall be taken as 0.81. in cm or mm.25 — ) NI 29 . Nl are different in magnitude a=vkl ideal combined stress. 17. Cr CT =drJ. section a-c-c-a is smaller than that of a-a. the intersecting part may where be regarded as rigid in the plane of the truss.71. and in the inevitable case. calculated from the following formula: NOTE — The values ot’ buckling coefficient shall be taken from Tables 23 [o ?7. it shall taken as N2 ok = all-owable reduced stress. or bolt holes shall be reduced from the sectional area F of the member. these shal I Y= stiffeners ratio of the stiffener. if the both ends of the member are when o = O.1 Net Sectional Area of Tension Member 0.

1 ) S1 No. where compressive stress are equai and tensile stress is larger @.S-1 — v) Uniformly distributed shear stress 30 ...05($-1) iii) 111 1. ) larger -1<$<0 a K’” = buckling coefficient for @= -1 ( refer to No.71 + 0.025 (@-l ) Table 23(a) Buckling Coefficient for the Partial Panel K ( without stiffner ) ( Clause 16.IS 807:2006 Table 22 Safety Factors for Local Buckling ( Clause 16. Loading Condition Safety Factor for Buckling Safety Factor for Buckling of of the Whole Plane a Partial Panel Surrounded by Stiffness (1) (2) (3) (4) . Iijr compressive stress is ~ ~Jm~ ~= O ( refer-to No. where K’= buckling coetlicient .5+0. Uniformly distributed compressive stress 1#1=1 ii) Linearly distributed compressive stress ()< @<l iii) Linearly distributed K=(l+@)K–@K’+ 100 tensile and compressive (l+@) stresses.125($-1) 1.075 (($-1) 1.1 ) sl Loading Condition Range of Application Bsrckling Coefficient K No.50+0..9 tensile and compressive stresses... ).1.180($-1 ) 1.1.075($–1) ii) 11 1.25+ 0.35+0.i) I 1. iv ) iv) Linearly distributed u >213 K=23.35 +0.

95(@+l..5< a 52.1) cx~(l +28) o<l@l<l -1 —.lly ‘(l+a~)2( 9+a~)z+2ya.5( I +a2)z+0. compressive stress a<4dl+2y ‘= 0. a3) vertical stiffeners at d(l +26L) centre w— ~= 4.o One vertical stiffener at A = 1. ‘= o.0 vertical stiffener at centre .3Lx2y centre B=(l+az )z(9+az)~L2a:y [(l +a:)o +(9+&)2] iii) Uniformly distributed compressive stress.167 (9+ Lx:)~+3..1) 1+2(5 at centre ii) Uniformly distributed compressive stress ()<@<] 0.24 ( 1 + a2 )2 + 3.. O-* E-= .1 ~= (l+a*)~+ 2(yL+yQ. N NOTE — Both stiffeners sl}all cross each other iiithout reduction of hknding stitTness or be combined at the same siiffness.9 SCX <1.16(9+ &)2+ 4.ab *U.24( I +a2 )2+0. One vertical 10. —.41 (l+9a~)z+ 13.41 (9+a~)2+ 1~.24( 1 +az )2+0. (9+a3)z +162y(l+LZ2)~ 4. One horizontal stiffener and 0..2)2+ 2y@(l+a2)2 vi) Uniformly distributed shear stress.0 r = (l+a2)2( l+9az)2+ 2y(l+a2)z+2y( I+9LY’)Z centre 1 u-u J 10.16 (1 +9c#)2 + 4. Table 23(b) Buckling Coefficient for the Partial Panel h’ ( Clause 16.l .1. 4 I+ N’1+27 One horizontal stiffener =&x a. z m .24 ( 1 + a2)z +3.05yas + (I+ Q?)2(9+cr2 )2+2@ (9+ry.5 s Cx<2. One horizontal and one 0.05y horizontal stiffener at 0.93 (1+az) K= v) a’~G Uniformly distributed shear stress.11 yczz stiffener at centre r ~l+a’)2( 1+9a2)z+ 162yu3( l+az)s+2yaz( l+9aD)2 10.- t 2 (l+cF)~ +27 HI i) m.93 (l+cP) iv) Uniformly distributed a% shear stress. One 10.4 SCIS i.1 ) S1 No Loading Condition and Arrangement of Stiffness Range of Application Buckling Coefficient K Uniformly distributed .95 ($$ +1.-.

14 2.86 1.78 5.62 1.11 1.72 2.03 1.3 I 2.15 1.74 1.41 1.12 1.16 1.20 1.76 1.70 1.26 I .09 1.55 3.22 1.14 1.23 2.82 160 170 4.98 2.12 1.03 3.23 2.90 2.26 1.31 1.48 1.55 6.31 3.36 1.09 1.24 1.10 1.88’ 4.41 170 180 -5.07 1.77 2.79 1.02 I .92 I .35 1.23 6.30 140 3.29 50 60 1.84 5.09 I .05 5.05 1.12 3.08 3.35 1.07 2.00 1.66 5.68 1.07 1.23 1.64 1.40 00 70 1.54 1.15 1.49 1.11 1.32 4.36 1.43 4.22 1.80 3.23 1.39 110 120 2.65 3.00 1.47 -5.60 2.90 1.19 1.76 1.72 5.43 2.60 3.10 6.31 2.99 3.69 80 90 1.49 4.64 2.19 I .39 1.65 4.16 2.50 1.08 2.29 6. 32 .30 1.51 2.1) Buckling Coefficients @ for Steel Members of Yield not more than 24 kgf/mm2 ( 240 N/mm* ) .05 2.01 1.51 X() 90 1.03 180 I 90 6.91 5.07 1.18 50 60 1.02 1.12 2.83 1.27 60 70 1.47 2.16 1.87 1.11 40 50 1.11 5.01 1..22 3.15 1.28 1.06 4.38 4.00 1.11 4.84 1.60 4.48 1.50 3.17 1.25 1.08 20 30 1.73 1.29 1.56 1.10 1.94 2.25 1.11 [.75 I 40 150 3.73 1.23 1.1.07 1.37 70 80 1.14 1.00 4.21 2.34 1.16 1.17 5.33 1.10 1.16 4.55 1.08 1.80 1.44 1. of which ratio of diameter to plate thickness is not more than 6 and k is equal to 120 or more.53 70 80 1.27 2.94 5.26 1.56 1.04 1.30 1.27 150 160 4.49 6.52 1.19 1.63 2.88 90 I 00 1.00 5.36 6.61 1.70 3.08 1.40 1.45 1.11 2.04 1.05 1.53 5.42 1. “Buckling Coefficients 01 for Cylindrical Steel Members of Yield not more than 24 kgf/mm2 ( 240 N/mn12 ) x o 1 2 .68 90 100 1.34 .10 1.32 1.58 1.32 1.27 1.02 2() 30 1.96 1.75 200 .17 1.41 1.41 3.04 1.05 2.06 1.05 1.46 1.03 1.02 2.85 3.59 1.06 1.37 1.16 2.94 1.71 4.97 2.18 1.13 1.00 100 )10 2.04 1.71 1.90 1.35 2.53 1.39 110 NOTE — To cylindrical coefficients.1.04 1.05 1.06 I .42 6.50 1.13 :() 40 1.64 1.77 4. IS 807:2006 Table 24 (Cluuse 16.3 4 5 6 7 8 9 k 20 1.63 1.18 2.21 1.47 1.39 I .13 1.28 1.14 1.08 1.82 1.45 3.42 1.20 4(I 50 1.31 1.29 5.17 3.54 4.58 1.23 5.59 5.46 1.00 2.55 2.44 1.95 4.81 1?() 130 2:85 2.05 1.27 2.17 1.04 1.69 I ()() 200 6.22 4.33 1.20 1.06 3() 40 1.97 6.01 I 00 110 2.16 6.13 1.00 1.36 3.59 1.21 1.94 1.90 3.61 1.24 1.35 2.01 1.35 5.20 2.78 1. o 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 k L 20 1.66 1.62 6.66 I .09 1.

