You are on page 1of 4

Chang, 8th Edition, Chapter 4, Worksheet #1 S. B.

 Piepho, Fall 2005

Types of Chemical Reactions

One skill that chemists learn over time is that of writing and balancing equations.  The first 
task is deciding what type of reaction is taking place.  In this chapter we study three types:

 Precipitation Reactions:  In these reactions two soluble salts usually react to form to an 
insoluble salt (the precipitate!) and a soluble salt.  The cations of the reacting salts exchange 
anions.  See Chang, Table 4.2, p. 119 for solubility guidelines.
 Acid­Base Reactions:  Most commonly an acid of the type HX or H2X reacts with a basic 
hydroxide to form a salt plus water.  Alternatively, the acid may react with ammonia (NH3) 
to form an ammonium salt (but no water).  These are proton transfer reactions in which H+ 
(the proton) is transferred from the acid to the base.
 Oxidation­Reduction Reactions:  These are reactions in which one type of atom increases in 
oxidation number (is oxidized) and another type of atom decreases in oxidation number (is 
reduced).  A large number of oxidation­reduction (redox) reactions contain one or more 
reactants or products, which are pure elements.

Note that hydroxides can react with acids in acid­base reactions, and also with other salts in 
precipitation reactions.  

Writing Balanced Ionic Equations

The first step in writing a balanced equation is predicting the products of the reaction as 
discussed above.  Then the steps below are completed in sequence:
 
 Balance the Molecular Equation:  In the “molecular” equation, nothing is broken up into 
ions.  Salt formulas are written so that the cation charges exactly balance out the anion 
charges so that the salt is neutral.  Then the equation is balanced for atoms.
 Balance the Total Ionic Equation: The first step in writing an ionic equation is to decide 
what species should be broken up into ions.  The rules below should help!

Break up into Ions Do NOT break up!  Leave “as is”!
 Strong Acids.  HCl, HBr, HI, HNO3, HClO4, and  Weak Acids.  Nearly all acids are 
H2SO4 are the most common examples; assume  weak.
other acids are weak.  Weak Bases.  Nearly all bases are 
 Strong Bases.  NaOH, KOH, or Ba(OH)2 are the  weak.
most common examples; assume other bases are   Insoluble Salts.  Most salts are 
weak. insoluble.
 Soluble Salts.  Salts of the alkali metals, salts   Non­electrolytes or Weak 

1
Chang, 8th Edition, Chapter 4, Worksheet #1 S. B. Piepho, Fall 2005

containing the NH4+ ion, the NO3­ ion, and other  Electrolytes.  Examples include H2O, 
salts as specified in Chang, Table 4.2, p. 119. gases, pure elements, hydrocarbons, 
and alcohols.

 Balance the Net Ionic Equation:  Identify all spectator ions:  these are ions that are identical
on both sides of the balanced total ionic equation.  Remove the spectator ions from the 
equation.  What remains is the net ionic equation.  Finally, simplify the stoichiometric 
coefficients if all of them are divisible by a common factor.

If all the ions are spectator ions so that nothing is left for your net ionic equation, no reaction 
has taken place!
______________________________________________________________________________
Exercises
For each of the following reactions, complete the chart.  Be sure to balance all of your 
equations.

2
Chang, 8th Edition, Chapter 4, Worksheet #1 S. B. Piepho, Fall 2005

1.   Mg(OH)2(s)  +   HCl(aq)
(a) Reaction type: Formulas of Products Formed:

(b) Molecular Equation
(c) Total Ionic Equation
(d) Net Ionic Equation

Answer to 1.(d):  Mg(OH)2(s) + 2 H+(aq)    Mg2+(aq) + 2 H2O(l)
______________________________________________________________________________
2.   AgNO3(aq)  +   K2Cr2O7(aq)

(a) Reaction type: Formulas of Products Formed:

(b) Molecular Equation
(c) Total Ionic Equation
(d) Net Ionic Equation

Answer to 2.(d):  2 Ag+(aq) + Cr2O72­(aq)      Ag2Cr2O7(s)
______________________________________________________________________________
3.   NH3(aq)  +  HC2H3O2(aq)     
                (or CH3COOH)
(a) Reaction type: Formulas of Products Formed:

(b) Molecular Equation
(c) Total Ionic Equation
(d) Net Ionic Equation

Answer to 3.(d):  NH3  +  HC2H3O2      NH4+(aq)  +  C2H3O2­(aq)
______________________________________________________________________________
4.   NaOH(aq)  +   H2SO4(aq)
(a) Reaction type: Formulas of Products Formed:

(b) Molecular Equation
(c) Total Ionic Equation
(d) Net Ionic Equation

Answer to 4.(d):   OH­(aq)  +  H+(aq)    H2O(l)   (obtain this after all coefficients have been divided by 
2)
______________________________________________________________________________
3
Chang, 8th Edition, Chapter 4, Worksheet #1 S. B. Piepho, Fall 2005

5.   H2S(aq)  +   Ba(OH)2(aq)
(a) Reaction type: Formulas of Products Formed:

(b) Molecular Equation
(c) Total Ionic Equation
(d) Net Ionic Equation

Answer to 5.(d):    H2S(aq)  +  Ba2+(aq)  +  2  OH­(aq)       BaS(s)  +  2 H2O(l)