You are on page 1of 35

RESEARCH

THE NEW AGGREGATION:


MODELS FOR SUCCESS
IN CREATING CONTENT VALUE

SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC.


SCI-201001

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

21 September 2010
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.  REPORT PROFILE .................................................................................... 1 
2.  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................ 2 
3.  PREFACE TO 2010 EDITION .................................................................... 3 
4.  BACKGROUND .......................................................................................... 3 
5.  WHAT IS AGGREGATION? ....................................................................... 4 
6.  ATTRIBUTES OF AGGREGATION VALUE ............................................... 5 
7.  THE TRADITIONAL AGGREGATION MODEL : THE FACTORY .............. 7 
8.  THE NEW AGGREGATION MODEL : THE NETWORK ............................ 8 
9.  ATTRIBUTES OF AGGREGATION: TRADITIONAL VS. NEW ................ 12 
10.  THE IMPACT ON TRADITIONAL AGGREGATORS ................................ 14 
11.  HOW VENDORS APPLY THE AGGREGATION MODEL ........................ 15 
12.  SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS MODELS IN THE NEW AGGREGATION .... 17 
13.  WHERE TRADITIONAL AGGREGATION MODELS STILL MATTER ..... 19 
14.  A CHECKLIST FOR APPLYING THE NEW AGGREGATION MODEL .... 21 
15.  RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION ........................................... 22 
15.1  General Recommendations............................................................................................. 22 
15.2  Recommendations for Commercial Aggregators ......................................................... 24 
15.3  Recommendations for Publishers .................................................................................. 24 
15.4  Recommendations for Institutions ................................................................................. 26 
15.5  Recommendations for Technology Companies ........................................................... 27 
15.6  Conclusion ........................................................................................................................ 28 

16.  ABOUT THE AUTHOR ............................................................................. 29 


17.  ABOUT SHORE ....................................................................................... 31 
 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. i


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

NOTICE - PROPRIETARY INFORMATION - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


This  document  is  the  property  of  Shore  Communications  Inc.    Because  it  contains  confidential 
information  proprietary  to  Shore  Communications  Inc.,  no  copies  may  be  made  whatsoever  of  the 
contents  herein  nor  any  part  thereof,  nor  should  the  contents  be  disclosed  to  any  party  without  the 
express  written  consent  of  Shore  Communications  Inc.    This  copy  must  be  returned  to  Shore 
Communications  Inc.  upon  request.    Shore  Communications  Inc.  reserves  all  rights  to  the  ownership, 
use, reproduction, distribution and publication of this document and the intellectual property therein. 
By receiving this copy of this document clearly marked with this notice you are accepting these terms 
and conditions of its use. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. ii


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

1. REPORT PROFILE

FOCUS The  New  Aggregation  is  an  evolving  model  for  commercial  electronic  content 
aggregation  services.  It  rewards  content  and  technology  suppliers  that  focus 
product and service development on the specific attributes of content aggregation 
that  best  suit  the  needs  of  audiences  participating  aggressively  in  the  content 
production, aggregation and distribution process. With today’s powerful and highly 
affordable  content  technologies  and  universal  network  connectivity,  commercial 
content  aggregators  face  an  array  of  new  challenges  and  opportunities  in  meeting 
the needs of individuals and institutions equipped with many of these technologies. 
This New Aggregation requires aggregators, publishers and the institutions that they 
serve to rethink how they can face the future of content monetization effectively. 

AUDIENCE Senior executives, strategists and marketing managers of content aggregation and 
content technology providers seeking to position their firms for higher profits and 
margins,  most  especially  those  reliant  on  institutional  sales;  senior  executives, 
strategists  and  marketing  managers  of  publishing  companies  trying  to  maximize 
profits  and  market  penetration  through  online  distribution  while  maintaining 
revenues  from  traditional  sources;  senior  information  technology  managers  and 
information professionals at major institutions trying to maximize the value of their 
commercial content investments across content platforms and technologies. 

CONTENT A  detailed  analysis  of  how  changes  in  content  technologies  have  rendered  many 
aspects  of  commercial  electronic  content  aggregation  obsolete.  Numerous 
diagrams  and  tables  provide  clear  illustrations  of  how  technology  has  impacted 
business  models  and  how  new  business  models  are  filling  in  the  gaps  where 
aggregators  and  publishers  have  failed  to  provide  value.  A  diagnostic  checklist 
provides  executives  an  opportunity  to  consider  how  their  own  operations  are 
impacted by these trends. Recommendations for clear actions to take in the light of 
these  trends  to  produce  successful  business  models  are  provided  for  commercial 
aggregators, publishers and the major institutions that they serve. 

Vendors of products and services mentioned or discussed in this paper include: AOL, 
Apple, Bloomberg, L.P., Connotate, Content Directions, Copyright Clearance Center, 
ECNext, Eliyon, EMC/Documentum, Endeca, Factiva, Google, IBM, Inside Scoop, ISYS, 
LexisNexis,  MarkLogic,  Microsoft,  Movable  Type,  MSN,  OpenText,  PHP  Nuke, 
Thomson Dialog, Verity, Vignette and Yahoo! 

USE An  assessment  that  can  be  used  to  stimulate  market  research,  product  planning 
and market positioning that will improve the operational and financial performance 
of  commercial  aggregators,  publishers,  content  technology  providers  and  the 
institutions that they serve. Those responsible for marketing strategies will find this 
paper to be useful in considering how to position products and services by focusing 
on  those  attributes  of  content  aggregation  most  likely  to  yield  high  value  in  their 
marketplaces. Implementers at major institutions will learn how to manage vendor 
relationships in a changing content marketplace. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 1


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Traditional  business  models  for  commercial  electronic  content  aggregation  are  now  challenged  by 
individuals and institutions equipped with powerful content technologies that see commercial content 
as  one  component  of  a  wide  array  of  valuable  resources  at  their  disposal.  Today’s  leading  corporate, 
academic  and  public  institutions  purchase  content  from  aggregators  with  increasing  reluctance.  They 
see aggregators’ business models and operations methods being largely out of touch with their needs 
for  sophisticated  content  integration  and  much  more  efficient  management  of  commercial  terms  and 
payments. 

Modern networking, search engines and more decentralized content publication and sharing techniques 
have  rendered  many  of  these  database‐driven  content  aggregator  “factories”  obsolete  by  reducing  or 
eliminating the benefits a vendor‐provided central database. Content oftentimes can be collected from 
individual  publishers  more  effectively  in  a  client’s  computer  directly  from  publishers  via  Web‐based 
technologies.  This  has  turned  the  vertical  “content  factory”  aggregation  model  on  its  side,  exposing 
specific attributes of content aggregation such as indexing and retrieval to exploitation by suppliers who 
can  service  specific  needs  without  collecting  commercial  content  in  an  aggregator’s  database.  Some 
aggregators  have  responded  to  technology  threats  by  developing  their  own  increasingly  sophisticated 
interfaces  and  tools  to  integrate  content  from  their  databases  into  institutional  workflows  more 
effectively.  But  better  interfaces  from  aggregators  cover  up  the  more  basic  issue  of  whether  today’s 
underlying  business  models  for  commercial  content  aggregation  are  viable  in  the  long  run.  New 
technologies and content consumptions patterns challenge these business models as never before. 

The  New  Aggregation  is  the  process  of  focusing  product  and  service  development  on  those  specific 
attributes  of  the  content  aggregation  model  that  best  suit  the  needs  of  specific  audiences 
participating aggressively in the content production, aggregation and distribution process. In the New 
Aggregation  model  profits  flow  to  those  suppliers  that  can  optimize  specific  attributes  of  the  content 
aggregation model most effectively, allowing clients equipped with powerful technology to select them 
at will. In reaction to the New Aggregation some aggregators will focus on engineering more exclusive 
content  redistribution  rights.  This  will  be  too  expensive  a  proposition  for  both  publishers  and 
aggregators  to  consider  in  most  instances  and  ignores  the  ability  of  clients  to  be  highly  effective 
commercial content redistributors when equipped with appropriate technologies. Most aggregators will 
wind up having to select those portions of the aggregation model that will allow them to survive most 
effectively. Most that insist on trying to make the old aggregation model more efficient will fail unless 
they provide truly unique content that has little competition. 

The  onus  is  on  institutions  and  publishers  to  demand  significant  changes  that  align  with  the  New 
Aggregation,  but  aggregators  should  consider  major  adjustments  to  their  marketing  and  product 
strategies  that  will  allow  them  to  transition  to  the  New  Aggregation  model  profitably.  This  paper 
provides  specific  recommendations  on  methods  and  strategies  for  aggregators  to  consider  in  that 
transition and models for success that already exist in the marketplace. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 2


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

3. PREFACE TO 2010 EDITION


This is a white paper that was written originally by John Blossom in 2004. It is being updated to reflect 
some of the changes in the content industry since that time, and will be reissued in a few months. What 
is amazing is how this paper laid out the case for what was going to happen in the content industry for 
the next six years. Almost all of its predictions and recommendations have proven to be the roadmap for 
success  in  the  content  industry  since  that  time.  Almost  none  have  been  contradicted.  Some  of  the 
companies  mentioned  in  this  version  of  the  paper  have  come  and  gone,  while  new  ones  have  come 
along. Source‐agnostic aggregation has reshaped the face of the content industry. Search engines such 
as Google and Bing have used the New Aggregation roadmap to redefine what people view as a valuable 
publication. New aggregators such as The Huffington Post have leveraged the New Aggregation model 
to  provide  a  source‐agnostic  approach  to  creating  value  in  publishing  that  challenges  traditional 
publishers  to  reconsider  their  models.  More  enterprise‐oriented  publishers  are  now  moving  towards 
interfaces  and  marketing  arrangements  for  their  content  that  maximize  its  value  within  a  New 
Aggregation  model.  And  social  media,  referenced  heavily  in  concept  if  not  in  name  in  this  paper,  has 
changed the balance of what types of content need to be aggregated – and how they are aggregated. 

In spite of these types of advancements, though, the publishing industry as a whole still fights against 
the New Aggregation model. Therefore, the lessons of this paper are as valuable today as they were in 
2004. Feel free to provide feedback on the paper that will help us to shape its next edition so that its 
lessons may be adapted to the concerns that you focus on most today. 

4. BACKGROUND
The concept of creating value out of a collection of content is as old as the cave paintings of prehistoric 
humans,  a  concept  that  has  formed  the  highly  profitable  basis  of  the  publishing  industry  since  its 
inception. Through books, journals, newspapers, Web portals, databases and search engines publishers 
and  technologists  alike  have  fashioned  an  array  of  products  and  capabilities  that  people  have  been 
willing  to  pay  for  to  get  valuable  collections  of  information  and  experiences  at  their  fingertips. 
Aggregation  of  content  is  a  fundamental  factor  in  creating  knowledge  that  can  lead  to  action:  people 
want to know they have most of all the information available and needed to make an informed decision. 
People like having access to content collections, sometimes just for the sake of having them. 

 But over the past few years the content industry has reached a tipping point as to where and how value 
in  aggregating  content  is  formed.  Long‐held  assumptions  about  how  companies  may  create  content 
value in aggregation are being upended by the proliferation of technologies and content consumption 
models that are challenging many of those fundamental assumptions. In virtually every segment of the 
content industry established giants must grow ever larger to retain profitable operations. Something has 
changed  in  aggregation,  something  that  many  publishers  and  distributors  of  content  are  reluctant  to 
acknowledge in its entirety.  

Yahoo! was one of the early heralds of a new period in aggregation services when it started adding little 
banner  ads  at  the  top  of  its  search  portal  pages  several  years  ago.        Search  engines  were  no  longer 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 3
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

providing just technology but money‐making destination content, aggregation on the fly from a myriad 
of  sources  that  few  would  have  taken  seriously  as  content  before  search  technology  made  them 
available to anyone with a browser. More recently file sharing services such as KaZaa have challenged 
premium  content  distributors  to  consider  the  power  of  individuals  with  access  to  new  powerful  and 
affordable  content  distribution  technologies  that  can  easily  bypass  traditional  electronic  distribution 
channels for premium content. 

In  major  enterprises  aggregation  of  published  content  is  only  a  portion  of  a  rich  tapestry  of  content 
weaved  from  internal  and  external  sources  into  highly  productive  work  environments.  The  advent  of 
powerful search technologies and Web content management systems are enabling institutions to create 
portals  that  enable  people  in  their  organizations  to  take  on  content  publishing  and  aggregation  roles 
traditionally  reserved  for  external  suppliers.  With  the  advent  of  stringent  corporate  governance 
regulations many of these institutions are now required to have more sophisticated management and 
control of their own content than do the content aggregators that supply them with premium content. 
All these and many additional facets of content aggregation have created an environment that requires 
us to carefully how content aggregation as a business model may thrive moving forward. This paper will 
consider  these  trends  in  detail  and  offer  concrete  and  viable  ways  in  which  content  suppliers, 
aggregators and consuming institutions may benefit from the New Aggregation. 

5. WHAT IS AGGREGATION?
Content  aggregation  is  the  act  of  assembling  and  managing  sets  of  content  collected  for  use  by  an 
audience.  Many  different  products  and  services  may  be  thought  of  as  providing  aggregation.  For 
example,  a  newspaper  is  an  aggregation  of  content  from  journalists,  news  wire  services  and  other 
sources.    A  bookstore  or  library  aggregates  books,  journals  and  other  media  for  use  or  purchase  by 
consumer, professional or academic audiences. A cable television service aggregates video channels and 
related multimedia services through a common distribution mechanism to audiences in local or regional 
markets.  A  database  service  (LexisNexis,  Factiva  or  Thomson  Dialog)  aggregates  news,  journals  and 
professional  information  produced  by  other  publishers  for  distribution  to  individuals  and  institutional 
audiences. Online services  like  Yahoo!, MSN and  AOL collect content from traditional publishers and 
non‐traditional sources for presentation to global and regional audiences.  

All  these  models  remain  highly  successful  in  their  own  right.  However,  some  companies  using 
aggregation  business  models  are  having  a  hard  time  demonstrating  they  are  providing  value  to  their 
respective audiences: 

 Newspaper  revenues  are  largely  flat  or  in  decline,  with  most  growth  centered  on  still‐young 
online operations. 
 Bookstores  are  facing  challenges  in  maintaining  content‐based  revenues,  becoming  more  like 
cafes and gift stores than aggregators to boost margins. 
 Library budgets in many public and private institutional sectors are facing severe challenges and 
stunting  the  revenue  growth  of  aggregators  serving  these  markets.  The  value  of  content 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 4


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

aggregation  services  that  libraries  provide  is  no  longer  a  base  assumption  for  many  library 
patrons used to online content access, even where libraries are well used and appreciated. 
 
The  following  table  illustrates  the  relatively  slow  revenue  growth  experienced  by  many  of  the  leading 
traditional content aggregator services in comparison to leading Web content outlets: 

Company 2001- 2002- 1H03-


02 03 1H04

Yahoo! 33 71 163

Borders 3 6 9

Factiva 0 -2 5

ProQuest 7 10 1

LexisNexis 1 -2 3

The New York -1 5 2


Times
Underlying publicly reported revenue figures adjusted for comparison in similar calendar periods 

Table 1. Percentage of Gross Revenue Growth for Select Aggregators, Period‐on‐Period 
 

Certainly there are exceptions to this overall pattern, but even these few examples demonstrate that 
aggregation is a low‐growth business for many prominent aggregators. 

6. ATTRIBUTES OF AGGREGATION VALUE


To understand better why the value associated with content aggregation is undergoing significant 
changes it helps to understand what provides value in content aggregation. There are several attributes 
that comprise aggregation services:  

 Commercial  Supplier  Agreements.  Much  of  the  premium  content  aggregation  business  has 
been  based  on  the  concept  of  having  the  rights  to  multiple  sources  of  hard‐to‐obtain  content 
and  managing  the  commercial  agreements  with  these  multiple  suppliers.  When  institutions 
enter  into  commercial  supplier  agreements  from  multiple  content  vendors  on  behalf  of  their 
staff  or  patrons  they,  too,  act  as  aggregators  of  content  value.  As  institutions  and  individuals 
move  more  towards  “just  in  time”  purchasing  of  premium  content  for  specific  purposes  and 
form  large  purchasing  consortiums  for  key  content  sources,  traditional  aggregators  face  the 
devaluation of this kind of service.  
 Collection. The ability to collect content into a discrete and coherent collection is thought of as a 
core value in aggregation. Traditionally the concept of collecting content has implied storage of 
content  in  a  central  location.  With  the  advent  of  search  engines  and  underlying  technologies 
that  make  traditional  databases  less  important  in  defining  content  collections,  though, 
aggregating content into standing collections is far less valuable than before. 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 5
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

 Normalization.  Content  comes  in  many  formats  and  in  many  degrees  of  quality.  A  traditional 
value  in  aggregation  is  to  make  content  consistent  in  its  form  and  presentation,  as  well  as  to 
provide  checks  and  processes  to  ensure  that  specified  standards  of  content  quality  are  met. 
Quality controls may be mechanical, as in software that checks for likely data errors, or editorial, 
as  in  the  process  of  approving  content  for  publication  or  posting.  With  the  advent  of  widely 
accepted  technical  standards  for  defining  the  structure  of  content  and  increased  corporate 
regulations  for  reporting  content  internally  and  externally,  though,  normalization  expertise 
provided by content aggregators is not as valuable as it used to be. 
 Value‐Add  Content.    Providing  a  collection  of  pre‐existing  content  has  some  value,  but  being 
able  to  add  content  to  a  collection  that  is  unique  to  a  given  collection  or  usage  context  can 
multiply  the  value  of  aggregation  significantly  to  both  suppliers  and  users.  In  today’s  content 
marketplace  value‐add content comes  from a wider array of suppliers than ever before and is 
delivered in new ways that challenge traditional aggregation models. 
 Indexing.  Being  able  to  locate  content  in  a  collection  is  as  important  as  having  a  collection: 
without  ease  of  access,  the  value  of  aggregation  is  highly  limited.  Today’s  search  engines 
minimize  the  value  of  a  single  content  supplier’s  indexing,  though  as  more  individual  and 
institutional  content  users  demand  indexing  that  can  span  multiple  content  collections  and 
place it in a broader context than one aggregator can manage. 
 Storage. Being able to store content efficiently for future use is an important aspect of providing 
aggregation value for archived collections. Storage costs have been reduced to virtually nothing 
for  even  vast  collections  of  content,  though,  no  longer  providing  aggregators  with  unique 
operational  advantages.  At  the  same  time  corporate  governance  regulations  have  pushed 
institutions  towards  far  more  sophisticated  and  reliable  content  archiving  capabilities, 
oftentimes  with  more  content  security  and  rights  management  capabilities  than  provided  by 
today’s aggregators. 
 Retrieval.  Being  able  to  retrieve  and  present  content  efficiently  from  a  stored  collection  has 
been a traditional aggregator advantage. Search engine technology has made retrieval a general 
function, no longer requiring the specialization of content aggregators in many instances. 
 Access Control. Having an aggregator manage access to premium content in a secure fashion is 
oftentimes  desirable  from  a  publisher’s  perspective.  But  many  publishers  now  manage  this 
function  themselves  with  efficiency,  even  as  content  users  demand  the  ability  to  access  and 
redistribute  content  in  a  wide  range  of  settings  that  challenge  traditional  access  control 
methods. 
 Distribution.  When  computer  networking  was  relatively  expensive  and  rare  the  benefits  of 
electronic content aggregation for managing distribution were fairly clear to both publishers and 
purchasers.  Now  ubiquitous  and  inexpensive  networking  makes  the  “where”  of  content  both 
less important and more complex than ever before. Content distribution still provides an edge 
where expertise in distribution technologies is at the core of a supplier’s value proposition but 
most of today’s content aggregators and publishers can no longer afford to focus on those skills 
cost‐effectively. 
 
