Tower Workshops Unit 20c 58 Riley Road London SE1 3DG t:020 7064 6703 www.shape.eu.

com

Ladywell Streetscape Action Plan
September 17 2010

Cover Illustration: Ladywell Village Before & After, Visualisation by Shape

CONTENTS
Chapter Executive Summary Introduction Policy Guidance Lewisham’s Policy Context Visioning Stage Consultation Stage Action Plan Appendices Page 4 6 9 10 13 16 22 25

3

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Ladywell Village Improvement Group (LVIG) carried out a survey of local views in 2009. It showed that people were concerned in particular about the lack of retail choice, poor environment and dominance of traffic in Ladywell. LVIG established a streetscape sub-group, which recommended that a streetscape action plan be commissioned as a way of guiding future improvements. Shape were commissioned to prepare the Action Plan, a document providing a deliverable vision for Ladywell that would address concerns raised by the initial survey, for presentation to LB Lewisham who have secured funding for detailed scheme design and costings in 2010/ 2011. Shape’s recommendation, set out in this report, was to address the design of the public realm, as a means to improving the environmental quality and economic viability of the retail centre. The commercial centre of Ladywell Village is currently designed to prioritise the needs of traffic moving through the village over the needs of local residents or businesses. This is evidenced by • a narrow footway, and generous width roadway for single lane traffic • wide swept corners allowing cars to manoeuvre around bends at speed • railings that prevent pedestrians from crossing the road at convenient points • pedestrians step down across roads, rather than cars rise up across continuous footways • small island refuges to crossLadywell Rd near the bus stop, and at the entry to Algernon Rd • limited provision for cyclists to park • no safe connection to Ladywell Fields, a strategic cycle route • the absence of provision for loading • the absence of parking spaces to allow through traffic to stop and use shops • a lack of provision for people with disabilities, no dedicated parking, or level access to shops • lack of enforcement of 20mph speed restrictions The centre should work well for those to whom it is a destination in itself, for people wanting to use the shops, the park, the station, to operate a business or simply reach their homes. Since 2000 there have been a number of significant changes in thinking about the design of streets in the UK, and particularly in London. Streets are not just corridors for vehicles, they are places in their own right, and the needs of all road users, including business owners, pedestrians, cyclists, children, older people, and those with disabilities should all be given priority. New projects have been built that provide vital safety statistics for the new approach, and also quantifiable information on the significant social, commercial and environmental benefits of improving shopping streets to encourage and prioritise walking, and the needs of local people. Shape have prepared proposals that will significantly improve the quality of Ladywell Village’s streetscape for everyone, and consulted on these with local people and a range of key stakeholders. The consultation has shown overwhelming support for the proposed approach, and the scheme is capable of supporting LB Lewisham as an exemplar project, delivering on a number of its policy objectives at a local level. The key changes recommended are Pavement / Highway widths Pavements should be widened, and parking bays/ loading bays provided, without reducing traffic capacity. This will provide safer and less constricted conditions for pedestrians and where shared use is desirable,cyclists, and encourage traffic to move more slowly through the centre, reducing noise and improving air quality. Wider pavements also provide space for seating, cycle parking, and tree planting. Crossings Reducing traffic speeds through Ladywell by
Above: Narrow, cluttered footway, surplus road width Below: Guardrailing prevents road crossing and loading

Above: Crossing island at Slaygrove/Gillian Street Junction

4

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
introducing raised tables surfaced in a non-bitmac material, (eg resin bonded aggregate) reducing corner radii, and narrowing the carriageway at the Junction of Ladywell Rd , Algernon Rd & Station Rd will allow guardrailing to be removed safely, and will allow people to cross the road at convenient points, rather than being restricted to designated crossings. The option of moving the designated crossing point closer to the Station Road should be investigated, as this will allow the creation of more loading/parking bays than in its current location, and encourage more people to use the crossing. Narrowing corner radii and overall road width and raising the road surface at Slaygrove Place/ Ladywell Road/ Gillian Street to create raised tables surfaced in an alternate material to standard bitmac will encourage more considerate driving, and reduced speeds. It will make this crossing points safer. A zebra crossing in this location should be investigated. Raising the road to footway level at all crossing points of side roads within the retail area, and using a non bitmac road surface requires cars to slow down, and look for pedestrians, and allows cyclists and pedestrians including those with shopping carts, pushchairs or in wheelchairs to cross more easily. Loading/Parking Providing loading bays will make it easier to run a business in Ladywell. Allowing short stay parking will allow through traffic to stop and use the shops, providing an opportunity for those travelling to or from work to shop, without needing to make an additional car journey, and supporting the local retailers. There should be provision for disabled drivers who want to use the centre. Environmental quality Ladywell Village is a designated Conservation Area. Attractive entry treatments indicating arrival in Ladywell Village will encourage reduced speeds and give a clear indication to drivers that they are entering a shopping / residential area, encouraging more considerate driving. Reducing traffic speeds will reduce traffic noise, and increase air quality. Enhancing the quality of the street, introducing street trees, rationalising signage and removing guardrailing will boost trade, and encourage investment in the buildings themselves. The station has recently been listed and is the entrance to the Ladywell Conservation area. It has the potential to provide a more attractive entry to Ladywell Village, if funding were to be made available, however stronger management of parking on footways and in resident bays would need to be part of any such scheme. Signage Signage should be restricted to essential highway signage in few locations. Direction signage should follow ‘Legible London’ design principles, adapted for cyclists (see Appendices) and be located at the entry to Station Rd and the junction of Algernon Rd and Ladywell Rd near the proposed Toucan Crossing, but without creating an obstruction. Cycling A national and london wide strategic cycle route ‘Waterlink Way’ between Greenwich and South Norwood Country Park emerges from Algernon Road, and continues through Ladywell Fields or at night down Malyons Road. The crossing is due to be converted to a ‘Toucan’ crossing to allow cyclists to safely cross Ladywell Road. The action plan recommends improving the existing poor connection for this cycle route, which currently serves only the most traffic confident cyclists, by permitting shared use of pavements, and clearly designating the cycle lane on Ladywell Bridge. Costs Based on costs of similarly ambitious projects in London in the last three years, Shape estimate the likely costs of moving kerb lines and creating raised parking /loading bays and raised tables at all crossings throughout the retail centre to be in the region of £4,000 per linear metre of roadway. Using this formula, the full scheme supported by local people could cost in the region of £800,000. The estimate can be seen as robust, in that LB Lewisham’s cost estimate for the scheme (a confidential document using contractor’s schedule of rates) indicates a budget of £750, 000 would be required for delivery. LVIG and Shape recognise that this figure may be more than can be allocated from the Local Implementation Plan/ maintenance budgets at this time. Should finding the full sums required be an issue, rather than stall the project, Shape/ LVIG recommend LB Lewisham consider a phased approach to implementation, with phase 1 costs of circa £400, 000, rather than risk non delivery. Ladywell Village needs investment now in a sustainable future, and consultation shows overwhelming support. Best practice guidance ‘Note 03/08’ from the Department of Transport for mixed priority routes like Ladywell Road also recommends a phased approach.
Below: Entry to Ladywell Conservation Area / existing connection to Ladywell Fields / Waterlink Way

5

INTRODUCTION
LADYWELL VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT GROUP Ladywell Village Improvement Group (LVIG) was established in 2008 by local residents concerned about the decline of Ladywell local shopping centre, and at that time, a lack of available support from Council town centre managers due to resource constraints. The area covered by the group is mainly focused on the commercial core of this small local centre. The group holds public meetings every two months and communicates via a webpage www. ladywell.blogspot.com and regular newsletters. The main aims of LVIG are • to improve Ladywell through promoting the partnership with key agencies such as the local authority and South East Trains as well as independent retailers, • attracting resources to the centre • engaging local people in events such as the annual Christmas market and regular community street planting days. An initial opinion survey was carried out to assess local views, which showed that people were concerned in particular about the lack of retail choice, poor environment and dominance of traffic in the area. LVIG established a streetscape sub-group and this carried out a review of the issues affecting the streetscape and local environment (report available from LVIG). The sub-group recommended that a streetscape action plan be commissioned as a way of guiding future improvements. In October 2009 LVIG was successful in bidding for funds from the Mayor’s Fund to commission a streetscape action plan for the centre. LVIG commissioned Shape landscape architects to produce the action plan in consultation with LVIG and local people. SHAPE Shape formed in 2003, bringing together expertise in landscape architecture, urban design, community consultation, and regeneration. Shape are very familiar with working in support of community groups seeking improvements to the public realm, and with the needs of small independent retailers, a number of their urban public realm projects are illustrated on their website at www.shape.eu.com . Shape’s Bridget Snaith led on this project. She is a qualified urban designer, and an enabler for CABE Space, the Governments public space design advisors. Between 2001 and 2007 Bridget worked with small retailers and local people in Waterloo to improve access to shops and retain on street parking on Kennington Road, (middle left) remove ‘sheep pen’ style road crossings on Waterloo Road and Westminster Bridge Road, (top left) improve Emma Cons Gardens, widen footways and introduce a new granite raised table outside the Old Vic Theatre. (bottom). In 2006 Bridget advised LB Lewisham, and the municpalities of Chester and S’Hertogenbosch, Holland on enhancing pedestrian activity and designing out crime & anti social behaviour in public space as part of the ‘Quercus’ project focussed in Ladywell Fields. She has produced design guidance for buildings and landscapes, including shopfront enhancement guidance for conservation areas, and has been Expert Advisor for the Heritage Lottery Fund.

6

INTRODUCTION
PROJECT BRIEF Shape were commissioned to devise an action plan of proposals to improve the streetscape and local environment in Ladywell Village. The action plan should include: • An overall ‘vision’ for the centre and how it could be improved in coming years • Hard and soft landscaping treatments that could be implemented over the short, medium and long-term with illustrations for each • More detailed design proposals for areas where more extensive treatment will be possible such Station Approach where some form of piazza is feasible • Suggestions for ways to improve the signage in the centre • Examples of treatments from similar small centres which have been implemented elsewhere • Suggestions for sources of funding which could be tapped into to help implement the proposal LB Lewisham aim to produce proposals for the highway through Ladywell in 2010 that can be implemented using Transport for London funds, secured for delivery of their Local Implementation Plan in 2011-2012. The LVIG Streetscape Action Plan is intended to inform, and contribute to these proposals. Parts of Ladywell including the commercial core and the train station have recently been designated as a conservation area. This has been taken into account in the streetscape action plan. RESPONSE TO BRIEF The commercial centre of Ladywell Village is currently designed to prioritise the needs of traffic moving through the village over the needs of local residents. This is evidenced by • a narrow footway outside the shops, and generous width roadway for single lane traffic • wide swept corners allowing cars to manoeuvre around bends at speed, making it difficult for them to stop for pedestrians crossing, and meaning pedestrians have to turn right around to see if cars are coming. • railings prevent pedestrians from crossing the road at points which are convenient for them, but would require lower traffic speeds to be safe • the need for pedestrians to step down across roads, rather than requiring cars to rise up across continuous footways • very small island refuges for crossing Ladywell Road near the bus stop, and at the entry to Algernon Road • limited provision for cyclists to park, and no safe connection to Ladywell Fields, a National Cycle Route & strategic london cycle route • the absence of provision for loading for businesses • the absence of parking spaces to allow through traffic to stop and use shops • a lack of provision for people with disabilities in terms of disabled parking space, wide clear footways, at grade road crossings, at grade entry into shops. • lack of enforcement of 20mph speed restrictions The centre should work well for those to whom it is a destination in itself, for people wanting to use the shops, the park, the station, to operate a business or simply reach their homes. Pavement/Highway widths There is currently greater road space through the retail centre than 6.75m two lane minimum required by Lewisham highways. (This road is used for abnormal loads.)In places pavements are so narrow and cluttered that it is difficult to pass others. Pavements could be significantly widened, and or parking bays/ loading bays provided without loss of traffic capacity. This would provide safer, less constricted conditions for pedestrians, and where shared use is desirable, for cyclists, and encourage traffic to slow down through the centre, reducing noise. Wider pavements also provide space for seating, additional cycle parking, and trees, adding facilities for local people and attractive greening. Crossings For pedestrians, guardrails prevent direct crossings of the road where these are desirable, for example to the train station from Algernon Road. Reducing traffic speeds through Ladywell, for instance by introducing raised tables in a non bitmac material, and narrowing the carriageway will allow guardrailing to be removed safely, and will allow people to cross the road at convenient points, rather than being restricted to designated crossings. Corner radii are wide, particularly into/out of Algernon Road, meaning cars can turn corners at relatively high speed. Islands provided near Ladywell Tavern provide a very small refuge for pedestrians crossing one carriageway at a time, with the same detail at the entry to Algernon Road. Neither refuge affords adequate space for a mother with pushchair and small children, a cyclist, or a powered wheelchair user. Both crossing points are well used. Narrowing corner radii and overall road width and raising the road surface to create raised tables of an alternate material to standard bitmac will encourage more considerate driving, and reduced speeds. It will make these crossing points safer. All crossings at side roads entering Ladywell or Algernon Road require pedestrians to step down to road level prioritising car traffic. Not all crossings have cut kerbs. Raising the road to footway level at crossing points, requires cars to slow down, and

7

INTRODUCTION
look for pedestrians/cyclists, and allows cyclists and pedestrians including those with shopping carts, pushchairs or in wheelchairs to cross the road more easily. (see below left) Loading/Parking There are few if any places to stop a car, should you wish to impulse buy. Short stay parking is currently operating informally particularly on Algernon Road, but people have to watch their cars to avoid tickets. Businesses cannot load conveniently as few spaces are provided, and are often issued with tickets. Providing loading bays will make it easier to run a business in Ladywell. Permitting short stay parking will allow through traffic to stop and use the shops, providing an opportunity for those travelling to or from work to shop without needing to make an additional car journey, and supporting the local retailers. Local people are concerned about the poor appearance of many businesses and about vacant premises. Making business operating conditions easier will make the business units more attractive, and increasing footfall through environmental improvements and providing short stay parking will further enhance the viability of the centre. There is no provision for disabled drivers who want to use the centre. There are no short stay spaces at the train station, and people leave cars on the pavement outside. The project should address these shortcomings. Environmental Quality Ladywell Village is a designated Conservation Area. There are few street trees, little space or incentive to sit outside, and the street scene is utilitarian at best, cluttered, damaged and in disrepair in a number of locations. Traffic is often congested, but when roads are moving traffic enters and moves through the village at speed. There is a 20 mile per hour limit, which does not appear to be heeded. Reducing traffic speeds will reduce traffic noise, and increases air quality. For road users, there is no clear indication that they are entering a shopping / residential area, which might encourage more considerate driving and improve trade. Entry treatments that indicate arrival, and encourage reduced speeds are desirable. Action to improve the setting of the Conservation Area by enhancing the quality of the street, introducing street trees, rationalising signage and removing guardrailing will encourage investment in the buildings themselves (see p10) . The station has recently been listed and is the entrance to the Ladywell Conservation area. It has the potential to provide a more attractive entry to Ladywell Village, if funding were to be made available, however stronger management of parking on footways and in resident bays would need to be part of any such scheme. Signage Signage should be restricted to essential highway signage in few locations. Direction signage should follow ‘Legible London’ design principles,adapted for the needs ofcyclists, as at Deptford , and be located at the entry to Station Rd, and the Junction of Algernon Rd / Ladywell Rd near the proposed Toucan Crossing, without creating an obstruction. (see p9) Cycling Ladywell Road is an important connector for local (LCN), regional (SCN) and national cycle routes (NCN). ‘Waterlink Way’ (NCN/SCN) emerges from Algernon Rd, then on through Ladywell Fields or at night down Malyons Rd. An LCN route travels along Ladywell Road and up Adelaide Avenue. The crossing at Algernon Rd is due to be converted to a ‘Toucan’ crossing to allow cyclists to safely cross Ladywell Rd. This action plan recommends improving the existing connection for the NCN/SCN route through Ladywell, as currently only the most traffic confident cyclists are served, by permitting shared use of pavements to Ladywell Fields, and clearly designating the cycle lane on Ladywell Bridge. Longer term, a connection through the railway viaduct is planned.
Above : Loading/ parking bay, Walworth Rd, Southwark Below: road raised to pavement level at side road, The Cut, Lambeth

Long term, consideration of far wider street management issues would be required, to address the underlying and significant problem of traffic congestion in Ladywell.

8

POLICY GUIDANCE
There have been a number of changes recently in thinking about how to design highways in the UK. ‘Manual for Streets’ published in 2007 clearly illustrates this change in thinking. It describes the ‘Place’ function of a street as key, it is no longer enough for streets to be focussed on the needs of vehicles above other needs. Streets need to allow for movement of all types- cars, pedestrians, cyclists, public transport, mobility scooters; they need to allow for access/deliveries; for parking; utilities and lighting; and very importantly the street should be an attractive and safe ‘place’ for people of all ages and abilities, in and out of vehicles. The specific design guidance for roads of the type through Ladywell Village is addressed directly in the Department of Transport document ‘Mixed Priority Routes: A Practitioners Guide’ 2008, and by ‘High Street Rennaissance’, 2008 both documents produced by the Department for Transport, and available on line. Much of this change in thinking has been due to the growing recognition of the importance of walking as a sustainable form of urban transport, as policy makers grow increasingly concerned about our impact on the environment and climate change. There have also been increasing health concerns in the UK as a nation with a growing obesity problem amongst adults and children; concerns over increased congestion of our roads, not least of these concerns congestion caused by children taken to and from school by car; and a poor record of road safety, particularly on roads through retail areas. In London, between October 2000 and July 2003, High Street Kensington underwent a dramatic and unprecedented redesign along European lines, removing guardrails, making crossings that went straight over the road without a need for ‘sheep pen’ guardrailing controlling pedestrians. Footways were widened, carriageways narrowed. For the first time congestion information and accident statistics were available for the UK, supporting long held beliefs that highways could be safe, attractive, and functional for everyone with a lot less clutter. In 2004, Danish Planner, Jan Gehl, completed a report for Central London Partnerships and Transport for London on making London a better city for people, and encouraging walking in the capital. This document highlighted the sometimes unfair distribution of pavement space compared to road space, the low priority given to pedestrians at many designated crossing points, cluttered footways, the problems created by guard railing, the difficulties for parents with small children, or older people in negotiating the streets, and the lack of provision for sitting. The Mayor/Transport for London published a number of guidance documents around the same time, including ‘Making London a Walkable City’ 2004, and ‘Improving Walkability’ 2005, and through Transport for London provided funding to the Boroughs to develop and implement schemes that would address many of the issues raised in Gehl’s report. Signage to encourage walking was also designed by Applied Information Group (AIG) for Central London Partnerships and TfL under a project called ‘ Legible London’, and has been introduced by many Boroughs. (Right) There is an ongoing policy directive from GLA/TfL to the Boroughs to remove street clutter, including guardrailing, rationalise signage, and to make the public realm a more attractive place and a better environment for walking - ‘Better Streets’ is part of the current Mayors ‘Great Outdoors’ strategy, also available on line. In the introduction to the ‘Great Outdoors’ the Mayor states the policy aim of creating ‘A more humane and healthier city where pedestrians and cyclists feel as if the space belongs to them as much as to cars.’ More detail from GLA policy documents is provided in the appendices to this report. Projects using the new design approach pioneered in Kensington have been improving the streetscene around London - Walworth Road, in Southwark, The Cut in Waterloo, (p8) and Camden’s ‘Naked Streets’ project have all made a major difference to the look and feel of busy retail areas in the capital, and provide a model for potential improvements in Ladywell Village, as well as a guide to potential costs. Renewed energy has been going into raising the profile of and providing for cyclists in London. Recent projects include the London cycle hire scheme which opened in July this year, new cycle super highways, and the Mayor of London’s recent suggestion that London should aim for 20% of journeys to be by bike , a level similar to Amsterdam. The presence of a National and major strategic cycle route through the junction of Ladywell Road and Algernon Road also needs to form part of the Streetscape Action Plan.
Legible London Signage, The Cut

9

LEWISHAM’S POLICY CONTEXT
The proposed improvements to Ladywell Village’s streetscape will only be delivered if they demonstrably support delivery of the wider aims of relevant funding and managing organisations – namely London Borough of Lewisham, Transport for London , and the Greater London Authority. The close fit between Greater London Authority/ Transport for London’s priorities and the proposed approach has been highlighted in the previous chapter, and further detail is provided in the appendices to this report. This section focuses more particularly on Lewisham’s policy objectives, and their relationship with those of the Ladywell Streetscape Action Plan. Funding for the delivery of the Action Plan can be secured by the Borough to deliver its objectives through Transport for London, via the Local Implementation Plan (the most likely source of funding for this project’s delivery) and through Section 106 funds, sometimes called ’Planning Gain’ ie. funds gathered from developers to mitigate any adverse impacts of development proposals within the Borough. Development need not be directly located within an area for it to be eligible for Section 106 funds, for example, increasing the number of residents in the Borough through new housing will generate more traffic, therefore investment of Section 106 funds in schemes that encourage walking and cycling elsewhere in the Borough helps to mitigate the impact of the development on traffic within the Borough as a whole. Similar arguments can be applied to adverse impacts on smaller retail areas of large retail developments etc, but only where policy indicates. LEWISHAM’S SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY STRATEGY 2008 -2020 The Borough sets out 6 strategic priorities to build and support sustainable communities of which five can be shown to be supported through the Ladywell Streetscape project. These five priorities are listed below, and followed by a summary of evidence to support each priority : • Safer – where people feel safe & live free from crime, antisocial behaviour and abuse • Empowered & Responsible – where people are actively involved in their local area and contribute to supportive communities • Clean, green & liveable- where people can live in high quality housing and can care for & enjoy their environment • Healthy, active and enjoyable-where people can actively participate in maintaining and improving their health and well-being. • Dynamic and prosperous-where people are part of vibrant communities and town centres, well connected to London and beyond. ‘Safer – where people feel safe & live free from crime, antisocial behaviour and abuse’ The Sustainable Community Strategy report itself states that ‘Feeling safe is about more than crime & policing, it’s also about how an area looks and feels and how people treat one another.’ The proposals for Ladywell aim to increase the attractiveness and openness of the streetscene, thus encouraging more use by pedestrians and increased activity in shops, and in the long term, occupancy of vacant shops. There will be improved sightlines due to decreased visual clutter, more space on the footway and more freedom to safely cross the street, to avoid areas or individuals engendering fear. ‘Personal Security Issues in Pedestrian Journeys’, DETR 1996 identifies the importance of improving natural surveillance as a means of addressing fear of crime while walking in the urban environment through measures such as: encouraging more people to walk; designing streets and squares that are overlooked by buildings; frontages with windows etc. ‘ Local Transport Note 03/08’ published by the Department of Transport showed that the type of improvements proposed when implemented in other UK retail areas increased road safety and resulted in an overall increase in user satisfaction with the environment. Empowered & Responsible – where people are actively involved in their local area and contribute to supportive communities The project has originated within the local community, has had an overwhelmingly positive response from residents and businesses in consultation, and has the support of local elected representatives. It’s delivery by the Borough will demonstrate Lewisham’s commitment to community empowerment. Clean, green & liveable- where people can live in high quality housing and can care for & enjoy their environment. ‘Local Transport Note 03/08’ published by the Department of Transport investigated the impact of carrying out this type of streetscape improvement scheme on 10 ‘Mixed Priority Routes’ throughout the UK i.e. routes through mixed shopping and residential areas that carry high volumes of traffic, a mix of road users – cyclists, pedestrians, cars, and have demand for deliveries and parking. It showed that, with no overall reduction in traffic, there was a reduction in traffic noise, an increase in air quality, increased road safety and an overall increase in user satisfaction with the environment. Healthy, active and enjoyable-where people can actively participate in maintaining and improving their health and well-being. Ladywell Road and Algernon Road are the main access points for Ladywell’s Station, the park at Ladywell Fields, the connection south to Waterlink Way (a strategic cycle route) and the access points for local shopping. Making better connections for pedestrians/cyclists to all of these destinations will have significant health benefits for local people. The proposals in Ladywell Village are aimed at improving the streetscape for walking and cycling by widening

10

LEWISHAM’S POLICY CONTEXT
pavements, linking safely to cycle routes, removing obstacles, and reducing traffic speeds. ‘Local Transport Note 03/08’’s review of similar schemes states that where streets have been improved along the same lines as proposed in Ladywell, pedestrian and cycling activity has increased, and children and mobility impaired users generally feel more confident. The Mayors ‘Draft Air Quality Strategy’ 2002 describes how improving the walking experience will encourage people to switch from cars to public transport, helping the whole community to benefit from the environmental advantages of more sustainable transport. It also describes in detail the health benefits of encouraging walking. Concern about a decline in physical activity and growing obesity in the UK population has prompted health professionals to recommend that adults participate in moderate physical activity for 30 minutes a day, at least three days a week. It is a target which the document states most people could attain through walking for short trips and combining walking with public transport for longer trips. Dynamic and prosperous-where people are part of vibrant communities and town centres, well connected to London and beyond. Local Transport Note 03/08 shows that in the improved streets investigated, improvements in the quality of streetscape have led to a reduction in vacant premises. In Crewe the number of cars stopping to use the shops increased by 20 percent. Transport for London’s Paper Improving Walkability 2005 states ‘From a commercial viewpoint, good walking conditions can benefit trade and competitiveness. A good walking environment will attract customers and investors and ultimately this will be reflected in land and property values and rents. CABE’s report on the impact of high quality streets ‘Paved with Gold’ 2007 states ‘Better streets result in higher market prices. The research shows that in London an achievable improvement in street design quality can add an average of 5.2 per cent to residential prices and an average of 4.9 per cent to retail rents. These findings have a central role to play in justifying investment. They make it possible to use an evidence-based approach to the design, appraisal and funding of street improvement works. It is clear from this work that the rewards from investing in design quality can be very significant’ LOCAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK: Lewisham Local Development Framework: Sustainability Appraisal & Strategic Environmental Framework Assessment: Core strategy – proposed submission version February 2010 Sustainability Appraisal Objectives: Objectives that can be demonstrably supported by the Streetscape Action Plan for Ladywell Village are: Economic • To encourage sustained economic growth. • To encourage and promote employment and new enterprises in Lewisham. Environmental • To improve air quality and reduce noise and vibration. • To reduce car travel and improve accessibility by sustainable modes of transport • To mitigate, and adapt to, the impact of climate change • To maintain and enhance landscapes and townscapes. • To conserve and where appropriate, enhance the historic environment Social • To improve the health of the population. • To reduce crime, anti-social behaviour and the fear of crime. • To encourage a sense of community identity and welfare. • To improve accessibility to leisure facilities, community infrastructure and key local services. Core Strategy Vision for Lewisham 2026, Proposed Submission Version 4.15 ‘Outside of the key areas of physical regeneration, the borough will have further built upon its unique assets, including the preservation of historic areas; the improvement of parks, gardens and open space networks such as the Waterlink Way, ...;’ 5.7 Growing the local economy Core Strategy Objective 3: Increase local employment and training opportunities (see column 1) 5.8 Core Strategy Objective 4: Climate change The streetscape action plan will support the objective by increasing air quality, reducing the number of car journey’s by allowing people to incorporate shopping into existing car journeys through Ladywell Village, and encouraging more people to shop locally, walking or cycling to and through the local centre. 5.10 Core Strategy Objective 7: Open spaces and environmental assets The proposals will enhance the Ladywell Village Conservation Area, and will address the poor connection between Algernon Road and Ladywell Fields - part of Waterlink Way. 5.12 Core Strategy Objective 9: Transport and accessibility ‘To ensure an accessible, safe, convenient and sustainable transport system for Lewisham that meets people’s access needs while reducing the need to travel and reliance on the private car, and which: • promotes choice and better health • improves integration, accessibility and connectivity within the borough and London subregion, and that specifically ...provides for a system of walking and cycling routes and strong links to the green infrastructure network’

11

LEWISHAM’S POLICY CONTEXT
5.14 Core Strategy Objective 10: Safety ‘Create safer and stronger communities by reducing crime and the fear of crime through innovative design and land use policies.’ 5.15 Core Strategy Objective 11: Protect and Enhance Lewisham’s character ‘Protect Lewisham’s urban environment and its local character and distinctiveness, through sensitive and beneficial design, in particular ..the borough’s 26 conservation areas and listed buildings.’ ‘A network of well connected and accessible walking and cycling routes would continue to be provided and upgraded across the borough, including Waterlink Way, ....... through the implementation of Legible Lewisham ...’. 7.4.1 Sustainable movement 7.113 The way we travel and the travel choices available to us are fundamental contributors to the sustainability of the borough and London as a whole. Sustainable movement in Lewisham means contributing to a reduction in traffic congestion and therefore greenhouse gas emissions, which can positively impact the factors influencing climate change. This can be achieved by reducing car travel and improving accessibility through public transport, walking and cycling, particularly in those areas of the borough where accessibility is currently limited. These measures can improve street safety and air quality and contribute to the overall health and general well-being of residents. Core Strategy Policy 14 Sustainable movement and transport The access and safety of pedestrians and cyclists throughout the borough will be promoted and prioritised. A network of high quality, connected and accessible • walking and cycling routes across the borough will be maintained and improved, including Waterlink Way, ...... 7.221 The Plan adopts wide ranging measures to reduce emissions within the borough including: • major long-term interventions such as the extension of the rail network, road construction and road infrastructure changes, aimed to increase sustainable travel modes and reduce congestion CORE POLICIES OPTIONS DISCUSSION This section is relevant to the likelihood of securing Section 106 funds for instance to supplement LIP funding, or for Borough funded shopfront improvement schemes. 7.2.2 RETAIL Option 20 : Accessibility - For the issue of accessibility the option is to encourage greater accessibility by public transport, walking and cycling to all retail and town centres. LAdywell Road is not currently designated a ‘retail area’ within the Borough’s plans. The Borough’s strategy for retail has focussed so far on larger retail centres, however recent consultation on proposed policy’s resulted in the following objection & response Option 21 Local shopping facilities The option for local shopping facilities will be to protect them from change of use or redevelopment where there is an economic demand for such services. In smaller centres and parades, change of use and contraction of the shopping facilities will be considered if evidence is established that there is no economic prospect of such uses continuing. Councillor Peake (ID: 318101) , Lewisham Liberal Democrat Council Group Object Response The importance of town centres (not Lewisham and Catford) elsewhere in the borough is almost totally neglected. We would suggest the Local Development Scheme should include Area Action Plans for other mid-sized town centres including (but not necessarily limited to) Deptford, Downham/Bromley Road, Forest HIll, Lee Green and Sydenham. At the same time, the importance of smaller town centres and

7.4 Building a sustainable community 7.387 This section deals with options that are necessary to secure a sustainable community. This includes: • providing and promoting sustainable transport, including public transport, reducing the need to travel particularly by the private car and improving the walking and cycling environment promoting good design for buildings, places and spaces

12

parades - the most sustainable retail offer for most residents - seems to be considered a side issue by the document. Areas including Crofton Park, Grove Park, and Honor Oak Park are barely covered, and not even described as local hubs, while the success of Brockley Cross over the last decade does not even see the council having the ambition to uprate it to an ‘activity’ hub. Summary Local shops and parades are treated as a side issue when they are the most sustainable form of shopping. Officer’s Response It is agreed that an emphasis on local shopping facilities will make the plan more sustainable. The Core Strategy will be redrafted from its current format presenting a series of options to a more spatially descriptive plan that will describe the Council’s aims to promote local shopping centres and parades.

VISIONING STAGE
The ‘visioning stage of the Ladywell Streetscape Improvement Project set out to identify a coherent set of objectives for the project with participation of local residents/ businesses. Early visioning allowed LVIG to guage local opinion of possible treatments used elsewhere in London, prior to any more detailed design/ costing, and to bring out issues that LVIG members may not have considered to date. Shape’s proposed methodology was to work primarily with a 3D model to scale. This format is accessible to the majority of people and is naturally intriguing. Exhibition boards, even well designed, can be less engaging and harder to interpret than a 3D model. The model was capable of showing existing conditions, and could be adapted allowing options to be explored. To maximise participation by people who had not previously contributed to LVIG’s brief, Shape proposed two visioning events at locations in Ladywell where footfall would be relatively high, and those passing by may have time to participate. LVIG members were informed of both events. The two locations proposed were morning rush hour at Ladywell Station, as residents wait for trains to work, and a marquee in Ladywell Fields on a Sunday morning near the cafe, a venue likely to attract families, and a range of ages. Photographs of the model were reproduced on annotated boards at the second event to supplement information that could be provided verbally, and allow information/options to be communicated more succinctly to participants. The annotated images are reproduced in subsequent pages. Views were recorded on a form, an ‘opinions log’ ,which was constructed as a reminder to consultants to discuss the full range of issues with participants. There were many copies of the form available at the events, and pens were provided. The form used is illustrated in the appendices to this report.

14

VISIONING STAGE
EVENT 1 The first event ran from 7.30am to 9.30 am on April 30th at Ladywell Station. Ages ranged from mid twenties to 60+, but the majority were aged 2555. A mix of ethnicities, mainly white, or African / Carribean and mixed race. Gender was balanced. A lot of people were interested in the model, and some delayed journeys to participate. The atmosphere was pressurised, but a lot of people participated in a short space of time. • • NUMBERS: there were 97 recorded opinions. WIDER PAVEMENTS/ SHORT TERM PARKING: 90 people were in favour. Only seven people said no. Concern was expressed about potential effect on traffic flow through the village (especially for buses stopping/ passing), and use of back streets as cut throughs. On parking, several people asked for longer duration (eg, 15-20 minutes). INTERSECTION: The options needed to be re configured frequently, on the model which was cumbersome, and the discussion was not followed by everyone, perhaps due to time pressures, but of those that did pick one rather than none or both, 20 supported option A (Algernon Rd turning unaffected by pedestrian crossing) and 11 picked option B (pedestrian crossing nearer station, greater impact on existing traffic flows). SEATING/ TREES: more people supported street tree planting than seating(58 compared to 43). STATION FORECOURT: some support here (41) Questions by some participants show that this may be more a case of emphasis, rather than lack of popularity for station improvements. People felt Ladywell Road should be the focus of investment, and were concerned money should not be ‘diverted’ to improving the station area. Some comments were made about providing more parking/ abuse of residential parking by station users -Malyons road used at present.

• • •

15

VISIONING STAGE
Other issues were raised for further discussion • some type of zoning coming into effect soon re parking/ unloading? Including Henrietta Street. • water main problem in front of tavern • concern over empty shops & condition of shopfronts • EVENT 2 The second event was held in Ladywell Fields between the Cafe and the smaller children’s play area on a Sunday morning between 10 am and 1.30 pm. Primarily respondents were white, with a few participants of other ethnicities. Gender was balanced. The majority of respondents were between 30 and 60, though some young people (teens) participated. Many respondents were parents accompanied by children aged from pre school to primary school age. In general people were able to give more time, and asked more questions before recording opinions, which may have resulted in the higher response rate across more detailed sections of the opinion log. • • • NUMBERS: 46 participants recorded opinions, however many of these were a single response recorded by a family group or couple. WIDER PAVEMENTS/ SHORT TERM PARKING: 43 in favour of wider pavements. Those against were concerned about effect elsewhere, or cited a link to congestion. 37 were in favour of short term parking / loading bays. Abstentions possibly due to wish to prioritise walking/cycling. 20-25 minutes requested again several times. INTERSECTION: 37 responses overall, probably due to use of boards to set out options, and less frenetic pace of consultation over all. 21 favoured option A, 16 favoured option B. Many participants complained about use of Algernon Road as a cut through avoiding Lewisham town centre, and congestion in Ladywell as a whole, • too many cars. SEATING/ TREES: more people supported street tree planting than seating(41 compared to 35). Overall, the percentage of respondents at Event 2 in favour of these items was higher than at Event 1, perhaps reflecting that families with children have more need for seating, and perhaps that participants had longer to consider their responses. 1 person stated they would be against seating. STATION FORECOURT: 36 supported improvements to the station forecourt . Several mentions of ‘not as important as Ladywell Road’

Other issues were raised for further discussion • cycle lane through Ladywell Fields not currently connected to Algernon Road. • more safe crossings needed on Ladywell Road, not just opposite station. • concern over empty shops & condition of shopfronts • need for residents parking scheme, as informal park and ride in operation particularparticularly on streets within 10 minutes walk of the station. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS Spreadsheets showing all recorded opinions form an appendix to this report. Total recorded opinions: 143 (97 event 1, 46 event 2) Wider Pavements /PaRKING: 93% in favour (93% /93% ) Intersection : No preference: 52% (68% / 20%) Option A: 29% (20% / 45%) Option B: 19% (11% / 35%) Seating : 55% in favour (44% / 76%) Trees: 69% in favour (59% / 89%) Station Forecourt : 54% in favour (42% / 78%)

16

CONSULTATION STAGE
Following the visioning exercise, design plans were developed with CAD software, to ensure alignments were suitable for highways use, and that swept paths, particularly of buses and heavy goods vehicles could be accomodated turning into and out of a narrowed Algernon Road to Ladywell Bridge, which is a significant /frequent manouevre. The designs were discussed with LB Lewisham through two iterations, until the Borough were satisfied that wider stakeholder consultation was appropriate. The station forecourt area had been supported for redesign at visioning stage with a caveat that this should be undertaken only if funding were not required to be diverted from the retail centre. LB Lewisham advised funds for station surrounds were no longer available from TfL, therefore further design development was not undertaken, and changes were not included in consulted designs. The first plans proposed that the bus stops should remain in the existing location, but be set into pull ins i.e. pavement widened beyond bus stops, but vehicles still able to pass buses as at present. This was in response to concerns raised by local people that buses would add to congestion if it was not possible to pass at stops. TfL Guidance on bus pull ins was used to develop the design. LB Lewisham advised that TfL would not approve designs showing bus pull ins, and that the buses should stop in the carriageway. They also advised that this design had been shown elsewhere not to add significantly to congestion, as bus stopping times were short, usually less than 1 minute, and buses were not so frequent as to create more than a temporary hold up to some journeys. Junction capacity was identified as the primary factor in congestion. A zebra crossing at Slaygrove Place junction with Ladywell Road would be subject to a standard test. Shape requested LB Lewisham undertake a test as part of their TfL funded design work for the project. In other Lewisham projects, police had raised objections to parking bays within crossing zig zags. It was noted that a minimum of two zig zags is required, and that in other boroughs, crossings are located close to junctions, and have parking bays within a few metres. This design element would be potentially controversial, and delivery was outside control of the design team. Shape therefore recommended to LVIG that the need for crossing relocation and the priority of parking /loading bays be established through further consultation. LB Lewisham also advised ‘structural’ kerbs and guardrailing on the bridge could not be removed. STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION Stakeholder consultation was held with • LB Lewisham Highways • representatives of disability groups • representatives of cycling groups using coloured CAD plans, visioning models, precedent phoitographs and the visualisation image on the cover to this report. Transport for London officer contacts were provided by LB Lewisham, but despite repeated attempts no response was given, calls and emails were not returned. Carol Mew, Lewisham Disability Coalition, 6th July 2010 • Concern over abuse of any on street parking/ loading spaces, which need to be enforced to function. Parking restrictions sometimes not well enforced in LB Lewisham, and drivers block footways • Need for very clear delineation of designated parking areas, road edges and street furniture locations, using strong contrast of materials for visually impaired. • Need to designate a disabled bay. Very little disabled parking available to allow movement impaired people to shop anywhere in Lewisham. Many reliant on cars for access. It is a good time to make local businesses and shops accessible for disabled people – not just parking space but lift footway at shop entrances as it is renewed, to get rid of steps at shop entries. A controlled crossing is much needed for disabled people, would prefer the entire junction of Algernon & Ladywell Road to be controlled, but will be improved cf present situation with shorter crossing distances and wider footways. raised tables at road crossings will aid mobility impaired. Another controlled crossing at Ladywell Tavern end would be good. Not keen on shared use of footway with cyclists.

• • •

Roger Stocker Lewisham Cyclists (LCC), 6th July 2010 Moving the crossing closer tot he junction would be a good idea Preferred shared pavement for cyclists and pedestrians over the bridge to segregated lanes Not too concerned about narrowing the road way and introducing parking/loading bays between the junction and Malyons Road Would prefer no parking or loading bays, but understands why businesses would like them A connection over the bridge is needed, as longer term plans for routes not crossing the bridge will take time to deliver. Carole Crankshawe, LB Lewisham Cycling officer 14th July 2010 Linking to Waterlink Way will be very good. Waterlink Way a designated route of national and strategic significance for cycling – part of the national cycle network route from South Coast to London, therefore Sustrans should also be consulted. Recognised in a number of different policy

17

CONSULTATION STAGE
documents and designations, including ‘Greenways’. Shared surfaces are preferable to segregated paths on footways, cycle route segregation found to be a cause of greater conflict, with cyclists behaving more aggressively. Shared surface tends to promote more care and consideration between users. A shared surface is being implemented by the Borough to the east of the entrance to Ladywell Fields already. The Boroughs own cycling strategy set out in its CRISP report from 2008 asks for many elements of the proposed design, and the existing crossing is capable of low cost conversion to a Toucan crossing (bikes & pedestrians) in short term – this also needs to include highway narrowing, and there is permission for it already. The crossing could move closer to the junction without adding significantly to capital costs. (if permissions can be obtained) On road designated green painted cycle path in same direction as traffic flow on Ladywell Bridge a good thing to help reduce traffic speeds to existing 20mph limit. Tom Sharland, Sustrans, 9th August 2010 ‘Sustrans strongly support these proposals, which will help to address one of the major barriers to cycling on the Waterlink Way between Greenwich and South Norwood Country Park.’ BUSINESS CONSULTATION Businesses were consulted by door to door visits during trading hours, and owners/managers opinions recorded, & summarised below. Businesses who were not open at the time of the visits, or where owners /managers were not on the premises were given a questionnaire, appended to thsi report. LADYWELL ROAD Masons Frequently has problems loading. Would benefit from a loading bay on the station access road. Very pleased with the proposed approach, and likes the visualisation. Geddes Not available. No response to questionnaire Oscars Very supportive of the ideas. And would be keen to support the best possible scheme. Would like to see something happen over the next few years, and concerned if the scheme is too ambitious it will not happen at all. Something that could be implemented one step at a time would be good, a phased approach. Loading a problem, often gets parking tickets when loading. Sebastian Roche Supportive of the scheme. Something needs to be done the street is a mess. Improvements welcome. Short stay parking spaces would be very helpful. Some green and trees would be a priority. Ladywell DIY Drainage has been a problem, the shop is below street level and at the lowest point. The shop has been flooded more than once. Concerned about increased congestion, but welcomes short stay parking bays and loading bays. Has problems loading, picking up goods for deliveries, even if just for a few minutes often gets tickets. The shops can cooperate on delivery times, and would find restricted times for deliveries problematic. Chip Shop A fantastic opportunity for Ladywell. Has been here 19 years. Currently Ladywell Road is not a relaxing place to be, people just want to get their things and go. Obstacles on the pavement a problem. It would be great to have wider pavements with trees and places to sit. Pavement cafes. Ladywell Supermarket(two businesses 111/54) Support the proposals Ladywell Kebab House Support the proposals Launderette Anything that helps the businesses and encourages local people to make use of their shops would be supported. Ladywell Tavern Should be a zebra crossing over Ladywell Road by Slaygrove. Supports the proposals Car Wash Not available. No response to questionnaire Engedi Designs Generally a good idea. More concerned about crime and ASB than environmental quality. Home 2U A good idea. Would like to see traffic speeds reduced, and loading/short stay parking would help the business.

18

CONSULTATION STAGE
DPNA Not available. No response to questionnaire Xpressions Pavement outside shop dangerous, people often tripping. Supports the proposed scheme. Coral Bookmaker Supports the scheme, it would be a much nicer place. ALGERNON ROAD Yes or Yes Not available. No response to questionnaire Village News Likes the ideas but wants to see the detail of the scheme.Wouldn’t want a tree to obscure his sign. Would like parking and delivery bays, and would likes the area to look more attractive. Tattoo Studio Would like to see the proposals implemented but concerned about loss of trade in construction period. Sunrise Ceramics Likes the look of the scheme, but concerned that the proposals would add to her journey time when she has to travel for business. Would like to see far better public transport connections and less congestion. Rumbles Sandwich Bar Parking/Loading bays would be good for business, like the look of the proposals. Village Barber Not available. No response to questionnaire Rose Corner Very supportive of the proposals Cafe Not available. No response to questionnaire RESIDENT CONSULTATION Shape presented the proposed approach at two public meetings: The Ladywell Community Forum on 8th June, and the Ladywell Village Implementation Group Forum on 21st July. At both events the scheme was well received. Local people wer concerned it should be delivered and urged a practical approach be favoured, including options for phasing delivery as funding became available. The visioning models were used to illustrate the action plan’s approach on the LVIG website, and questionnaires were distributed to (1000 ?) households in the Ladywell area along with a newsletter briefly outlining the thinking behind proposals. The website images and newsletter stimulated some debate. Again the majority liked the proposed vision for Ladywell, but concerns were raised that there would be increased congestion through the Village Centre as a result of highway narrowing. The questionnaire (illustrated right) allowed residents to say if they supported the principles behind the scheme, and then asked a number of questions that were aimed at identifying community priorities, specifically around the issue of crossing location and parking provision. 52 completed questionnaires were returned. The detailed results are tabulated over leaf. Generally 37 respondents stated they were in favour of wider pavements, and giving more priority to people who are walking/cycling /using the shops 8 respondents had no stated view 2 respondents felt the proposals would add to congestion/pollution 1 respondent felt smartening up the shopfronts was all that was needed 1 respondent wanted a safer cycle way on the bridge 3 respondents did not want cyclists sharing pavements. Space for further comments was provided on the backs of the questionnaires, and these comments are summarised below.

Comments Empty Shops an eyesore. Issues with visibility of 'green man' Proposal will encourages sense of community Would give more 'villagey' feel Would encourage more business Wants trees (x4) Bicyclist does not feel safe on bridge Make Gillian Street dead end Derelict shops are problem Dustbins on pavement are problem Any reduction in traffic flow will increase pollution Parking vital for small shops Crime worries, including street drinking Wants segregated cycle lane at edge of pavement not shared use ( x5) Traffic getting worse, this will not help( x2) Shops just need lick of paint/ sharpening up Buildings badly maintained Drainage problems at present should be addressed by scheme.

19

CONSULTATION STAGE
Ladywell Village Improvement Group: Streetscape Improvements Consultation
LVIG are looking at how roads in Ladywell Village could be better for local people going to the shops, station, bus stops and Ladywell Fields. Initial consultation shows support for wider pavements, seats & trees, short stay parking, and moving the crossing closer to the station.

Please give us your views using this questionnaire • then bring it to the LVIG Forum on 21st July, • or drop it in to Oscars Cafe on Ladywell Road.
More information is available on the LVIG website on http://ladywell.blogspot. com. Put any thoughts /comments on the back of your questionnaire

Please circle yes or no to say whether you agree or disagree with these statements.
I only cross Ladywell Road using the pedestrian lights ......... yes
Ladywell Village’s roads and pavements as they are now - most of the space is for cars and other vehicles.

no no no no no no no no no no no no no no

I only cross Ladywell Road at the lights or islands ............... yes I feel safe to cross Ladywell Road anywhere ....................... yes I have difficulty getting over Ladywell Road ........................ yes It’s not convenient to cross the road at the lights now ......... yes If there was no guard rail, and roads were narrower, I could cross where I want ........................................................ yes The crossing should go more directly to the station ............. yes Moving the crossing lights would be important for me ......... yes I often use the station or bus stops on Ladywell Road .......... yes I have to cross the road to walk/cycle to the park ............... yes

Ladywell Village’s roads and pavements redesigned to give more priority to people walking, and shopping, and improve the environment.

I usually walk or cycle to the shops .................................. yes I drive to work using Ladywell Road /Algernon Road............. yes I’d like to be able to park in the village to pop into the shops yes Short stay parking outside the shops is a priority for me....... yes

What do you think about wider pavements, and giving more priority to people who are walking/ cycling / using the shops? ..................................................................................................... ..................................................................................................... .....................................................................................................
continue on the back of the sheet if you wish.

20

21

CONSULTATION STAGE
COMMENTARY ON CONSULTATION RESULTS The large majority of people do not feel safe to cross Ladywell Road anywhere, and many only cross at the lights, however the majority felt that if guard railing were removed they could cross where they wanted. More people felt crossing lights were currently in an inconvenient location, however opinion was evenly split as to whether the crossing should be moved. More people felt short stay parking should be provided, many because they felt it would support the businesses, rather than for their own purposes. However, short stay parking was not a priority for the majority of respondents. CONCLUSION The consultation results support the view that the streetscape in Ladywell Village is not currently meeting the needs of local people. Stakeholders are in favour of the proposals, which offer an opportunity to improve quality of life for residents of Ladywell Village, and support the sustainable future of the local retail centre. In addition they offer the chance to create a safe cycle link in a strategic cycle route. The needs of disabled people should be considered, and the opportunity taken to make Ladywell accessible to Lewisham residents who have restricted provision elsewhere in the Borough. Results indicate that while the overriding aims of the scheme are supported by residents - widening pavements, and giving more priority to people who are walking, cycling and using the shops, the crossing location need not be changed if this would add to the difficulty of implementing the scheme. The potential to relocate the crossing should be investigated however, as it will ensure greater use of the crossing, particularly by cyclists ,who should be encouraged to use the proposed safer shared surface route to Ladywell Fields. Loading for businesses near the crossing is problematic. The suggestion of creating a loading bay on the station approach road may well be sufficient to resolve this difficulty. In the long term, consideration of far wider street management issues are required to address the underlying problem of traffic congestion in Ladywell.

22

ACTION PLAN
Ladywell Streetscape Action Plan
Outline Design Drawing, After Consultation.

Raised tables at crossing points in centre
ad Algernon Ro

Gillian Street

Pavements widened, with raised loading/parking bays.

Pavements widened, with loading/parking bays.

Raised table with non bitmac surface at intersection. Crossing relocated to near desire line . Guardrails removed.

ll Road Ladywe

Existing Crossing

On road loading only bay on Station Road

Pavements widened with maximum number raised loading /parking bays. Raised table with non bitmac surfacing at intersection. Paved island in centre lengthened. Detailed for occasional overrun. (see Richmond Centre). Options review to include potential for zebra crossing Toucan Crossing - for cycles & pedestrians. Cyclists may share pavement to Ladywell Fields & to night route down Malyons Road to ‘Waterlink Way’. On road cycle lane from Ladywell Fields. Joins with pavement before Station Road
Malyons Road

Dashed line shows existing kerb. Pavements widened, bus stops in carriageway per TfL preference

23

ACTION PLAN
Ladywell Streetscape Action Plan
Option for Phase 1 / Reduced Cost Scheme

a Algernon Ro

Gillian Street
Raised table with non bitmac surface at intersection. Crossing relocated to near desire line. Guardrails removed. Dashed line shows existing kerb. Bus stop opposite Malyons Road moves toward centre line.

Pavements as existing with on road loading/parking bays.

d

Ladywe

ll Road

Existing Crossing Pavements widened with maximum number raised loading /parking bays. On road loading only bay on Station Road
Toucan Crossing - for cycles & pedestrians. Cyclists may share pavement to Ladywell Fields & to night route down Malyons Road to ‘Waterlink Way’. On road cycle lane from Ladywell Fields. Joins with pavement before Station Road

Review potential for Zebra Crossing

Road Malyons

Right: preferred scheme, estimated cost £7-800,000 Above: reduced cost Phase 1 scheme, estimated cost £250-400,000

24

APPENDICES
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Conservation Area Shopfront Policy, Funding for works to Buildings in Conservation Areas Signage -Legible London design information GLA/ TfL/ Mayor of London Policy Schedule Visioning Survey form Business ‘Questionnaire’

6. Cycling policy documents (extract from CRISP report) 7. Controlled Parking Zone Plan

APPENDIX 1
Conservation Area Shopfront Policy, Funding for works to Buildings in Conservation Areas Conservation Area 5.3 The proposed conservation area also includes the infill development of the late 19th and early 20th century that completed the Jerrard streets as well as the commercial core of Ladywell, known as Ladywell Village, along Ladywell Road between the railway bridge and Slagrove Place. This area contains some of the oldest houses and pubs of Ladywell and Edwardian commercial properties that were constructed around 1900 in response to the rapidly increasing community around them. LDF – Development Policies and Site Allocations, Preferred Options Report U10 Shopfronts The Council will seek to establish and maintain shopfronts of a high design quality by: (a) requiring the retention of shopfronts of quality, either original to the building, or of particular value. (b) requiring all new shopfronts including signs, to relate well to the original framework and scale of the building within which they are placed, which will include: a. retaining or reinstating existing original fascia and pilaster columns which from the window surrounds including where shopfronts are combined b. ensuring that materials relate well to the building. Preferred materials will be timber, and the use of aluminium discouraged. (c) discouraging open shopfronts without a glazed screen that break up the continuity of a shopping frontage (d) requiring wherever possible separate access to any residential accommodation on other floors, and encouraging the restoration of such access if already removed. (e) requiring the provision of suitable access for people with disabilities in new shopfronts. (f) including street numbering on new shop fronts. (g) making provision in the design for storage or refuse bins where feasible. In Conservation Areas the Council will additionally: (h) require the retention and refurbishment of shopfronts that are original to the building and/or contribute to the special architectural or historic character or appearance of the Conservation Area (i) require all new shopfronts, and the materials used for shopfronts to preserve or enhance the special architectural or historic character or appearance of the Conservation Area. U11 Shop and Building Signs, Advertisements and Poster Hoardings and Other Advertisement Displays Shop signs, including projecting signs should normally be located at fascia level. Moving digital displays and message boards and intermittent or flashing signs will not normally be acceptable. Within Conservation Areas and residential areas, internally illuminated box signs, will not normally be permitted unless they can be successfully related to the design and detail of the building, and do not detract from the special character of a group of buildings or a street. Other advertisements including shop advertisements should be of a high quality design and use appropriate materials. The Council will resist the display of poster hoardings which are considered to be out of scale and character with the building/site on which they are displayed. Normally refuse permission for temporary promotional banners or other forms of temporary advertising where they would detract from the character or appearance of a conservation area. Temporary hoardings may be suitable for some form of public art. LADYWELL CONSERVATION AREA FUNDING SOURCE REVIEW 01 September 2010 1. HERITAGE LOTTERY FUND 1.1 HERITAGE GRANT AIM: General Purpose assistance with heritage renovation, with emphasis on community involvement and learning AMOUNT: £50k to £1m (small grant), higher available APPLICANTS: ‘organisations’ and partnerships, with emphasis on NFP’s DEADLINE: Rolling programme, two stage application. First stage not funded. COMMENT: public benefit required if funding going to private sector 1.2 TOWNSCAPE HERITAGE INITIATIVE AIM: Renovation, in areas needing regeneration, again w/ emphasis on community training / participation AMOUNT: £500,000 to £2m APPLICANTS: emphasis on local partnerships DEADLINE: 30 November 2010, two stage process COMMENT: not a substitute for building maintenance; emphasis on restorations/ save from dereliction Public realm improvements cannot exceed 25% of grant. 1.3 YOUR HERITAGE AIM: Research /interpretation/ education programmes by and for local people around local heritage AMOUNT: £3000 - £50,000 APPLICANTS: organisations (not private) DEADLINE: rolling programme COMMENT: does include capital works

2. BIG LOTTERY 2.1 AWARDS FOR ALL AIM: improving local communities and lives of people most in need – stronger, healthier: improving rural and urban environments – so communities better able to access / enjoy AMOUNT: £300 to £10,000 APPLICANTS: not for profit group. DEADLINE: rolling programme COMMENT: broad remit but check before applying; need to spend within one year 2.2 BIG LOCAL TRUST Setting up local trust with local benefit closes 23 September 3. ENGLISH HERITAGE 3.1 PARTNERSHIP SCHEMES IN CONSERVATION AREAS AIM: Fund restorations, reinstatements, works to public realm, and improved management/operations of historic properties AMOUNT: varies – contributions required from property owners APPLICANTS: Local Councils (3rd party only under special circumstances) DEADLINE rolling COMMENT: Prioirity given to ‘At Risk Register’ locations. Requires match funding and business case, esp showing improved management Reference made to assisting local economy and sustainable communities 4. ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE FUND AIM: Renovate properties of acknowledged historic or architectural importance AMOUNT: varies APPLICANTS: Trusts –not private owners DEADLINE : See website

HELPFUL WEBSITES: English Heritage: Historic Environment – Local Management (HELM) - www.helm.org.uk Heritage Alliance – Heritage Funding Directory www.heritagelink.org.uk

APPENDIX 2
Signage -Legible London design information. Please note: Many users will be cyclists. Signs in Ladywell should include markings symbols and routes for cyclists as in Deptford.

APPENDIX 3
GLA/ TfL/ Mayor of London Policy Schedule Note: the following are excerpts from policy documents. This is not an exhaustive list, but indicative of the GLA policy framework, and the importance of works such as those proposed to the Authority. GREATER LONDON AUTHORITY local authorities of a local walking strategy, including planning mechanisms as a key part of implementation. London Planning Documents • The Walking Plan for London (TfL 2004, Objective 4), says that the needs of pedestrians should be fully considered in all public and private development proposals and that designs should maximise pedestrian access and convenience and minimise crime risks. • The Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy, TfL, 2001, says that TfL will work with the London Boroughs and others to make London one of the most walking friendly cities for pedestrians by 2015. • The London Plan (Policy 3C.20) sets out criteria which Development Plan policies should follow for improving conditions for walking. mean less use of cars and congested public transport services. Many journeys by car are short and could transfer to walking. Also, by making walking a more pleasant activity, people can be encouraged to walk to a nearer destination rather than drive to a more distant one. If people walk rather than use public transport modes this can reduce the need for costly public transport upgrades. From a commercial viewpoint, good walking conditions can benefit trade and competitiveness. A good walking environment will attract customers and investors and ultimately this will be reflected in land and property values and rents. Developers therefore have a direct financial interest in quality public realm.

LONDON’S GREAT OUTDOORS ‘Well designed and decently maintained public spaces can bring communities and people together and encourage physical and cultural activity, recreation and play. They can restore a sense of place, identity and pride in an area, and play a big part in attracting businesses and jobs. Shabby and hard to use public spaces can form barriers between people and places, create the impression that an area is struggling and unloved, and usher too many people into their cars to hurry through and away........ By investing in high quality public space now, we can begin to adapt London to continue to be a great, a successful, and an eminently ‘liveable’ city for the 21st century..’

The value of walking improvements Walking should be encouraged because it is the most efficient and the only fully sustainable mode of travel. Yet walking as a mode of travel has been declining in London. The Walking Plan for London seeks to reverse this trend. Improved walking conditions can: • Increase the proportion of travel made on foot • Enable greater use of public transport • Improve personal health • Help those who have least travel choices • Benefit the environment • Encourage trade and competitiveness • Increase land and property values From a transport viewpoint, increased walking can

Identify key actions needed to achieve the target, and identify the principal risks to target achievement and how these will be managed Statutory consultees include police, TfL, disable people’s orgs,

Demonstrate how the views of consultees have been taken into account, other orgs/groups consulted should be identified The ‘place- shaping ‘ role needs to be identified in the 3 year Impact report Other priorities include tackling climate change, obesity, crime & disorder, and economic development & regeneration.

WALKING POLICY Tfl Improving Walkability 2005 ‘DETR Encouraging Walking’, 2000, “Land use planning is the most important long term solution to our transport needs. We need to change the way that we plan, with greater emphasis on enabling access by walking…” ‘Walking in Towns and Cities’, Eleventh Report of the Environment, Transport and Regional Affairs Committee, May 2001, Recommended the preparation by all

Key features : an evidence based identification of Borough Transport Objectives – lips must be firmly grounded in evidence and analysis of local hallenges

and issues within the broader context of the goals, challenges and outcomes contained in the MTS Major Schemes are subject to the step appraisal and approval process, and funded through a competitive bidding process

The Mayor’s Draft Air Quality Strategy, September 2002 This strategy is focused on improving London’s air quality towards the challenging objectives in the government’s National Air Quality Strategy. Walking is a pollution free mode of transport and increased levels of walking will actively contribute to cleaner air within London 2.3.3 Social inclusion Walking is unique in being able to promote equality and reduce social exclusion. Walking is a free means of travel that can provide access to most facilities and financial status does not limit opportunity. Activities that involve local people in the development of projects can help to strengthen the local community and reduce people’s worries about personal security. Creating a walkable environment has the ability to promote accessibility, particularly for those in deprived communities by: _ improving access to passenger transport links 2.3.2 A better environment Walking has the least external environmental impacts of all forms of travel. Motorised travel has significant impacts on the environment and air quality, despite improvements such as catalytic converters. The most effective way of reducing the impact of travel on the environment is to reduce the number of motorised vehicle trips. Short car journeys, of two kilometres or less, contribute disproportionately to air pollution, since engines and catalytic converters do not work efficiently until properly warmed up. In a dense and mixed urban environment such as London there is great scope to create walkable environments with local facilities and good links to public transport where a car is not necessary. Walking cannot replace all car trips, however, many short trips can be made on foot, and longer trips can be made by more sustainable modes where walking is just one element of the journey. _ supporting the local economy _ strengthening the local community _ providing a no-cost alternative to public transport _ improving travel for those unable to drive because of age, mobility or lack of access to a car. If residents are to overcome the anonymity of many neighbourhoods and know the people living close by, it is necessary for them to share time and space with each other. This is what happens when people walk their local streets rather than drive from one front door to another. This helps to engender trust and underpins civic organisations such as residents and tenants associations and is particularly crucial to the lives of people in disadvantaged communities. In addition, more and more people can enjoy town centres in the evening with improvements like better lighting and pedestrian crossings. The RNIB have found that many older people would visit their town

TfL Business Plan & Investment programme includes the following to deliver Mayoral Priorities • Major initiatives to promote walking & Cycling, improve the public realm and where appropriate promote shared use of road space

Improving the walking experience will encourage people to switch from cars to public transport, helping the whole community to benefit from the environmental advantages of more sustainable transport.

LIP needs engagement with LSP priorities, sustainable Communities Strategies and Local Area Agreements From ‘Walking Plan 2004’ The Mayor’s Draft London Ambient Noise Strategy, March 2003 Increased levels of walking will contribute to the reduction of ambient noise and increased levels of walking may be partially dependent on strategies to reduce noise to create a more pleasant environment. The Mayor’s Draft Energy Strategy, January 2003 Energy is central to life in London and the way we use energy has huge implications for our environment, economic regeneration and social equity. Walking is the most energy efficient mode of transport for travelling short distances and increased levels of walking will actively contribute to greater energy efficiency within London.

centres in the evening if there were attractions for them and the pedestrian environment was improved. 2.3.4 Healthier lifestyles According to a health survey of England and Wales, 60% of men and 70% of women are not reaching recommended levels of physical activity. (DoH 1999) The 2002 Health Survey for England showed that a sixth (16%) of boys and girls aged 2 – 15 are obese and almost a third (30%) are overweight. (DoH 2002) Health professionals recommend that adults participate in moderate physical activity for 30 minutes a day, at least three days a week. The regime is equally as effective when distributed over three separate 10 minute sessions. It is a target which most people could attain through walking for short trips and combining walking with public transport for longer trips. Brisk walking for 20 minutes uses the same energy as swimming for 10 minutes or playing football for 12 minutes and is shown to help reduce the risk of cardio-vascular disease, help control weight and strengthen bones. In children and young people, walking can be promoted as part of the daily journey to and from education establishments and leisure activities with the following benefits: _ reduces the risk of obesity and associated health risks _ provides opportunities for socialising _ develops personal independence and self-esteem _ maximises bone density

_ forms a positive life-long habit. From young adulthood to middle age, walking can become part of the travel routine to and from work and leisure activities with the following benefits: _ becoming more active in middle age is associated with lower mortality _ develops a healthy physical activity habit _ reduces cholesterol levels in men who walk more than 2.5 hours per week _ lowers blood pressure in those with hypertension _ can help protect against osteoporosis after the menopause. In older-age walking is the most important physical activity. The benefits of physical activity can still be gained if walking is taken up in later life: _ reduces all-cause mortality and hospital admissions for elderly people who start being vigorously active (brisk/fast walking) adds healthy years of life _ improves muscle bulk, and strength _ preserves daily living activities and helps avoid isolation or institutionalisation. Fundamentally the promotion of physical activity in the population costs less than the healthcare required by its absence. 2.3.5 Boosting the economy Central London Partnership’s recent publication ‘Quality Streets’, states ‘London, being the UK’s capital, is the UK’s ‘shop window’, as well as being a major contributor to national GDP. Ensuring London’s success is fundamental to the continued competitiveness of the UK as a whole. Central to that success is maintaining London as a place where people want to live and work, invest in and visit. A vibrant, attractive

street scene and well managed, safe streets are key components of this – environments that encourage people to walk, either as a leisure activity or means of transport.’ The importance of a good walking environment as a fundamental component of town centre vitality was underlined in a recent study of 12 London town centres (Harris Research, Town Centre Survey, Oct 1999). The study revealed that 44% of all visitors arrived by foot. Shopping centre locations surveyed included Richmond, Sutton, Tooting, Acton, Angel, Barking, Bethnal Green, Eltham High Street, Harrow, Kings Road West, Muswell Hill and Thornton Heath. TfL recently carried out a literature review on the economic impacts of pedestrian environments. The review included a number of case studies of other UK cities including Oxford, Leeds and Edinburgh and developed a series of indicators of economic vitality following the introduction of public realm or pedestrian improvements. In all of the case studies the city centre’s position in the UK’s retail rankings remained high or improved, prime retail rents remained steady or improved and office rents and air quality also improved. This research also suggests a strong link between streets with fast moving traffic and poor quality shopping. Many shoppers want to visit places like Covent Garden or other well paved areas safe from traffic, where they can sit, eat and drink outdoors and be entertained. Tourism remains vital to the economy in London and is directly linked to the pedestrian environment. In 2001 there were over 28 million visitors travelling to London and 90% of these visitors use public transport and walk. These tourists spend around £6 billion annually during their visits. Reassessing road space and priority given to cars can reduce vehicle speeds and improve road safety. TfL recently commissioned research into 20mph zones in London and published the results in LRSU

Safety Research Report No.2, 2003 (from TRL research in unpublished project report PR/T/077/03). The conclusions were:

_ road user casualties within the zones reduced by

about 45% and fatal and serious (KSI) casualties reduced by about 57% _ flows in the treated streets fell by around 15% _ accident migration onto surrounding roads was not found to be a problem. Conflicts can occur with pedal cyclists, although in 2002 only six incidents were recorded, of which two were classified as serious. Compared to the 7,457 pedestrian casualties in 2002, this doesn’t appear to be a significant casualty issue, but it is likely that many other incidents go unreported. The perceived safety issue of pedestrian and cycle conflicts is far more significant. Illegal and inconsiderate pavement cycling can be a major deterrent to walking, particularly for older and more vulnerable pedestrians

APPENDIX 4
Ladywell Villlage Improvement Group Village Centre Traffic/ Pedestrian Environment Survey 30 April 2010

PLEASE TICK ITEMS WHICH YOU FAVOUR …………AND PROVIDE ANY COMMENTS YOU WISH
NAME / CONTACT DETAILS pavement widening 10min parking intersection config A OR config B seating street trees station forecourt COMMENTS please

APPENDIX 5
Now

Ladywell Village Improvement Group STREETSCAPE ACTION PLAN: BUSINESS CONSULTATION Asking businesses for their views on improving the environment in Ladywell Village Centre

The future?

To tell us you support these proposals, are against them, or if you have any concerns or questions, please call Shape, working for LVIG, on 020 70646703

NOW • the street is not an attractive place • a space for moving through not for staying in

PROPOSED • make the street better for shoppers and businesses • a place for local people with less impact from traffic

• roads are wider than they need to be

• widen pavements, plant trees

• pavements get very narrow

• make it easy to cross the roads

• loading is difficult • designated loading bays/ short stay parking • there is no parking for shoppers

New loading bay set into wider pavement, Camden High Street

Original kerb line/edge of road before road narrowed to standard width for through movement.

Wider pavements, new seating and trees at The Cut in Waterloo. Where a side road crosses the pavement it is lifted to pavement level, making it easier for pedestrians, and giving them priority.

New loading/ short stay parking bay set into wider pavement, Walworth Road

These kind of changes have improved other shopping streets in London in the last few years, as illustrated here. We have asked most of the other businesses in Ladywell Village, and they like these ideas.

To tell us you support these proposals, are against them, or if you have any concerns or questions, please telephone Shape, who are working for LVIG, on 020 70646703

APPENDIX 6

APPENDIX 6

APPENDIX 6

APPENDIX 7

Green = permit holders only Brown= metered parking/permits Magenta= short stay (30 mins)

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful