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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer

Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018

University of Massachusetts Boston


College of Advancing and Professional Studies (CAPS)
Instructional Design Graduate Program

Instructor Information

Apostolos Koutropoulos, MBA, MSIT, MA, MEd


a.koutropoulos@umb.edu
Skype: akoutropoulos
Office Hours: virtual office hours by request

Note: Throughout the semester, I will communicate with you via your UMB email account. Please review
the following website for a job aid that will assist you in forwarding your UMB email account to your
personal account if you prefer:
http://howto.wikispaces.umb.edu/Forward+Student+UMB+Email+to+Personal+Account

Classes begin Tuesday May 29, 2018 (and run through Thursday August 23, 2018)

Academic Calendar: http://www.umb.edu/registrar/academic_calendar

Course Information

Course Title: Design and instruction of online courses

Prerequisites: INSDSG 601, INSDSG 602, INSDG 640, or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite Skills:

1. Application-level knowledge of instructional design principles and practices


2. Basic computer skills, which include:

• Operating system skills (e.g.: opening applications, file management)


• Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint application knowledge
• Internet Skills (e.g.: ability to navigate the Internet, search, upload/download files)
• Some knowledge of a course management system would be useful
• Some HTML authoring, graphics, and multimedia expertise.
• Helpful: Teaching/training experience

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
Course
Description: This course is for instructors, teachers, trainers, or instructional designers who want to
explore the critical success factors in designing and delivering online instruction. Through
readings, discussion, and various activities, we will examine the pedagogical implications of
technology-mediated learning, the dynamics of the virtual classroom, the elements of
effective online course design, as well as the tools and technologies available to create and
deliver online instruction design, and to assess student performance. Through group-based
and individual project work, we will design and create online modules. This course will use
a range of interactive and collaborative instructional techniques in an effort to provide
current or potential online instructors rich firsthand experience of what it is like to be a
student learning in an online environment.

Technical Requirements:
This course has the option to use Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing system. It is a
good idea to go through Blackboard Collaborate at the beginning of the semester to make
sure you can access the service and work out any bugs before you really need to use it for
work. One cautionary note: some students who have attempted to participate in a
Blackboard Collaborate session from their work sites have found that firewalls block their
access so this is something to check out before your session.

You will also need a headset with microphone to fully participate and can also use a
webcam if you have one. If you experience difficulty with the audio over the web then
there is an opportunity to also call in via phone (phone charges may apply depending on
your location). There is also the capability to upload PowerPoint presentations, use a group
whiteboard and utilize text chat. Any synchronous sessions we have will be recorded and
archived for future reference.

Students will be developing content for their online course project during the semester
however there is no requirement to use specific applications for development. This choice
is up to the student and is often driven by what is available at the worksite or owned
personally. At the end of this syllabus I have included some links to free Learning
Management Systems that you can use as part of this course.

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
Required Text(s): None that you have to buy :-)

Optional but recommended: Garrison (2017). E-Learning in the 21st Century: A Community of inquiry
framework for research and practice.

Selected chapters will be used from Bates (2015) Teaching in a Digital Age, available for free download
from: https://opentextbc.ca/teachinginadigitalage/

Reading as assigned, articles are listed in the course each week and are available electronically in the UMB
Healey library or for free online. Please email instructor before paying for articles, as you should be able to
access all required readings for free. Please ensure you have your library barcode and can access library
resources before the start of the course: https://www.umb.edu/library

Course
Objectives: By fully participating in this course, you should be able to master the following Course
Objectives (CO):

1. Describe the pedagogical implications of learning in an online environment and relate


them to your own student populations
2. Explain at least one model of instructional design in addition to the Dick and Carey
model
3. Develop content with a universal design approach that will consciously address the
needs of different types of learners with a range of learning styles
4. Scaffold an online or hybrid, instructor-led course to support collaboration and
communication in an online, global environment
5. Identify the key success factors for delivering effective online instruction in your own
online or hybrid course design
6. Evaluate a range of tools, techniques, and technologies available to develop content,
manage instruction, and assess student performance in online courses and implement
those most effective for their own course design
7. Design and teach a lesson online.
8. Design and implement at least three modules of an online course within a course
management system

Course
Policies: Participation - Attendance and presence are required for this class. The Discussion Board
make up our "classroom" so logging in defines your presence. I expect you to let me know
ahead of time if you will be unable to participate for a week, or if this is not possible, to be
in touch with me as soon as you can thereafter. Email is the best way to notify me.

You are expected to log on to the course website a minimum of three times a week and to
post a substantive contribution to the discussion at that time. You are expected to post an
original reflection by Wednesday, midnight EST, of each week and then reply to at least two
of your peers by Sunday. Simply saying "I agree" is not considered a substantive

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
contribution! You must support your position or add somehow to the discussion when
logging on. Try to relate the topic to your own experience if possible.

Group Work – This course depends on your involvement with online discussion and
activities. Be aware that the responses and learning of your peers depend on your timely
contributions, especially for the group assignments in the course. You will be directed each
week whether to post your assignments/reflections in either the Discussion Board to a
specific topic or to another communication/collaboration site or designated folder.

Please review the descriptions of the assignments while you work on them and before you
post the finished product. A common mistake is to become intrigued with a wonderful
tangential idea and not address the assignment requirements. It may be fun to do but you
may lose points.

Norms to ponder: timeliness, confidentiality within your group, dealing with group issues
within the group, and civility and supportive criticism only. We want this to be an
intellectual "safe" zone. For specific assignments that require you to work in a group I
don’t specify internal group deadlines. There is one assignment deadline and your group
should negotiate amongst its members what should be done and by what time.

Late Work – Adhering to proven characteristics of andragogy, there will be an emphasis on


the exploratory and experiential. We will utilize discussion, small group work, and
individual activities to engage with the material. For this reason, it is very important that
you keep up with the reading assignments and log in a minimum of three times per week,
which includes posting your weekly reflection question by Wednesday midnight. EST so that
there will be sufficient time to interact with your peers. Discussion topics will be turned off
one week following the end of the discussion in order to keep the class moving. Lack of
preparation and failure to engage in the many learning opportunities in this course will be
taken into account in your final grade. Course deliverables are expected to be on time
unless there is some extenuating circumstance. Points will be deducted for late work. This
includes discussion forum assignments and work. No late work will be accepted five days
after the due date. (Example: if an assignment is due on Sunday, the last possible day to
submit it is the following Friday. Your maximum grade for the assignment at that point will
be 75%)

Required Assignments:

For more details on learner assessment, see Blackboard Learn. Due dates are specified in Blackboard Learn
Learner assessment is outlined in the following table. This course is graded using mastery grading. This
means that you accrue points by successfully completing tasks/activities. It is possible to attain 100% in this
course.

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
Participation (30%) Each week you are required to actively participate in the class and demonstrate
your participation. Unlike face-to-face classes, the instructor does not ‘see’ you
unless you actively participate in course discussions and course activities. Each
participation discussions and activities will be outlined in the weekly folder in
Blackboard learn.
Online Teaching (30%) You will be required to teach a topic to your classmates on week 7, 8, 9, or 10.
During that week you will be expected to complete all the tasks of a typical online
instructor (providing content, facilitating discussion, creating and facilitating
activities, assessing students). 1 week after you teach, you will submit a report on
your experience teaching online. Each team will teach a 1 week lesson (3-4 hours
of student content) on a topic assigned by the instructor (based upon student
interest).
Final Project (40%) Final Project deliverables will include three parts:

1. A design for at least three weeks of an online course


2. Implementation of a minimum of 3 modules in a course management
system
3. Course syllabus
4. Course orientation video
5. Peer review reports

Example Learning Management Systems:

• https://www.schoology.com/
• https://www.coursesites.com
• http://www.freemoodle.org/
• https://www.instructure.com/

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018

Grading

Grading: Grade type for the course is a whole or partial letter grade. (Please see table below)
Note: the lowest passing grade for a graduate student is a “C”. Grades lower than a “C”
that are submitted by faculty will automatically be recorded as an “F”.

Please see the Graduate Bulletin for more detailed information on the University’s grading policy.

UMass Boston Graduate Grading Policy


Letter Quality
Grade Percentage Points
A 93-100% 4.0
A- 90-92% 3.7
B+ 87-89% 3.3
B 83-86% 3.0
B- 80-82% 2.7
C+ 77-79% 2.3
C 73-76% 2.0
F 0-72% 0.0
Given under very restricted terms and only when satisfactory work has been accomplished in
INC N/A
majority of coursework. Contract of completion terms is required.
INC/F Received for failure to comply with contracted completion terms. N/A
W Received if withdrawal occurs before the withdrawal deadline. N/A
AU Audit (only permitted on space-available basis) N/A
Not Attending (student appeared on roster, but never attended class. Student is still responsible for
NA tuition and fee charges unless withdrawal form is submitted before deadline. NA has no effect on N/A
cumulative GPA.)

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018

Methods of Instruction

Methods: This course is an instructor-facilitated, fully online asynchronous course conducted via the
Blackboard Learn course management system. Weekly discussion, small group work, and
individual activities will provide opportunities for student-to-content, student-to-student
and student-to-instructor involvement. Although the course will be conducted
asynchronously, there can be opportunities for synchronous sessions during the semester
to provide real-time interaction. A variety of multimedia will be incorporated including
podcasts, video clips, narrated streaming PowerPoint presentations, articles, weekly
discussion forums, interactive games, and weekly formative assessments. Hands-on
development for the final course project will take place in an LMS of the student’s choice
and will include materials developed with a range of multimedia chosen by the student.

Accommodations

Section 504 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer guidelines for curriculum modifications and
adaptations for students with documented disabilities. If applicable, you may obtain adaptation
recommendations from the UMass Boston Ross Center (508-287-7430). You need to present and discuss
these recommendations with me within a reasonable period, prior to the end of the Drop/Add period.

You are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in your personal files for use when applying for future
degrees, certification, licensure, or transfer of credit.

Code of Student Conduct

Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including requirements for the Academic
Honesty Policy, delineated in the University of Massachusetts Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin and
relevant program student handbook(s).

http://media.umassp.edu/massedu/policy/3-08%20UMB%20Code%20of%20Conduct.pdf

Other Pertinent and Important Information

Incomplete Policy: Incompletes will be assigned only in cases of illness, accident, or other catastrophic
occurrences beyond a student's control. Incompletes are given under very restricted terms and only when
satisfactory work has been accomplished in majority of coursework. A contract of completion terms is
required for all incompletes with concrete deliverables on specific due dates.

Coursework Difficulties: Please discuss all coursework matters with me sooner than later.

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018

MLOs for INSDSG 684 The Design and Instruction of Online Courses

1.1 Complete scholarly research including searching, locating, and analyzing literature in the field;
2.1 Seek multiple data and information points when conducting analysis;
2.2 Apply tools of analysis including task and needs analysis;
2.3 Analyze performance gaps;
3.1. Develop performance outcomes that are measurable, have a specific action, and have specific
conditions stated;
3.2. Use evidence-based instructional strategies to maximize learning;
3.3. Design appropriate multimodal instructional delivery, including face-to-face, online, blended, and
emerging modes;
3.4. Develop formative and summative learner assessments;
3.5. Draw on a range of instructional design models to craft effective instructional interventions;
4.1. Evaluate the relevancy and effectiveness of the instructional materials to help learners attain
learning objectives;
4.2. Demonstrate competency using a range of current and emerging technologies to build learning
solutions;
4.4. Apply visual literacy concepts and principles in the planning, layout, and design of learning
materials;
4.6. Develop learning materials based on sound cognitive research findings.
5.1. Develop implementation plans, taking into consideration social, organizational, and technical
implications;
5.2. Facilitate instruction using multiple delivery modes including face-to-face and distance learning;
5.3. Apply effective practices that encourage learner interaction, engagement, and learning;
5.4. Stay current with emerging trends in delivery modes and their related technologies;
5.5. Manage the implementation process.
6.1. Evaluate instructional materials for usability and effectiveness;
7.1. Act in ethically sound ways while executing all duties;
7.2. Act mindfully and advocate on behalf of the learner;
7.3. Distinguish process from content issues and determine how process can block or enhance group
effectiveness;
7.4. Communicate clearly, collegially, and credibly in written and verbal discourse;
7.5. Engage respectfully, fairly, and cooperatively as part of a team;
7.6. Consider connections between instructional design and other disciplines to inform the
instructional design process.
8.2. Practice collaborative and team work strategies that build rapport and trust, mediate and resolve
conflicts, and influence people;

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
8.3. Implement processes to effectively manage people and projects;

The 27 PLOs are assessed using the following assignments:

• Participation assignments: 1.1, 2.1. 3.4, 3.5, 4.2, 4.6, 5.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6, 8.2,
• Teaching week assignments: 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.1, 4.2, 4.4, 4.6, 5.1, 5.2,
5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 6.1, 7.1 ,7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6, 8.2, 8.3
• Project assignments: 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.1, 4.2, 4.4, 4.6, 5.1, 5.5, 8.3

Course Schedule
Detailed course content will be made available in the course management system (Blackboard Learn) one
week before the scheduled start. In addition to the weekly learning objectives, throughout the course
learners will learn new tools to support online learning.

Week Dates Topic

Week 1 May 29 – June 3 Introduction to Online Education and Community of Inquiry Framework

Week 2 June 4 – June 10 Social presence & Learner-Learner interaction

Week 3 June 11 – June 17 Cognitive presence & Learner-Content interaction

Week 4 June 18 – June 24 Teaching presence & Learner-Instructor interaction

Week 5 June 25 – July 1 Learning management systems

Week 6 July 2 – July 8 Critical instructional design

Week 7 July 9 – July 15 Learner Led – TBD

Week 8 July 16 – July 22 Learner Led – TBD

Week 9 July 23 – July 29 Learner Led – TBD

Week 10 July 30 – Aug. 5 Learner Led – TBD

Week 11 Aug. 6 – Aug. 12 Project implementation & peer reviews

Week 12 Aug. 13 – Aug. 19 Final peer reviews & project submission

Week 13 Aug. 20 – Aug. 23 Student project presentations

Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018

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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
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Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
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Updated: May 18, 2018


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INSDSG 684 Syllabus- Summer
Design and Instruction of Online Courses 2018
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Updated: May 18, 2018


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