49 4.26 1.60 1.94 7.08 1.64 5.05 ?() 30 1.34 170 180 7.41 1 43 1.32 I 1.85 I 1.24 110 120 3.27 1.22 I 1.37 ] 1.82 8() 90 1.20 2.28 I 1.88 3.22 5.63 3.88 8.04 1.90 1.23 1.39 I 1.58 1.11 I 1.17 I 1.69 I 1.54 \ 1.-.08 I ()() 200 9.72 ] 100 110 2.27 I 40 50 I 1.20 I .03 1.24 1.21 I 1.19 1.42 7.32 1.72 5.02 5.22 1.69 3.12 I 1.05 1.30 4.53 I 2.69 4.46 I 1.18 4.08 1.79 I 1.19 1.57 5.19 I 1.58 I 1.67 I 1.03 1.17 ] 3() 40 I 1. ( 320 N/mmz ) A o 1 2 3 4 .36 I 1.02 1.06 ! 1.76 I 1.56 4.34 2.o5 \ 1.79 8.15 1.40 6.51 1.1.57 1.02 1.62 6.52 I 60 70 I 1.55 1. \ 2.04 1.13 1.77 2.10 1.73 I 1.52 3.48 6.94 1.25 6.10 3() 40 1.06 I 1.86 6.62 1.29 2.10 7.16 5.09 1.98 3.38 1.30 :.58 3.61 I 1.14 1.45 I 1.23 I 1.75 4.33 I 1.36 1.15 2.25 7.51 7.46 1.09 1.98 2.07 2.02 8.37 60 70 1.35 I 1.95 5.18 I 1.20 1.07 I 1.11 —.12 I 1.41 I 1.27 8.40 3.21 1.48 \ 2.15 I 1.50 5.09 140 150 5.43 \ 2..1) Buckling Coefficients 02 for Steel Members of Yield Point 30 kgf/mmz ( 300 N/mm* ) to32 kgf/mm2 .88 2.17 6.74 I 1.32 6.63 4.13 1.13 ] 1.42 I 1.11 1.24 —-! ! ()() 100 2.31 I 1.77 1.17 7.50 I 1.00 4.93 I 80 90 1.37 4.16 40 50 1.03 I !—–.08 I 1..44 I 1.40 1.07 — -.86 1.68 7.07 1.78 6. I 2.48 149 1.07 I 1.08 I 1.67 I 2.01 2.39 2.18 1.62 I 2.25 5() 60 1.29 I 1.90 I 1.it j I.35 3.98 9.34 1.29 5.54 8.70 8.86 5.70 1.02 1.23 I 1.63 I 1. Of which ratio Of diameter to plate thickness is not more than 6 -and k is eqLIal to I 00 or more.09 3.03 3.29 1.60 I 1.95 1.10 8.03 1.88 4.43 130 140 4.24 90 NOTE — To cylindrical coetTicients.45 1.46 3.15 1.60 7.11 2.94 6.03 2.05 I 2.14 3.10 I 1.16 I 1.53 70 80 1.06 4.07 1. 1S 807:2006 Table 25 (Clause 16. 33 .19 3.93 2.81 I 1.5 6 7 8 9 L 20 ! 1.02 7.15 —.76 7.43 5.28 1.09 6.71 \ 70 80 I 1.33 1.81 4.04 1.51 I 1.31 1.75 I 3.02 6.48 I 1.56 I 1.06 1.12 4.94 3.— 2.38 I 50 60 \ 1.94 8.25 ! “1.12 1.10 \ 20 30 I I.06 1.73 1.98 2.36 8.20 ] 1. 2.36 5.83 I 1.11 1.55 I 60 170 6.82 2.45 8. I 2.85 7.79 150 160 5.24 4.70 6.24 I 1.18 180 190 8.18 2i)i)” Bucking Coefficients for Cylindrical Steel Nlembers to of Yield Point 30 kgf/mm2 ( 300 N/mmz ) to 32 kgf/mm2 ( 320 N/mmz ) L () I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 y A 20 1.14 I 1.17 1.58 I 2.09 I 1.62 8.28 I 1.66 I .88 I 1.82 120 130 3.65 I 1.

42 1.76 70 80 I .14 2.62 140 + 150 5.05 20 3() 1.46 1.08 1.06 1.03 1.12 1.64 2.59 110 — 120 3.26 1.16 1.34 1.1.83 3.33 5. IS 807:2006 Table26 (Cluuse 16.20 121 1.32 1.88 1.35 1.25 1.92 1.10 2.07 1.35 3.24 1.71 3.38 1.51 1.15 1.05 2.23 1.65 3.33 1.19 2.01 1()() 110 3.48 4.23 3.06 1.82 4.01 80 90 2.83 1.07 1.89 3.09 4.98 2.12 1.04 I .51 1.10 30” “ 40 1.06 1.38 2.02 4.10 1.02 I .08 1.83 1.64 1.96 4.41 4.15 1.35 4.05 1.01 80 Nol E — To cylindrical ctwt’tlcients.03 1.36 1.47 1.75 1.40 5.08 1.17 1.66 1.08 1.1) Buckling Coefficients o) for Steel .46 1.09 1.12 3.16 1.79 1.59 70 80 I .14 1.06 I .88 1.69 4.44 1.28 1.04 1.31 1.89 130 1-1o 4.13 1.18 3.31 1.06 3.39 1.96 4.36 1.27 40 5() 1.33 1.47 3.43 2. k o 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 k Z() 1.23 1.66 1.70 1.53 1.09 .04 5.02 1.32 1.24 2.29 1.27 50 — 60 1.25 1.26 1.58 1.03 1.52 “1.10 1.53 2.70 [50 — Buckling t’ocfficients for Cylindrical Steel Members w of Yield Point 34 kgf/mm2 ( 340 N/mmz ) to 36 kgf/mm2 ( 360 N/mmz ) .91 ].53 3.43 i .74 1.90 2.33 2.1.14 1.11 5.02 1.09 1.11 20 30 Ill 1.97 2.48 9() 10 () 2.07 1.62 1.55 1.71 1.93 1.54 1.15 1.15 4.62 1.30 1. of which ratio of diameter to plate thickness k not more than 6 and A.22 120 130 4.55 60 70 1.41 3.41 I .05 I .19 1. A () 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 k- —— 20 I.81 1.49 1.62 4.38 1.69 2.18 1.40 50 60 1.29 3.37 1.68 1.77 3.47 I .69 5.13 1.11 1.17 40 —.79 1.11 1.25 5.18 5.60 1.57 1.Members of Yield Point 34 kgf/mm2 ( 340 N/mmz ) to 36 kgf/mm2 ( 360 N/mmz ) — .14 1.is equal [0 90 or mm 34 .95 3.72 1.28 1.24 1.86 1.85 2.49 1.58 2.18 30 40 1.96 1.13 1.44 1.20 1.22 1.19 1.55 5.29 2.55 4.07 1.18 1. 5() 1.75 4.74 2.21 1.41 60 — 7() 1.22 1.79 2.47 5.16 1.

57 6.73 3.49 1.01 I.06 I ..06 I 1.09 3() 40 1.25 5.62 1.09 1.47 1.44 1.93 1.38 1.41 2.11 6.67 5.67 60 70 1.52 2.42 [Z() - 130 5.16 1.88 1. -- IS 807:2006 Table 27 (Clause 16.29 40 50 1.04 1.33 1.56 1.18 1.64 1.14 1.22 1.67 1.46 4. 20 I 103 I 1.35 1.00 I .17 1.00 1.47 1.12 1.23 1.29 130 140 6.26 1.09 4.87 I 00 Ilo 3.25 .76 5.46 50 60 1.17 30 40 1.06 1.13 1.21 1.40 1.27 1. 20 loo 1.01 5.o6 I 1.04 7.07 1.64 2.47 6.37 1.28 1.94 4.08 1.13 3.94 7.69 4.98 2.85 5.53 4.32 “50 60 1.16 4.59 3.26 1.74 1.88 2.37 1.14 1.35 1.66 6.“38 4.12 1.1) Buckling Coefficients w for Steel Members of Yield Point 44 kgf/mmz ( 440 N/mm* ) to 46 kgf/mm2 ( 460 N/mmz ) .30 1.39 1.08 2.34 5.54 1.07 I 1.15 1.51 1.20 1.60 1. 35 .03 -70 N(3TE — To cylindrical coefficients.42 1.70 1.10 1.77 1.—— .46 3.30 1.02 6.59 5.09 I 1.11 1.80 1.13 1.07 I 1 1.39 3.18 40 50 1.ol 1.15 1. of which ratio of diameter to plate thickness is not more than 6 and k is equal to 80 or more.19 1.51 1.93 1.05 1.24 2.94 6.52 3.14 2.05 1.o5 I 1.20 1.33 150 Buckling Coefficients for Cylindrical Steel Members (o of Yield Point 44 kgf/mm2 ( 440 N/mm2 ) to 46 kgf/mm2 ( 460 N/mmz ) ?& o “1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a. __ .88 1.55 60 70 !.20 6.72 1.32 6.82 2.09 5.25 1.03 M’ 30 1.00 3. .30 2.1.76 2.85 6.11 1.00 1.98 2.65 1.43 I .10 1.32 1.80 3.02 1.94 3.16 1. .60 1.02 1.06 3.83 1.75 6.66 3.78 1.26 3.23 140 150 7.09 I ?() 30 1.41 1.24 1.93 5.03 1.34 1.04 I 1.21 1.03 70 80 2.08 1.o4 II 1.85 4.45 1.58 X() 90 2.32 3.23 4.12 1.31 4.61 110 120 4.17 5.29 1.19 2.70 2.19 90 100 3.83 1.50 5.75 1.13 7.58 1.01 4.47 2.23 1.1.13 1.35 2.01 1.77 4.

A FIG. 19 BUCKLINGLENGTH OUT OF PLATE 17. by the reducing factor C.8/ The compressive members having approximately c may be interpolated in linear proportion for uniform sectional area but having variable height 0.01 Ih. and N2and Forces of members FIG. 18 EFFECTIVENET SECTIONALAREA l— I I where a and b are Nodal points ofTrusses and N.51 36 . IS 807:2006 A “t-- . / Ratio ~. see Table 29.3 Limit for Slenderness Ratio of the member shall have the equivalent geometrical moment of inertia obtained by The slenderness ratio of the members shall not exceed multiplying the maximum geometrical moment of inertia the values given in Table 28.-l IMUX i) Main compressi}.e member 150 These shall be applied only to the bearing member ii) Auxiliary compressive member 240 1 of hinged joint of 10>0. Table 28 Limit of Slenderness Ratio Members l=cxlMar S“l Kinds of Members Slenderness where No. _ 10 (1) (2) -JL-. .+__Q-- +-@--- 1.ur 17.81~11 ~0.4 Compressive Members with Variable Height c= 1 forll >0.

. Shape of Ibc Member Reducing Factor (1) (~) (3) i) (r l.21.08 + 0. 1S 807:2006 Table 29 Reducing Factor C (C/ausc 17.l<rs/ 1[.48 + 0. The combined compressive members shall be dealt same as single compressive member the equivalent e= distance between the neutral axis to tension slenderness-ratio is given by the following formula: edge or compression edge. in cm4 or mm4. . ~ ( (). kl = radius of gyration of a single member in cm or mm.18 + 0. . d= length ofa diagonal member in cm or mm: where A= gross sectional area of a compound member k.)= rzll /.62+~– 1.l<r<l It. 20(a) and rigid frame members shown in Fig. 20(11). =r~ll II : c = ( 0. 37 . o. The combined compressive members are divided into ~l=nm2 ~:%:i k. 1<0.. in cm or mm.5/.~~ — .<o. i)) d [o=r2[ O.32r+ 0. and m= number of single members built up into one combined unit by means of horizontal joint I = moment of inertia.0.. L m I)ilrabola .5~)+~ (0.51.02r + o. 17. .AI’m = maximum geometrical moment of inertia.all members to a 1.52r) k s’”” ii) b I.92r ) +. 10 = equivalent geometrical moment of inertia. principal axis ( see Fig.) L -’Ea- iii) c 10= r: [1 II O.33r+(). = ~ for rigid frame member lattice members shown in Fig.— L -la I)mabola where compressive member.32 + 4&4.4) il Nu.l<r<l 1. 21 ).5 Combined Compressive Members ~= slenderness ratio ofa single member..32r ) (. ~= slenderness ratio of.l<r<l k (=(().17+ 0. I I()=r:ll ~ = (). ~= 13. as shown in Fig. = equivalent slenderness ratio of a combined in cm2 or mm2. 21.5W .=/.

1 Rivets or Bolts for Joining Girder F. in kgfor ● . in cmJ or axial distance of single member exceeds 20 kl. k. is to be given from the following formula: 17.4= gross sectional area of combined in the relategirders shall be calculated from the formula: compressive member in clmzor mm?. the 80 100 8020 section of which is intended to be jointed with rivets or bolts. ——. the equivalent shear force shall be taken mtm4. = equivalent stear force in kgf or N. and II 5 [. diagonal members due to F. 1$ L_ ‘. *’ ‘e 49’ ‘+ I II II tl I I t.le II = buckling length ofa single member in cm member.— e ———e I I $ I I II II II II I I il !1 I I I I II II r~ II II :1 1: 11 ! 1 I . and b) In the case of a lattice member constituted Z = number of horizontal joints arranged in a of two members. = minimum radius of gyration of a sing. in the case where to the neutral axis of the girder. in kgf or N: mm~. and 0=c<1 allowable comperssive stress in kgf/cml FS or N/mm7.frame member. as the value shown in the following formula: F= shear force acting on the girder. where 1= geometrical moment of inertia of a girder P= pitch of rivets or bolts.=q . =/4%.—-——— IS 807:2006 .4~ = sectional area of a lattice member cm2 or where mmz. 1= geometrical moment of inertia of a girder a) For a rigid .6 Shear Stress Acting on Combined Compressive Members D= ‘t Z sin a All of the batten plates and parting lathes together with their ioints shall not exceed the allowable stresses where against the equivalent shear forces shown in the a = angle between the main member and t]lc following forlmula: diagonal member. or mm.+ . in cm or mm: to the neutral axis of the girder in cm4 or Ha = allowable load for rivet or bolt. :+ * 61 1+ I a) b) F’1~.. !1 relating to the neutral axis of the girder. the force D acting on the parallel plane. 38 .20 COMBINW COMPRHSIVE MFMFERS .-20) ~ s = geometrical moment of area of the section ~. N. 18 DETAILE-D DESIGN OF GIRDERS SUBJECTED I TO BENDING 80 w41ere 18. The rivets or the bolts forjointing the combined member . II II I 1 II II I II L ~0. in cm~ or mm.

1. Y x 1. 21 MFTHOD OF SL~ND~RNESSRATIO ( Continued) 39 . x x —T – x x —— x 7 Fr 1“ t I .3 3’ a) m=2 L x x b) m=2 Y! 1 c) m=2 e l——---- YI 1P)’ Y x -\# I x x +jJk I Jx y $iHF \4- \ Y I x YI d) m=2 .1 I IY *-- 11 yl IY g) m=2 h) m=2 k) m=2 x x Y\ /Y A \ /Y Y/“ % \ x Y/‘ 7- \ x FIG. x’ _..e) m=2 f) m=2 Y 1] Y.L-. u C=d I Y 31E . 1S 807:2006 YI ...

23 ) of the plate girder ~. ~= maximum shear force at thejoint. bending moment on the web. on the joining bolts ( including rivets ) shall be Iw = geometric moment of inertia of the web calculated from the following formula. The web joint ( see Fig. —_. in cm or mm. 22 where n= total number of jointing bolts on one side the rail is just on the web and particularly the correct of-the joining line. It R= resultant force acting on a bolt atJ. Bolts or Welded Directly Subjected to Iw provided M. in kgfor N: 18. and Y“ = distance from the neutral axis to the furthermost bolt. 22. uniformly in the angular direction of 45° from just under 50 mm of the wheel as shown in Fig.-bolt shall be reduced of the girder. ___ Xe F1ci. In this case.cm or N mm. Then the maximum resultant force acting I= moment of inertia in cm4 or mm4. 40 . around the neutral axis of the gross section the allowable strength ot. in cmz or mm2.2 Rivets.IS 807:2006 G!P-lik-. in kgf. calculation is impossible.3 Web Joint of Plate Girder Receiving Bend ~w .the distance from the Ey = total sum of square of distance from joint tlange of plate girder to the neutral axis relative toyn bolts atone side of the joint line to the neutral in the formula: axis. bolts or the welds directly subjected where to the wheel load shall be as given in Fig.mm. in kgf. cm or N. bending moment on the welded joint of the receiving bending moment shall be designed girder.k= h4 — Wheel Load [ ‘[he rivets. in cm4 or mm4. in kgf shall be assu[med that the wheel load is distributed orN. considering both the shear force and the bending moment. T@ ‘/’ ‘ Y ~ 4+”%.21 METHOD OF SWNDERN~SSRATIO 18. according to the fiatio ot.

- --1- . --1- .ITL 50 mm --1-- / .22 DISTRIBUTION OFWHEELLOAD . I I I +---4’ 4+” -+-+ +--+- +---+ ’+-+ NEUTRAL ——-—— — AXIS ‘+--4 +----i Y. --Q--t%----e-t-o ---e-* I FIG. I A t .. Y2 ----------Yn — DISTANCES FROM NEUTRAL AXIS (cmor mm) FIG. -J I Y. 4-.23 WEBJOINT 41 .

22 DIAPHRAGMS AND VERTICAL STIFFNESS 24. The distance between the adjacent diaphragm ( longer/ 25 WELDED BOX GIRDERS short ) shall not exceed 7600 S Welded box girders ( Fig.IS 807:2006 19 WELDING OF IN. above each girder diaphragm. and approximately equal to the dead load deflection c) For cranes over 24.5 m span not less than plus one-half the live load deflection.DIJSTRIAL AND M-ILL W = maximum trolley wheel load.2 Weld joint design. welded to the girder or attached with welded studs. Girders shall be cambered to an amount not less than 3.1 Ratio of Crane Span to End C-arriage Wheel and the rated load shall not exceed 1/750 of the span Base of the crane ( if the span of the cranes is more than Following condition to be considered: 12 m). the wheel base is measured from centre line to centre line of the two ‘The deflection of members or the structure as a wheels which are far apart on the runways. b) Allowable stress in welds. The welding of clips are preferred. with the truck shall be provided by the large gusset 2) Weld joint category. that the bridge rails shall be supported on wear plate whichever is greater. welding procedure and inspection of welds given in Annex B. 42 . All diaphragms shall bear against the top cover plate and shall be welded a) Weldability classification of qualified steel. 24 BRIDGE TRUCKS 20 LIMITING DEFLECTiON The cranes having bogie trucks. where The bridge rail shall be attached to the bridge girders I = thickness of one web plate.75 m or depth of the web (h). CR ( Crane Rail ) or equivalent rails for both for bridge rails as well as gantry rails. in kg/cm2. and A substantial end tie must be provided to give d) Classification of welded joints horizontal tixed end for rigidity to girder. so that the bending 22. 23 GIRDER END -CONNECTION c) Fatigue stress in welds. The rails shall be selected based on the IRS 6 ( Indian Rail Steel ). with equalizing bogie trucks require a rigid end connection. It is recommended If the spacing exceeds 1. to the web plates. The girders 1) Weld joint design. web plate shall be reinforced with welded on top of the top cover plate and positioned full depth diaphragms at major load points. and by means of alternately spaced rail clips that are v = shear stress in web plate.5 m of the span. 21 CAMBERS b) For cranes over21 m span and up to 24. a) For cranes up to and including 20 m span not less than one-sixth of the span.2 Bridge and Gantry Rails The spacing of vertical web stiffness shall not ‘ The selection of bridge rails as well as gantry rails exceed depends upon the wheel load ( maximum) and wheel 800 [ diameter.1 Diaphragms stress produced in the rail by trolley wheel load is not transmitted into the top cover plate. one-seventh of the span. Cranes tlnishing. and 1/600 of the span ( if the span of the crane is less than 12 m ). All welds shall be designed for S = section modules of rail.and maximum shear and bending. in mm. The maximum vertical deflection of the girder produced by the dead load.5 m. the weight of the trolley 24. 19. in mm3. whole ( without taking into consideration the impact factor ) should not be such as would impair the strength Cranes with fixed bogie trucks require a flexible end or efficiency of the structure or lead to damage to connection to obtain the equalizing effec~.1 The following points shall be taken into Short diaphragm shall be placed between the fulIdepth consideration: diaphragm to support the bridge rail. 24 ) shall be fabricated of structural steel with continuous ( full penetration butt w and fillet welds ) longitudinal welds running the full where length of the girders. in kg( without CRANES impact ). 19. plate welded to the bottom of the truck and attached to girders with bolts in reamed holes.

TROLLEY WHEEL LOAD [ . II II II 11” h — ++ t l!!dl TROLLEY STOPS :-A SOLID STOP SHALL BE WELDED TO GIRDERS AS SHOWN IN THE FIGURE FIG.24 GIRDERARRANGEMENT 43 . n----n II II II II di=d=l Ii . . .

~=1235 J( )— blc ~c = maximum compressive stress. the allowable compression stress shall be computed from the following 1235 C(k+l) J & shall not exceed M formula: 38 ~ where = thickness of top cover plates. 25.2 Height — Thickness ( h/t ) Ratio of Web b) When the ratio of blc exceeds 38 ( see Plate Table 30 ). b/c f. ( kgf/cm2 ) t = thickness of web. is equal c= thickness of the top cover plates. to or less than 38. in kgf or mm2. and compression stress c) bfc shall not exceed 60. in mm. 25. a) Compression stress is less than I 235 kg/cmz b= width of the girder. b) Maximum h/tfor 845 kg/cm2 = 220 b) I/b shall not exceed 60.1 Girder-Proportion At reduced stress level. and S1 No.. and when the ratio of b/c ( see Table 30 ). the maximum value ‘M’ for hlt maybe as follows: The box girder shall be designed for suitable size taking into account of the following proportions: a) Maximum h/t for I 145 kg/cm2 = 188 compression stress a) //h shall not exceed 25. in mm. in mm. c) Maximum h/t for 700 kg/cm2 — – 240 where compression stress [= span of the crane. in mm i) 40 1 145 r The coefficients C and M ii) 44 99() For Longitudinal Stiffness c M iii) iv) 48 52 x70 770 I None 81 188 v) 56 690 One 162 376 vi) 60 625 Two 243 564 44 .3 Compression Stress h= depth of the girder. in mm. in mm. Table 30 Values of Compression Shear Stress k = f~f.1S 807:2006 25.

A minimum preparation before joining shall consist of removing every trace of dust.l Coefficient of Friction ( p ) p. The tension. and stains must be removed by tlame cleaning orby the c= coefficient depending on the thread application of suitable chemical products ( carbon tetra. The diameter of holes shall not exceed by more than It is necessary to insert two washers.50 Iii) St 52 0. shot blasting A-1.4. be heat treated so that their hardness shall be at least equal to that of metal constituting the bolt. This could be sand blasting.3) ~ Nominal Diameter.30 0. = torque to be applied.2 Bolts Tightening where m is the friction surface. one under the 2 mm of bolt diameter. the friction co~fficient on the chloride for instance ). These washers shall have a 45° bevel. brushing must be done When determining the stress in the bolt.6 58 84.lOc.4 Quality of the Bolts SI Joined Normally Prepared Special Prepared -Bolts used for this type of joint have a high elastic No.3 115 157 192 245 303 353 459 501 [ J 45 . in m-kg.4. rust. form.1. resulting Property values of bolts are given in Table 34. can be measured by calculation of Schematic diagram is shown in Fig.55 ‘E = elastic limit. and the other above the nut.2 and 9. c = 0. i) St 37 0. P. thread diameter. the tensile just prior to jointing.30 0.30 0. Material Surfaces Surfaces ( Flame limit: ( DegreasesI and Cleaned Shot or Brushing ) Sand Blasted ) The ultimate tensile strength ORmust be greater than (1) (2) (3) (4) the values given in Table 33.6) CLASSIFICATION OF JOINTS A-1 DESIGN OF BOLTED JOINTS the torque to be applied to the bolt and given by the formula: A-1.3 Value of the-Tensile Stress Area of the Bolts or oxy-acetylene flame cleaning done not more than five hours before tightening. and c) m=3 A. Table 31 Values of Coefficient of Friction(p) A-1. area shall be calculated by taking the arithmetic mean of the core ( minor ) diameter and the effective The coefficient of friction are given in Table31. Table 32 Values of Tensile Stress ( Clause A-1. in mm 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 27 .50 where ii) St 42 0. They shall a) m=l.18 ( metric bolts ). d= nominal diameter of the bolt. 25. bolt head. Value of the tension induced in the bolt shall be pre-determined by calculation. b) m=2. of friction. oil and paint F= nominal tension to be induced in the bolt.F The coefficient of friction used for calculation of the force transmitted by friction depends upon the joined where material and upon the preparation of the surfaces. from tightening. in mm.30 L i Tensile ‘Stress Area.=l. by energetic brushing with a clean metallic brush. IS 807:2006 ANNEX A ( Clauses 9. d. at least on the internal rim and Effective friction surface shall be considered as: turned towards the bolt head or the nut. in inn): 36. Oil in tonnes. These values are given in Table 32. threads and between the nut and the A more careful preparation may increase the coefficient washer.

4 ) SI No. IOCTE 1 I 1 I 111 I I I I I ili #1 1 1 1 1 I 1:1 1 I Ill I I I I I I Ill I FIG. kgf/mm2 . kg/mm2 a~. Table 33 Tensile Strength of Bolts ( Clause A.2”/.15tJE ii) 70 to 85 > 1. ).25 EFFECTIVEFRICTIONSURFACE . (1) (2) (3) i) <70 ~ 1. o~ ( 0.12f3E iii) >85 > I.1.

45 9.00 6.4) SI Bolt Tensile Clamping Applied Normally Prepared Surfaces Specially Prepared Surfaces No.36 1.14 4.97 4.39 1.60 7.40 120 5.75 2.2 2.80 49.42 9. Table 34 Property Values of Bolts ( Clause A-1.25 5.00 11.18 6.55 11.03 iii) 14 115 8.30 35.90 vi) 20 245 17.89 [.20 9.50 Steels A-52 p = 0.9 1.m p=o.55 2.75 3.50 NOTE — For bolt with elastic limit of CE.60 16.79 4.65 v) 18 192 13.14 1. A-52 mm Area t kg.55 3.85 6.52 1.3 Steels A-37.02 10.93 5.10 3.97 7.28 2. .27 5.00 12.08 3.50 12.55 1.71 6.94 1.26 2.76 4.21 1.06 14.42 4.90 A viii) 24 353 25.52 3.55 9.0 4.25 2.10 13.68 j.14.10 3.22 2.40 15. Dia Stress Force Torque Steels A-37.06 5.72 2.61 8.60 69.3 6.86 2.00 176 6.15 4.j7 1.08 ii) 12 84.31 10.7 3. Where no special measures are taken toavoid stripping of thethreads [O.83 0.76 3.17 8.94 8.4 1.80 vii) 22 303 21.80 95.27 8.08 5.80 5.76 3.50 3. =0.70 6.00 9.90 8.02 2.60 5.70 + ix) 27 459 33. A-42.55 mmz Case I Case 11 Case 111 Case I Case 11 Case 111 Case 1 Case 11 Case 111 t t t t t t t t t (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (lo) (11) (12) (13) (14) i) 10 58 4.27 0.25 8.02 3. .00 12. the values of the forces and of the torque indicated in this table are to be multiplied by the ratio oE/90.8 2.76E) these values aretobe divided bY 1. A-42 p = 0.27 22.36 4.14 iv) 16 157 11.45 7.

to the base metal throughout its total thickness. be 40 percent of the yield strength for members not controlled by buckling. 26to 28. f) Staggered intermittent fillet welds. Table 37 and Fig. shall be considered as applied to this effective area regardless of the direction of b) Groove welds. weld shall be the effective weld length multiplied by the effective throat. with a minimum of 51 mm. than 60”0. B-5. in which the weld a) Base metal. 29. and metal completely fill the groove and is fused b) Weld metal. the metal is more than 6 mm thick. range does not exceed the value given in Table 2) Thickness of the base metal 1. fillet weld shall not be less than 4 times the weld size. The b) Intermittent fillet welds may be used to carry dimensions for different metal thickness calculated loads.3 Intermittent Groove Welds The allowable tensile or compressive stress in the base metal shall be 50 percent of the yield strength Intermittent groove welds are prohibited. 29 and where fillet welds are used to reinforce groove welds. and e) The edges of the abutting member shall be beveled when necessary. opening to 3 mm maximum. The shear stress in a fillet weld a) General requirements. 48 . d) Fillet welds shall not be used in skewed d) Fillet welds. Allowable stresses in the weld metal shall conform a) The minimum fillet weld size -shallabe as m Table 35. The maximum stress in welded joints to repeated stress b) The maximum fillet weldsizepermitted along fluctuation or reversals shall not exceed the edges of members should be: a) the basic allowable stress.4 Fillet Welds B-3 WELD METAL Types of fillet weld shown in Fig.5 Intermittent Fillet Welds Complete information regarding location type. c) Intermittent fillet -welds shall not be less than b) A complete-joint penetration groove weld 51 mm in length at each end of the joint. Maximum spacing permitted between welds a) The effective area of a full penetration shall be 300 mm.2) WELD JOINT DESIGN. at least B-5. B-5. I Genera} Requirements B-5.slot welds. size and extent of all welds and welded joints shall be a) Length of any segment of intermittent shown on the drawing.6 mm when 36. or 1) Thickness of the base metal when the b) the allowable fatigue stress and the stress metal is less than 6 mm thick. are given in Table 37.2 Groove Welds 25 percent of the joint shall be welded. given in Table 38 except where fillet weld B-4 FATIGUE size as shown in Fig. B-5 WELD JOINT DESIGN c) The effective weld area shallbe the effective weld length multiplied by the effective Following points to be considered: throat. except in and the allowable shear stress in the base metal shall secondary members. to limit the root g) Plug and. applied load. c) Intermittent groove weld. B-2 BASE METAL B-5. T-joints that have an included angle of less ej Intermittent fi!let welds. WELDING PROCEDURES AND INSPECTION OF WELDING FOR INDUSTRIAL AND MILL CRANES B-1 ALLOWABLE STRESSES is one that has been welded from both sides or from one side.1S 807:2006 ANNEX B ( clause 19.

equal to or less than matching weld effective area bear except stress on base metal may be used “meta[ sha!l not exceed 0.loint designed to bear Same as base metal Tensile or compression Same as base metal parallel to the axis of the weld .45 nominal tensile Weld metal with a strength level normal to designed to strength of weld metal.3 6 yield strength of bas e metal 49 .27 nominal tensile strength of weld metal. equal to or less than matching weld shear stress on metal metal may be used shall not exceed 0.27 nominal tensile effective area strength of weld metal.36 yield strength of base metal iii) Partial Joint Tension nominal to 0. except shear stress on base metal shall not exceed 0.36 yield strength of base metal Tension compression Same as base metal parallel to the axis of weld v) Plug and Slot Shear parallel to effective 0. except tensile strength on base metal shall not exceed 0.27 nominal tensil e Weld metal with a strength level Welds area strength of weld metal.27 nominal tensile strength of weld metal.55 yield strength of base metal iv) Fillet Welds Shear on effective area 0. except shear stress on base metal shall not exceed 0.(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) i) Complete Joint Tension normal to the Same as base metal Matching weld metal shall be used Penetration effective area Compression normal to Same as base metal Weld metal with a strength level the effective area equal to or one classification less than matching weld metal may be used Tension or compression Same as base metal Weld metal with a strength level parallel to the axis of the equal to or less than matching weld weld metal may be used Shear on the effective area 0.55 percent of base metal . except shear stress on base metal shall not exceed 0. Type of Weld Stress Weld Allowable Stress Required Weld Strength . IS 807:2006 Table 35 Allowable Stresses in Weld ( Clause B-3) II No. Level ..36 yield strength of base metal ii) Partial Joint Compression Joint not C. Shear parallel to axis of 0.27 nominal tensile weld strength of weld metal.

5 I mm or greater and with weld termination ground a) when R >610 mm B b)when610mm>R> 152mm c c)when152mm>R>51mm D viii) Fillet Welds Shear stress on throat of fillet welds F Base metal at intermittent welds attaching transverse stiffeners c and stud type shear connectors Base metal at intermittent fillet welds attaching longitudinal stiffeners E ix) Stud Welds Shear stress on nominal shear area of stud type shear connectors F x) Plug and Slot Welds Base metal adjacent to or connected by plug or slot welds E 50 . and weld metal in or adjacent complete joint c penetration groove welded splices either not requiring transition or when metal required with transition having slope not greater than I to 2 % and when in either case. IS 807:2006 Table 36 Fatigue Stress Provisions — Tension or Reversal Stresses ( Clause B-4) S1 No. R with weld termination ground when sloped welds ground web connedion a) R>610mm BB b)610mm>R> 152mm cc c)152mm>R>51mm DD d)51mm~R>0 EE v) Groove Welds Base metal. B built-up plates or shapes connected by continuous complete or partial joint penetration groove welds or by continuous fiIlet welds parallel to the direction of applied stress Calculated flexural stress at toe of transverse stiffener welds on c girder web or flanges Base metal at end or partial length welded cover mates having E square or tapered endswith or without welds across the ends iii) Groove Welds Base metal and weld metal at complete joint penetration groove B welded splices of rolled and welded sections having similar profiles when welds are ground and weld soundness established by non destructive testing Base metal and weld metal in or adjacent to complete joint B penetration groove welded splices at transitions in width or thickness with welds ground to provide slopes no steeper than 1 to 2 % and weld soundness established by non-destructive testing iv) Groove Welded Base metai at details of any length attached by groove welds Longitudinal subjected to transverse or longitudinal loading or both when loading materials weld soundness is transverse to the direction of stress is having equal or established by non-destructive testing and the detail embodies unequal thickness a transition radius. parallel to the line of stress is a) <51 mm c b)51mm<L<102mm D c) L > 102 mm E vii) Fillet Welded Base metal at details attached by fillet welds parallel to the Connections direction of stress regardless of length when the details embodies at transition radius R. General Condition Situation Stress Category (1) (2) (3) (4) . reinforcement is not removed and weld soundness is established by non-destructive testing vi) Groove or Fillet Base metal at details attached by groove or fillet welds subject Welded Connection to longitudinal loading where the details embodied a transition radius R. O Plain Material Base metal with rolled or cleaned surfaces. Oxygen cut edges A with tine smoothness ii) Built-up Members Base metal and weld met-al in members without attachment. less than 51 mm and when the detail length L.

——- .26 ALLOWABLEFATIGUESTRESS FOR CRANES ( M 1 and M2 ) .2006 2000 200 1507) 150 1000 100 500 50 -1 500 -50 1000 -1oo 1500 -150 2000 -200 FIG. —.. ._ ——— ________ 1S-807 :.

IS 807:2006 2000 200 1500 150 1000 100 50 -1= o 0 I I 1 I -500 I I i I I I I I I I I I I I -50 I I WI I I 1 -1000 -1oo -1500 -150 -2000 -200 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I FIG. M4 and M5 ) 52 . 27 ALLOWABLE FATIGUE STRESSFOR CRANES ( M3.

. IS 807:2006 2000 200 1500 150 1000 100 500 50 -1 o 500 -50 . 28 ALLOWABLEFATIGUESTRESS FOR CRANES ( M6. 1000 -1oo 1500 -150 2000 -200 FIG. M7 and M8 ) 53 .

?‘.29 FILLET WELD 54 . . . ~ (. --Jd f -..1S 807:2006 — — WELD SIZE -WELDSIZE -- . I i ROOT OF ROOT CF WELD WELD 29A Weld deposit 29B Weld deposit by a deep penetrating process 1 ik’N\ 1 ROOT OF WELD EFFECTIVE THROGHOUT REINFORCEMENT / 29C Actual throat of a bevel group weld reinforcement with a fillet weld FIG.

lap or edge joints.groove weld T-joint (7’). plug welds 1) Welds are placed at each end of the joint in joints.6 Category VI or more of the joint length.1 Category I v) 38. shear loading in a lap joint to prevent buckling b) Square . B-6. plus 8 mm. The maximum No. B-6. component parts of built up members except c) Single V-groove weld butt joint (B). used. The root of the first weld is chipped.3 Category 111 (1) I (2) I (3) I (4) I Complete joint penetration butt.2 Category 11 ““~ in mm Metal Arc in mm Process for Single Horizontal Position in mm Welded butt or T-joints with complete joint penetration. comer joint a) Plug or slot welds may be used to transmit (Q.corner joint or separation of lapped parts.4 Category IV Complete penetration butt. T-joints and corner joints. plug or slot welded up. B-7 WELDING-PROCESS B-5. b) When the total aggregate length of the staggered intermittent fillet weld is 90 percent B-6.1 to 57. T-joints and corner joints the pIate. partial penetration butt. B-6. provided: as butt. gouged or ground vii) 152 16 to sound metal before making ‘the second weld and the weld faces are ground or machined flush with the Table 38 Minimum Fillet Weld Size direction of metal removal parallel to the principal stress.5 -Category V the distance between two consecutive welds even though they are on opposite sides of Partial joint penetration butt. Thicker Part Joimt Throat diameter of the hole shall not be greater than mm mm 2 M times the thickness of the weld. joint (C).6 Staggered Intermittent Fillet Welds backing strip that is not removed after welding. T-joints and corner joint welded from both sides or from one side using a EM!_U-l B-5. ( Clauses B-4 and B-5. vi) 57. (1) (2) (3) B-6 WELD JOINT -CATEGORIES O 6 3 ii) 6to !3 5 Different types of weld joint categories are given in iii) 13to19 6 Table 39.4) Finished joints shall be non-destructively tested. b) The effective area shall be the nominal area d) Double V-groove weld butt joint (B). and fillet. Finished joints shall be non-destructively tested. 55 . fillet welded lap. T-joints corner. or to join (q. and and structural welded joints of secondary importance.1 to 152 13 The root of the first weld is chipped.2) c) The minimum diameter of the hole for a plug weld shall not be less than the thickness of SI Metal Thickness of Minimum Effective the part containing it. gouged or ground to sound metal before making the second weld. the clean spacing shall be considered B-6. T-joints and corner joints welded on one side only. T-joints and corner a) When staggered intermittent fillet welds are joints welded on both sides. any odd number Joints with no special welded groove preparation such of weld segments may be used. 2) Clear spacing does not exceed 152 mm. welds of secondary importance in strength on one side. corner with quenched and tempered steel. iv) 19 to 38 8 B-6. IS 807:2006 Table 37 Minimum Effective Throat for Partial of the hole or slot m the plane of the faying Joint Penetration Groove Welds surface. ( Clause B-5.1 10 Welded butt joints with complete joint penetration.7 Plug and Slot Welds a) Square-groove weld butt joint (B). T-joints and comer joint welded on both sides.

r I I 11 & .. A F III . Table 39 Classification of Welded Joinls ( Clause B-6) Category Conf’iguratlon of Welded Joints . * F EL F N = A F e A E 56 .

IS 807:2006

Table 39 — Continued

.

NOTES
1 Details of weld joint (groove design, root opening, etc) are those required for the welding process to be used.
2 The diameters of plug welds or the width of slot welds is indicated by dimension ‘d’.

e) Single-bevel groove weld butt joint (B); joint (C);
9 Single-bevel groove weld T-joint (7), comer j) Single J-groove weld butt joint (B), T-joint
joint (C); (7’),corner joint (C); and
g) Double -bevel groove weld butt joint T-joint, k) Double J-groove weld T-joint(7), corner joint
comer joint (C); (C), butt joint (B).
h) Single U-groove welds butt joint (B), corner Some of various joints are given in Table 40.
57

&
IS ?307:2006

Table 40 Square — Grooved Butt Joints (B)
( Clause B-7)

.

MILD STEEL Square-groove Corner joint
weld (f)
Butt joint (f?)
Welding Process Groove Preparation Permitted Gas
Base Metal
Welding Shielding
Thickness Tolerances in mm
Positions for
( U = Unlimited )
FCAW
T, Tz Root As detailed As tit Up
mm mm opening
$ub-merged Metal Arc 6, Max — R=TI +2, –0 +6, –2 All —
Welding ( SMAW )
Gas Metal Arc Welding 6, Max u R=T1 +2, –(J +6, –2 All —
GMAW )
Flux Cored Arc Welding 10, Max — R=TI +2, –(J +6, –2 All Not
: FCAW ) required

Square — Groove Butt Joint

Square-groove weld 1
Butt joint (B)
II

b-

&

MILD STEEL
1
Welding Process Groove Preparation Permitted Gas
Base Metal
Welding Shielding
Thickness Tolerances in mm
Positions for
( U = Unlimited )
FCAW
T] Tz Root As detailed As tit Up
mm mm opening
Sub-merged Metal Arc Welding 6, Max — R= T112 +2,0 +2, -3,5 All —
Gas Metal Arc Welding 10, Max — R = 0-3.5 +2-0 +2, -3,5 All Not
Flux Cored Arc Welding required
Sub-merged Arc Welding (SAW) 12.5, Max — R=O +0 +2, -3,5 Fiat —

58

1S 807:2006

Square-Groove T-Joint (7) Corner Joint (C)

Square-groove weld
T- joint (T)
. I I
Corner joint (C)

MILD STEEL
—-
Welding Process Groove Preparation Permitted Gas
Base Metal
Welding Shielding
Thickness Tolerances in mm
Positions for
( U = Unlimited )
FCAW
TI Tz Root As detailed As fit Up
mm mm opening
Sub-merged Metal Arc Welding 6, &tOX u R= T,12 +2,0 +2, .3,5 All
Gas Metal Arc Welding IO, Max u R= Oto 3.5 +2,0 +2, -3,5 All Not
Flux Cored Arc Welding required
Sub-merged Arc Welding 10, Max u R=O *O +2, () Flat

Single V-Groove Butt Joint (B)

Single V-groove weld Tolerances
Butt joint (B) As detailed As fit UP
AA
MILD STEEL

df%-
J \.! J
!Q
\ i

-d&-

Welding Process Base Metal Groove Preparation
Thickness
( U=Unlimited )
T,, mm T2, mm Root Opening Groove Angie
Sub-merged Metal Arc Welding u — R=6 ~ = 45o All l–
R=1O ~ = 300
R= 12.5 ~ = 200
Gas Metal Arc Welding u — R=5 ~ = 300 *
Flux Cored Arc Welding R=5 ~ = 300

R=6 ~ = 300

Sub-merged Arc We[ding 2, Max — R=6 ~ = 300
Sub-merged Arc Welding u — R=8 (-J= 200

59

–5” . IS 807:2006 Single V-Groove Corner Joint ( B ) $iogle V-groove weld Corner joint (C) . OH Required ‘Iux Cored Arc-Welding Not required Not recruired . OH l– Fl - U spacer = 6 x I Sub-merged Arc — R=16 f= Oto6 a = 20” Welding R .ub-merged Metal Arc Welding u u R=6 a = 45° All R=1O a = 3130 F. OH — R= 12. mm Root Root Face Groove Opening Angle Sub-merged U preferably Metal Arc 16 or thicker F.-0 Note fa M “ f=io 1. –o a = +19° –0° +10”. &fL7X I lub-merged Arc Welding u — I Double V-Groove Butt Joint (B) Double V-groove weld Tolerances Butt ioint (B) As detailed As fii ~Ip MILD STEEL R=O = 6.5. MILD STEEL I L 1 17- Welding Process Base Metal Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Thickaess Welding Shielding ( U= Unlimited ) Positions for FCAW T.ub-merged Arc We!ding 12. V..5.5 a = 20° F..(3H I — Weldirw svacer = 3 x R -~ F. mm T. = +0 +1. OH — las Metal Arc Welding u u R=5 a= 30° F.5... mm I T. –o @ J@ Welding Process Base Metal Thickness I Groove Preparation ‘ Permitted Gas (f/= Unlimited) T.. mm Root Opening Groove Angle . l“.

~ = +100 -00 +10”. F. Flat Not required .. mm Tz.. . -1. .\M ~ n_p. <.5 .. “ I Welding Process Base Metal Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Thickness Welding Shielding 7[.. . 61 . ~. MILD STEEL T1 9 .5. All Required Flux Cored Arc Welding u — R=6 @= 45. 1 . — IS 807:2006 Single-Bevel Groove Butt Joint (B) lingle-bevel groove weld Tolerances Butt joint (B) R=+l. (x . All Requirwd R=1O ~ = 30. -5” IY -.OH — Gas Metal Arc Welding R=5 a = 30. --—--. mm Root Opening Groove Angle ‘ositions for FCAW Sub-merged Metal Arc u — R=6 ~=450 All — Welding R=IO ~ = 30.0 +6.

.. tilLD STEEL Welding Process 1 Base Metal Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Thickness Welding Shielding T. R= Oto3 1. T.5. v--t.. –5” +10”. .. Single-Bevel Groove T-Joint (T) and Corner Joint (C’) ( Clause B-7) Single-bevel groove weld I Tolerances -. . T-joint (T) f“ —-._ [ Note J T2 R L![.. -.5..! ~ . . +0” 62 .5.–0” +1o”.5.–0” Gas Metal Arc Welding (‘ Prefer. -o 1.-3 thicker j-=oto3 1. T. 15° + 1o”.5.–5” All Not required p= f).. .~x .– Note Z * f Welding Process Base Metal Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Shielding Thickness Welding for FCAW Tolerances Positions Root T. Corner Joint (C) #. Flat — R=6 ~=450 * F = Flat.5. . — R= Oto3 Welding ably 16 or 1. -o 1. OH = Overhead Double-Bevel Groove Butt Joint (B) ( Clause B-7) louble-bevel groove weld TI . rx+p. . -o not limited All — ~= 450 p=o”to rx+p. -0 Flux Cored Arc Welding ilbiy 16 – f = o to.3 1. -o Not limited or thicker ~=450 +10”. Root Groove Positions for FCAW Opening Angle mm Sub-merged Metal Arc Welding u u R=6 cl=45° All R=1O ~=loo * F._ -—-. Opening Root Face As detailed As fit LSp Groove Angle Sub-merged Metal Arc U Prefer. OH — Gas Metal Arc Welding Flux Cored u u R=5 ~=300 All Required Arc Welding R=1O ~=300 Flat Not required I R=6 Ct=45° All Not required Sub-merged Arc Welding u u R=lfl ~= 30. Butt joint (B) c1 ma .

~1 Corner joint (C) }J ~4 i? Note J Welding Process Base Metal Gas Shielding Thickness for FCAW T T. f =*1.5 ly~~~l -’:’qg{:.—.5 Welding Process Base Metal Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Shielding Tlrickness Welding for FCAW ( U=Unlimited ) Positions T. Welding R= Oto3 j= 3 ~ = 200 ~=6 * F. h R = +6. –0” +10”. . -3 All Arc Welding Preferably f=oto3 1.5.{. . T. . OH = Overhead 63 . )ouble-bevel groove weld T-joint (T) .00 +10”. J+.OH — Gas Metal Arc Welding u u R= Oto3 f= 3 a = 20° ~=6 All Not required Flux Cored Arc Welding u u R= Oto3 f= 3 u = 200 ~=6 All Not required * F = Flat. Max +0... -(l All Not required f= 5.’.5 . –0” +10”.5 Not limited . O +6.5. OH . /. ~ = fjoo +10”. a = +10”. -o not limited 16 or ~=450 +10”.. u R= Oto3 f= 3 ~ = 450 ~=6 All — R= Oto3 f= 3 a = 20° ~=6 F. -5 *1. –o 1. — IS 807:2006 Double-Bevel Groove T-Joint (2) and Corner Joint (C) ( Clause B-7) . -0 +1. –5” thicker I Gas Metal Arc Welding lJ — All Not required Preferably Flux Cored Arc Welding 16 or thicker Sub-merged Arc Welding R= Oto3 *O +(j...5. .. Note V -. –5” R.5... I Opening Root Face As detailed As tit up Groove Angle 1T Sub-merged Metal u R= Oto3 1. T. –1 . ——. NOTE J -. Root Root Groove Groove Opening Face Angle Radius Sub-merged M’etal Arc u R= Oto3 f= 3 ~ = 450 ~=(j All . –5” Single U-Groove Butt Joint (B) and Corner Joint (C) ( Clause B-7) Single U-groove weld Tolerances ( Butt joint (B) As detailed As fit Up Corner joint (C) R = +1.

.-50 f = 1.. -O a = +1 O”.— I ___ --- -“F *- . Ldk Welding Process Base Metal Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Shielding Thickness Welding for FCAW ( U=Unlimited ) Positions Sub-merged Metal Arc Welding -=-b.. IS 807:2006 Single J-Groove Butt Joint (B) (Clause B-7 ) jingle J-groove weld Tolerances .~--+ T-joint (T) As detailed As fit Up Corner joint (C) if -\ ru ~fp”1!? .5 Welding Process Base Metal Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Shielding Thickness Welding for FCAW ( U=Unlimited ) Positions Sub-merged Metal Arc Welding Gas Metal Arc Welding Flux Cored Arc Welding + I I i I I 1 Single J-Groove T-joint (T) and Corner Joint (C’) ( Clause B-7) .— -.. R= Oto3 f= 3 a = 30° r=10 All * F. -3 +10”. OH = Overhead 64 .I . -5” Not limited *1.-O +1. -0° f = 1. OH . “. –00 I +10°.–0 I Not limited r = +fj.. Gas Metal Arc Welding u u R= Oto3 f= 3 a = 30” r=10 All Not required Flux Cored Arc Welding * F = Flat.5 .5. Nolo V ‘) R = +1.ingle J-groove weld Tolerar es . –() *1.5.5... -0 r= +6.5. . Butt joint (B) ~ = +100.

-o r = +6. . f As detailed Toleral R = +1. .> .5 .. -O a = +10”. . -3 +10”.5.. IS 807:2006 Double J-Groove Butt Joint (B) ( Clause B-7) . Double J-groove weld Butt joint (B) \[I’/ <-.. .K-. . . . ... -Welding Process Base Metal I Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Shielding Thickness Welding for FCAW ( U= Unlimited ) Positiona T. . .5.”’1. -O As fit UP +1.. . .5. -00 = 1. p I i I . Root Root Groove troove Opening Face Angle Radius Sub-merged Metal Arc u u R= Oto3 j-= 3 r=10 All — Welding Preferably 160r thicker Gas-Metal Arc Welding 11 — R= Oto3 f= 3 a = 30° r=10 All Not required Flux Cored Arc Welding Preferably 16 or thicker 65 . T. –5” Not limited *1.

shrinkage stresses or distortions are Iikely to affect the adequacy of the structure. 30 and distortion control shall be provided where tolerances given in Table41. –o +1. -O +1. ..2’)and Corner Joint (C) ( Clause B-7) Double J-groove weld Tolera es T-joint (T) As detailed As tit Up Corner joint (C) R = +1. -0 +10”.. -3 r:% . b) All welds.1 Tolerances for Groove Weld Joint Preparations applied heat while welding progresses. OH = overhead. Root Root Groove Groove I I Opening Face Angle Radius Sub-merged Metal Arc u — R= Oto3 f= 3 ~ = 45° r=10 Welding Preferably 160r R= Oto3 j= 3 a = 30” r=10 thicker Gas Metal Arc Welding u — R= Oto3 f= 3 ~ = 3rJo r=10 All Not required Flux Cored Arc Welding Preferably 16 or thicker I ● F = Flat. shall be For different type of stress category.DING CYCLES to minimize distortion and shrinkage. the loading cycles deposited in a sequence that will balance the are given in Table 42.5.5.5. B-7. B-8 CONT-ROL OF DISTORTION AND d) Joints that are expected to produce large SHRINKAGE STRESSES shrinkage should &ually be welded with as a) Procedure and welding sequence for little restraint as possible before other joints assembling and joining parts of a structure that are expected to cause less shrinkage are or of built-up members or for welding welded.IS 807:2006 Double J-Groove T-Joint (.+— —. 66 . t . for Arc Welding c) A programme for welding sequence and Some joint preparations are shown in Fig. in so far as practicable. reinforced parts to members shall be designed B9 NOMINAL NUMBER OF MM.— Nole. -5” Not limited d l-- ““R~.— Note V ~ = +100 -00 f = 1. T. J r = +6..5 Welding Process Groove Preparation Permitted Gas Shielding ‘Welding for FCAW Positions w T.

5 +1. Weld Preparations Root not Gouged Root Gouged mm mm (1) (2) (3) (4) Root face *1. 30 TRANSITIONBY CHAMFERINGTHICKNESSPART Table 41 Tolerances for Groove Weld Joint Preparation for Arc Welding ( Clause B-7. I 24 1 Transition by slopingweldsurface chamfering 1 1 CHAMFER CHAMFER 24 BEFORE 24 BEFORE WELDING ~ 1 24 BEFORE 1 WELDING CENTRE LINE ALIGNMENT OFFSET ALIGNMENT FIG. IS 807:2006 1 24 1 I 24 1 1 REMOVE AFTER 2.5 iii) Root opening with steel backing +6 Not applicable Groove angle + 5“ + 10” iv) -5° 67 .5 Not limited i) ii) Root opening with other than steel backing +1.1) S1 No.

IS 807:2006 Table 42 Allowable Range of Stress (MPa) ( Clause B-9) SI No.500.000 500000 to 2000000 Over 2000000 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) i) A 276 221 166 166 ii) B 228 172 117 103 iii) c 193 145 96 83 iv) . Stress Category 10000 to 20000 100000 to . D 166 117 69 62 v) E 117 83 48 41 vi) F 117 96 76 62 .

Hyderabad SHRI GIRISH SHRIVASTAVA SHRI H. GURNANI Hercules Hoists Ltd. New Delhi SHRI BALRAJ GOEL SHRI R. S: YADAV ( Alternate ) Reva Engineering industrial (P) Ltd. K. K.. New Delhi SHRIB. C. t3ANERJF. K. RAO ( A1/ernute ) Furnance and Foundry Equipment Co. CHAKRABORTHY SHRJ D. Bangalore SHRIA. Thane SHRI D. MISHRA ( A/[ernate ) Tata iron and Steel Company limited. P. CHITLANGIA SHR~ LALITMOHA~ ( Alternate ) Indian Link Chain Manufacturers Ltd. Kolkata SHRI D. Mumbai SHRI K. “MISHRA ( Alternate ) Mega Drives Pvt Ltd. Kolkata SHRI P. ——_—— . N. GAUTAM ( Alternate ) Directorate General Factory Advice Service and Labour SHRID. C. Thane SHRI D. Mumbai SHRI SHYAM M. C. S. SENTHILVEL ( Alternate ) National Thermal Power Corporation Ltd.E( Alternate) Ministry of Defence ( DGI ). . L. Larsen and Toubro Limited. MANICKAM Armsel MHE Pvt Ltd. N AI-WA SHRI MANISH NALWA ( A/ternate ) 69 .. B. P. Mumbai SHRIP. New Delhi SHRI R. Ranchi SHRIT. GHOSH SHRIG. S. Kolkata SHRI M.. PATHAK Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd. K. JOSHI SHRI S. BHATTACHARYA SHRI R. New Delhi SHRI K. Pune SHRI R. Jamshedpur SHRID. IS 807:2006 ANNEX C ( Foreword) COMMI’ITEE COMPOSITION Cranes. CHAKRABORTHY SHRIL. VASUOEVA Anupam Ltd. PARTHI~AN SHRI RAJJNDER SJNGH ( Alternate ) Ministry of Surface Transport. KUCHERIA Indian Chain Pvt Ltd. Tiruchirappalli (Chairman) SHRIK. SINGH ( Allernate ) Unicon Technology lntcrnationol Pvt Ltd. S. Dastur and Co Ltd. GUPTA SHRID.lessop and Co Ltd. ME 14 Organization Representative(s) Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd. ROY SHRIH. NEVATIA . GANDHI ( A/ferns/e ) Tata Engineering and Locomotive Co Ltd. Kolkata SHRI BIMAL CHANDRAPAL SHRI TAPAN DATTA ( Alternate ) . DAS Institute. New Delhi SHRI T.. B. MAJUMDAR SHRI N. Mumbai SHRI P. S. BHUJLE ( Alternafe ) Metallurgical and Engineering Consultants (1) Ltd. ——. Lifting Chains and Its Related Equipment Sectional Committee. BHARANI ( A1/ernate ) Central Building Research Institute. Anand SHRIK.—-. Roorkee SHRIR. S. HERI ( A/lernate ) SH~IN. DATTA Mukand Ltd. K. K.N.K. K. K. SINGH( Alternate ) M. RATHORE SHRI J.

BASU. M. MALANI SHRI D. Mumbai SHRI S.Director and Head ( MED ) [ Representing Director General. S.IS 807:2006 WMI Cranes Ltd. BIS ( flx-oficio ) ] Member Secretary SHRJS. ROY Director ( MED ). B. BIS 70 . CHATTERJEE ( Alfernate ) BIS Directorate General SHRIA.

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