All of these attributes are still part of the scenario for content aggregation, but as noted there are fewer 
and fewer companies that can provide the full range of these attributes profitably. Why is that so ‐ and 
where are the pressures on the traditional aggregation model leading today’s publishers and suppliers 
of premium content? 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 6


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

7. THE TRADITIONAL AGGREGATION MODEL : THE FACTORY


In the traditional aggregation model, one company performs or contracts for all the functions of content 
aggregation  to  provide  a  base  of  clients  with  a  finished  product  based  on  content  provided  from 
numerous  publishers,  authors  and  other  content  sources,  including  sometimes  their  own  unique  “in‐
house”  content.  Be  it  a  publishing  house,  a  newspaper,  a  news  and  journals  retrieval  service  or  a 
business  and  scientific  data  supplier,  the  profitability  of  aggregation  services  has  been  premised  on 
having  all  the  components  of  aggregation  under  its  command.  This  is  illustrated  in  the  pyramid‐like 
structure found below  in  Figure 1, in  which one content production capability provides a  base for the 
next capability. It is similar to the model of manufacturing automobiles introduced by Henry Ford and 
others  when massive quantities of standardized components from internal and external suppliers were 
assembled  in    a  central  facility  to  ensure  the  economies  of  scale,  trained  labor  and  product  quality 
required to produce a product affordably.  

Distribution 

Access Control 

Retrieval

Storage 

Indexing 

Value‐Add Content 

Normalization 

Collection 

Commercial Supplier Agreements 

 
Figure 1. The Traditional Aggregator Service Hierarchical Model 
In the era of printing press dominance, the  correlation between  the factory model and  the publishing 
and  aggregation  process  was  exact:  publishers  were  manufacturers  and  distributors  of  content  from 
centralized plants. In the more recent era of computers the “factory” became a computer center, with 
the relational database as the  primary production engine , a software method for organizing content for 
efficient  aggregation.  Databases  allowed  for  efficient  content  collection,  normalization,  indexing, 
storage,  retrieval  and  access  control,  capabilities  around  which  content  aggregators  developed 
commercial supplier agreements and distribution channels.  

 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 7
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

Why did this model succeed so well for so long? In large part because it had no viable competition. As 
illustrated  in  Figure  2  below,  the  underlying  basis  for  centralized  production  control’s  efficiency  is  the 
premise that the producer has strong technology to produce a product and that the client for a product 
has comparatively weak technology to produce the same. With technology dominance came premium 
prices. 

USERS WITH WEAK TECHNOLOGY

Centralized Content 
Distribution 

POINT OF VALUE 
CONTROL 

Centralized Content 
Aggregation 

PRODUCERS WITH STRONG TECHNOLOGY

 
Figure 2. The Basis for Traditional Aggregator Strength is Technology Imbalance 

In this representation of the traditional aggregation model, the production pyramid results in a “choke 
point”  –the  point  of  value  control  ‐  at  the  top  of  the  production  pyramid  at  which  the  value  of  an 
aggregator’s products and services can be easily established and maintained prior to fanning it out for 
distribution to clients who have no choice but to accept the control that the vendor has over accessing 
the  content  product.  Once  the  product  escapes  the  control  of  the  producer  it  is  in  the  hands  of  the 
purchaser as they please. 

8. THE NEW AGGREGATION MODEL : THE NETWORK


Content aggregation has changed forever due to two key factors: inexpensive, powerful computers and 
the Internet. The average new desktop or laptop computer has the ability to collect, produce, store and 
distribute vast quantities of content efficiently; even the relatively inexpensive, pocket‐sized Apple iPod 
can  store  up  to  40  gigabytes  of  information,  enough  for  thousands  of  multimedia  documents  and 
recordings,  while  the  processing  power  of  today’s  desktop  computers  dwarfs  the  needs  of  all  but  the 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 8
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

most  demanding  software  designed  for  individual  use.  While  it’s  easy  to  imagine  that  new  forms  of 
storage and new production technologies will create more demand for content storage and generation 
by individuals, already at these levels simple and affordable devices intended for use by individuals are 
capable of being both content “factories” and content “warehouses” of a scale that exceed the abilities 
of  individuals  to  absorb  that  content  easily.  To  think  of  it  in  terms  of  traditional  economics,  we  have 
created  an  infinite  supply  of  content  production  capacity  and  storage  capacity,  which  creates  huge 
pressures on any factory‐oriented content aggregation model to produce goods and services at a profit.  

The  Internet  exacerbates  the  problem  of  profitable  content  production  in  the  factory  model 
significantly. With the Internet one effectively eliminates distribution as a competitive barrier, a factor 
that  favors  not  only  traditional  content  “factories”  but  virtually  any  node  on  the  distribution  network 
that  can  be  both  factory  and  storage  units  for  anyone  in  the  world.  Designed  inherently  to  resist 
centralized  control  and  bottlenecks,  the  Internet  makes  it  simple  for  individuals  and  institutions  to 
create their own aggregation capabilities locally using powerful and affordable technologies and then to 
create and to redistribute content to other individuals and institutions with ease. As illustrated in Figure 
3  below,  the  point  of  strongest  value  control  –  the  “choke  point”  –  is  no  longer  the  aggregator’s 
“factory” but the Web‐connected desktops of individuals and the computer rooms of institutions where 
most content aggregation now occurs.  Either of these new choke points can create their own pyramids 
of  aggregation  from  content  sourced  from  the  Internet  and  local  sources  and  distribution  pyramids 
locally and within the greater distribution funnel of global content. 

USERS WITH STRONG & WEAK TECHNOLOGY

Decentralized 
Content 
Redistribution 

POINT OF VALUE CONTROL

USERS WITH STRONG TECHNOLOGY

POINT OF VALUE CONTROL

Decentralized 
Content Aggregation 

PRODUCERS WITH STRONG & WEAK TECHNOLOGY

 
Figure 3. In The New Aggregation Strong User Technology is the Focus 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 9


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

Thus  the  worries  about  file  sharing  networks  representing  an  unusual  outside  threat  to  mainstream 
content aggregation and distribution are largely misplaced. In fact file sharing networks and other peer‐
based  content  distribution  methods  represent  the  normative  form  of  content  aggregation  given  how 
today’s content technology has empowered content consumers in far greater proportion than content 
aggregators.  The  willingness  of  individuals  and  institutions  to  pursue  their  own  aggregation  schemes 
using that technology is only natural. From simple weblogs collected by newsreader software to global 
“server farms” to search engines scanning innumerable Web sites, the world is awash in technology that 
allows any individual or institution to collect high‐quality content from any number of sources and share 
it easily with others. File sharing is a simple example of capabilities that are deployed in many variant 
forms that place technology‐empowered users at the center of the world of content. By taking in and 
generating more content sources than any traditional aggregator could contemplate assembling in their 
“factory” database, the networked world itself has become both the content factory and its warehouse. 
In  the  view  of  Shore  today’s  leading  publishers  are  the  individuals  and  institutions  equipped  with 
powerful and affordable publishing technologies who create valuable content for more audiences in 
more venues than ever before. 

Does this mean that aggregation is dead as a business model? Far from it: aggregation is thriving in this 
environment  –  when  its  providers  adapt  to  the  concept  of  a  user‐centric,  network‐driven  model  for 
providing their products and services and move away from the “all‐singing, all‐dancing” factory model. 
The  New  Aggregation  is  the  process  of  focusing  product  and  service  development  on  those  specific 
attributes  of  the  content  aggregation  model  that  best  suit  the  needs  of  specific  audiences  that  can 
participate aggressively in the content production, aggregation and distribution process.   

Individuals  Individuals   Individuals 


Institutions  Institutions  Institutions 

Aggregators, Agents and Networks
Commercial Agreements

Value‐Add Content

Access Control
Normalization

Distribution
Collection

Retrieval
Indexing

Storage

 
Figure 4. The New Aggregation: The Unbundled Factory 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 10


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

In the traditional aggregation model, content is production‐centric, building a monolithic service similar 
to our pyramid diagram in Figure 1. By contrast, as illustrated in Figure 4 above, the New Aggregation 
topples that pyramid and turns it on its side, with individuals and institutions being able to select specific 
attributes of aggregation products and services from multiple suppliers via aggregators and other agents 
as well as without any intermediaries via network connections. At the top of the value chain Individuals 
and institutions may in turn feed content to others to amplify its personal and professional value and in 
turn  gain  value  from  one  another  via  business  or  personal  transactions.  Understanding  individual  and 
institutional  users  as  key  components  of  the  aggregation  model  is  a  crucial  factor  in  developing  a 
services‐driven  aggregation  model.  The  attributes  that  many  aggregators  once  provided  as  necessary 
components of the production chain are now often replicated by tools readily available to their clients, 
who  are  able  to  combine  them  in  innovative  ways  to  create  content  value  more  efficiently  than 
traditional  publishers  and  aggregators.  When  aggregators  offer  product  attributes  that  are  largely 
redundant  to  client‐supplied  capabilities  they  increase  the  likelihood  of  competitors  eliminating  those 
redundant  attributes  to  produce  content  value  for  clients  more  cost‐effectively.  Clever  marketing  and 
implementation  techniques  can  overcome  these  redundancies  to  some  degree  but  they  cannot 
eliminate  the  inevitable  pressure  on  profit  margins  to  eliminate  them.  Competitive  stances  for 
aggregators  therefore  must  be  evaluated  not  only  in  terms  of  their  positioning  against  other  similar 
companies  but  also  on  an  attribute‐by‐attribute  basis  with  all  those  suppliers  that  meet  the  needs  of 
their target audiences – including technology companies and  the individuals and institutions equipped 
with technology products. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 11


