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INSTRUCTION MANUAL

Operation/Safety/System Specifications/
Lubrication/Mechanical Maintenance/
Hydraulics/Pneumatics
FOR
AFCPS 823-B ANGLEMASTER
(with PC BASED CONTROL SYSTEM)

Peddinghaus Corporation
Version #1, Rev. 2
(May 2, 2002)

INTRODUCTION/MACHINE DESCRIPTION
It is important that all persons supervising, operating or servicing your “Peddimat” CNC
system read and understand this manual.

This manual deals with the mechanical operation and maintenance of your “Peddimat”
CNC system. Some of the features described may be for optional equipment which you
may not have in your system.

The Peddinghaus AFCPS 823-B Anglemaster is a machine used for fabricating structural
angle, flat, and channel. The machine consists of two punch axes for angle, and one for
flat stock and channel. The shear cuts the angle or flat stock to the desired lengths. The
punch section can be programmed for any selected punch or punch combinations to
produce holes or layout marks at desired locations. The loader assembly will place the
next work piece for processing on the infeed, and the unloader will sort parts into
unloading stations. The pinch drive mechanism allows maximum utilization of material
stock in that you may program material to have a lead end drop only. The computer
control will determine the amount of remaining stock if any.

Optional equipment will have its own manual. All pertinent manuals will be provided for
the equipment you are receiving. For information on optional equipment which is
available for your machine, contact your Peddinghaus sales representative.

CAUTION: ALL PERSONS INVOLVED WITH THE SUPERVISING,


INSTALLING, OPERATING, OR SERVICING OF YOUR “PEDDIMAT”
PC/CNC MACHINE/SYSTEM SHOULD WEAR APPROPRIATE
SAFETY GLASSES, SAFETY SHOES, HARD HATS, AND
PROTECTIVE WORK GLOVES.
PEDDINGHAUS CORPORATION

Peddinghaus products have been marketed throughout the world since 1903.
In the years prior to 1977, these Peddinghaus products were manufactured in Germany
exclusively. In 1977 Peddinghaus Corporation, located in Bradley, Illinois, was founded
and became actively involved with the engineering, manufacturing, sales and servicing of
machines and systems for the fabrication of plate and structural steel.

Presently, Peddinghaus Corporation manufactures a wide range of manual and


CNC products for the world market. Peddinghaus Corporation maintains a complete
stock of replacement parts and service technicians to service their products which are
successfully sold throughout the world market.

 Peddinghaus Corporation, 1995


All Rights Reserved

 Peddimat Software is a copyright of Peddinghaus Corporation

Peddinghaus Corporation reserves the right to improve or change product design


and specifications without prior notice. In addition, Peddinghaus Corporation assumes
no responsibility for damages, injuries or accidents caused by improper or other than
normal use of its or any related equipment.

PEDDINGHAUS CORPORATION
300 N. Washington Avenue
Bradley, Illinois 60915
Telephone: (815) 937-3800
Telefax: (815) 937-4003
MACHINE IDENTIFICATION PAGE

MODEL: ________________________________________________________________

SERIAL NUMBER: _______________________________________________________

DATE OF MANUFACTURE: ______________________________________________

CONTROL TYPE/NUMBER: _______________________________________________

DRIVE CONFIGURATION: ________________________________________________

ORIGINAL PURCHASER: _________________________________________________


TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
NUMBER
DAILY USAGE........................................................................................................1.0
General ..................................................................................................................1.1
Safety Related Inspection & Maintenance Information ........................................1.2
Housekeeping ........................................................................................................1.3
Start-Up .................................................................................................................1.4
Checking Safety Devices.......................................................................................1.5
Principles Of System Operation ............................................................................1.6
Measurement Wheel (Disk) Adjustment Information...........................................1.7
Measuring Disk Adjustment Diagram ..............................................................1.7.1
Idler Clamp & Pinch Drive Height Adjustment Information................................1.8
Idler Clamp & Pinch Drive Height Diagram ....................................................1.8.1
Shear Lift/Lower Cylinder Shimming Information...............................................1.9
Shear Lift/Lower Cylinder Shim Diagram .......................................................1.9.1
Parts Subject To Wear/Replacement Criteria........................................................1.10
Punch And Die Changing Procedure.....................................................................1.11
Shear Blade Changing Procedure..........................................................................1.12
Shear Blade Changing Diagram And Part Numbers.........................................1.12.1

UNLOADING / INSTALLATION / DISMANTLING.........................................2.0


Shipping The Components ....................................................................................2.1
Unloading ..............................................................................................................2.2
Unloading..........................................................................................................2.2.1
Machine Set-Up ................................................................................................2.2.2
Dismantling Of Packing....................................................................................2.2.3
Cleaning ............................................................................................................2.2.4
Hydraulic Power Unit .......................................................................................2.2.5
Machine Connections ............................................................................................2.3
Hydraulic Connections .....................................................................................2.3.1
Electrical Connections ......................................................................................2.3.2
Pneumatic Connections.....................................................................................2.3.3
Instructions For Safe Dismantling Of Various Machine Components..................2.4
Procedure For Removal Of Punch Counter Balance Cylinder .........................2.4.1
Punch Counter Balance Cylinder Removal / Replacement Diagram...........2.4.1.1
Procedure For Removal Of Punch Cylinder From Bridge-Frame ....................2.4.2
Typical Punch Cylinder Dismantling Diagram ............................................2.4.2.1
Procedure For Removal Of Entire Bridge Frame Assembly ............................2.4.3
Typical Bridge Frame Assembly Dismantling Diagram..............................2.4.3.1
Procedure For Removal / Replacement Of Shear Lift / Lower Cylinders........2.4.4
Shear Lift / Lower Cylinder Dismantling Diagram......................................2.4.4.1
Requesting A Service Technician For A System Start-Up ...................................2.5

SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................3.0


Specifications ........................................................................................................3.1
Material Processing Capacities / Sizes .............................................................3.1.1
Punch Gauging: Angles Diagram.................................................................3.1.1.1
Punch Gauging: Angles Diagram (Continued) ............................................3.1.1.2
Punch Gauging: Angles Diagram (Continued) ............................................3.1.1.3
Punch Gauging: Channels ............................................................................3.1.1.4
Punch Gauging: Flats ...................................................................................3.1.1.5
Punched Holes And Measuring Wheel Interface .........................................3.1.1.6
Minimum Stock Length ....................................................................................3.1.2
Shear Specifications..........................................................................................3.1.3
Punching Parameters.........................................................................................3.1.4
True-Position Punching/Shearing Specifications.........................................3.1.4.1
Punch Tooling: Standard 270 (English) .......................................................3.1.4.2
Punch Tooling: Standard 280/290 Series (English) .....................................3.1.4.3
Punch Tooling: Metric With Metric Ram-End Option (PFP #3) .................3.1.4.4
Shearing Parameters (Single Cut Type)............................................................3.1.5
Speeds ...............................................................................................................3.1.6
Typical Cycles ..................................................................................................3.1.7
Additional Information .....................................................................................3.1.8
Shear Blade Specifications ...............................................................................3.1.9
Minimum Unshearable Drop (Angle) Part Data ..........................................3.1.9.1
Passline .............................................................................................................3.1.10

SYSTEM ASSEMBLY IDENTIFICATION .........................................................4.0


General Arrangement Of Standard Equipment .....................................................4.1
Infeed Roller Transfer Module Identification Diagram....................................4.1.1
Head End Identification Diagram .....................................................................4.1.2
Shear Assembly Identification Diagram...........................................................4.1.3
Emergency Stop Switches & Safety Switches ......................................................4.2

CONTROL SWITCHES .........................................................................................5.0


Infeed Electrical Switch Information ....................................................................5.1
Punch Cylinder Control Switches .........................................................................5.2
Punch Electrical Switch Adjustment Procedure ...............................................5.2.1
(Y / Z Axis) Punch Gauge Reference Switch Data ...............................................5.3
Shear Assembly Electrical Switch Locations........................................................5.4
Shear Electrical Switch Adjustment Procedure ................................................5.4.1

CARE AND MAINTENANCE ...............................................................................6.0


Lubrication ............................................................................................................6.1
Infeed Conveyor Lubrication............................................................................6.1.1
Shear Assembly Lubrication.............................................................................6.1.2
Punch Assembly Lubrication............................................................................6.1.3
Pinch-Drive Clamp Assembly Lubrication.......................................................6.1.4
Exit Measuring Wheel Assembly Lubrication..................................................6.1.5
Entry Measuring Wheel Assembly Lubrication ...............................................6.1.6
Punch Mounted Encoder Assembly Lubrication ..............................................6.1.7
Cone Drive Gear Reducer.................................................................................6.1.8
Pneumatic Lubrication ......................................................................................6.1.9
Care And Maintenance Of The Mechanics ...........................................................6.2
Service / Repair Parts........................................................................................6.2.1
Ordering Spare Parts (Order Entry Department) ..............................................6.2.2
Returning Spare Parts For Credit......................................................................6.2.3
Assembly Drawings ..........................................................................................6.2.4
Fasteners ...........................................................................................................6.2.5
Loctite ...............................................................................................................6.2.6
Screw Torque Chart ..........................................................................................6.2.7
Painting .............................................................................................................6.2.8
Care And Maintenance Of “Original Equipment Mfg.” Devices .........................6.3
Cone Drive Gear Reducer.................................................................................6.3.1
Care And Maintenance Of Hydraulics And Pneumatics.......................................6.4
Cylinders ...........................................................................................................6.4.1
Hose, Tube, And Pipe Specifications ...............................................................6.4.2
Hydraulic Reservoir ..........................................................................................6.4.3
Changing The Hydraulic Oil.............................................................................6.4.4
Hydraulic Oil ....................................................................................................6.4.5
Hydraulic Oil Types..........................................................................................6.4.6
Hydraulic Power Units......................................................................................6.4.7
Hydraulic Power Unit Adjustment Procedure..............................................6.4.7.1
Pneumatics ........................................................................................................6.4.8
Care And Maintenance Of Electricals...................................................................6.5
Care And Maintenance Of The Control Console..............................................6.5.1
Primary Current ................................................................................................6.5.2
Care And Maintenance Of General Components..................................................6.6
Care And Maintenance Of Computer And Accessories........................................6.7
Bridge Frame Alignment.......................................................................................6.8
Maintenance Log...................................................................................................6.9

MISC. TECHNICAL / TROUBLE SHOOTING INFORMATION...................7.0


hydraulic power unit trouble-shooting areas.........................................................7.1
ten rules of hydraulic system maintenance .......................................................7.1.1
trouble-shooting guide & maintenance hints ....................................................7.1.2
field setting input horsepower limiting control.................................................7.1.3
pump / motor shaft alignment procedure (foot mount models) ........................7.1.4
pump / motor shaft alignment procedure (bell housing models) ......................7.1.5
coupling clearance data to prevent shaft end-loading.......................................7.1.6
causes of broken punch ends or punch heads........................................................7.2
causes of premature wear on punches and dies.....................................................7.3

ASSEMBLY DRAWINGS AND BILLS OF MATERIAL ..................................8.0


1. Daily Usage
To maintain accurate and reliable performance of your Peddinghaus “Peddimat” PC system, specific
maintenance practices must be followed. The following sections deal with safety and mechanical
operation.

1.1 General
Use the information contained in this manual to prevent injury to those persons supervising,
operating, or servicing your “Peddimat” PC system. Also be certain to read any other literature
provided to you by Peddinghaus Corporation.

1.2 Safety Related Inspection and Maintenance Information


Inspect all hoses and tubing for cracks, splits, wear, and abrasion. In particular, inspect all of the high
pressure hoses, paying close attention at the hose to hose-fitting interface joint for signs of cracking,
wear, fraying, or splitting. If any of these conditions are discovered, the hose assembly should be
replaced immediately. Inspect all hoses once per week minimum and prior to running each new job,
particularly if machine will experience heavy-duty and continuous production cycles.

Inspect the (3) screws which fasten the entry measuring wheel to the shaft hub. Inspect once per
month to make sure these screws are secure, and re-tighten if not.

Inspect the coupling screws (1 per end) which connect the Entry encoder shaft to the measuring wheel
shaft. Inspect once per month minimum, and more often under heavy-duty production cycles, to
make sure these screws are secure. If not re-tighten as required.

The machine should be inspected daily for loose fasteners or damaged equipment. These should be
repaired and/or replaced before operating the “Peddimat” PC system.

1.3 Housekeeping
The area around the “Peddimat” PC System should be maintained in a clean and uncluttered
condition. Punch slugs and scrap metal should be removed from the floor to prevent any accidental
loss of footing.

The controls should be kept clean and readable, and should not be obstructed in any manner.

All oil and grease should be kept off the floor, the control areas, and areas of the “Peddimat” PC
system which are not designated as to be oiled or greased. The area around the hydraulic reservoir
and hydraulic components should be kept clean of oil, and any leakage must be repaired immediately.

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1.4 Start-Up

• All emergency “OFF” buttons on the machine must be enabled (refer to figure 4.2).

• The Main Power Disconnect located on the electrical cabinet must be “ON” (refer to figure 4.2).

• Switch the machine control on with the “POWER ON” push button located on the machine
control console. Please wait until start-up screen appears on the video screen. It may take
approximately 30-60 seconds for this boot-sequence to occur (refer to figure 4.2).

1.5 Checking Safety Devices

CAUTION: PRIOR TO PUTTING YOUR “PEDDIMAT” PC/CNC SYSTEM IN


OPERATION, WHETHER IT BE AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SHIFT OR START-UP
AFTER BREAK, THE FUNCTIONALITY OF THE BELOW DESCRIBED SAFETY
DEVICES MUST BE CONFIRMED. FAILURE TO DO SO CAN CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY.

• With the machine power “ON” and “Pinch Drive 1” and/or “Pinch Drive2” enabled the overhead
red light must be operating.

There are four (4) emergency stop push buttons on the standard equipped Anglemaster (refer to figure
4.2). Check each one independently. Press an emergency stop button. The machine operation should
stop and a red “E-Stop” sign should appear on the screen. Pull the button out and press “ENTER” or
space bar on the keyboard to reset it. Repeat this procedure for all emergency stop buttons on the
system.

1.6 Principles of System Operation


The material stock is loaded onto the in-feed conveyor once piece at a time by a Peddinghaus loader
or by means provided for by the customer. The placement of the material stock on the in-feed rollers
must be put far enough into the head end of the machine so that (entry) Pinch Roller #1 can be closed
to grip and transport the material. It is important that manual loading of the conveyor does NOT
involve the dropping of material stock onto the in-feed rollers. Peddimat loading systems use
cushioning devices to ensure NON-SHOCK LOADING.

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Once the material is loaded, and the desired program is selected, press “CYCLE START” to initiate
program execution, beginning with the axis referencing sequence described hereafter.

• The (material flow) X-Axis reference sequence operates as follows:


The entry pinch drive roller clamp closes, activating encoder #1 which is used for the majority of
material measurement. If the material is already covering the X-REF switch, the material will
move slowly backwards until the X-REF switch is uncovered. At this point, the material will
move slowly forward until the X-REF switch is covered again, and then stop. If the X-REF
switch was uncovered to begin with, the material will move slowly forward until the switch is
covered, and then stop.

• The (punch cylinders) Y and Z-Axis reference sequence typically operates as follows:
The axis will move up at high speed until the REF SWITCH turns on (at approximately 6.0”
gauge). Then it will move down at slow speed until the REF SWITCH turns off, then stops. If
the reference cycle starts with the REF SWITCH already on, it will move down slowly until the
switch turns off, then stop (refer to figure 5.3).

• If the operator chose the “Automatic Stock Measurement” option, the material will move
forward slowly until the “auto-measure switch” is uncovered (refer to figure 5.1). At this point
the stock length will be displayed on the screen, along with any applicable error messages.

• If the material is flat stock, the next operation will be a re-clamp sequence. the material will feed
forward to the second hold down. Both hold downs will engage. The first pinch roller will then
momentarily disengage, and then re-engage. This will ensure the material is at the proper datum.

• If the operator chose the “Auto-Nest” option, the rest of the program will be created
automatically and displayed on the screen along with any applicable error messages.

Next, the machine will begin punching and shearing. The material will feed to the correct
X-dimension, and the bridge-frames will move to their proper gauge positions. The hold-down
rollers and the second pinch roller will engage automatically whenever they are able to contact the
material. Then a punch, layout, or shear cycle will begin.

• During a punch cycle the punch ram and stripper stroke together until the stripper makes contact
with the material being processed. At this point, the “layout” proximity switch is broken and the
stripper is hydraulically locked. The punch ram continues until the “bottom of stroke” proximity
switch turns on, then begins its return stroke. Once the punch strips from the material, the
“layout” proximity switch is actuated and the stripper and punch ram return together until the
“top of stroke” proximity switch turns on. This completes a typical punch cycle (refer to figure
5.2).

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• During a layout cycle, the punch strokes until the “layout” proximity switch turns on. Then it
returns until the “top of stroke” proximity switch turns on. This completes a typical layout cycle
(refer to figure 5.2).

• A shear cycle begins with lifting the shear assembly to the shear position. Next, the shear ram
strokes until the “bottom of stroke” proximity switch turns on, indicating the material has been
sheared. At this point the shear returns until the “top of stroke” proximity switch turns on, and
the shear assembly lowers to the pass-through position. This completes a typical shear cycle
(refer to figure 5.4).

When the trailing edge of the material reaches the first (entry) pinch drive, the material will stop
momentarily. The first (entry) pinch drive will open, which activates encoder #2 (on exit pinch drive
assembly). After a short delay, further processing continues (refer to figure 4.1.2).

After all program instructions have been executed, the pinch drive will open and both hold downs
will also open. Any material left in the machine should now be removed following the below
procedures. The machine is now ready to begin processing more material.

WARNING: NEVER REACH THROUGH THE SHEAR BLADES AT ANY TIME FOR ANY
REASON, OR WITH ANY OBJECTS (ESPECIALLY ANY PARTS OF YOUR BODY) IN
ORDER TO REMOVE A PIECE OF MATERIAL. THE MACHINE MUST BE PUT IN THE
“E-STOP” MODE PRIOR TO REACHING INTO THE MACHINE FOR MATERIAL
REMNANT REMOVAL

Mechanically removing material can be accomplished as follows:

1. switch to jog mode

2. reduce feed rate (to 10%)

3. activate #2 pinch drive (closest to shear)

4. press “Jog +” button to power material out through shear opening

CAUTION: STAY CLEAR OF EXIT SIDE OF SHEAR WHEN PERFORMING ABOVE


PROCEDURE BECAUSE MATERIAL MAY FLY FORWARD THROUGH SHEAR
OPENING DURING POWERED MATERIAL REMOVAL.

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1.7 Measurement Wheel (Disk) Adjustment Information
The measurement disk height has been pre-set at the factory. However, if adjustment is required for
any reason, refer to figure 1.7.7.1, and as follows for proper procedure.

The measurement wheel should be checked whenever normally scheduled machine maintenance is
performed, or whenever a location problem occurs with the X-axis gauging of holes produced. One
way to check for properly functioning measuring disk height is to load a straight piece of bar stock
(flat or angle) material (at least 48” (1220 mm) long) onto the entry side rollers. Move the material
forward into the machine just far enough so the leading material edge engages the circumference of
the measuring disk and then measure for the approximate 1/4” (6mm) of interference as illustrated in
figure 1.7.1 (next page). If adjustment of the measuring disk is required, proceed as instructed per
this figure.

BE SURE TO OBSERVE REQUIRED LOCK-OUT/TAG OUT PROCEDURES FOR


SAFETY.

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1.7.1 Measuring Disk Adjustment Information

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1.8 Idler Clamp And Pinch Drive Height Adjustment Information
These components have been pre-set to their proper operating heights at the factory. However, if
adjustment or replacement of these components is required for any reason, refer to figure 1.8.1, for
correct shimming heights. For the shimming procedure, a precision straight bar/angle of adequate
length must be used. Prior to initiating the shimming procedure, totally compress the springs of the
measuring disks to avoid having the disks cause interference during the set-up/adjustment procedure
described. Refer to figure 1.7.1 for spring compression details using the adjustment screw/jam nut
shown.

After shimming the pinch drives to their proper height, the idler clamps need to be adjusted to insure
the floating datum will function properly. With the precision straight bar/angle loaded into the
machine, engage one pneumatic clamp and datum cylinder per punch assembly. Release the pinch
drives to allow the clamps to control the material. At this point, the material may float away from the
lower drive wheel of the pinch drive assemblies. Use the adjustment rod on each datum cylinder to
move the material into alignment with the lower drive wheel of both pinch drive assemblies. Tighten
the jam nut against the datum roller plate on both punch assemblies, then release all clamps and
remove the material from the machine.

BE SURE TO OBSERVE REQUIRED LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURES FOR SAFETY!

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1.8.1 Idler Clamp & Pinch Drive Height

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1.9 Shear Lift/Lower Cylinder Shimming Information
In order for the shear (in the raised position) to be in proper adjustment for correct operation, the
lower blades must contact the underside of the material stock. This parameter has been pre-set at the
factory. This adjustment only needs to be made if the lift/lower cylinders are removed or replaced for
any reason, and is accomplished by the insertion of shim stock as required. Refer to figure 1.9.1 for
illustration of shim stock locations.

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1.9.1 Shear Lift/Lower Cylinder Shim Information

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1.10 Parts Subject To Wear/Replacement Criteria

INSPECTION OF PUNCHES AND SHEAR BLADES:

Inspect punches and shear blade every 1000 punch and shear cycles. Look for cracking, chipping,
galling and rounding of cutting edges.

REPLACEMENT CRITERIA:

PUNCHES:

Punches must be replaced after repeated cutting-edge sharpening removes a maximum of 3 mm (1/8”)
of punch material or if the hole size (or quality) produced by the punch is no longer acceptable to the
user. If punches are allowed to get shorter by more than this amount, and the punch does not
penetrate the die opening, the punches will still punch through the material; however, the slug created
will hang-up in the material. This creates the problem of preventing the machine from automatically
moving the stuck material and incurring down-time to rectify this situation. It might also cause
machine damage.

SHEAR BLADES:

Shear blades must be replaced after repeated cutting-edge sharpening removes a maximum of 3mm
(1/8”) of blade material or if the quality of the cut edges it produces is no longer acceptable to the
user. Also note; the shear must work much harder when the blades have dull cutting edges, since this
results in the blades attempting to serrate rather than cutting down through the material to be sheared.
This creates additional stress on the shear unit and should be avoided.

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1.11 Punch and Die Changing Procedure

CAUTION: ALWAYS MAKE CERTAIN ALL MACHINERY COMPONENTS WILL


MAINTAIN A SAFE POSITION DURING ALL SET-UP, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIRS,
BY USING CONTROL PROCEDURES. NEVER DEPEND UPON THE MACHINE’S
HYDRAULIC OR PNEUMATIC POWER TO HOLD OR MAINTAIN ANY COMPONENTS
IN A CONSTANT POSITION.

SHUT DOWN PROCEDURE

Before performing any routine tool changes on machine, or any related equipment, BE CERTAIN TO
TURN OFF THE CONSOLE’S POWER SWITCH, TURN OFF THE MAIN POWER
DISCONNECT ON THE ELECTRICAL CABINET, AND PUSH THE EMERGENCY (“E”)-STOP
BUTTON CLOSEST TO THE LOCATION OF THE WORK BEING DONE AND FOLLOW
PROPER LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURES BEFORE PROCEEDING. REFER TO FIGURE
4.2 AND SECTION 6.2 FOR DETAILS.

CHANGING PUNCHES AND DIES

CAUTION: DO NOT PROCEED until shut down procedures above have been followed. In
addition, always remove the punch before changing the mating die.

CHANGING PUNCHES

For removal of punches, use the wrench provided with the machine. For standard tooling (272
punches) use wrench YC3460776. For standard tooling (282 punches) use wrench YC3461415. For
metric tooling (PFP punches) use wrench YC3460775. NOTE: If keys are used with punches, be
sure the key is fully seated in the punch and ram keyseats. Also, the keys may remain stuck in the
ram keyseat and MUST BE REMOVED prior to installing punches without keyseats; this should be
checked every time punches are changed to prevent potential machine/ram damage during subsequent
punching operation.

CHANGING Dies

For removal of dies, first loosen the locking set screw captivating the die within the die pocket and
then insert any small diameter pry bar into the slot of the die pocket to assist changing the die.

NOTE: If installing shaped dies, be sure shaped die orientation matches shaped punch orientation.
Also, when using relieved style dies (as supplied with your machine) be sure to install them with the
small hole facing up.

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1.12 Shear Blade Changing Procedure
NOTE: Use the shear identification diagram and shear-blade data/part numbers given in figure
1.12.1 in conjunction with this page.

Follow the shear-blade changing sequence described below:

TO CHANGE THE UPPER SHEAR BLADE:

1. The upper shear blade must be cycled to remain fully down. Turn off the machine as specified
per the procedure given on the previous page. Remove upper shear blade and re-install new
upper shear blade or existing shear blade as required. Be certain that the clearance between the
upper and lower shear blades is maintained at .008”(0,203mm) to .012”(0,305mm) or adjust for
desired cut quality. DO NOT PERMIT THE UPPER BLADE TO MAKE CONTACT
WITH THE LOWER BLADE. There may be existing shims in between the shear blade and
blade holder. (Refer to diagram on next page for shim placement location.)

2. Cycle the machine before cutting any material. DO NOT STAND IN FRONT OF OR NEAR
THE SHEAR UNTIL IT HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED THAT THE SHEAR BLADES ARE
SET PROPERLY AND THE UPPER AND LOWER SHEAR BLADES DO NOT
CONTACT EACH OTHER.

TO CHANGE THE LOWER SHEAR BLADE:

1. The upper shear blade should be removed per above instructions. Keep any shim stock used with
the upper shear blade. Remove the lower shear blades and re-install them or install new lower
blades. Lower shear blades may be rotated to use second cutting edges. If lower blades are
sharpened, it may be necessary to use shims behind the blades. The distance from the last punch
to the shear must be maintained. THE LOWER BLADES MUST NEVER EXTEND
OUTWARD FAR ENOUGH TO CAUSE INTERFERENCE WITH THE UPPER BLADE
WHEN THE SHEAR IS CYCLED.

2. Re-install the upper blade (THE UPPER SHEAR BLADE HOLDER SHOULD ALREADY BE
IN THE DOWN POSITION). Check the gap between the lower and upper shear blades; it should
be about .008”(0,203mm) to .012”(0,305mm).

3. Cycle the machine before cutting any material. DO NOT STAND IN FRONT OF OR NEAR
THE SHEAR UNTIL IT HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED THAT THE SHEAR BLADES ARE
SET PROPERLY AND THE UPPER AND LOWER SHEAR BLADES DO NOT
CONTACT EACH OTHER.

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1.12.1 Shear Blade Changing Information and Part Numbers

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2. UNLOADING/ INSTALLATION / DISMANTLING

2.1 Shipping the Components


To facilitate the shipment and installation of your Peddimat system, it has been dismantled into sub-
assemblies. The various component groups, sub-assemblies or optional equipment are identified as
follows:

• Main Machine Structure

• Infeed Conveyor Sections (optional)

• Outfeed Conveyor / Unloader Sections (optional)

• Loaders (optional)

• Consolet Control Cabinet

• Box of Miscellaneous Parts

2.2 Unloading

2.2.1 Unloading

Extreme care and safety must be exercised in unloading all components. Always use cranes and
forklifts of sufficient capacity with chains and cables of recommended design (Refer to American
National Standards Institute B30.9 or European Standards Committee CEN/TC 168/pr EN 818-1, -
2, -8). The weights of the various elements are indicated on the bill of lading, and on the following
diagrams.

The Peddimat sub-assemblies include many delicate, precision components. Unloading them
requires extreme caution and experience. Peddinghaus Corporation strongly recommends that a
professional rigger be employed to unload and place the equipment.

(CAUTION) PERSONNEL INVOLVED WITH THE UNLOADING AS WELL AS THOSE IN


THE AREA SHOULD WEAR APPROPRIATE SAFETY GLASSES, SAFETY SHOES, HARD
HATS, AND PROTECTIVE WORK GLOVES.

2-1
WARNING: THREADED HOLES WITH OR WITHOUT LIFTING EYES MAY BE
PROVIDED. HOLES ARE PROVIDED IN SOME PLATES THAT ARE OF SUFFICIENT
STRENGTH FOR LIFTING THOSE ASSEMBLIES. NEVER USE EYEBOLTS OR
THREADED HOLES LOCATED ON CYLINDER ASSEMBLIES OR ELECTRIC MOTORS
FOR LIFTING THE ENTIRE ASSEMBLY. THESE EYEBOLTS OR TAPPED HOLES ARE
FOR LIFTING ONLY THOSE DEVICES AS INDIVIDUAL COMPONENTS.

For components having no holes provided, such as roller transfer module sections, straps may be
placed around the main frame members.

The following diagrams have data for lifting the various assembly and sub-assemblies of your
“Peddimat” PC/CNC System. These can be used for initial receiving of your system as well as for
maintenance of your system.

2-2
"Y" AXIS

MAIN MACHINE STRUCTURE

2-3
MAIN MACHINE STRUCTURE

2-4
TYPICAL PUNCH AND BRIDGE FRAME ASSEMBLY

2-5
TYPICAL PUNCH CYLINDER ASSEMBLY

2-6
SINGLE-CUT SHEAR ASSEMBLY

2-7
TYPICAL PINCH-DRIVE CLAMP ASSEMBLY

2-8
ENTRY MEASURING WHEEL/ENCODER ASSEMBLY

2-9
CONTROL CONSOLE

2-10
STANDARD ENTRY ROLLER TRANSFER MODULE SECTION

2-11
2.2.2 Machine Set-Up

The various components should be set at the location of final assembly per your general
arrangement drawing. This drawing will also show the location of optional equipment and specific
notes of installation.

2.2.3 Dismantling of Packing

Various methods of packing are employed to insure that the shipment arrives at its destination
intact. Once this packing material has been removed, all parts and components should be verified
with the packing list. A list indicating shortages must be made immediately.

2.2.4 Cleaning

A protective coating has been applied to various machine surfaces to eliminate corrosion during
shipment. A soft cloth should be used to remove this protective coating, where applicable, prior to
the arrival of the Peddinghaus service technician.

2.2.5 Hydraulic Power Unit

(CAUTION) THIS “PEDDIMAT” PC/CNC SYSTEM IS DESIGNED FOR PETROLEUM


BASED HYDRAULIC FLUID WHICH IS FLAMMABLE. CHECK APPLICABLE FIRE
CODES FOR SPECIAL CAUTIONS.

The hydraulic reservoir will be shipped empty. Refer to the hydraulic maintenance section (section
6.4) for filling instructions.

The reservoir holds 80 gallons (303 liters). The visual sight gauge should be used to confirm that
the reservoir is at the proper level.

The minimum start-up temperature of the hydraulic power unit is about 55 degrees F (13 degrees C).

2-12
2.3 Machine Connections

2.3.1 Hydraulic Connections

All the various hydraulic connections on your “Peddimat” PC/CNC system have been made at the
factory. The only exception is the hydraulic hose connections to the power unit.

2.3.2 Electrical Connections

Prior to the arrival of the Peddinghaus service technician, suitable electrical leads must be brought
into the main electrical enclosure as shown on your Peddinghaus Corporation approval drawing. It
is essential that the leads are of sufficient capacity and the voltage is the same as indicated on your
general arrangement drawing. A good earth ground is required to achieve satisfactory operation of
PC/CNC systems in an industrial environment. Refer to the appropriate national codes. The
grounding connection is located at the main power disconnect.

WARNING: DO NOT ENERGIZE POWER TO YOUR “PEDDIMAT” PC/CNC SYSTEM


UNTIL THE PEDDINGHAUS SERVICE TECHNICIAN HAS CHECKED THE
INSTALLATION.

2.3.3 Pneumatic Connections

Refer to your general arrangement drawing for air requirements and its location.

2-13
2.4 Instructions For Safe Dismantling Of Various Machine
Components

2.4.1 Procedure For Removal Of Punch Assembly Counter Balance


Cylinder-Typical Per Each Punch Assembly.

NOTE: The Counter Balance Cylinder is used to perform the punch gauging movements required
to locate the tooling in the automatically programmed or manually specified positions to produce
the desired holes / “layout marks” in the material.

1. Secure and support the Bridge Frame assembly by attaching a lifting cable of sufficient size and
capacity from an overhead crane to the Bridge Frame as shown in Figure 2.4.3.1.

NOTICE: The Bridge Frame assembly must be supported by the lifting cable, since as soon as the
Counter Balance cylinder rod is disconnected from the Bridge Frame, (per Step 3.), the
assembly will be in a runaway condition. (Refer to page 2-5 for Punch assembly
weight.)

2. Crack (unscrew fittings slowly) and disconnect the two (2) hydraulic hoses from the Counter
Balance Cylinder. Be prepared to have a suitable container ready to collect the hydraulic oil
released upon disconnection of fittings. Also, be careful to prevent spillage of hydraulic oil
onto the machine, since this may create any number of hazards. Be sure any oil spillage is
entirely cleaned up; on both the machine and the surrounding areas.

3. Unscrew the Counter Balance Cylinder Rod from the Bridge Frame. (Refer to figure 2.4.1.1.,
next page) CAUTION - SEE NOTICE PER STEP 1.

4. Unscrew Counter Balance cylinder attachment screws and carefully remove the Counter
Balance Cylinder.

5. Reverse this procedure when replacing Counter Balance Cylinder or re-assembling these parts
following cylinder maintenance/repairs.

2-14
2.4.1.1 Punch Assembly Counter Balance Cylinder Removal / Replacement Diagram

2-15
2.4.2 Procedure For Removal Of Punch Cylinder From Bridge-Frame
Typical Per Each Punch Assembly.

NOTE: The punch cylinder performs the hole punching and “layout marking” functions required
as specified by the material processing program/input parameters.

(REFER TO FIGURE 2.4.2.1. ALONG WITH THESE INSTRUCTIONS)

1. Disconnect and remove the hydraulic hoses from the punch cylinder and secure hoses away
from the work area. Be prepared to have a suitable container ready to collect the hydraulic oil
released upon disconnection of the hoses. Plug hose fittings to prevent hydraulic oil spillage
during subsequent dismantling steps. Also, be careful to prevent spillage of hydraulic oil onto
the machine, since this may create any number of hazards. Be sure any oil spillage is entirely
cleaned up; on both the machine and the surrounding areas.

2. Next, remove the Ram Guide-Keys by unscrewing the socket head cap screw located through
the center of the keys.

3. Next, remove the “layout” proximity switch bracket from its mounting location on the Stripper.
The proximity switch should be left assembled to the bracket, since this will allow reassembling
this part without having to spend time recalibrating the proximity switch’s activation location.

4. Next, remove the top hose connection fitting and fully screw in the appropriate lifting eye-bolt
into the top port; (eye-bolt provided in lifting-kit). Connect a lifting cable of sufficient size and
capacity from an overhead crane through the eyebolt. (Refer to figure 2.4.2.1. for punch
cylinder assembly weight.

5. After fully supporting the Punch Cylinder, remove the Punch Cylinder Mounting Screws. The
Punch Stroke Switch Bracket is also attached with these screws, and can be removed leaving
the proximity switches assembled to the bracket.

6. Next, loosen the (4) tie rod nuts joining the punch cylinder to the sidewalls and remove the tie
rods from the punch sidewalls. At this point, the cylinder may still be pinched between the
Bridge Frame Side Plates. If necessary, use a jack to spread the Side Plates slightly.

7. Once the Punch Cylinder is free, proceed to slowly and carefully lift and guide the Punch
Cylinder Assembly along the keyways away from the Bridge Frame. Reverse this procedure
when re-assembling these parts.

2-16
2.4.2.1 Typical Punch Cylinder Dismantling Diagram

2-17
2.4.3 Procedure For Removal of Entire Bridge Frame Assembly
Typical For Each Punch Assembly (See Figure 2.4.3.1.)

1. Disconnect and remove the hydraulic hoses from the Punch Cylinder. Be prepared to have a
suitable container ready to collect the hydraulic oil released upon disconnection of the fittings.
Also, be careful to prevent spillage of hydraulic oil onto the machine, since this may create any
number of hazards. Be sure any oil spillage is entirely cleaned up, on both the machine and the
surrounding areas.

2. Disconnect and remove all electrical wires from the Encoder, Proximity Switches, and from the
clips holding them to the Bridge Frame.

3. Disconnect and remove the plastic tubing supplying air to the Pneumatic Clamp Cylinders and
the Datum Cylinder.

4. Remove the Pneumatic Clamp Roller Block Mounting Screws (4) and the Pneumatic Clamp
Cylinder Mounting Screws (4) and move the Clamp assembly away from the working area.
Follow this procedure for both clamps assemblies.

5. Remove the Datum Roller Plate Mounting Screws (8) and Datum Cylinder Mounting Screws
(2). Carefully lift the Datum Roller Assembly away from the work area.

6. Disconnect and remove the Counter Balance Cylinder. Refer to section 2.4.1 to complete this
step.

7. Lastly, proceed to slowly and carefully guide and lift the Bridge Frame Assembly off the guide
rails using crane/lifting cable positioning to accomplish this maneuver.

2-18
Figure 2.4.3.1 Typical Bridge Frame Assembly Dismantling Diagram

2-19
2.4.4 Procedure For Removal/Replacement Of Shear Assembly
Lift/Lower Cylinders

NOTE: The Shear Assembly Lift/Lower Cylinder’s function is to raise the entire Shear Assembly
during the shearing operation and to lower it during other processing operations.

REFER TO FIGURE 2.4.4.1 BEFORE STARTING!

1. Disconnect and remove the hydraulic hoses from the cylinders. Be prepared to have a suitable
container ready to collect the hydraulic oil released upon disconnection of the fittings. Also, be
careful to prevent spillage of hydraulic oil onto the machine, since this may create any number
of hazards. Be sure any oil spillage is entirely cleaned up, on both the machine and the
surrounding areas.

2. Before disconnecting the Cylinders from their mounting surface, BE SURE TO BLOCK THE
SHEAR BASE WITH A SUITABLE MATERIAL TO PREVENT IT FROM DROPPING
ONTO THE TABLE TOP AND CREATING A HAZARDOUS SITUATION; (Refer to figure
2.4.4.1.) Then remove the cylinder by unscrewing the four attachment screws. NOTE: When
assembled and in the lowered position, the Shear Assembly is always held approximately 1/4”
above the table top, therefore, this space must be blocked before any maintenance to the Shear
lift/lower cylinder begins.

2-20
Figure 2.4.4.1 Shear Lift/Lower-Cylinder Dismantling Diagram

2-21
2.5 Requesting a Service Technician For A System Start-Up
Once the system is unpacked and set up as described previously, it is time to contact Peddinghaus
Corporation’s Service Department to schedule the arrival of their service technician. The
Peddinghaus Service Department can be reached at 815-937-3800 during the hours of 8 to 5 Central
Standard Time, or by fax at 815-937-4003.

2-22
3. SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS

3.1 Specifications

3.1.1 Material Processing Capacities/Sizes:

Minimum Gauges: 272 punches, 271 dies (maximum diameter 1 1/4”)


See Figure 3.1.1.1

Angle leg sizes of 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” through 2” x 2” are 11/16” to the inside of the leg.
Angle leg sizes of 2 1/2” x 2 1/2” are 1 3/16” to the inside of the leg.
Angle leg sizes of 3” through 8” are 1 1/4” to the inside of the leg.
Channels: see figure 3.1.1.4 for gauging charts

Minimum Gauges: 282 punches, 291 dies (maximum diameter 1 1/2”)


See Figure 3.1.1.2

Angle leg sizes of 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” through 2” x 2” are 13/16” to the inside of the leg.
Angle leg sizes of 2 1/2” through 8” are 1 3/16” to the inside of the leg.
Channels: see figure 3.1.1.4 for gauging charts

Minimum Gauges: PFP #3 punch & dies


See Figure 3.1.1.3

Angle leg sizes of 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” through 2” x 2” are 19/32” to the inside of the leg.
Angle leg sizes of 2 1/2” x 2 1/2” are 15/16” to the inside of the leg.
Angle leg sizes of 3” through 8” are 1 3/16” to the inside of the leg.
Channels: see figure 3.1.1.4 for gauging charts

Material Sizes:
Angle: (inches)
Maximum: 8 x 8 x 1 1/8 Thick (Punching Only)
Maximum: 8 x 8 x ¾ (Shearing)
Minimum: 1 1/2 x 1 1/2 x 1/8 Thick

Metric Angle: (mm)


Maximum: 200 x 200 x 20 Thick (Punching & Shearing)
Minimum: 40 x 40 x 4 Thick

Flat: (inches)
Maximum Punching: 12 x 1 1/4 Thick
Maximum Shearing: 12 x 1 Thick
Minimum: 3 x 1/4 Thick

Metric Flat: (mm)

3-1
Maximum Punching: 300 x 30 Thick
Maximum Shearing: 300 x 25 Thick
Minimum: 75 x 6 Thick

Channel which can be punched in web only and passed through a shear without blades:

See figure 3.1.1.4 “Punching Only Material Guide for Channels” for additional data.

3-2
3.1.1.1 Punch Gauging: Angles

3-3
3.1.1.2 Punch Gauging: Angles (Continued)

3-4
3.1.1.3 Punch Gauging: Angles (Continued)

3-5
3.1.1.4 Punch Gauging: Channels

• The upper shear blade must be removed prior to running channel.

• The channel is loaded on the same side as the flat stock material.

• The punches cannot be moved manually to zero gauge or to a higher gauge that would cause the
stripper to impact on the channel flange once the channel has entered the punch area.

• As a response to the inputted program data, the punch is set in its proper position prior to the
channel entering the punch station.

Channel sizes and gauges are listed below:

ALL GAUGES ARE SHOWN FROM THE “HEEL” LOCATION OF THE MATERIAL AS IT
SITS IN THE PINCH DRIVES. GAUGES ARE APPROXIMATE BASED ON IDEAL
CHANNEL SHAPE.

GAUGING BASED ON P.F.P. #3 SERIES TOOLING.


METRIC CHANNEL SIZES
80x45 .88-1.12 140x60 1.31-3.19
100x50 .91-1.82 160x65 1.41-3.81
120x55 1.19-2.47
AMERICAN STANDARD SIZES
C3x4.1 .88-1.00 C6x8.2 .91-3.88
C3x5 .88-1.00 C6x10.5 .97-3.88
C3x6 .88-1.00 C6x13 1.12-3.88
C4x5.4 .88-1.97 C8x11.5 1.25-5.69
C4x7.25 .91-1.97 C10x20 1.34-7.59
C5x6.7 .97-2.88 C12x20.7 1.41-9.44
C5x9 1.00-2.84 C12x30 1.44-9.44

MISCELLANEOUS CHANNEL SIZES


MC4x13.8 1.38-1.62 MC6x16.3 1.47-3.41
MC6x12 1.38-3.56 MC6x18 1.47-3.25
MC6x15.1 1.41-3.47 MC8x22.8 1.59-5.09
MC6x15.3 1.44-3.25 MC12x50 1.75-9.25

3-6
GAUGING BASED ON 270 SERIES TOOLING.
METRIC CHANNEL SIZES
80x45 .94-1.12 140x60 1.56-3.19
100x50 .96-1.81 160x65 1.66-3.81
120x55 1.44-2.47
AMERICAN STANDARD SIZES
C3x4.1 .91-1.03 C6x8.2 .97-3.88
C3x5 .91-1.03 C6x10.5 1.03-3.88
C3x6 .94-1.00 C6x13 1.38-3.88
C4x5.4 .91-1.98 C8x11.5 1.50-5.69
C4x7.25 .96-1.98 C10x20 1.59-7.59
C5x6.7 1.03-2.88 C12x20.7 1.66-9.44
C5x9 1.03-2.84 C12x30 1.69-9.44

MISCELLANEOUS CHANNEL SIZES


MC6x12 1.62-3.56 MC6x18 1.72-3.25
MC6x15.1 1.66-3.47 MC8x22.8 1.91-5.09
MC6x15.3 1.72-3.25 MC12x50 2.00-9.25
MC6x16.3 1.72-3.41

GAUGING BASED ON 280 SERIES TOOLING.


METRIC CHANNEL SIZES
80x45 1.06-1.12 140x60 1.62-3.19
100x50 1.09-1.82 160x65 1.69-3.81
120x55 1.53-2.47
AMERICAN STANDARD SIZES
C3x4.1 .91-1.00 C6x10.5 1.34-3.88
C4x5.4 1.03-1.97 C6x13 1.44-3.88
C4x7.25 1.06-1.97 C8x11.5 1.53-5.69
C5x6.7 1.16-2.88 C10x20 1.62-7.59
C5x9 1.16-2.84 C12x20.7 1.69-9.44
C6x8.2 1.09-3.88 C12x30 1.75-9.44

MISCELLANEOUS CHANNEL SIZES


MC6x12 1.69-3.56 MC6x18 1.75-3.25
MC6x15.1 1.72-3.47 MC8x22.8 1.91-5.09
MC6x15.3 1.72-3.25 MC12x50 2.03-9.25
MC6x16.3 1.75-3.41

3-7
3.1.1.5 Punch Gauging: Flats

3-8
3.1.1.6 Punched Holes and Measuring Wheel Interface

3-9
3.1.2 Minimum Stock Length

3.1.3 Shear Specifications


• Hydraulic psi: 3000 psi (20,7 Mpa)

• Shear tonnage: 400 Tons (363 Metric Tons)

3-10
• Upper Shear Blade with four different radii for various angle fillets and reversible cutting
surfaces.

• Lower Shear Blades have two cutting surfaces each.

• Maximum angle: 8” x 8” x 3/4” (200mm x 200mm x 20mm), and 65000 psi (448 Mpa) tensile
strength.

• Flat Stock Blade for flats only. Maximum flat: 12” x 1” (300mm x 25mm)

• Maximum flat 12” x 3/4” (300mm x 19mm), 65000 psi (448 Mpa) tensile strength.

3.1.4 Punching Parameters

Maximum material tensile strength that can be processed is affected by hole size and material
thickness. The following chart gives some examples of how these properties affect maximum
tensile strength allowable.

270 Tooling 280 Tooling


1-1/4" Max. Hole 1-1/2" Max. Hole
Size Size
1" Flat Stock 80,000 psi Tensile 70,000 psi Tensile
8x8x3/4" Angle 100,000 psi Tensile 90,000 psi Tensile

Smaller hole sizes and/or material thickness can result in higher maximum tensile strength
allowable.

1. Punching Capacity Rating (Tons):

All Punches
130-USA
(118 - Metric)

2. Full Stroke of Press Ram: 2.25” (57.2mm)

3. Maximum Punch Sizes: Standard 270 Series; 1 1/4” Diameter (See Figure 3.1.4.2)
Standard 280 Series; 1 1/2” Diameter (See Figure 3.1.4.3)
Metric (PFP #3); 26mm Diameter (See Figure 3.1.4.4)

4. Punch Positioning:
4” bore hydraulic cylinder for each punch. Two speed valve control for positioning
with an encoder on each punch Bridge-Frame.

5. Punching Accuracy:
True position tolerance of punched holes:
1/16” (1,6mm) See drawing 3.1.4.1 “True-Position Punching/Shearing Specs.”

3-11
3.1.4.1 True-Position Punching/Shearing Specifications

3-12
3.1.4.2 Punch Tooling: Standard 270 Series (English)

3-13
3.1.4.3 Punch Tooling: Standard 280/290 Series (English)

3-14
3.1.4.4 Punch Tooling: Metric with Metric Ram-End Option (PFP #3).

3-15
3.1.5 Shearing Parameters (Single Cut-Type)

Applies to Angle & Flat Stock only

1. Shear Tonnage:
400 Tons-USA
(363 Metric Tons)

2. Shearing Accuracy:
True position tolerance of punched holes:
1/16” (1,6mm) See drawing 3.1.4.1 “True-Position Punching/Shearing Specs.”

3.1.6 Speeds

823-A Infeed; Punching and Shearing

Infeed Speed - 150 FPM (46 meters/min.), maximum (X-Axis)


Typical Punch Cycle - 1.75 Sec.
Typical Shear Cycle - 3.5 Sec.

3-16
3.1.7 Typical Cycles

3.1.8 Additional Information

• General Machine Description:


The 823A Anglemaster consists of the following (in sequence):
Infeed (powerless), Pinch Drive & Measuring Disk (large), Material Stock Clamp,
Punch “Y”, Material Stock Clamp, Punch “Z”, Material Stock Clamp, Pinch
Drive & Measuring Disk (small), Shear

• Infeed/Material Feed System:


Infeed consists of powerless (idler) conveyors; Material feed system consists of (2)
Pinch Drive Assemblies powered by a Servo motor driving (2) gear reducers
connected in series (one per Pinch Drive) and all located on head end of machine.

• Hydraulic System:
25 HP motor powering a 40 GPM pump at 1750 RPM.

3-17
3.1.9 Shear Blade Specifications

3-18
3.1.9.1 Minimum Unshearable Drop (Angle) Part Data

3-19
3.1.10 Passline

3-20
4. SYSTEM ASSEMBLY I.D.’S

4.1 General Arrangement of Standard Equipment

"Z" AXIS
"Y" AXIS

4-1
4.1.1 Infeed Roller Transfer Module Identification Figure

4-2
4.1.2 Head End Identification Figure

4-3
4.1.3 Shear Assembly Identification Figure

4-4
4.2 Emergency Stop Switches & Safety Switches
CAUTION: ALL OPERATORS AND PERSONNEL IN THE GENERAL AREA OF THE
MACHINE MUST BE MADE FAMILIAR WITH THE LOCATION AND OPERATION
OF ALL EMERGENCY STOP SWITCHES AND SAFETY SWITCHES.

"Z" AXIS
"Y" AXIS

4-5
5. CONTROL SWITCHES

All of the following switches are pre-set at Peddinghaus for the proper operation of this machine.
Should any switch need re-adjusting, follow this guide.

5.1 Infeed Electrical Switch Information

"Z" AXIS
"Y" AXIS

5-1
5.2 Punch Cylinder Control Switches (Typical)

5-2
5.2.1 Punch Electrical Switch Adjustment Procedure
The top and bottom of stroke proximity switches must be set to actuate when the punch cylinder
reaches its extreme upward and downward motion. In addition, the top proximity switch, when
actuated, also permits the material to move in the X-Axis, unless using the short stroke option.

(Refer to Figure 5.2 for proximity switch location before proceeding)

The switches should be set/adjusted as follows:

Lower proximity switch:

With punch cylinder stroked fully down, loosen and slide lower proximity switch upward
until it actuates. Fasten at that location.

Upper proximity switch:

With punch cylinder retracted fully up, loosen and slide upper proximity switch
downward until it actuates. Fasten at that location.

Punch short stroke proximity switch:

With the punch cylinder retracted fully up, adjust the short stroke proximity switch
downward until it actuates. Fasten at that location.

Layout mark proximity switch:

NOTE: Adjustment of the layout mark proximity switch may affect the proper functioning of the
stripper.

The punch-cylinders can be programmed to perform a layout mark on the inside leg of
the angle being processed. Flats can also be programmed to receive a layout mark on
their top surface via programming of the “Z” axis punch cylinder. The depth of the
layout mark can be set by adjusting the proximity switch’s location relative to the target
pin. To obtain a deeper layout mark, loosen the proximity switch from its mounting
bracket slot and move the switch slightly downward (nearer) to the material being
marked. Secure proximity switch in new position. Test cycle the adjusted punch axis,
remove the material from the machine and check if the depth of the mark is satisfactory.
If a shallower layout mark is desired, follow same procedure as above except move the
proximity switch slightly upward (away) from the material being marked. For location of
layout mark proximity switch, refer to section “5.2 Punch Cylinder Control Switches”.

Please note that the switches have been pre-set at the factory. After all proximity switches have
been properly set as instructed above, make certain each proximity switch is securely fastened to
the mounting bracket before initiating production with the machine.

5-3
5.3 Typical (Y/Z Axis) Punch Gauge Reference Switch Data

5-4
5.4 Shear Assembly Electrical Switch Locations

5-5
5.4.1 Shear Electrical Switch Adjustment Procedure

The top and bottom of stroke proximity switches must be set to actuate when the shear blade
reaches its extreme upward and downward motion. In addition, the top proximity switch, when
actuated, also permits the material to move in the X-Axis.

(Refer to Figure 5.4 for proximity switch location before proceeding)

The switches should be set/adjusted as follows:

Lower proximity switch:

With shear cylinder stroked fully down, loosen and slide lower proximity switch upward
until it actuates. Fasten at that location.

Upper proximity switch:

With shear cylinder retracted fully up, loosen and slide upper proximity switch
downward until it actuates. Fasten at that location.

Shear short stroke proximity switch:

With the shear cylinder and exit pinch drive retracted fully up, loosen and slide the short
stroke proximity switch downward until it actuates. Fasten at that location.

Please note that the switches have been pre-set at the factory.

After all proximity switches have been properly set as instructed above, make certain each
proximity switch is securely fastened to the mounting bracket before initiating production with
the machine.

5-6
6. CARE AND MAINTENANCE

6.1 Lubrication
The primary lubricants used on this “Peddimat” PC/CNC system are as follows:

MOLYCOTE BR2 GREASE applied by grease gun, brush, or hand packed. (Moly-disulfide
paste grease).

SAE 30 OIL or equal applied by spout can.

ISO GRADE 100 (ACME #100) CHAIN OIL applied by brush or spout can.

“NOOK” BALL BEARING SCREW LUBRICANT SPRAY #E-900

Nook Industries, Inc.


23200 Commerce Park Road
Cleveland, OH 44122-5869 U.S.A.
Telephone: (216) 464-4393
Fax: (216) 464-4669

CAUTION: BE CERTAIN TO FOLLOW ALL MANUFACTURER’S


RECOMMENDATIONS FOR APPLICATION AND SAFETY FOR ANY LUBRICANT
AND CLEANING FLUIDS.

The following figures show the recommended lubrication procedures and time schedule. It is
suggested that a lubrication log be kept by the user.

PLEASE READ BEFORE SERVICING YOUR “PEDDIMAT” PC/CNC SYSTEM.

CAUTION: TURN ALL POWER OFF BEFORE BEGINNING ANY SERVICE


PROCEDURE. FOLLOW ESTABLISHED E.U. SAFETY DIRECTIVE LOCK-
OUT/TAG-OUT PROCEDURES.

CAUTION: ANY GUARDS OR COVERS THAT MUST BE REMOVED FOR


SERVICING MUST BE COMPLETELY RE-INSTALLED PRIOR TO MACHINE
START-UP.

6-1
CAUTION: USE NON-FLAMMABLE CLEANING FLUIDS FOR CLEANING PARTS
AND REMOVING EXISTING GREASE. MACHINES ARE NOT EQUIPPED WITH
EXPLOSION PROOF CONTROLS OR ELECTRICAL DEVICES.

CAUTION: ALWAYS MAKE CERTAIN ALL MACHINERY COMPONENTS WILL


MAINTAIN A SAFE POSITION DURING ALL SET-UP, MAINTENANCE AND
REPAIRS, BY USING ADEQUATE PHYSICAL BLOCKING, RESTRAINT, AND
CONTROL PROCEDURES. NEVER DEPEND UPON THE MACHINE’S HYDRAULIC
OR PNEUMATIC POWER TO HOLD OR MAINTAIN ANY COMPONENTS IN A
CONSTANT POSITION.

6.1.1 Infeed Conveyor Lubrication

All bearings are sealed and need no lubrication maintenance.

6-2
6.1.2 Shear Assembly Lubrication

6-3
6.1.3 Typical Punch Assembly Lubrication

6-4
6.1.4 Typical Pinch-Drive Clamp Assembly Lubrication

6-5
6.1.5 Exit Measuring Wheel Assembly Lubrication

6-6
6.1.6 Entry Measuring Wheel Assembly Lubrication

6-7
6.1.7 Punch Mounted Encoder Assembly Lubrication

6-8
6.1.8 Cone Drive Gear Reducer

Type of Oil: AGMA 8 Comp. SUS 150-190 @ 210 Degrees F.

Lubricating oils for use in gear units should be high quality well-refined petroleum oils. They
must not be corrosive to gears, to ball, roller, or sleeve bearings; they must be neutral in reaction;
free from grit or abrasives; and have good defoaming properties. As they may be subject to high
operating temperatures, they must have good resistance to oxidation.

For worm gears, additions of 3 percent to 10 percent of acidless tallow or similar animal fats are
desirable.

Ambient Temperature

The recommended oils for use in an ambient temperature range of approximately 15 degrees to
125 degrees F with the low end of the range depending upon the pour point of the specific oil
used. If the ambient temperature will be below or above this range, please contact Cone Drive for
specific recommendations on proper lubricant as well as proper oil seal and shim materials.

Oil Sump Temperatures

The maximum recommended oil sump temperature is 200 degrees F. Where reducers will be
used at maximum ambient and at full catalog rating, contact Cone Drive for lubrication
recommendations.

Sludge

It is necessary that the oil is clean and free from sludge at all times to obtain long life from a gear
unit.

Sludge in gear units may be caused by excessive heat, from dust and dirt and other contaminates
and by the presence of moisture or chemical fumes. Therefore, every precaution should be taken
to prevent water and foreign particles from entering the gear case.

Oil Change: 1-1/2 Quarts

The oil in a new unit should be drained at the end of two weeks’ operation and the case
thoroughly flushed with light flushing oil. The original oil can be used for refilling if it has been
filtered; otherwise, new oil must be used. After this, a change of oil every 2500 hours of
operation or every six months, whichever occurs first, is recommended for units under favorable
conditions. Where operating conditions are severe, such as a rapid rise and fall in temperature of
the gear case with accompanied sweating of the inside walls and resulting formation of sludge, or
where operation is in moist or dusty atmospheres, or in the presence of chemical fumes, it may be
necessary to change the oil at intervals of one to three months.

Oil Level

6-9
Cone Drive reducers are furnished with either a “bull’s eye” type sight glass or a bronze or
yellow pipe plug to indicate oil level. In either case, an oil level tag is affixed to the unit near the
oil level indicator. Oil level should always be checked with the unit stopped.

For Replacement of the Cone Drive:

Cone Drive Reducers Are Shipped Without Oil

After assembly, all reducers are test run with a rust inhibiting oil and drained. This oil coats all
internal parts and will protect the reducer for a period of 30 days. If the unit is to be stored longer
than 30 days, please contact Cone Drive for storage instructions.

6-10
6.1.9 Pneumatic Lubrication

Mist Lubricator Filling

Operation & Service:

• Filling-Inlet pressure must be eliminated before fill plug is removed. SHUT OFF AIR
SUPPLY and depressurize the unit by turning the self-venting regulator to zero pressure. Fill
to fill line on the bowl with oil of 100 to 200 SSU viscosity at 100 degrees F and an aniline
point greater than 200 degrees F - same as SAE No. 10 (petroleum based hydraulic oils or
spindle oils are good examples). DO NOT USE OILS WITH ADHESIVES OR TACKY
ADDITIVES. COMPOUNDED OILS CONTAINING SOLVENTS, GRAPHITE, SOAPS
OR DETERGENTS (automotive oils generally contain detergents) ARE NOT
RECOMMENDED.

• Replace the fill plug and seat firmly - excessive torque is not necessary. The lubricator is
now ready for setting. Repressurize the lubricator.

• OIL DELIVERY ADJUSTMENT - adjust oil delivery, use a slotted screwdriver to turn the
adjusting screw in the top of the lubricator.

LESS OIL - Clockwise

MORE OIL - Counterclockwise

By counting the number of drops per minute in the sight dome, you can adjust your requirements.
Approximately 3% of the drops seen in sight dome go downstream; adjust drip rate accordingly.
Consult the oil delivery conversion chart.

25 drops per minute equals one ounce (.03 liters) per hour - volume of oil passing through sight
dome.

NOTE: This is a constant density type lubricator which delivers a constant ratio of oil to air
flow. Therefore, if air flow increases or decreases, oil delivery will be adjusted proportionately.
ONLY IF A DIFFERENT RATIO IS DESIRED SHOULD YOUR NEEDLE VALVE SETTING
BE CHANGED AFTER YOUR INITIAL SETTING.

6-11
Your “PEDDIMAT” PC/CNC system has an intermittent pneumatic usage. Because of this, the
lubricator is set for a steady dripping of oil. Oil is used only on demand of air, so the oil reservoir
should be checked on a weekly basis.

6-12
Filter Draining

Operation & Service:

• Both free moisture and solids are removed automatically by the filter. There are no moving
parts.

• Manual drain filters must be drained regularly before the separated moisture and oil reaches
the bottom of the lower baffle. Automatic drain models will collect and dump liquids
automatically.

COLLECT DRAINED CONTAMINATED LIQUID AND DISPOSE OF IN AN


ENVIRONMENTALLY SAFE MANNER.

• The filter element should be removed and replaced when a working pressure of 75 psi (5 bar)
can no longer be set with the regulator.

6-13
• To remove the filter element: SHUT OFF AIR SUPPLY and depressurize the unit by
turning the self-venting regulator to 0 (zero) pressure.

∗ Unscrew threaded bowl.

∗ Unscrew lower baffle and remove filter element and gaskets (2).

∗ Clean all internal parts, blow and element before reassembling. See polycarbonate
bowl cleaning section below.

∗ Install element and gaskets (2).

∗ Attach lower baffle and tighten firmly.

∗ Replace bowl seal; lubricate seal to assist in retaining it in position. Use only mineral
base oils or grease. Do NOT use synthetic oils such as esters and do NOT use
silicones.

∗ Screw bowl into body.

TO CLEAN POLYCARBONATE BOWLS USE MILD SOAP AND WATER ONLY! DO


NOT USE cleaning agents such as acetone, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, gasoline, toluene, etc.,
which are damaging to this plastic.

Bowl guards are recommended for added protection of polycarbonate bowls where chemical
attack may occasionally occur.

For servicing of filter, regulator and oiler, see Section 6.4.8.

6.2 Care And Maintenance Of The Mechanics


PLEASE READ BEFORE SERVICING YOUR “PEDDIMAT” PC/CNC SYSTEM.

CAUTION: TURN ALL POWER OFF BEFORE BEGINNING ANY SERVICE


PROCEDURE. FOLLOW ESTABLISHED EUROPEAN UNION SAFETY DIRECTIVE
LOCK-OUT/TAG-OUT PROCEDURES.

6-14
CAUTION: ANY GUARDS OR COVERS THAT MUST BE REMOVED FOR
SERVICING MUST BE COMPLETELY RE-INSTALLED PRIOR TO MACHINE
START-UP.

CAUTION: ALWAYS MAKE CERTAIN ALL MACHINERY COMPONENTS WILL


MAINTAIN A SAFE POSITION DURING ALL SET-UP, MAINTENANCE AND
REPAIRS BY USING ADEQUATE PHYSICAL BLOCKING, RESTRAINT, AND
CONTROL PROCEDURES. NEVER DEPEND UPON THE MACHINE’S HYDRAULIC
OR PNEUMATIC POWER TO HOLD OR MAINTAIN ANY COMPONENTS IN A
CONSTANT POSITION.

6.2.1 Service/Repair Parts

Peddinghaus Service Department Structure

Peddinghaus Corporation maintains a complete staff of service technicians who are familiar with
the mechanical, electrical, pneumatic, and hydraulic function of this PC/CNC system. Their
many years of experience in dealing with systems of this nature puts them in the unique position
to be able to assist in identifying any problems you may be experiencing with your “Peddimat”
PC/CNC system.

If you require replacement parts only for your servicing needs, then call our ORDER ENTRY
DEPARTMENT at 815-937-3800 U.S.A.

If troubleshooting assistance is required, then contact our SERVICE DEPARTMENT.

When contacting our personnel for assistance, please be prepared to give the name of your
company and the machine system in question. With this basic information, our technicians will
be able to access, by computer, your service file to become familiar with the history of your
installation, machine vintage, software being utilized, type control, drives, etc. This type of
information, with the assistance at your end, enables us to either solve the problem or determine
what parts are required to rectify the present situation.

6.2.2 Ordering Spare Parts (Order Entry Department)

When dealing with and contacting the Peddinghaus Corporation’s Order Entry Department, it is
extremely beneficial if you have the appropriate assembly drawing in front of you prior to placing
the call. Our sales technician will immediately be able to access the same assembly drawing to
synchronize the replacement part requirement.

6-15
CAUTION: USE ONLY AUTHORIZED PEDDINGHAUS REPLACEMENT PARTS.
FAILURE TO DO SO CAN REDUCE THE FUNCTIONALITY OR LIABILITY AND
SAFETY OF THIS SYSTEM. THIS CAN LEAD TO SERIOUS INJURY OR EVEN
DEATH, NOT ONLY TO THE MACHINE OPERATOR, BUT ALSO TO OTHER
EMPLOYEES.

6.2.3 Returning Spare Parts For Credit

No item that is returned to Peddinghaus Corporation will be accepted without prior authorization.
If it arrives at our facility without a return authorization number, it will be refused and returned to
the sender.

To receive such a return authorization number, please call (815) 937-3800 (U.S.A.),
FAX (815) 937-4003 or write Inside Sales for instructions and a return authorization number.

The return authorization number must be shown on the outside of the package of any parts that
are being returned.

6.2.4 Assembly Drawings

Section 8 contains actual assembly drawings and bills of material used to construct your
“Peddimat” PC/CNC system. These drawings will be useful for replacement parts, adjustments,
and understanding the operation of the various mechanisms.

Each drawing is accompanied by a bill of material. Matching the ballooned number with the
items on the bill will help you determine part numbers for servicing.

NOTICE: FASTENERS NOT SPECIFICALLY DESIGNATED ON THE ASSEMBLY


DRAWINGS SHOULD BE HANDLED AS PRESCRIBED IN THE FOLLOWING
SECTIONS ON FASTENERS, LOCTITING AND FASTENER TORQUES. BE CERTAIN
TO FOLLOW ALL PRECAUTIONARY NOTES FOUND ON THESE DRAWINGS, AS
WELL AS SAFETY PROCEDURES DOCUMENTED IN OTHER PEDDINGHAUS
CORPORATION’S MANUALS PROVIDED TO YOU.

6.2.5 Fasteners

In order to maintain the proper operation and safety of Peddimat PC/CNC systems, it is important
to understand the use of fasteners in their design.

During the repair or re-assembly of any components, it is important to replace all fasteners as
they were originally installed; having same grade, tensile, strength and torque installation values.

The following parameters must be followed:

6-16
• Hex head capscrews are to be at least SAE GRADE 5 or better, with the following minimum:
tensile strengths, based on screw size:
Up to 3/4” diameter (inclusive) = 120,000 psi (827 N/mm2)
Over 3/4” to 1” diameter (inclusive) = 115,000 psi (792 N/mm2)
Over 1” to 1-1/2” diameter (inclusive) = 105,000 psi (724 N/mm2)

• Socket head capscrews are UNBRAKO brand from SPS Technologies* (or equal) and are a
minimum of 180,000 PSI tensile strength (1,241 N/mm2).

• Lockwashers, flatwashers, cotter pins, and roll pins must be replaced and found.

• Do not substitute roll pins for dowel pins.

• Length of thread engagement is critical and must be maintained.

• Fasteners that require a special torque applied will be indicated as such on additional
maintenance instructions found in this manual.

• Fasteners that require a special loctiting application will be indicated as such on additional
maintenance instructions found in this manual.

*Sps Technologies
Unbrako Division
Highland Avenue
Jenkintown, Pennsylvania 19046
United States of America

Phone: 215-572-3200

6-17
6.2.6 Loctite

Fasteners are loctited to assure proper and safe machine operation. The maintenance department
should not neglect these practices during the repair or re-assembly of any Peddimat system.

Be certain to follow all instructions and safety precautions as stated by the Loctite Corporation**
when using their products or an equivalent product.

Normal machine operation may cause a loosening of some fasteners, or maintenance may require
the removal of some fasteners. These may be re-assembled with loctite as follows:

• If previously loctited, remove existing loctite with wire brush.

• For fasteners smaller than 1/4” thread, loctite #222 purple may be used.

• For fasteners 1/4” thread and larger that are made of high strength alloy (UNBRAKO type)
use loctite #262 red if additional maintenance sheets indicate the use of this loctite.

• Loctite acts as a lubricant and torque values should be based on this fact.

• On blind threaded holes, place the loctite into the hole not on the fastener.

• Because of the setting time of loctite, use primer “N” for maintenance applications.

• Loctite #262 may be used for securing keys into keyways.

• Pneumatic/Hydraulic Seal 545 may be used to secure and seal air and hydraulic lines. USE
TEFLON TAPE ON ACETYLENE OR OXYGEN FITTINGS, DO NOT USE LOCTITE
SEAL 545 OR PST.

**Loctite Corporation
Newington, Connecticut 06111
United States of America
Phone: 203-246-1223

6-18
6.2.7 Screw Torque Chart

6-19
6.2.8 Painting

NOTICE: THE REPAINTING OF THE VARIOUS MACHINE ELEMENTS SHOULD


FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES AS PRESCRIBED IN THE FOLLOWING SECTION ON
PAINTING.

The color scheme of Peddinghaus Corp. Peddimat PC/CNC systems uses several types of acrylic
and acrylic enamel paints. Although it may not be possible to achieve the same original factory
paint appearance, following are some guidelines to assist with any general repainting that might
be required.

• Gray automotive type primer.

• Green coating 10-2-098 non-lead by Jordan’s Paint Manufacturing of Forest Park, Illinois or
equivalent coating.

• Green coating for electrical cabinets and standup Peddimat machines is acrylic enamel (for
high gloss).

• Orange coating for certain moving machine elements is an acrylic enamel.

• Clear urethane coating over control console panels.

• 1200° F high temperature black (wherever this paint was originally used).

• The Peddimat purchaser may have specified a certain color or paint other than our standard.

The use of these paints is for several reasons:

• The basic color scheme is for Peddinghaus Corp. product registration.

• The quality of the paint product assures ease of clean up for good housekeeping.

• Orange color is used to designate certain moving machine elements.

• High temperature black offers component protection for certain components which operate at
above ambient temperatures. It is also used where thin coat paint protection is required.

Repainting

If repainting is required, follow the original machine paint scheme, and use the following as
guidelines.

• Orange machine elements should remain that color for general machine safety.

• Use high temperature paints where above ambient temperatures are encountered.

6-20
• Do not allow paint to get into bushings, shafts, rotating or sliding mechanisms, or on
guideways. Do not paint on grease fittings or openings.

• Do not allow paint to get into electrical components, control buttons, limit or proximity
switches, or switch light reflectors.

• Do not paint over any warning signs, labels, product identification, control tags, instructions,
or air filters.

• Paint should never interfere with the intended function of the machine or cause an unsafe
operating condition.

6.3 Care and Maintenance of “Original Equipment Mfg.”


Devices

6.3.1 Cone Drive Gear Reducer

Refer to Section 6.1.9 for maintenance of the gear reducer.

6.4 Care and Maintenance of Hydraulics and Pneumatics

6.4.1 Cylinders

The assembly drawings indicate part numbers for various packings of Peddinghaus manufactured
cylinders. Also on the assembly drawings are part numbers for rod and piston seal kits of stock
cylinders.

6-21
6.4.2 Hose, Tube and Pipe Specifications

The following component specifications are required as minimums when replacing any hose,
tubes, or pipes on your “Peddimat” PC/CNC system.

6-22
6.4.3 Hydraulic Reservoir

The replacement filter numbers are found on the filter canister itself. The filter has a clogged
filter indicator that will rise when the filter is not clean.

6.4.4 Changing the Hydraulic Oil

Prior to changing the hydraulic oil (or performing any maintenance work), the machine must be
shut off and any accumulators must be drained/relieved. FAILURE TO DO SO CAN CAUSE
SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH. Proceed as follows to drain/relieve any accumulators on the
machine:

• Shut off and lockout power to the machine.

• Drain/relieve accumulators by rotating control knob on drain-valve in direction shown on


sign located near the accumulator drain-valve.

The first quantity of hydraulic oil installed must be changed after 1000 working hours (see hour
meter located in switch cabinet). Future hydraulic oil changes must be performed after 2000
hours or no later than one (1) year. The power-unit reservoir holds 80 gallons (303 liters) of
hydraulic oil.

6.4.5 Hydraulic Oil

Suggested hydraulic oils are selected for their properties of viscosity range, anti-wear, oxidation
resistance, and foam inhibitors.

Upon installation, all hydraulic functions are cycled manually to remove trapped air from the
system. “Top Off” the reservoir fluid level to maximum “Full” in the sight gauge indicator
before automatic operation.

Under normal operating conditions, temperature rise, and average ambient humidity, operational
life is about 2000 hours. If the neutralization number (total acid number) reaches or exceeds a
value of 2.0, the oil has become corrosive and should be changed regardless of running time.

6.4.6 Hydraulic Oil Types

Mobil DTE #24 or Duro AW Oil 32

Should the oil level sink below the minimum mark, then the tank must be immediately
replenished.

6-23
6.4.7 Hydraulic Power Unit

Pressure adjustments on the hydraulic power-pack and the hydraulic pump are only to be made by
Peddinghaus customer service engineers or by authorized personnel. (See figure 6.4.7.1 - on
following page for adjustment procedure). Any work of this nature carried out by unauthorized
persons will mean that the machine warranty will terminate immediately.

Install a new filter after 1000 hours of operation and replace thereafter when the dirty filter
indicator is observed on the power unit.

Suction strainer should be cleaned at each oil change.

6-24
6.4.7.1 Hydraulic Power Unit Adjustment Procedure

6-25
6.4.8 Pneumatics

For operation of filter-regulator-lubricator, see Section 6.1.11 (Pneumatic Lubrication)

Parker Filter 07F SPARE PARTS

• Element kit 40 micrometer; filter, seal, gasket: Parker #PS201P

• Element cartridge kit 40 micrometer; holder, filter, gasket, baffle shroud, deflector, seal, body
seal, Parker #PS204P

• Polycarbonate Bowl Kit; bowl with drain, seal, Parker #PS205P

CAUTION: TRANSPARENT BOWL SAFETY INFORMATION


Polycarbonate bowls, being transparent and tough, are ideal for use with filters and lubricators.
They are suitable for use in normal industrial environments, but should not be located in areas
where they could be subjected to direct sunlight, an impact blow, nor temperatures outside of the
rated range. As with most plastics, some chemicals can cause damage. Polycarbonate bowls
should not be exposed to chlorinated hydrocarbons, ketones, esters and certain alcohols. They
should not be used in air systems where compressors are lubricated with fire-resistant fluids such
as phosphate ester and di-ester types.

TO CLEAN POLYCARBONATE BOWLS, USE MILD SOAP AND WATER ONLY! DO


NOT use cleansing agents such as acetone, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, gasoline, toluene, etc.,
which are damaging to this plastic.

Bowl guards are recommended for added protection of polycarbonate bowls, where chemical
attack may occasionally occur.

Parker Regulator OTR Spare Parts:

• Poppet Kit; poppet and relief tube assembly, cap seal. Parker #PS212P

• Relieving Piston Kit; seal piston, piston. Parker #PS110P

• Gauge, 0-160 PSI; Parker #P781642

• Control Spring, 2 to 125 PSI; PARKER #P78482

6-26
SERVICING:

NOTE: SHUT OFF AIR SUPPLY AND DEPRESSURIZE ALL AIR LINES CONNECTED
TO THE REGULATOR BY SETTING THE SELF-VENTING REGULATOR TO ZERO
PRESSURE.

• To service the piston or control springs, turn the adjusting handle counterclockwise until
compression is released from pressure control spring.

∗ On the 06R and 07R Series, remove bonnet by unscrewing bonnet from body and
removing the control spring, piston and piston seal.

∗ Clean and carefully inspect parts for wear and/or damage. If replacement is necessary,
use parts from the service kits.

∗ Lubricate the piston seal with a mineral base oil or silicone grease. DO NOT use
synthetic oils such as esters.

∗ Install piston, piston seal, control spring, and adjusting screw pressure plate. On the
06R and 07R Series, screw bonnet to body and tighten to 50 to 75 inch-pounds (5.65
to 8.47 newton-meters) torque.

• To service poppet and relief tube:

∗ Relieve all pressures as described in above NOTE.

∗ Remove cap by unscrewing from body (located opposite from control spring bonnet).
Remove poppet relief tube and balancing spring.

∗ Clean and carefully inspect parts for wear and damage. If replacement is necessary,
use parts from service kit.

∗ Lubricate cap seal as listed above, install in groove of cap and screw cap into body.

• Turn on air supply and adjust to desired secondary pressure as described in step 1 in
Operation.

Parker-Micro-Mist Lubricator 17L Spare Parts

• Body Service Kit, Parker #PS231BP

• Replacement Bowl Kit; polycarbonate bowl with manual drain, seal, Parker #PS225P.

NOTICE: SEE PREVIOUS PARAGRAPH ON SAFETY: TRANSPARENT BOWLS.

6-27
Pneumatic Lubricants

• Parker F442 P Oil

• Gardner-Denver Co. #A-51 Air Lube Oil

• American Oil Co. Grade “C” Spindle Oil

• Mobil Oil Co. Velocite #6 Spindle Oil

6.5 Care and Maintenance of Electricals


Checks and maintenance work on the electric and electronic equipment should only be carried out
by authorized expert personnel. We would like to recommend once again that you take out a
customer service contract with us. By doing so, you will have the guarantee that the machine, in
particular the electric and the electronic equipment, is maintained and serviced by expert
personnel.

6.5.1 Care and Maintenance of the Control Console

Perform a functional check of the operating controls once per year minimum. Follow instructions
specified in Chapter 1.

6.5.2 Primary Current

Clean disconnect and components every six months; primarily the electrical cabinet filters must
be cleaned or replaced (if necessary) at least once per month.

Check all connections once per year minimum; test physically for secureness.

Check and adjust control and auxiliary voltages once a year; use A.C. voltmeter to measure
secondary voltage of control transformer. Use a D.C. voltmeter to measure 24-volt D.C.
secondary power supply at corresponding terminal strip.

6-28
6.6 Care and Maintenance of General Components

• Check all safety devices, E-stops, etc. at least once per operating day for functionality as
instructed in Section 1.7.5, “Checking Safety Devices”.

• Clean limit switches and proximity switches as required (once per year minimum). Wipe
sensing face (surface) with clean cloth.

• Check wiring for mechanical damage every six months. Inspect visually for cracks in
insulation and for pinch points.

• Check all connections every six months; test physically for secureness.

• Check encoder fixtures and couplings every six months; test physically for secureness.

6.7 Care and Maintenance of Computer and Accessories

• Perform a system back up of the computer hard-drive once per week.

• Clean floppy disk drive using a commercially available cleaning disk at least once per month.

• Clean computer screen and membrane covered keyboard using a soft cloth and glass cleaner.
Clean as often as required based on usage and dusty conditions prevailing at the particular
working installation.

6.8 Bridge Frame Alignment


The adjusting of each punch station proximity switch device will move that punch axis “zero”
position either in or out (depending on direction of adjustment). Refer to Figure 5.3.

CAUTION: DO NOT REMOVE THE BRIDGE FRAME POSITIONING HYDRAULIC


CYLINDER OR LINEAR ALIGNMENT COUPLING SINCE THIS WILL ALLOW THE
BRIDGE FRAME TO FALL DOWNWARD UNCONTROLLABLY.

6-29
6.9 Maintenance Log

6-30
7. Misc. Tech/Trouble-Shooting Info.

7.1 Hydraulic Power Unit Trouble Shooting Areas


The following trouble shooting areas are included to assist the user in maintaining the machine
tool at its best possible condition.

Hydraulic Oil

Dirty Oil

• Components not properly cleaned after servicing.

• Air breather left off.

• Tank (sump) gasket not properly seated.

• Hydraulic lines not properly covered while servicing machine.

• Filters not replaced at proper intervals, or when indicated.

Foaming Oil

• Low oil level (return to tank line not below fluid level).

• Fluid contaminated with incompatible foreign matter.

• Suction leak to pump aerating oil.

• Lack of anti-foaming additives (Improper fluid).

Moisture in Oil

• Soluble oil solutions splashed into improperly sealed sump or fill-pipes left open.

• Moisture in containers used to replace fluid in tank.

• Extreme temperature difference in certain geographical locations.

• Sediment not drained from sump at frequent enough intervals, to remove water collected
over possibly long operating periods.

7-1
Overheating of System

• Continuous operation at relief valve’s setting (stalling under load, etc.).

• Excessive slippage or internal leakage (check stall leakage past pump, motors, and cylinders).

• Improper air circulation around reservoir.

• Power unit operating in direct sunlight or ambient temperature is too high.

Pumps

Pump Makes Excessive Noise

• Check for vacuum leaks in the suction line (such as a leak in fittings or damaged suction
line).

• Check for vacuum leaks in the pump shaft-seal. Flooding connections with fluid being
pumped may cause the noise to stop or abate momentarily, thus locating the point of air entry.

• Check alignment with drive mechanism. Misalignment will cause wear and subsequent high
noise level in operation.

• Check compatibility of fluid being used with manufacturer’s recommendations.

• Aeration of fluid in reservoir (return lines above fluid level).

• Worn or damaged gears in housing.

• Worn or faulty bearings.

• Reversed rotation.

• Plugged or restricted suction line or suction strainer.

• Plugged reservoir filter breather.

• Oil viscosity too high or operating temperature too low. Air leak in suction line or fittings
also causing irregular movement of control devices.

• Loose or worn pump parts.

• Air leaks at pump shaft-seals.

• Oil level too low and drawing air in through inlet pipe opening.

• Air bubbles in intake oil.

• Pump housing bolts or mounting bolts loose or not properly torqued.

Pump Fails to Deliver Fluid


7-2
• Low fluid level in reservoir.

• Oil intake pipe’s suction strainer plugged.

• Air leak in suction line and preventing priming. Oil viscosity too high (operating temperature
too low).

• Pump shaft or parts broken.

• Dirt in pump.

• Reversed pump rotation.

Oil Leakage Around Pump

• Shaft seal worn.

• Head of oil on suction pipe connection - connection leaking.

• Pump housing bolts loose or improperly torqued.

Excessive Pump Wear

• Abrasive dirt in the hydraulic oil being circulated through the system.

• Oil viscosity too low.

• Pump misaligned with motor shaft.

• Air being drawn in through the inlet of pump.

Pump Parts Inside Housing Broken

• Seizure due to lack of oil.

• Excessive torquing of housing bolts.

• Solid matter being drawn in from reservoir and wedged in pump.

General Maintenance Tips - Pumps

Hydraulic pump failures are caused primarily by poor maintenance, bad repair, or exceeding the
operating limits of the pump. Though pumps wear out through normal usage, few failures are
caused by old age.

Most hydraulic pumps fail because of contaminated or improper fluid. Solid particles of sand,
dirt, lint, and grit in fluid act as an abrasive on the pump’s closely fitted parts. Water and other
7-3
foreign liquids cause rust and corrosion of the pump parts and housings. The rust tends to flake
into the fluids, adds to its abrasive content, causing more wear and increasing internal leakage.
The pump’s reduced efficiency is the result.

Sludge in the system contributes to pump failures. It is formed by the chemical reaction of
hydraulic fluid to excessive temperatures and condensation. It builds up on internal parts and
eventually plugs the pump. If it plugs the pump’s inlet, the pump will cavitate and freeze because
of friction and heat. Selection of fluid viscosity is extremely important. Always use the fluid
with the viscosity rating’s specified and always use a good grade fluid.

Solenoid Valves

Solenoid Fails

• Voltage too low. If voltage will not complete the stroke of the alternating current
solenoid, it will burn out the coil.

• Signal to both solenoids of a double solenoid valve simultaneously. One or both of the
valves will be unable to complete their stroke and will burn out.

• Covers lift off solenoids, allowing cast iron dust or metallic chips to collect within the
magnetic field. Device cannot complete stroke and solenoid burns out.

• Push-pin peens to a point where it is not long enough to actuate the valve (replace with
new pin).

• Mechanical damage to leads (short circuit, open connections, etc.).

• Mechanical damage to coils (short circuit, open windings, etc.).

• Tight spool or other mechanical parts of the valve being actuated can prevent the solenoid
from completing its stroke and subsequently burning out.

Solenoid Valve Fails to Operate

• Is there an electrical signal to the solenoid or operating device? Is the voltage too
low? (Check with voltmeter or test-light in emergency).

• Is the solenoid push-pin shifting the pilot-spool far enough? (After considerable
service the push-pin or other parts may have been worn enough to prevent sufficient
spool movement).

7-4
• Has foreign matter jammed the main spool? (Remove end caps and see that main
spool is free in its movements, remember that there will be a quantity of fluid
escaping when the cap is removed. The operator should provide a container to catch
it).

• Is pilot-drain restricted? (Remove pilot-drain and let the fluid pour into an open
container while the machine is again tried for normal operation. Refer to circuit
diagram for possible routing of internal lines and possible blockage).

• Is pilot pressure available? (Check with gauge on main pressure input port for
internally piloted pipes and in the supply line to the externally piloted pipe).

• Is fluid media excessively hot? (Check for localized heating which may indicate an
internal leak. Also, check reservoir temperature to see if it is within the machine
specifications).

• Is there foreign matter in the fluid media causing gumming deposits? (Check for
contamination. To make sure that fluid is compatible, refer to machine specs).

• Is an adequate supply of fluid being delivered to actuate the load? (It is possible to
have sufficient pressure to shift the valve, but insufficient pressure to actuate the
workload).

• Check circuit for possible safety interlocks on pressure sources to valve or to pilot
section.

Filters

The key to good filtration is filter maintenance. A machine may be equipped with the best filters
available and they may be positioned in the system where they do the most good, but if the filters
are not taken care of and cleaned when dirty, the money spent for the filters and their installation
has been wasted. A filter can be no better than the maintenance afforded to it. The following
maintenance suggestions are included as an aid for the user.

Maintenance Suggestions

• Set up a filter maintenance schedule and follow it diligently.

• Inspect filter elements that have been removed from the system for signs of failure which
may indicate the service intervals should be shortened and of impending system problems.
(Periodic inspection of the filter element in a new machine is desirable, to determine the
proper replacement interval).

• DO NOT return to the system any fluid that has leaked out.

• Always keep the supply of fresh fluid covered tightly.

• Use clean containers, hoses, and funnels when filling the reservoir.

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• Use common sense precautions to prevent entry of dirt into components that have been
temporarily removed from the circuit.

• Make sure that all cleanout-holes, filter-caps, and breather-cap-filters on the reservoir are
properly fastened.

• Make certain that the fluid used in the system is that which is specified by Peddinghaus
Corporation.

• Before changing from one type of fluid to another (for example, from petroleum based oil to
a fire-resistant-fluid) contact Peddinghaus Corporation. Fire-resistant-fluid CANNOT be
substituted for hydraulic oil on most standard Peddinghaus power units.

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7.1.1 TEN RULES OF HYDRAULIC SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

1. STOP leaks.

2. LOOK at fluid daily - to see if free from contaminants, water, foam.

3. LISTEN for unusual noises.

4. Keep fluid at moderate temperature - preferably between 90° F and 120° F.

5. Check fluid level - keep reservoir full.

6. Clean or change filters and strainers when required. Also, clean the magnets.

7. Use only fluids that meet pump specifications.

8. Add only clean, new oil - through a strainer or filter.

9. Use only clean, well-marked containers for adding oil.

10. Have your fluid tested periodically - to see if it needs to be filtered or changed.

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7.1.2 TROUBLE-SHOOTING GUIDE & MAINTENANCE HINTS

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

INTRODUCTION
General

The trouble shooting charts and maintenance hints that follow are of a general system nature but
provide an intuitive feeling for a specific system. The more general information is covered in the
immediately following paragraphs. Effect and probable cause charts appear on the following pages.

System Design

There is, of course, little point in discussing the design of a system that has been operating satisfactorily
for a period of time. However, a seemingly uncomplicated procedure such as relocating a system or
changing a component part can cause problems. Because of this, the following points should be
considered:

A. Each component in the system must be compatible with and form an integral part of the system.
For example, an inadequate size filter on inlet of a pump can cause cavitation and subsequent
damage to the pump.

B. All lines must be of proper size and free of restrictive bends. An undersized or restricted line
results in a pressure drop in the line itself.

C. Some components must be mounted in a specific position with respect to other components or the
lines. The housing on an in-line pump, for example, must remain filled with fluid to provide
lubrication.

D. The inclusion of adequate test points for pressure readings, although not essential for operation, will
expedite trouble-shooting.

Knowing the System

Probably the greatest aid to trouble-shooting is the confidence of knowing the system. The construction
and operating characteristics of each one should be understood. For example, knowing that a solenoid
controlled directional valve can be manually actuated will save considerable time in isolating a
defective solenoid. Some additional practices which will increase your ability and the useful life of the
system follow:

A. Know the capabilities of the system. Each component in the system has a maximum rated speed,
torque, or pressure. Loading the system beyond the specifications simply increases the possibility
of failure.

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B. Know the correct operating pressures. Always set and check pressures with a gauge. How else can
you know if the operating pressure is above the maximum rating of the components? The question
may arise as to what the correct operating pressure is. If it isn’t correctly specified on the hydraulic
schematic, the following rule should be applied:

The correct operating pressure is the lowest pressure that will allow adequate performance of the
system functions and still remain below the maximum rating of the components and
machine.

C. Once the correct pressures have been established, note them on the hydraulic schematic for future
reference.

D. Know the proper signal levels, feedback levels, and dither and gain settings in servo control
systems. If they aren’t specified, check them when the system is functioning correctly and mark
them on the schematic for future reference.

Developing Systematic Procedures

Analyze the system and develop a logical sequence for setting valves, mechanical stops, interlocks, and
electrical controls. Tracing of flow paths can often be accomplished by listening for flow in the lines or
feeling them for warmth. Develop a cause and effect trouble-shooting guide similar to the charts
appearing on the following pages. The initial time spent on such a project could save hours of system
downtime.

Recognizing Trouble Indications

The ability to recognize trouble indications in a specific system is usually acquired with experience.
However, a few general trouble indications can be discussed.

A. Excessive heat means trouble. A misaligned coupling places an excessive load on bearings and can
be readily identified by the heat generated. A warmer than normal tank return line on a relief valve
setting. Hydraulic fluids that have a low viscosity will increase the internal leakage of components
resulting in a heat rise. Cavitation and slippage in a pump will also generate heat.

B. Excessive noise means wear, misalignment, cavitation or air in the fluid. Contaminated fluid can
cause a relief valve to stick and chatter. These noises may be the result of dirty filters, or fluid, high
fluid viscosity, excessive drive speed, low reservoir level, loose intake lines, or worn couplings.

Maintenance

Three simple maintenance procedures have the greatest effect on hydraulic system performance,
efficiency, and life. Yet, the very simplicity of them may be the reason they are so often overlooked.
What are they? Simply these:

A. Maintaining a clean sufficient quantity of hydraulic fluid of the proper type and viscosity.

B. Changing filters and cleaning strainers.

C. Keeping all connections tight, but not to the point of distortion, so that air is excluded from the
system.

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7.1.3 FIELD SETTING INPUT HORSEPOWER LIMITING CONTROL

FOR PAVC SERIES PUMPS (Control Option H)


1. Back the compensator and the horsepower control out. Block the outlet of the pump, so that
you don’t have any flow possibilities.

2. Turn both clockwise each 1/2 turn at a time until you reach the maximum pressure that you
wish to set the system.

3. Turn the horsepower control clockwise 1/2 turn more to see if it has an effect on pressure; in
other words, get control over to the compensator. Tune compensator down or up to set the
correct maximum system pressure.

4. Back the horsepower control all the way out. If you don’t know what horsepower you are
looking for, start at the lowest setting and make small adjustments up using method A or B.

A) Input horsepower can be set by measuring Amp draw on an electric motor.

I. Relate Amp draw to horsepower at rated motor RPM.

II. Slowly restrict the pump outlet and record the Amp draw at several points.

III. If Amp draw exceeds maximum desired, turn HP control counterclockwise. If Amp
draw is lower than desired at all points, turn control clockwise and repeat test.

B) To set input HP from an internal combustion drive is much more cumbersome. An accurate
flow meter (± 1 GPM full range) is required as is an accurate pressure gauge and a needle
valve. Set-up is shown below.

INPUT H. P. DETERMINATION SET-UP DIAGRAM

I. Slowly close needle valve, making note of flow rate at several different pressures.

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II. Using formula:

Flow in GPM X Pressure in PSI x .82 = Input Horsepower


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For each pressure reading, compare to desired input horsepower.

III. If results are lower on ALL points than desired, adjust HP control clockwise and repeat. If
results are higher on ANY point, adjust HP control counterclockwise.

NOTE: The more data points taken, the more accurate the resulting setting.

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7.1.4 Pump/Motor Shaft Alignment Procedure (Foot Mount Models)

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7.1.5 Pump/Motor Shaft Alignment Procedure (Bell Housing Models)

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7.1.6 Coupling Clearance Data To Prevent Shaft End-Loading

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7.2 Causes of Broken Punch Ends or Punch Heads

Improper Stripping

Punch ends or heads are usually broken off as a result of improper stripping. For good stripping,
the stripper must contact the material in at least two points, 180° apart, in line with the punch.
Both points must contact the material simultaneously. If only one point contacts the material, for
example, if punching on the end of a part, the punch will be snapped off during stripping.

Exceeding the Diameter to Thickness Ratio

Punching a small hole through very thick material, exceeding the compressive strength of the
punch, will cause the punch end to expand and break. The break ordinarily happens before the
punch enters the material but sometimes a slight expansion during the punch cycle will cause the
punch to break as it is being stripped. Swelling of the punch end can usually be measured to
indicate this type of failure. (See Diameter to Thickness Charts for preventing this type of
problem.)

Punching Exceptionally Hard Materials

Punching exceptionally hard material usually results in a severe breakthrough shock that, in some
cases, will cause the punch head to break off. We recommend that material having a shear
strength greater than 100,000 PSI not be punched, which would mean that the tensile strength of
the same material would be approximately 135,000 PSI. Examples of hard material that we do
not recommend punching would be C-1090, grader and snow plow blade material, and non-
annealed spring steel. Under special conditions, such material can possibly be punched, but the
factory must be contacted. Special punch units are needed for this application. We do not
guarantee punches being used on re-rolled rail stock since there is no way of telling when a hard
spot will be encountered.

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7.3 Causes of Premature Wear on Punches and Dies

Misalignment of Punch and Die

Many punches are not normally worn out, but they are damaged by having the punch misaligned
with the die. Misalignment causes the punch to shear into the die, and makes the punch appear as
though it was naturally worn; however, the damage usually appears on only one side of the punch
and die. To correct this problem, make sure that the punch and die are properly aligned and tight
in the press.

Insufficient Clearance

Insufficient clearance between the punch and die for a given thickness of material will cause
excessive wear. Proper clearance decreases the amount of force required to strip the material
from the punch. If there is insufficient clearance, the stripping force will be as great as 10-20% of
the punching force. However, if there is proper clearance, the stripping force will drop to
approximately 3% of the punching force. Since wear is usually proportional to the applied force,
it is obvious that the proper clearance will greatly increase the life of the punch. Cutting oil or
die lubricant is recommended for punching, wherever possible, to reduce wear and galling.
Normal clearance should be approximately 8-10% of thickness of material being punched.

Nibbling

Nibbling or punching just a part of a hole, using a standard punch, will cause the punch to be
thrust sideways and shear into the die.

Hard and/or Abrasive Materials

If a hard and/or abrasive material is being punched, a punch made from a better grade of tool
steel, for example, high-speed steel, should be used. However, using a standard steel punch with
a good grade of cutting oil will extend the life considerably. Cutting oil or die lubricant is
recommended for punching and shearing wherever possible.

Shaped punches having sharp corners, such as squares and rectangles, have their corners broken
down prematurely as a result of punching hard, thick material. Under such conditions, the
corners on the punches should be ground with a radius, or a 45° chamfer to eliminate the very
sharp sensitive corners. The size of the radius or chamfer depends upon the hardness of the
material being punched. For example: when punching a ¾” square hole in ½” thick C-1045
material, corners of the square should be broken approximately 1/16”.

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Soft Material

Soft materials, such as copper and aluminum tend to stick to the punch and gall. Lubricating the
material and punch with a good grade of cutting fluid will increase the life of the punch and die.
Increasing the die clearance will also prolong tool life and reduce the stripping force. Soft
materials may also be damaged by the various clamps and rollers on the machine.

Sharpening Punch and Die Too Late

The number of holes between sharpenings varies with the type and thickness of material. Fifty
thousand holes can be pierced before sharpening on thin sheet metal while as few as 500 holes
can be expected on heavy material, such as 1” thick. A punch and die should be sharpened at a
point where a sharp cutting edge can be restored after grinding .015”. If they are used beyond
this point, the wear increases rapidly and greatly reduces the number of holes pierced per punch.

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8. ASSEMBLY DRAWINGS AND BILLS OF MATERIAL

The following assembly drawings were used to assemble your “Peddimat” machine. They are
provided here to assist you with general maintenance and repair.

8-1