You are on page 1of 14

YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Name: ________________________________________

Year group:___________ Date: __________________

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens


Date: 03 Jan 2018

LO: To explore the genre of Novel and understand its nuances.

Starter: What do you understand by the word “fiction”? use few words or a sentence.

_____________________________________________________________________

New Learning: Novel is a fictional prose or writing or text of a considerable length

There are different types of novel based on the themes of the story or plot. Like these..

1. Mystery -__________________________________________
2. Romance -_________________________________
3. Children’s lit - _______________________________
4. Epistolary - _____________________________________
5. Biographical-____________________________________
6. Horror- _______________________________________

Find few examples for each type


YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Draw a novel Book cover

Main Task: Research on the word “novel”. Find out where it came from?

Write what does it mean in your own words. (Discuss with your partner)Then give few
examples

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Extended Task: Write about your favorite story then give reasons why do you like it?

______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

WWW:________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
EBI:__________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Date: 7 Jan 2018

LO: To understand importance of the historical and social background of the novel –
Great Expectations.

Starter: Why do we need to know the historical and social background of a story?

______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

New Learning:

Great Expectations is set in early Victorian England, a time when great social changes
were sweeping the nation. The Industrial Revolution of the late eighteenth and early
nineteenth centuries had transformed the social landscape, enabling capitalists and
manufacturers to amass huge fortunes. Although social class was no longer entirely
dependent on the circumstances of one’s birth, the divisions between rich and poor
remained nearly as wide as ever. London, a teeming mass of humanity, lit by gas lamps
at night and darkened by black clouds from smokestacks during the day, formed a
sharp contrast with the nation’s sparsely populated rural areas. More and more people
moved from the country to the city in search of greater economic opportunity.
Throughout England, the manners of the upper class were very strict and conservative:
gentlemen and ladies were expected to have thorough classical educations and to
behave appropriately in innumerable social situations.

Mid-Plenary: How does knowing the historical and social facts of a story helps you
understand it better.

______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

Main Task: Create a poster


YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Date: 8 Jan 2018

Lo: To know the author of the book Great Expectations and his writing.

Starter: How is knowing an author help you understand the novel?

New Learning: Charles Dickens was the author of this novel Great Expectations

Why is Charles Dickens famous?


Who was Charles Dickens?
Charles Dickens is a famous English writer. People all over the world
enjoy his stories. One of them is Oliver Twist, the story of a poor boy
in Victorian times. Books by Dickens can be funny and sad. His stories
are full of interesting 'characters' (people).
When did Dickens live?
Dickens was born in England in 1812. He died in 1870.
His first big success was The Pickwick Papers. This was in 1837, the
year Victoria became Britain's Queen.
Dickens lived through the Industrial Revolution. He wrote about how
life was changing, especially for poor people and children.
Why do people read Dickens?
Many of Dickens' stories came out in weekly or monthly parts, as
serials. Each month people could read a new chapter in the story.
Perhaps this is why Dickens' books make good films and TV serials too.
Readers like a good story, with interesting characters. Dickens was
very clever at making up characters. People all over the world know
Oliver Twist, Scrooge and David Copperfield, even if they have not
read the books in which these characters appear.
Early life
Where was Dickens born?
On 7 February 1812, Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth. His
parents named him Charles John Huffam Dickens.
Portsmouth was the home of the Royal Navy. His father, John Dickens,
worked as a clerk for the Navy. His mother's name was Elizabeth
Barrow. She wanted to be a teacher and run a school.
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Happy times
The Dickens family never had much money. Charles had seven
brothers and sisters. Mr Dickens dreamed of being rich. Mrs Dickens
dreamed of owning a school. Somehow things never went right.
In 1816 the family moved to Chatham, in Kent. Charles was happy
there. He went to school. He explored the countryside. He loved the
old castle at Rochester.
Hard times
In 1822 the family moved to London. Now times were hard. Mr
Dickens was sent to prison for six months for not paying his bills.
Charles (aged 12) had to work in a dirty old factory, beside the River
Thames. He could hear rats squeaking and running about. His job was
to put labels on pots of 'blacking', used to clean fireplaces.
Dickens never forgot this unhappy time. He wrote about it later.
Growing up
By 1824 Mr Dickens had enough money to send Charles back to
school.
At 15, Charles got a job in a lawyer's office. He hated it. In his books
he makes most lawyers horrid!
Charles learned shorthand. He got a job writing about Parliament. He
travelled around England by stagecoach, writing for newspapers. He
wrote stories about the people he met.
Dickens the writer
Dickens is a success
In 1833, he sold his first story. At first Dickens called himself 'Boz'.
This was his pen-name.
In 1836, he married Catherine Hogarth.
Suddenly he became famous. His funny stories called The Pickwick
Papers were a success.
Oliver Twist
Oliver Twist came out in 1837. It was a grim tale about an orphan boy
(Oliver), who is sent to the workhouse. Oliver ends up in the London
underworld, in a gang of thieves led by Fagin.
The story ends happily for Oliver, but people were shocked. Were poor
children really treated so badly?
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Life for poor children


Life for poor children in Victorian times was very hard. Small children
worked in coal mines and factories.
Little boys were made to climb inside chimneys and clean them. Oliver
Twist almost becomes a 'chimney-boy'. Instead he is made to work for
an undertaker.
Life in London
London was a big, crowded city. Many poor people lived in slums.
Homeless children slept on the streets. Many people died from
diseases. Almost half the funerals in London in the 1830s were of
children under 10.
London did not have a police force until 1829. Even young children
were sent to prison.
Dickens the celebrity
A famous man
Dickens became so famous people knew him as he walked about
London. He was a celebrity.
Dickens walked for miles around the city, watching and listening. He
made notes for new stories.
Dickens keeps busy
In 1846 Dickens became editor of the Daily News, a newspaper. He did
not like being told what to do by the owners, so in 1850 he started his
own magazine, Household Words. Now he could write what he liked.
Dickens was a show-off. He loved to give public readings from his
books. In 1842, he visited America.
Two famous books
Of his many books, Dickens liked David Copperfield best. In it he
wrote about Mr Micawber, who seems very like Dickens' father.
In 1843, Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol. It is one of his most famous
stories. In it, we meet the miserScrooge - and three ghosts!
Why did people like long books?
In Victorian times, there was no radio, no television, no internet, no
cinema. People read lots of books. Readers liked long stories, to pass
the time.
Grown-ups read novels and magazines. Children had their own books
too.
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Dickens was the most famous novelistin Britain. There were lots of
others, such as Sir Walter Scott and Charlotte Brontë.
Family life
Dickens and his wife had 10 children. But their marriage was not
happy. In 1858, they split up.
Dickens loved acting. He had his own little theatre at home. While
acting in a play in 1857, Dickens fell in love with Ellen Ternan, an
actress.
What happened to Dickens?
How was Britain changing?
Dickens saw many changes during his life, made by the Industrial
Revolution.
In 1820 most people in England worked on farms. When Dickens died
in 1870, most people worked in towns. Many poor people worked
in factoriesand lived in slums.
What made Dickens angry?
Dickens was angered by the sad things he saw. In his books, he tried
to show what was wrong. In Nicholas Nickleby, he wrote about a
terrible school, Dotheboys Hall, where unwanted children were cruelly
treated.
He wanted to make life better for people. He wanted new libraries,
hospitals and schools.
Pictures in Dickens
Many of Dickens's books had pictures. The pictures helped readers
follow the story. Two artists were famous for their Dickens drawings.
They were George Cruikshank and Hablot K Browne, known as 'Phiz'.
How did Dickens die?
In 1864 Dickens and Ellen Ternan were in a train crash. Dickens was
not badly hurt, but he was never very well after this accident.
In 1868 he went on a tour of the United States. He read to large
audiences, on stage. It was very tiring. He came home worn out and
sick.
Dickens died in June 1870, at home in Kent. He was working on a new
book. It was The Mystery of Edwin Drood.
Charles Dickens was buried in Westminster Abbey.
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Main Task

Create a timeline for the life events of charles dickens.

Plenary: Was this plenary helpful to understand the author’s importance. Give reason

______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

LO: To understand the Initial chapters of the novel and identify the plot, setting and
major characters.

Starter: What are the main features of a story, discuss and draw a mind map.

New Learning:

Chapter 1 to 3

Summary

Seven-year-old Pip walks through a churchyard on a cold, gray day before Christmas,
visiting the graves of his parents. He lives in the marsh area of Kent where the River
Thames meets the sea. Orphaned as a baby, he lives with his sister, Georgiana, who is
twenty years older than he, and her husband, Joe Gargery, the village blacksmith.
Suddenly a convict "with a great iron on his leg" confronts him. The convict has escaped
from the nearby prison ships called the Hulks. After turning Pip upside down and finding
only a piece of bread, the starving man threatens to eat his fat cheeks. Learning that Pip
lives with a blacksmith, he agrees to let Pip live as long as he returns the next morning
with some "wittles" and a file from Joe's forge. To further ensure Pip's help, the convict
tells him there is a young man with him who will eat his heart and liver if he fails to
return. Pip agrees to help and then watches the man stumble away.

Pip returns to his home and is warned by Joe that his sister is on a ram-page [rampage]
looking for him. She returns a short time later and lets him have it on the backside with
the "Tickler," a wax-tipped cane. She has "brought him up by hand," something that
gains her respect from all the neighbors, and Pip notices she is quick to use the hand
on him and Joe. At supper, Pip slips his bread in his pants leg to save it for the convict.
Joe, concerned that Pip has swallowed the bread whole and might choke, expresses his
worry. Mrs. Joe responds by pounding Joe's head against the wall and calling him a
great stuck pig, then pouring Tar-water down both Pip's and Joe's throats. Later that
night, they hear guns from the prison ship firing, announcing the escape of another
convict.

Unable to sleep, Pip gets up early to steal the food and file, and then sets out to deliver
them. He runs into a second convict and assumes him to be the young man who eats
boys' livers. Running in terror, Pip finds "his" convict. While watching the man devour
the food, Pip expresses concern about not leaving enough food for the young man who
is waiting. The convict realizes he is not alone on the marshes, and suspecting it is an
enemy of his, starts madly filing his leg iron while Pip escapes.
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Analysis

Dickens gets right to the action. Within the first few paragraphs, he has introduced the
main character, Pip, conveyed that the story is being told in first person by Pip when he
is older, given the location of the story, revealed that Pip is an orphan with five dead
brothers, and introduced the conflict: a convict in need of help. The choice of the
retrospective first-person narrator is effective because the reader immediately feels part
of an intimate and confessional conversation.

Description is one of Dickens' strengths and weaknesses, as seen in the quote


describing the convict: " . . . a man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in
mud, and lamed by stones, and cut by flints, and stung by nettles, and torn by briars;
who limped, and shivered, and glared, and growled; and whose teeth chattered in his
head as he seized me by the chin." It is rich with detail, creating a crisp vision of the
man, and it is overloaded with detail, making the reader wonder if Dickens will ever
stop. Yet there is no question he has a gift for bringing the reader right into the place, in
this case " . . . a bleak place overgrown with nettles . . . dark flat wilderness . . .
intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it."

Dickens establishes unique characters immediately, as well. Pip is "the small bundle of
shivers." The convict's feelings as he stumbles through the graveyard, come across
clearly: " . . . he looked in my young eyes as if he were eluding the hands of the dead
people, stretching up cautiously out of their graves, to get a twist upon his ankle and pull
him in." With the convict's use of w's in his words — (wittles instead of vittles) and the
convict's eating style (similar to that of a large dog snapping up mouthfuls and watching
for danger), Dickens defines the convict's social class, education level, current life
situation, as well as his feelings about that. The description of Mrs. Gargery (Mrs. Joe)
as having a heavy hand that she uses much on Pip and her husband, as well as Pip's
description of his sister's method of buttering his bread and getting pins from her bib
stuck in the bread, tell a great deal about her nature, how her marriage works, and what
Pip thinks of her, too.

In these first three chapters, the reader also sees reoccurring character tags and
repeating elements that further cement the characters in the readers' heads: Mrs. Joe
constantly tells Pip about "being brought up by hand"; Joe refers to Pip as "old chap,"
and uses w's in words like "conwict"; the convict has an unusual clicking in his throat,
and there is the recurring image of the iron shackle on his leg. (These repetitions were
necessary because the story was published in weekly installments and readers may not
have remembered the characters without such clues.)

The relationships are quickly established: Pip's sister rules the house, beats both her
husband and brother, and is insecure and wants to be thought of as irreplaceable; while
Pip views Joe, his brother-in-law, as a best friend, fellow-sufferer, and a larger species
of child. The two males survive by having fun rituals such as comparing who has eaten
more of his bread first and using silent signals to communicate with each other when
Mrs. Joe rampages.
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Pip's relationship with the convict is noteworthy. In spite of being terrorized, Pip also
feels a fascination and bond with the man. He is attracted and repulsed at the same
time. Instead of running away the moment the convict first turns to leave him in the
graveyard, Pip stays and watches the man struggle away. This foreshadows the similar
struggle in Chapter 39, when the convict returns to his life and Pip is both repulsed and
concerned for his safety. There is a bond between these two. They are both — child
and convict — at the mercy and control of others and as such, are both victims in life.
Pip naturally responds to another "victim" and helps him, and this is the element to
which the convict responds when he later rewards Pip for his kindness.

These chapters introduce several themes: right and wrong, good and evil, justice and
guilt. Pip struggles with the wrong of stealing for a convict and the good of caring for a
suffering human being. He also feels guilty for just being alive. From infancy, his sister
has never let him forget he owes his existence to her; he is saturated with this guilt.

Dickens is careful to tie up his details, such as the threat of the young man who eats
boys' livers. By having Pip discover the second convict and then remind the first one to
leave enough food for the young man, Dickens introduces the conflict between the two
convicts. The problem of the second convict is foreshadowed even before Pip finds him,
when the guns go off the night before, announcing the second escape from the ships.

Humor and satire are important tools in these chapters, as well. Pip, for example,
always calls his parents by the only names he knows: "Philip Pirrip, late of this parish"
and "also Georgiana, wife of the above." His deceased brothers are described as "the
five little stone lozenges." Even Pip's politeness to the convict, requesting to be held
right-side up and expressing delight that the convict enjoys the stolen food, are funny. A
bit of satire shows up when the stick used to beat Pip is referred to as the "Tickler."

Glossary

Franks and Frisians Germanic tribes united in opposition to the Geats.

Hugas a Frisian subgroup or family.

Hetware joined with the Franks against Hygelac.

Merovingian pertaining to the Franks.

Ravenswood site (in Sweden) of major battle between Geats and Swedes.

swathe to wrap with bandages.

Eofor and Wulf fought Swedes' King Ongentheow to his death. For a chronology of the
Geats' feuds, see Chickering,

Mid-Plenary
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

Name the important characters in the story:

Main Task:

Write down any new words you come across this summary: Find Meaning and frame sentences

1.___________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

2.___________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
3.___________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

4.___________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

5.___________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Home-task: Write down the important events in the first three chapters?

_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant

_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

WWW EBI
YR-9G2 Intervention Plan Teacher: Aarti Rajanikant