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

9. ATTRIBUTES OF AGGREGATION: TRADITIONAL VS. NEW


The  full  force  of  why  there  is  a  new  regimen  for  aggregation  can  be  seen  most  clearly  when  one 
examines what is happening in specific attributes of aggregation. The following table illustrates the shift 
in  methodologies  from  traditional  aggregation  to  methods  being  pioneered  and  perfected  in  the  New 
Aggregation: 

CONTENT AGGREGATION VALUE ATTRIBUTES

Attribute Attribute Traditional New


Methods Aggregation Aggregation

Commercial  Licensing and  Agreements for  Agreements for


Agreements Distribution Agreements accessing databases accessing content
with suppliers objects
 Precursor to collection
 Licensing Agreements or distribution  Objects may be
with purchasers distributed prior to
 Redistribution collecting licensing fees
 Billing and payment discouraged, difficult to
services monetize  Redistribution
encouraged and
 Agreements tied to monetized
distribution channels
 Agreements may be
 Billing and payment independent of
usually centralized via distribution channels
aggregator
 Oftentimes no billing,
direct billing via original
suppliers or billing via
other parties

Collection  Making content  Collection into central  Content oftentimes


available for control and facilities controlled by never collected for
distribution aggregator permanent storage, or
indexing data only
 Collection generally
mandatory for  Client oftentimes
distribution provides storage if
required
 Generally project-driven
by data center staffs of  Oftentimes automated
supplier and with no supplier
aggregators intervention

Normalization  Presenting content in a  Oftentimes requires  Content generally


normalized form and adaptation of content developed to widely
format for easier use from a proprietary accepted industry
and distribution supplier or aggregator standards with no
format adaptation required
 Identifying and
correcting content that  Standards closely held,  Standards open, public
may not meet expected oftentimes opaque and easily accessed
standards
 Standard quality control  Quality control
an essential component oftentimes provided by
peer review

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 12


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

CONTENT AGGREGATION VALUE ATTRIBUTES

Attribute Attribute Traditional New


Methods Aggregation Aggregation

Value-Add  Deriving additional  Centrally designed  Oftentimes user-driven


Content content to complement
supplied content  Centrally managed  Individual and
collaborative sources
 Centrally archived
 Generated or stored in
content objects or local
repositories

Indexing  Generating information  Indexes generally  Indexes generally


that will ease content limited to collections include all relevant
storage and retrieval under license by content, whether under
aggregator license or not

 Additional content  Indexing may include


indexed separately input from content users
(links, usage, etc.)
 Indexing based on
content attributes and  Indexing may include
established taxonomies dynamically generated
taxonomies

Storage  Retaining content for  Content stored in  Content storage


retrieval and delivery central databases of oftentimes distributed,
aggregator with some content retrieved and
copying to client sites stored at client site, at
individual publishers’
 Archive retention based sites and separate
on commercial policies archiving services
of aggregators,
oftentimes without long-  Archive retention
term guaranteed access requirements based on
archiving standards or
regulatory policies

Retrieval  Locating content for  Search engines tailored  Search engines capable
delivery to highly structured of locating both highly
content structured and
unstructured content
 Searches for
aggregator’s content  Searches across
only multiple sources in
multiple locations –
 Multiple search filters including client sources
and criteria
 Simplified searches and
 Interfaces oftentimes “advanced searches”
oriented towards
information  Intuitive search
professionals interfaces, some using
natural language

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 13


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

CONTENT AGGREGATION VALUE ATTRIBUTES

Attribute Attribute Traditional New


Methods Aggregation Aggregation

Access  Managing permissions  Database login “choke  Multiple access models:


Control to access and use point” , limited to open access, tiered
content subscribers access, federated
access or digital rights
 Little direct management
management of
redistribution  Rights management
and copyright
management interfaces
allow for effective
monetization of
redistribution

Distribution  Making content  Physical and electronic  Electronic media with


accessible to media physical as a service
individuals and option
institutions who are  Public and private
qualified for access network delivery  Primarily public network
delivery to local
 From central “choke networks, or vice versa
point” to clients
 Distribution from
multiple nodes and sub-
distribution points,
including publishers’
sites, download portals,
clients and individual
users
 

10. THE IMPACT ON TRADITIONAL AGGREGATORS


As the above table illustrates there are fewer and fewer attributes of aggregation in which traditional 
suppliers of premium content hold a clear advantage: 

 Commercial  agreements,  while  still  the  “bread  and  butter”  of  most  aggregators,  are  slipping 
away  as  their  own  content  and  technology  suppliers  become  more  independent  in  their 
marketing efforts. 
 Content collection often falls in to the hands of their clients, especially as they become adept at 
collecting their own content via Web‐centric technologies and publishing content to their own 
networks of associates and clients. 
 Vendor‐proprietary  content  standards  are  largely  in  disfavor  and  content  quality  assurance  is 
becoming a specialty service fairly rapidly, accelerated by the growth of cost‐effective services 
markets such as India.  
 Value‐add  content  just  as  likely  to  be  generated  via  client  facilities,  using  software  and  Web 
services  (Web‐delivered  digital  objects  that  include  both  content  and  software  functionality) 
developed by technology companies or their own staffs. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 14


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

 Indexing requirements for clients oftentimes exceed the large but universally limited universes 
of content provided by the traditional aggregator; storage of content needs to be more at the 
convenience of the client than the provider. 
 Retrieval of content can come via any number of client‐centric channels, rarely controlled by the 
aggregator. 
 Access control no longer aligns with the technology needs and capabilities of clients who require 
transparent access to content from multiple repositories. 
 Distribution can come via any number of established and innovative channels, most of which are 
not controlled by aggregators directly.  
 

With  so  many  points  of  potential  weakness,  the  impact  of  the  New  Aggregation  on  traditional 
aggregators is turning out to be immense, even though its full impact on aggregator and major publisher 
revenues  is  seen  mostly  in  terms  of  stagnant  revenue  growth.    With  traditional  aggregators  having 
virtually  no  long‐lasting  and  clear‐cut  technology  advantages  over  their  clients  and  suppliers, 
aggregation  as  we  know  it  today  is  held  together  largely  by  the  inertia  that  comes  from  the 
unwillingness  to  unravel  established  commercial  agreements  and  increasingly  clever  work  by 
aggregators  in  distributing  premium  content  via  software  applications  that  wed  them  more  closely  to 
their clients’ needs. Yet since at the core of their operations many aggregators no longer offer significant 
operational  advantages  via  technology,  distribution  advantages  may  be  short  lived  at  best  as  content 
suppliers  employ  other  content  distribution  routes  with  more  profitable  or  commercial  terms 
management or more effective content distribution.  

The  solution  for  many  traditional  aggregators  is  clear:  they  must  decide  which  attributes  will  benefit 
them  in  the  New  Aggregation  model  and  move  to  focus  on  those  attributes  more  exclusively.        The 
business models that come out of that focus, however, are likely to differ significantly from those they 
employ today. 

11. HOW VENDORS APPLY THE AGGREGATION MODEL


To see how aggregation models differ in the New Aggregation versus traditional aggregation, it may help 
to compare an established aggregator to companies that are playing new roles in aggregation along the 
lines of the New Aggregation model. For the purposes of broad contrast I have chosen for comparison 
purposes: 

 LexisNexis, a major aggregator of professionally‐oriented content 
 Google, the leading open Web search engine used in both professional and personal settings 
 Verity, one of the leading search solutions providers in enterprise content 
 Weed, a technology company established to promote the effective sale of premium content via 
file sharing networks and other peer‐to‐peer and supplier‐oriented distribution channels 
 
The  following  table  summarizes  how  the  key  attributes  in  these  vendors’  offerings  vary  from  one 
another in general terms: 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 15


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

CONTENT AGGREGATION MODEL COMPARISONS

Attribute LexisNexis Google Verity Weed

Commercial  Central attribute;  Mostly between  May integrate  Central attribute;


Agreements traditional terms suppliers and premium content ability for
and conditions clients, no billing via Factiva, but suppliers and
with suppliers and except for not involved in redistributors to
clients, central advertising premium content collect via Weed,
billing. services terms, no billing. outsourced
billing.

Collection  Collects most  Indexing and  Indexing only  Clients and other
content in a contextual collected networks mostly
central database content collected responsible for
collecting

Normalization  Collected content  Formats under  Formats under  Enables


is normalized into control of clients control of clients industry-
internal and distributors, and distributors, standard file
standards. high standard Web standard Web distribution, no
QA standards interface, no interface, no content quality
enforced by staff content quality content quality assurance
and technology assurance assurance

Value-Add  Derived content  Derived content  Derived content  Distributors and


Content stored and linked to in linked via search clients provide
distributed search results, interface and value-add
contextual ads Web services content

Indexing  Indexes primarily  Indexes all  Indexes client  Indexing


databased exposed Web content, responsibility of
content content, some federation of distributors and
databased premium and clients
content Web content

Storage  Primarily central  Only indexing  Only indexing  Primarily on


storage in storage storage client and file
database sharing
networks, initial
download
storage

Retrieval  Primarily via  Primarily via  Primarily via  Via client


central database supplier sites client-internal storage and file
and supplier sharing networks
sites

Access  Database login or  Responsibility of  Oftentimes  Rights


Control commercial individual integrated into management
terms, suppliers, federated checks access
redistribution not redistribution not access, rights for each
controlled controlled redistribution not item accessed,
controlled redistribution
controlled and
monetized

Distribution  Via Web, private  Via Web and  Via private  Via Web, file
networks and mobile device networks, Web sharing networks
mobile device networks and mobile and mobile
networks device networks device networks

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 16


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

Note  in  this  comparison  how  new  players  in  content  aggregation  gain  advantage  by  paring  away  the 
most  expensive  and  complex  components  of  aggregation  –  storage,  quality  control  and  centralized 
commercial  agreement  management  –  and  concentrating  their  business  models  on  those  aspects  of 
content  that  are  least  replicated  elsewhere  and  most  valuable  to  their  audiences.  Google  still  has 
extensive  infrastructure  for  content  indexing,  but  it’s  free  to  change  that  infrastructure  with  few 
expensive  dependencies  on  suppliers  and  users.  This  frees  Google  to  concentrate  more  internal 
resources  on  providing  indexing  power.  Verity  and  other  enterprise  search  technology  providers  also 
steer clear of storage, QA and commercial content issues (though content management  providers and 
archival  specialists  embrace  them  in  narrower  niches),  concentrating  primarily  on  indexing  and  access 
control management. Weed discards almost all attributes of the traditional aggregation model, retaining 
only commercial agreements, standards and access control as primary attributes, yet provides effective 
content  monetization  for  multiple  sources  via  numerous  collection,  storage  and  distribution  models. 
Each of these New Aggregation players discards those attributes of the “factory” that no longer make 
economic sense to them and concentrate on those attributes of aggregation that benefit their audiences 
most within user‐centric content distribution networks. 

12. SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS MODELS IN THE NEW AGGREGATION


All major aggregators provide some blending of old and new attributes in their current offerings, even as 
many  vendors  who  provide  New  Aggregation  services  also  opt  for  aspects  of  traditional  content 
aggregation.  But  overall  there  are  distinct  business  models  arising  in  aggregation  that  are  clearly 
different  from  those  that  have  formed  the  basis  of  traditional  publishing.  Following  are  some  of  the 
more significant models evolving from the New Aggregation model: 

NEW AGGREGATION BUSINESS MODELS

Model Key Key Key Examples


Attributes Strengths Weaknesses

Open  Public and  Source-Neutral;  Reliant on others to  Google


Collection Enterprise quality not provide access
Search facilities indexing presumed control to premium  Yahoo!

Engines content and


providing  Easily adapted
and restricted
content
 Verity

relevance and to a wide range  Endeca


of content  Limited content
context
collections monetization  FAST
 Generally no
 Highly tuned
capabilities
 IBM “Masala”
limits to types,
sources and new  Content quality
 ISYS
volume of technologies difficult to ascertain
content

Content  Collaborative  Enabling most  Sometimes difficult  KaZaa


Sharing content knowledgeable to index sources
collection and and capable  Groove
Networks
distribution content experts  Archival access
 Microsoft
uncertain
SharePoint
 With and without  Infinite storage
 Loose borders on
rights
management
capacity and
flexibility content usage  OpenText
LiveLink

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 17


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

NEW AGGREGATION BUSINESS MODELS

Model Key Key Key Examples


Attributes Strengths Weaknesses

Archival  Storage arrays  Minimize impact  Standards for  EMC


Products with vast of “content glut” addressability still
capacity with not universal  DOI (Content
and
content-oriented  Ensure that Directions)
Services
addressability content in  Efforts for
 Alexandria
original form is independent
Project
 Affordable, accessible archiving of
highly scalable commercial content
mass storage  Ongoing access weak

Content  Database-driven  Creating highly  Enterprise-scale  Vignette


Management development, reusable content systems expensive
management in enterprises  IBM WebSphere
and delivery of  Learning how to be
 Stellant
content for  Workflow and an effective
individuals and collaborative
content easy to
publisher is harder
than most would
 PHP Nuke
enterprises
develop think  MovableType
 Integration of
 Weblogging and  Content  ECNext
commercial
content via Web cheap/free CM ecommerce rarely
services packages integrated well
popularizing
publishing

Content  Deriving useful  Streamlining of  Derived content  Eliyon


Mining & content from content may lack quality
Content existing Web repurposing to controls  Connotate

Services sites, networks


and databases
specific client
needs
comparable to
commercial
 Inside Scoop

sources
 Packaging  Quickly
derived content configurable and  With no formal
for reuse and highly adaptable agreements with
sale sources content
may come and go
 Outsourced
quality
assurance

Rights &  Ensuring and  Allows for  Implementation has  Sealed Media
Distribution enabling usage content object been awkward in
Management and commercial use in many the past, but now  Copyright
terms settings without much more Clearance
logins streamlined Center
 Enabling
 Weed
authorized  Ability to control  Lacking industry
redistribution value and
security of
standards  eMeta

content as it is
redistributed

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 18


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

NEW AGGREGATION BUSINESS MODELS

Model Key Key Key Examples


Attributes Strengths Weaknesses

Contextual  Assembling and  Enhancing  Limited capabilities  Google AdSense


Advertising placing contextual to date for placing
contextual ad content value content itself  Yahoo! Overture
inventory in Web
Sites
cost-effectively contextually  Kanoodle
 Enables  Algorithms used to
 Enabling otherwise manage bidding
automated invisible content process not very
bidding for ad to get exposure mature
inventory
 
Many  of  these  solutions  have  been  available  for  some  time  in  various  forms  and  some  are  used  by 
aggregators for key operations. For example, content management has been used since the beginning of 
the Web era and is used by many commercial publishers for their operations. But it’s been only recently 
that  content  management  suppliers  have  provided  mature  and  complete  enterprise‐level  content 
management solutions. Content management and Web portal providers now compete very effectively 
with aggregators who are vying to provide workflow management software as a way to lock in content 
sales.  

No single example of a services‐driven aggregation model may appear to present an impressive threat 
individually. But when taken in sum all of these are instances of increasingly successful businesses that 
are  taking  away  key  segments  of  the  aggregators’  traditional  business  model.  These  new  suppliers 
succeed  with  individuals,  enterprises  and  commercial  publishers  who  are  looking  to  have  content 
respond  to  a  far  more  sophisticated  set  of  requirements  than  most  aggregators  can  manage  to 
encompass  without  threatening  their  core  revenue  base  and  margins.  Thus  most  aggregators  fail  to 
invest in content technologies anywhere near the level required to compete with players running with 
New Aggregation attributes. In comparison New Aggregation companies are invested very highly in the 
breakthrough content technologies that help the individuals and institutions that they serve to produce 
content value breakthroughs.  

13. WHERE TRADITIONAL AGGREGATION MODELS STILL MATTER


In the world as we know it old methods and models rarely disappear altogether, but instead find their 
way  into  new  forms  of  use.  There  will  always  be  content  aggregators  with  useful  databases,  just  as 
newspapers  and  books  continue  to  be  published  some  twenty  years  after  the  advent  of  personal 
computing. Content databases will continue to thrive when their contents are truly unique or add value 
to audiences at crucial moments when their own processes could not hope to replicate their value. But 
even in these instances, the content “factories” as we know them may find themselves with increasingly 
abbreviated  versions  of  the  production  pyramid,  focusing  on  only  those  attributes  of  aggregation  for 
their  audiences  that  are  reasonably  profitable.  For  example,  having  databases  that  store  data  that  is 
highly suited to the database technology in use and difficult to replicate elsewhere may remain the basis 
for  a  very  viable  aggregation  business  model,  but  standards  for  querying  and  delivering  that  content 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 19
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

may “lop off” much of the traditional business model built around other aggregation attributes. So even 
when the factory model still applies in terms of producing content it is really a choice between selecting 
a smaller market in which the full model can still operate cost‐effectively or servicing a broader market 
with fewer aggregation attributes. Improving production efficiencies and techniques may be necessary 
to  maintain  competitive  production,  but  the  pace  and  breadth  of  technology  development  and 
distribution is unlikely to allow those improvements to be long‐term market differentiators unless they 
take full advantage of the peer‐to‐peer strength of the New Aggregation model. 

At the same time there will continue to be numerous individuals and institutions that prefer to have an 
aggregator service act as a “choke point” for simplifying relationships with content sources and services. 
For  these  clients  having  a  “single  neck  to  choke”  when  managing  external  content  sources  still  offers 
them  operational  advantages  and  many  content  purchasers  will  continue  to  purchase  professional 
content in this mode for some time to come. But as the New Aggregation model continues to take hold, 
suppliers  of  “choke  point”  content  aggregation  services  are  beginning  to  discover  that  in  the  long  run 
this may be an opportunity that damages both revenues and margins. The obligation to maintain a wide 
array  of  content  increasingly  available  via  other  channels  continues  even  as  clients  continue  to  put 
pressure  on  these  aggregators  to  lower  price  points  or  to  add  more  content  sources  to  diminish  the 
commoditization of their databased content. As suppliers learn how to allow clients to “choke” specific 
content aggregation  attributes separately across a wide range of content sources these pressures will 
diminish,  leaving  aggregators  to  enjoy  a  wide  and  flexible  range  of  aggregation  models  to  suit  their 
clients’  needs  and  focus  on  the  specific  components  of  aggregation  that  offer  their  clients  the  most 
value. 

The  key  operational  advantage  that  traditional  aggregators  provide  is  quality  assurance  procedures  to 
help  normalize  content  into  highly  usable  and  standardized  forms  and  formats.  With  some  forms  of 
data‐oriented content this advantage will continue to endure, but for many forms of content, especially 
text‐based  content  and  entertainment  content  that  is  easily  normalized  via  Web‐oriented  standards, 
these advantages will be limited or best pursued as part of a business model using quality assurance as 
one  of  a  limited  set  of  product  attributes.  Notably  traditional  aggregators  known  for  data  quality 
assurance  such  as  Dun  &  Bradstreet  find  themselves  increasingly  selling  their  quality  assurance 
capabilities  as  outsourced  services  for  their  clients  trying  to  rationalize  their  own  business  content  – 
already  providing  some  selection  of  formerly  product‐centric  attributes  and  packaging  them  as 
aggregation services. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 20


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

14. A CHECKLIST FOR APPLYING THE NEW AGGREGATION MODEL


The  New  Aggregation  challenges  publishing  institutions  adding  value  to  content  via  aggregation  to 
consider how this major shift affects their operations. Not every aggregator needs to worry about this 
shift immediately, but it will help to understand when concern is warranted. The following is a simple 
checklist  of  key  questions  for  aggregators  and  publishers  using  aggregation  services  to  consider  when 
approaching whether and how the New Aggregation may be providing opportunities or threats to their 
operations: 

 Is your revenue model locked in to login‐based access to premium content?  
The  New  Aggregation  is  both  user‐centric  and  network‐centric:  rights  to  access  content  must 
follow  its  usage  through  both  initial  distribution  and  redistribution  to  multiple  devices  –  an 
environment  more  conducive  to  rights  management  schemes  attached  to  the  content  itself 
rather than to a database. Remember, individuals and institutions equipped with powerful and 
affordable  content  technologies  are  today’s  leading  publishers.  It  is  you,  the  aggregators  and 
publishers, who are gaining access to the world’s publishing arena, not your clients. 

 Are your content supplier commercial agreements tied tightly to your centralized storage and 
distribution technology? 
In  traditional  aggregation,  locking  in  content  suppliers  to  your  storage  and  distribution 
technology was a key tactic for ensuring supplier and client dependency. This works when you 
control  the  technology  that  matters  most  to  the  client,  but  no  longer  works  well  at  all  for 
secondary  storage  and  distribution.  Apple  and  Microsoft  will  do  well  with  locking  music 
publishers into iPods and Portable Media Centers because the technology is close to the users’ 
needs and integrates well with standard networks and devices.  Not since the Lexis UBIQ “Red 
Box”  and  the  eponymous  Bloomberg  data  terminal  have  premium  business  content  providers 
tinkered effectively with their own user‐oriented devices. In this environment, tying commercial 
agreements  to  centralized  storage  schemes  will  please  neither  the  supplier  nor  the  client  and 
lead to trailing revenues. 

 Is your content mostly text‐based? 
Specialized databases that have unique data as their primary content are less vulnerable to the 
New Aggregation than text‐based aggregators. The original concept of storing text in a database 
was to enhance indexing and repurposing. But effective indexing no longer requires storage of 
content  in  a  central  facility  and  content  repurposing  is    simpler  now  that  standards  based  on 
eXtensible  Markup  Language  (XML)  and  other  content  normalization  standards  are  prevalent. 
Data providers still have much to worry about if their data is not certifiably unique in quality and 
scope, especially since recent U.S. court judgments do little to protect databases of facts. 

 Does your ability to store and retrieve historical content provide real product advantages? 
The  ability  to  store  content  indefinitely  with  immediate  retrieval  is  not  a  major  trick  for  most 
institutions, which are required to do so in most instances for regulatory compliance purposes. 
On the other end of the scale, petabyte‐scaled storage fits conveniently into the corner of most 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 21


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

rooms these days. If you can do clever things with historical content that distinguishes it, then 
great – otherwise, consider outsourcing it ASAP to services more adept at long‐term storage. 

 Does your content integrate easily with client portals and processes? 
This is an area in which many aggregators have made significant progress in the past few years. 
“Workflow”  is  the  buzzword  of  the  moment  for  many  publishers,  and  rightfully  so  from  many 
perspectives. What’s largely missing at this point from aggregators is sophisticated integration 
that  makes  it  as  easy  to  search  for  and  insert  content  into  a  portal  application  as  looking 
something up via a search engine. If you’re on the cutting edge of portal development, you can 
buy yourself some time to transition your business model into something more in line with the 
New Aggregation’s long‐term trends. If you’re not, you had best pick your battles carefully – and 
soon. 

 Can  you  easily  enable,  track  and  take  advantage  of  content  redistribution  by  clients  as  a 
marketing and revenue opportunity? 
Without  an  effective  approach  to  rights  management  and  content  security  most  commercial 
publishers and aggregators are slipping behind their institutional and individual clients in being 
able to manage content value in ways that fit today’s content distribution realities. In a multi‐
device, multi‐role content consumption environment, being able to treat those individuals and 
institutions as inherent and central components of the premium content distribution process is 
essential  to  long‐term  revenue  growth.  Those  who  control  rights  standards  and  methods  will 
control  content  commercialization  in  the  New  Aggregation  ‐  leaving  most  publishers  and 
aggregators far from the action.  

15. RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION

15.1 General Recommendations


“Good content is where you find it” is a favorite truism of ours at Shore. The marketplace for content 
knows  no  borders,  leaving  most  of  today’s  aggregators  of  premium  content  scrambling  to  figure  out 
how  to  position  published  premium  assets.  Most  aggregators  must  confront  a  market  that  demands 
much more value than most publishers and aggregators can provide individually. There is still a large and 
significant  place  for  commercial  content  aggregation  in  the  New  Aggregation  model.  However,  the 
shape  of  how  money  is  made  in  content  aggregation  is  changing  rapidly  because  of  this  new  model’s 
strength. Except where  content and central technologies are truly exceptional and unique, centralized 
“choke points” will be of little use, leaving most content money to be made either inside user‐defined 
and controlled choke points (search engine results, portals, local storage devices, online communities) 
or  very  intertwined  with  high‐value  network  services  (Radianz,  cable  television,  XM  Radio).  Service 
providers  in  the  middle  layer  of  this  marketplace  must  specialize  radically  to  survive  in  this  new  mix, 
either on the basis of content sets or aggregation services – or both. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 22


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

There  is  no  perfect  answer  to  this  problem,  but  there  are  a  few  general  strategies  that  should  be 
considered for all concerned with the fate of aggregation services: 

 Unless they provide real value, lose your databases. 
In many instances the persistence of centralized databases that repeat content found elsewhere 
is a useless anachronism that will only isolate premium content from the true contexts in which 
it  will  find  value.  Tools  such  as  MarkLogic’s  Content  Interaction  Server  provide  the  ability  to 
access content from many sources in a normalized form without resorting to typical databasing 
schemes.  Unless  the  content  is  unique  in  its  context,  put  database‐centric  business  models 
aside.  In  most  instances  a  centrally  controlled  database  no  longer  provides  a  great  marketing 
advantage  for  major  aggregators,  even  when  it  provides  technological  advantages  within  the 
scope of its content. 

 Accept  that  monetization  of  distributed  content  objects  is  a  necessary  and  ultimately  more 
powerful commercial model than controlled access to databases.  
Again, good content is where you find it, so allowing content objects to flow to the point where 
their  value  can  be  realized  as  quickly  and  effectively  as  possible  is  the  most  effective  way  to 
ensure rapid and profitable content monetization. Enabling publishers of ALL content to create 
and distribute these content objects with monetization capabilities built in to their framework 
will  be  the  cornerstone  technology  in  the  New  Aggregation.  Aggregators  and  publishers 
servicing professional markets lag behind both their clients and consumer markets in developing 
and  deploying  effective  rights  management  techniques.  The  major  aggregators  that  adapt 
rapidly to rights management controls and move away from database access controls will be the 
winners in the New Aggregation era. 

 Controlling distribution is not as important as controlling monetization. 
With  so  many  powerful  options  for  content  distribution  that  are  well  beyond  the  abilities  of 
publishers  and  aggregators,  including  the  current  Information  Lifecycle  Management  (ILM) 
movement  in  corporate  circles,  it  is  largely  pointless  to  control  content  distribution  except  in 
those  instances  where  there  are  few  or  no  options  for  delivery  (cable  television  franchises, 
exclusive wireless networks, etc.). Allowing easily replicated electronic content to flow freely in 
forms which ensure that monetization will be swift and convenient when it finds the right venue 
is the key to effective aggregation services. Look at the Weed model of monetization carefully. 
Like  weeds,  it’s  far  easier  to  have  content  find  its  right  context  when  its  movement  is 
unimpeded. 

 Be flexible in your approach to monetization models.  
In some instances rights management will be the key to this monetization process, but it need 
not be the only solution, nor an “all or nothing” solution. Rights management and other controls 
can enable not just purchasing but a wide range of access models, including subscriptions. Think 
carefully  about  how  your  audiences  value  content  in  specific  contexts,  and  work  your 
monetization models back from those human needs. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 23


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

15.2 Recommendations for Commercial Aggregators


As mentioned earlier many institutions are learning how to take advantage of the New Aggregation in 
pieces  and  reaping  significant  advantages.  But  few  major  aggregators  have  embraced  the  notion  that 
these new techniques and technologies are anything more than useful extensions of their core business 
model.  

 Accept that your storage‐bound search engines are of limited value.  
Your clients’ technology suppliers do it better, open Web search engines do it better – you have 
neither the financing nor the positioning to provide superior content search capabilities in most 
instances,  in  large  part  because  your  search  engines  are  stuck  on  top  of  one  database  that’s 
poorly  integrated  with  your  clients’  content  and  the  Web.  Except  where  unique  content  or 
content structure makes their presence necessary or advantageous, try to allow content to flow 
as  readily  as  possible  to  where  your  search  engine  along  with  other  search  engines  will 
determine  its  uniqueness.  If  you  can  compete  on  a  level  playing  field,  the  relevance  of  your 
search will have credibility and will be integrated with other content sets far more easily. If you 
can’t, then perhaps the searching business is not for you. 

 Choose which aggregation attributes will be your points of excellence. Quickly.  
With  clients,  publishers  and  common  services  taking  care  of  storage  for  retrieval  and  search 
engine  companies  taking  care  of  indexing,  this  leaves  the  “front  end”  of  the  business  – 
interfaces,  Web  services  and  workflow  products  –  and  the  “back  end”  –  commercial 
management  –  as  the  keys  to  success  in  supporting  successful  premium  content  aggregation. 
Most  aggregators  will  have  to  choose  which  of  these  will  be  their  strengths,  and  work  from 
there. 

 Beware the lure of workflow.  
Products that integrate content into highly effective user interfaces are very hot right now and 
can  be  expected  to  provide  a  great  deal  of  value  to  aggregators  for  some  time  to  come  – 
especially  when  they’re  integrated  into  institutional  workflows  and  operations.  But  for  most 
aggregators, workflow management can wind up being a shield that diverts attention from the 
inherent weaknesses of their content base. For example, decades of improving client integration 
and workflow via real‐time financial content products did not save market data vendors in the 
financial  securities  sector  from  the  inherent  weaknesses  in  their  content  aggregation  models 
based  on  commonly  available  market  data.  Consolidation  and  thinner  margins  followed 
inevitably, consolidation that is still unfolding. “Knowing the flow” can be valuable, but should 
be part of a greater strategy of aggregation attribute repositioning. 

15.3 Recommendations for Publishers


Commercial content providers that produce mostly their own exclusive and original content have much 
to gain in the New Aggregation model and have gained much already. The Web has enabled publishers 
of all kinds to reach both consumer, academic and professional audiences via search engines and other 
new  channels  without  having  to  rely  on  traditional  aggregators,  opening  up  both  challenges  and 
opportunities.  The  key  challenge  publishers  using  aggregation  services  face  when  introducing  direct 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 24
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

Web‐based  access  is  ensuring  that  direct  Web  access  does  not  conflict  with  aggregation  services  in  a 
way  that  decreases  overall  revenue.  Here  are  a  few  thoughts  as  to  how  publishers  may  approach  the 
New Aggregation and continue to reap benefits: 

 You  must  enable  your  content  to  be  aggregated  by  anyone  at  any  time  without  having  to 
think about how it impacts your bottom line. 
Many  publishers  have  implemented  online  registration  processes  to  provide  some  degree  of 
control and knowledge of users. This creates a proliferation of “choke points” that reduces the 
value of content in the user’s eye due to this inconvenience. Already tools exist to allow people 
to  circumvent  these  controls,  a  sure  indication  of  their  undesirability  as  a  commercial 
management  tool.  Premium  publishers  need  to  embrace  rights  management  technologies 
aggressively, preferably in standard forms that will allow them to provide a user with rights to 
view content via any electronic distribution channel. Attaching enforceable commercial policies 
to  each  and  every  content  item  distributed  is  an  essential  element  in  rationalizing  traditional 
aggregation  channels  with  more  user‐centric  distribution  methods.  This  will  allow  content  to 
flow  into  the  hands  of  people  who  need  it  most  and  value  it  most  as  quickly  as  possible  – 
enhancing the likelihood of people recognizing its value. 

 Try to separate agents that can get content into the right context and agents that can manage 
the enforcement and fulfillment of commercial terms. 
Publishers have relied on traditional aggregators to provide both distribution and enforcement 
of  commercial  terms  of  use.  With  distribution  no  longer  a  key  strength  of  many  traditional 
aggregators, it may pay to consider how to license content for use by individuals and institutions 
via agents that do not have to manage its distribution. Instead of having to negotiate dozens of 
special deals with dozens of companies who would like to distribute your content, try to imagine 
a  world  in  which  there  are  a  handful  of  agents  (ideally  one)  that  can  manage  the  technical 
details of commercial use by consuming institutions and individuals independent of any specific 
distribution  channels  via  rights  management  capabilities.  In  this  model  there  is  still  room  for 
traditional  revenue  streams  such  as  subscriptions,  “pay‐per‐view”  and  special  redistribution 
agreements, as well as new models such a peer‐to‐peer distribution. This new world of content 
monetization is already upon us and promises to be very lucrative for those who know how to 
manipulate  the  model  to  their  advantage.  Within  this  new  model  there  is  always  room  for 
negotiating  agreements  that  don’t  fit  this  methodology  well,  but  by  focusing  on  simplifying 
commercial terms with the ultimate consumers of content as much as possible it becomes far 
easier  to  generate  steady  streams  of  revenue  at  maximum  market  penetration.  This  will  all 
happen – if publishers take the lead in fighting for it aggressively. 

 Focus on creating more fully featured content objects. 
Since  content  normalization  is  now  more  fully  in  the  hands  of  commercial  publishers  and 
increasingly redundant with the capabilities of traditional aggregators, it falls upon commercial 
publishers  to  look  much  more  carefully  at  how  they  package  electronic  content  for  use  and 
reuse.  In  earlier  eras  this  meant  looking  at  print,  CD‐ROM  and  database  options.  But  today’s 
content marketplace favors rights‐protected content objects such as eBooks that can be moved 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 25
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

from platform to platform with relative ease and reuse. Publishers need to build features into 
content objects that make them more useful to their audiences, features that can be upgraded 
as necessary to increase the content’s value. This is likely an area where most publishers will rely 
on  suppliers  and  distributors  to  provide  useful  technologies,  but  unlike  the  traditional 
aggregation model it need not be a matter of sending your “dumb” content into someone else’s 
database  where  it  gets  “smartened  up”:  these  services  can  be  brought  in‐house  or  added 
externally  via  technology  providers  who  do  not  have  to  take  a  role  in  content  licensing  and 
distribution. The more of the content packaging equation you control, the more value you can 
retain  for  yourselves,  so  getting  smart  about  building  content  objects  for  Web  services  and 
other  forms  of  object‐oriented  content  distribution  is  an  essential  skill  for  every  primary 
publishing organization today. 

15.4 Recommendations for Institutions


In Shore’s view, today’s leading publishers are the individuals and institutions equipped with powerful 
and  affordable  content  technologies  and  a  deep  understanding  of  what  people  in  their  organization 
need  to  accomplish  their  objectives.  You  are  the  real  center  of  the  content  universe,  yet  you  struggle 
with suppliers of aggregated premium content whose products are still designed based on the premise 
that commercial publishers and aggregators provide the leading edge of content value. In the meantime 
your own content and Web‐sourced content demonstrate to you on a daily basis that while commercial 
content  is  important  and  useful  it’s  not  so  important  to  be  treated  so  differently  from  your  other 
content  sources.  The  New  Aggregation  opens  doors  to  new  techniques  that  are  already  leveraged  by 
corporate,  academic  and  public  sector  institutions  in  many  ways  beyond  traditional  aggregators’ 
capabilities.  To  accelerate  the  process  of  encouraging  your  suppliers  to  transition  to  more  effective 
services in the New Aggregation model, here are a few routes to consider when dealing with publishers 
and aggregators: 

 Demand  more  unbundling  of  workflow  applications,  content  licensing  and  other  aggregator 
services. 
Many  of  these  workflow‐oriented  products  are  excellent,  but  the  cost  of  locking  in  to  one 
aggregator  at  the  expense  of  locking  out  content  acquisition  budget  from  other  potentially 
crucial  sources  that  emerge  is  hampering  the  move  to  “on‐demand”  content  licensing  and 
purchasing.  Appreciate  the  value  that  aggregators  are  providing  in  these  applications,  but 
appreciate  more  fully  how  much  you’re  getting  locked  in  to  solutions  that  will  hamper  your 
competitiveness  in  the  long  run.  Content  licensing  should  be  fully  independent  from  content 
workflow wherever possible. 

 Consider  carefully  how  you  may  employ  rights  management  within  your  own  institution  to 
manage commercial content. 
Most  suppliers  of  content  for  professional  and  academic  use  have  been  very  slow  to  consider 
how  to  implement  digital  rights  management  as  a  key  content  management  technology.  By 
contrast many institutions have embraced DRM as a key mechanism to enable secure sharing of 
content  inside  and  beyond  their  organizations,  even  as  DRM  is  gaining  success  quickly  in 
consumer content. If your content suppliers are unable or unwilling to adopt DRM, show them 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 26
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

the way by incorporating their content in your own DRM schemes. Combined with Information 
Lifecycle  Management  storage  schemes  you  have  the  ability  to  make  commercial  content  a 
permanent  and  well‐controlled  part  of  your  greater  content  infrastructure  –  no  matter  where 
instances of it may reside. This will be especially important for corporate compliance purposes, 
where  the  context  in  which  commercial  content  has  been  used  may  be  as  relevant  as  the 
content itself.  

 Consider how commercial content can be integrated into your search engine strategies more 
directly.  
Today’s major institutions are graced with both their own sophisticated search technologies and 
open  Web  technologies  to  aid  users  in  locating  the  right  content  for  the  right  purpose.  With 
traditional  commercial  aggregation  schemes,  though,  the  best  that  most  institutions  can 
manage for integration is federated search, an awkward mechanism at best, or indexed retrieval 
via Web services. Caching commercial content “behind the firewall” is one widely‐used strategy 
that can provide both more effective local indexing and less external knowledge of its use, but 
can prove to be an expensive and complicated option for many. Consider how to source content 
directly  from  publishers  in  a  way  that  will  enable  its  use  more  directly  in  your  search 
infrastructure, both via the open Web and via aggregators providing your search engines direct 
access  to  their  databases.    Both  publishers  and  aggregators  may  not  feel  terribly  comfortable 
with these arrangements at first, but when combined with digital rights management it makes 
eminent  sense  to  incite  the  movement  towards  object‐oriented  publication  by  demanding 
published content act the same as any other type of content in its ability to be manipulated by 
today’s leading content technologies – regardless of its location. 

15.5 Recommendations for Technology Companies


Technology  companies  have  much  to  gain  in  the  New  Aggregation  model  and  have  done  so  already. 
Unfettered by many of the basic assumptions about content aggregation models companies like Google 
and  Open  Text  Have  made  tremendous  strides  by  exploiting  specific  aggregation  attributes  with 
precision and excellence. Yet it is not all sweet news for technology companies in this new environment. 
Many  struggle  to  find  a  business  model  that  will  take  them  beyond  their  own  traditional  models  of 
software licensing fees that are increasingly hard to justify on a component or feature level, while others 
wrestle  with  what  it  really  means  to  be  a  content  services  provider  as  opposed  to  a  pure  technology 
play.  Here  are  a  few  thoughts  as  to  how  content  technology  companies  focusing  on  professional  and 
institutional sales can succeed in the New Aggregation environment:  

 Don’t get sucked in to the old business models as a growth strategy. 
Between a tiny number of lucky technology companies turned aggregators such as Yahoo! and a 
galaxy  of  publishers  and  aggregators  there  are  not  many  plays  out  there  that  are  going  to 
capture significant market share replacing existing aggregators by doing their old models a little 
better.  Even  Apple’s  iTunes  is  starting  to  flounder  as  a  destination  content  site  as  new 
technology companies and distributors enter the picture to carve off pieces of the aggregation 
puzzle. Stick to specific attributes of the aggregation model that match your strengths well and 
let your clients decide how to mix and match them to their needs. Think IBM, which has been 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 27
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

successful  at  creating  synergy  with  content  providers  while  gradually  developing  key 
components that strip away their core strengths. 

 Unless you’ve got really new technology, focus on specific content sectors. 
The graveyard of the content technology industry is lined with companies that tried to market 
an  idea  without  understanding  which  content  markets  were  best  suited  for  its  exploitation. 
Smart  technology  companies  do  research  on  which  content  market  sectors  need  their 
technology  the  most  and  develop  highly  tuned  product  development  and  marketing  plans  to 
meet those sectors’ user‐level content needs. Get to know not just the stats and the outline of 
those sectors but the personalities and work styles of the end users in great detail. In doing so 
you’ll  be  creating  content  value  and  not  just  technology  –  positioning  yourself  for  ongoing 
marketing to that sector or a sellout to sector‐specific aggregators eager to hold on to revenues 
and market share. 

 If you DO have really new technology, focus on dominating an aggregation attribute with it.  
Search  engines  and  related  technologies  are  glutting  the  market  for  indexing  and  retrieval 
services, for example, but nobody does rights management well for content purchased by both 
institutions  and  individuals.  The  company  that  can  dominate  with  this  capability  will  in  effect 
become  the  commercial  hub  for  all  professionally‐oriented  content  purchasing  and  licensing. 
This  may  cramp  the  style  of  folks  coming  out  of  universities  with  concentrations  in  already 
crowded  content  technology  markets,  but  order  them  a  few  pizzas  more  to  have  them  think 
about  that  they  can  do  with  other  more  underexploited  aggregation  attributes  and  your  new 
technology will penetrate more markets far more quickly. 

15.6 Conclusion
In some ways the New Aggregation is hardly new at all: the Internet and the Internet Protocol (IP) that 
enable both public and institutional networks have been with us for decades and the Web itself is hardly 
a  new  phenomenon.  What  is  different  today  is  a  far  more  sophisticated  approach  being  taken  by 
individuals and institutions to content value informed by this long exposure to the Web and the absolute 
ubiquity  of  IP  as  a  worldwide  communications  medium.  Having  scrambled  for  the  better  part  of  a 
decade to catch up with this phenomenon commercial aggregators and the publishers that they service 
are  at  the  edge  of  having  to  accept  that  the  balance  in  their  business  models  is  about  to  shift  over 
permanently  in  favor  of  New  Aggregation  attributes  as  the  way  to  highly  profitable  operations.  Many 
aggregators lack the financial depth to continue in their present form and will be challenged further as 
more institutions and individuals demand that their suppliers fall in line with these new norms. It’s up to 
these aggregators and publishers to embrace the New Aggregation rapidly – and it’s up to today’s major 
institutions to push their aggregators and publishers to embrace it. The end result of these efforts will 
be  a  world  of  commercial  content  that’s  far  more  in  line  with  how  people  have  used  content  for 
centuries.  The  center  of  publishing  technology  moved  long  ago  into  our  own  hands;  it’s  time  for  the 
business  methods  and  commercial  models  of  commercial  aggregators  and  publishers  to  follow  that 
movement at long last. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 28


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

16. ABOUT THE AUTHOR


John Blossom
President
Shore Communications Inc.

jblossom@shore.com

John  Blossom  is  one  of  the  most  widely  recognized  content  industry  analysts,  providing  thought 
leadership  to  executives  in  search  of  new  approaches  to  rapidly  changing  markets  for  publishing  and 
technology products and services. Mr. Blossom founded Shore Communications Inc. in 1997, specializing 
in research and advisory services and strategic marketing consulting for publishers and content service 
providers  in  enterprise  and  media  markets.  Mr.  Blossom’s  engagements  have  included  strategic 
marketing  consulting  for  major  corporations  and  startups  as  well  as  speaking  engagements  at  major 
conferences and advisory services for senior industry executives. Mr. Blossom is the author of the book 
"Content Nation: Surviving and Thriving as Social Media Changes Our Work, Our Lives and Our Future," 
published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. in January 2009, and speaks frequently at industry and corporate 
events on publishing in enterprise and media markets.. 

Mr. Blossom's career spans more than twenty years of marketing, research, product management and 
development in advanced information and media venues, including the marketing and development of 
financial  information  services  at  global  financial  publishers  and  financial  services  companies  (Citicorp, 
Quotron and for Reuters Holdings PLC), as well as earlier experience in broadcast media. Mr. Blossom 
served  as  a  Vice  President  and  Lead  Analyst  at  Outsell,  Inc.,  where  he  provided  research  and  analysis 
coverage of content technologies and financial and corporate information markets for major corporate 
clients, and developed successful online ecommerce services for research reports. For his excellence in 
qualiitative  research,  Mr.  Blossom  was  recognized  with  the  Vendor  of  the  Year  award  by  Standard  & 
Poor's  in  2001.  Mr.  Blossom's  ContentBlogger  weblog  won  the  Software  and  Information  Industry 
Association  2007  CODiE  award  for  Best  Media  Blog.  Mr.  Blossom  is  currently  writing  a  book  on  social 
media. 

Mr. Blossom's extensive global experience with the marketing and management of financial information 
services, including real‐time datafeeds, established him as one of the thought leaders in this important 
market  segment,  leading  to  strategic  assignments  with  the  executive  management  team  of  Reuters 
Group  PLC.  Mr.  Blossom  was  also  a  key  player  in  a  number  of  ground‐breaking  Internet‐oriented 
initiatives at Reuters, including the introduction of content management services and a global effort to 
integrate  Internet‐based  information  suppliers  into  the  mainstream  Reuters  information  services 
environment.  Mr.  Blossom  has  traveled  to  and  is  familiar  with  both  European  and  Asian  markets  for 
content as well as North American markets.. 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 29


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

In  1999,  Mr.  Blossom  joined  Waters  Information  Services  as  Director  of  Market  Research,  where  he 
spearheaded the design, development and marketing of The Waters Survey, the first publicly published 
survey  to  collect  highly  detailed  information  on  financial  information  product  usage  from  financially 
oriented institutions in the United States.   

Mr. Blossom has been interviewed frequently by the business press and has been quoted in many major 
news and trade publications and media outlets, including: 

The Wall Street Journal 
Financial Times 
Washington Post 
Denver Post 
USA Today 
Marketplace radio 
ABC Radio National 
CEO Magazine 
Information Today 
EContent Magazine 
Upgrade Magazine 
BusinessNow television 
Wall Street and Technology 
Waters Magazine 
Securities Industry News 
Red Herring 
 

Mr. Blossom speaks regularly at major industry conferences and events, including: 

SIIA Information Industry Summit 
SIIA NetGain 
SIIA Financial Information Summit (Rome) 
SLA Annual Conference 
The National Press Club 
The Commonwealth Club 
ASIDIC 
NFAIS 
Buying and Selling eContent 
Search Engine Strategies 
Infovision (India) 
InfoCommerce Annual Conference 
OCLC Symposium 
TransPromo Annual Conference 
Uchida Spectrum User Symposium (Tokyo) 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 30


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

17. ABOUT SHORE


Shore  Communications  Inc.  is  a  leading  research  and  advisory  service  focusing  on  organizations  that 
create,  market,  purchase,  deploy  and  use  professionally‐oriented  content  and  the  technologies  that 
enable its value in individual and collaborative environments.  Unlike many other research and advisory 
services, Shore is unique in its focus on understanding not just content or technology or users but the 
complex  interplay  between  these  forces  that  create  value  in  enterprise  and  media  content  markets.  
This  positioning  is  important  to  our  clients,  who  increasingly  view  their  own  operations  in  the  same 
unified manner. 

Shore focuses on the research and advisory needs of the creators and consumers of content and related 
technologies in the professional world. At the core of Shore's operations is a talented and experienced 
team of analysts and specialists who are dedicated to an unbiased and objective approach to servicing 
your needs. Shore’s team includes senior analysts with years of experience in providing marketing and 
research  services  to  major  communications  companies,  including  major  quantitative  and  qualitative 
research  projects  that  have  oftentimes  set  standards  for  coverage  and  quality.  Shore’s  clients  include 
major  publishing  companies,  emerging  content  technology  companies  and  other  new  and  established 
companies needing leading edge thinking to drive their product development and purchasing plans. 

Shore  is  a  stock‐issuing  corporation  incorporated  in  the  State  of  Connecticut  and  in  continuous 
operation  since  1999,  with  operations  and  team  members  throughout  the  United  States.  Our  team 
consists of numerous industry experts with years of experience  in the publishing and communications 
industry and who have worked as successful independent consultants providing research and advisory 
services prior to joining Shore’s virtual team.  

Shore  works  with  its  clients  on  a  highly  confidential  basis.  In  general  outline,  our  engagements  have 
included: 

 Major  market  opportunity  evaluations  for  enterprise  and  media  content  and  technology 
companies,  including  competitive  product  evaluations,  executive  interviews,  market  surveys, 
market  research,  narrative  research,  market  sizings,  marketing  and  product  plan  evaluations, 
platform evaluations, go‐to‐market plans and strategic investments and acquisitions advice. 

 Services  for  major  and  emerging  companies  in  financial  information,  legal,  regulatory  and 
compliance  information,  scientific,  technical  and  medical  information,  business  information, 
mobile markets, social media publishing, search, categorization and aggregation technologies. 

 Engagements  and  work  experience  with  global  enterprise  publishers,  including  experience  in 
Asia and the EU. 

For further information please contact us at: 
21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 31
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. THE NEW AGGREGATION - SCI-201001

Shore Communications Inc. 

4 Merritt Lane 

Westport, CT 06880‐1421 

203.293.8511 

http://www.shore.com/ 

inquiries@shore.com 

21 September 2010   COPYRIGHT © 1999-2010 SHORE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 32


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED