You are on page 1of 59

Solar Tracking

AY2017-2018 Project Design Report


Advisor:
Terry Wang
Goal: By March 16, 2018, we will create a complete set of design
documentation to manufacture a portable, easy-to-use solar panel
mount. The mount will be adjustable to varying sizes of 100W solar
panels. Additionally, the mounting system will autonomously and
periodically adjust its orientation towards the sun to achieve optimal
solar intake.
PROJECT DEFINITION

APPROVALS

ROLE NAME SIGNATURE DATE

Team Leader Jong Min Jung

Advisor Terry Wang

Project Manager Ryan Carter

Purchasing Manager Carlos Ayala

Safety Manager Christopher Rocha

Document Manager Kashif Laurie

Team Member Devin Frerichs

Team Member Matthew Tsang

Document Number: DEFN-MAE0162

Document Name: Solar Tracking

Release Date: October 31, 2017 Solar Tracking


This document was created from
template SDP-120. Contact the
Author: Jong Min Jung
Mechanical and Aerospace department
at the University of California, Irvine for Version: A
more details.
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

Revision History

REV DESCRIPTION DATE APPROVED BY

- Initial Release [10/23/2017] Jong Min Jung

1 Final Release [10/31/2017] Jong Min Jung

2 Update [3/14/2018] Jong Min Jung


PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

Table of Contents

Title and Approvals i


Revision History ii
Table of Contents iii
1 PROJECT OVERVIEW 1
1.1 Executive Summary 1
2 PROJECT DETAIL 2
2.1 Project Goal 2
2.2 Project Milestones 2
2.3 Project Team 2
2.4 Organization Chart 1
2.5 Steering Team 1
2.6 Available Project Funds 1
2.7 Resource Estimation 2
2.8 Communication Plan 2
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

1 PROJECT OVERVIEW

1.1 Executive Summary

For off-grid campers, gas operated generators are the typical machine of choice for electrical
power generation. Electrical generators provide a portable power solution to provide creature comforts.
The downside to these generators is that they are noisy, difficult to transport, and they emit pollution.
Portable solar panels are a viable option for customers seeking to replace their generators. Solar panels
capture renewable energy without excessive noise and pollution. However, there is no portable solar
power system available on the market to achieve high-energy intake. Studies have shown that
compared to a fixed-position solar panel, there is an average energy-intake gain of 20-30% with solar
tracking technology.
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

2 PROJECT DETAIL

2.1 Project Goal

By March 16, 2018, we will create a complete set of design documentation to manufacture a portable,
easy-to-use solar panel mount. The mount will be adjustable to varying sizes of 100W solar panels.
Additionally, the mounting system will autonomously and periodically adjust its orientation towards the
sun to achieve optimal solar intake.

2.2 Project Milestones

Milestone Name Target Date Comments

Discovery Report Fall 2017 Complete

Design Report Winter 2018 Complete

2.3 Project Team

# Name Project Role Email Phone Standing Units

1 Jong Min Jung Team Lead jongmj@uci.edu (909) 868- Senior 4


8265
2 Ryan Carter Project Manager carterrm@uci.edu (707) 688- Senior 4
6005
3 Carlos Ayala Purchasing ayalace@uci.edu (562) 682- Senior 4
Manager 0066
4 Christopher Rocha Safety Manager clrocha@uci.edu (559) 920- Senior 4
8557
5 Kashif Laurie Document klaurie@uci.edu (909) 455- Senior 4
Manager 6716
6 Devin Frerichs Member dfrerich@uci.edu (650) 868- Senior 4
9165
7 Matthew Tsang Member tsangmf@uci.edu (626) 991- Senior 4
2822
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

2.4 Organization Chart

Team Advisor: Terry Wang


Brian Jung
Team Lead

Kashif Laurie
Matthew Tsang Christopher Rocha Devin Frerichs Carlos Ayala Ryan Carter
Document
Team Member Safety Officer Team Member Purchasing Manager Project Manager
Manager

2.4 Steering Team

# Name Title Steering Role Email Phone

1 Terry Wang Professor Advisor terryw1@uci.edu N/A

2.5 Available Project Funds

Funding Source Comments Est. Amount ($)

Course Lab Fees (Fall Quarter) $100 x 7 team members $700

Course Lab Fees (Winter Quarter) $100 x 7 team members $700

Total Funds Available: $1,400


PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

2.7 Resource Estimation

Name Est. Hours (Fall) Est. Hours (Winter) Rate ($/hr) Est. Total ($)

Jong Min Jung 120 160 35 9,800

Ryan Carter 120 160 35 9,800

Carlos Ayala 120 160 35 9,800

Christopher Rocha 120 160 35 9,800

Kashif Laurie 120 160 35 9,800

Devin Frerichs 120 160 35 9,800

Matthew Tsang 120 160 35 9,800

Total 840 1120 35 68,600

2.8 Communication Plan

The solar tracking team will meet twice every week. The details of our weekly meetings are shown
below.

Communication Type Audience Day Time Location Responsibility

Skype Everyone Sunday 7:00 PM N/A Ryan Carter

In-person Everyone Wednesday 1:00 PM On campus: UCI Student Center Jong Min Jung

Skype Everyone Friday 7:00 PM N/A Jong Min Jung


PRODUCT SPECIFICATION
APPROVALS

ROLE NAME SIGNATURE DATE

Team Leader Jong Min Jung


Advisor Terry Wang

Project Manager Ryan Carter

Purchasing Manager Carlos Ayala


Safety Manager Christopher Rocha

Document Manager Kashif Laurie


Team Member Devin Frerichs

Team Member Matthew Tsang

Title Page and Approvals

Document Number: SPEC-MAE0162

Document Name: Project Specification

Release Date: October 31, 2017 Solar Tracking


This document was created from
template SDP-210. Contact the Author: Jong Min Jung
Mechanical and Aerospace department
at the University of California, Irvine for Version: A
more details.
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

1. Revision History

REV DESCRIPTION DATE APPROVED BY

- Initial Release [10/31/17] Jong Min Jung

A Update communication plan and project team [1/10/18] Jong Min Jung
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

Table of Contents

Title Page and Approvals i


Revision History ii
Table of Contents iii
1 PROJECT SPECIFICATION OVERVIEW 1
1.1 Executive Summary 1
2 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 2
2.1 Product Value Proposition 2
2.2 Product Context 2
2.3 User Characteristics 2
2.4 Assumptions 3
2.5 Dependencies 3
3 PRODUCT REQUIREMENTS 4
3.1 Functional Performance Requirements 4
3.2 Human Factors Requirements 5
3.3 Physical Requirements 5
4 APPENDIX 5
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

1 PROJECT SPECIFICATION OVERVIEW


1.1 Executive Summary
For off-grid campers, gas operated generators are the typical machine of choice for electrical
power generation. Electrical generators provide a portable power solution to provide creature comforts.
The downside to these generators is that they are noisy, difficult to transport, and they emit pollution.
Portable solar panels are a viable option for customers seeking to replace their generators. Solar panels
capture renewable energy without excessive noise and pollution. However, there is no portable solar
power system available on the market to achieve high-energy intake. Studies have shown that
compared to a fixed-position solar panel, there is an average energy-intake gain of 20-30% with solar
tracking technology. By March 16, 2018, we will create a complete set of design documentation to
manufacture a portable, easy-to-use solar panel mount that will be adjustable to varying size solar
panels. Additionally, the mounting system will autonomously and periodically adjust its orientation to
achieve optimal solar intake.
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

2 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
2.1 Product Value Proposition
The minimum viable product (MVP) features of our design were compared to the features of portable
solar panels from leading competitors on the market. A summary of our product value proposition is
shown below.

HQST Renogy Grape Solar Goal-Zero Our Design

Must-Haves
• Utilize Solar Energy Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
• Portable Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Performance Benefits
• Efficient Solar Tracking No No No No Yes
• Lightweight 26.1 lbs 29.8 lbs 28 lbs 25.9 lbs 40 lbs
• Weather Resistance Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Delighter
• Easy Setup/Storage Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2.2 Product Context


Our solar tracking system will require a 100W solar panel, one or more deep cycle batteries, and a
charge controller. These components will not be included with our product. Our system will utilize these
components to provide maximum solar energy gain to the end user.

2.3 User Characteristics


Name Samuel Thompson

Age 45

Gender Male

Marital Status Married

Education BA

Job Architect

Income $125,000

Demographics Middle class Caucasian male, married, with two children

Technology Use Average. Owns a smartphone, iPad, and laptop

Technology Adoption Early majority


PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

2.4 Assumptions
It is assumed that the end user of our product will be able to transport the solar tracking system to its
location of operation. The end user will possess a common socket wrench tool set to secure all hardware
during the setup process. The end user will be able to mount their solar panel (1) to the T-bracket (3).
Furthermore, once the solar panel has been mounted to the T-bracket (3), the end user must mount the
T-bracket to the elevation arm (4). The end user must also be able to connect all power cables, setup
their charge controller, and align the panel so that sunlight is incident on the face of the solar panel’s
photovoltaic cells.

2.5 Dependencies
The solar tracker system’s logic controller and motors will depend on energy from the end user’s
RV/camper batteries. This will be accomplished by a single power cable connected from said batteries to
an electrical port located on the solar tracking system. In total, there will be 4 conductors contained in
the power cable: 1 pair of conductors will be used to transfer the output electricity from the solar panel
to the end users batteries and the other pair will be used to transfer electricity from the end user’s
batteries to the solar tracking system.
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

3 PRODUCT REQUIREMENTS
3.1 Functional Performance Requirements
Metric Description Units Marginal Value Ideal Value
Max Operating Maximum ambient temperature Degrees 140 90
Temperature conditions for system’s operation (°F)
Min Operating Minimum ambient temperature Degrees -5 40
Temperature conditions for system’s operation (°F)
Maximum Load Maximum solar panel weight that can lbs 22 18
be supported
Maximum Panel length Maximum length of solar panel that in. 48 42
the system can support
Maximum Panel width Maximum width of solar panel that in. 29 26
the system can support
Maximum Panel height Maximum height of solar panel that in. 2.5 1.4
the system can support
Minimum Panel length Minimum length of solar panel that in. 39 42
the system can support
Minimum Panel width Minimum width of solar panel that in. 21 26
the system can support
Minimum Panel height Minimum height of solar panel that in. 1.1 1.4
the system can support
Electrical enclosure Degree of protection against the IP rating IP65 IP66
Protection intrusion of solid objects, dust,
accidental contact, and water in
electrical enclosures.
Maximum Wind Speed Maximum velocity of wind that panel mph 30 15
can sustain without tipping
PROJECT DEFINITION DEFN-MAE0162

3.2 Human Factors Requirements


Metric Description Units Marginal Value Ideal Value
Setup Time The length of time required to min 30 20
setup the system for operation

3.3 Physical Requirements


Metric Description Units Marginal Value Ideal Value
Weight Weight of complete system lbs 50 40

4 APPENDIX

IP Ingress Protection (IP) code. This standard defines ratings for water and debris

protection.
Customer Persona
Name: Samuel Thompson

Age: 45

Gender: Male

Marital Status: Married

Education: Bachelor’s Degree

Job: Architect

Income: $125,000

Quote: “I spent a lot of time outdoors as a kid with my family. I want


my kids to have that same experience, even if we have to bring some
extra distractions.”
Samuel loves to go camping with his family a few times each year. He owns a 29 ft, Class C RV.
He is an advocate for a greener planet. He met his wife Linda while looking for hiking shoes at a
sporting goods store. His family loves remote camping, but they do not want to part with
electricity.

Demographics: Middle class Caucasian male, married, with two children

Needs/Goals:

- Be as environmentally friendly as possible


- Set up camp hassle free (30-40 minutes)
- Keep wife and children as comfortable and safe as possible
- Enjoys long periods of comfort
Relevant Motivation and Attitudes:

- Encourages friends and peers to reduce their carbon footprints


- Welcoming to other campers nearby
- “Talking is more effective than texting”
Technology Use:

- Average
- Figures out solutions on his own
- Owns a smartphone, iPad, and laptop
Technology Adoption Life Cycle Segment:

- Early Majority, he has to see the real need for an upgrade and is willing to do so if his
needs are met. Otherwise, what he has “does the job fine”.
Concept Generation

Seasonal Bracket
T-bracket
Legs
Azimuth Motor
Mount
Concept Selection
Every concept generated was discussed during our team
meetings to hear various opinions. The main considerations for us
were manufacturability and cost. Discussions were used to rule out
any ideas that were not feasible for us to manufacture or if it would be
too much for our budget of $700 per quarter. From the remaining
concepts, we used decision matrices to decide which idea to pursue.
T-bracket Mount
Specification Reference Phone Wire Thumb
Case Screw
Manufacturability 0 + + +
Cost 0 0 0 +
Ease of Use 0 + - +
Durability 0 + + +
Total 0 +3 +1 +4

Material
Specification Reference Steel Aluminum
Weight 0 - +
Heat Conductivity 0 - +
Corrosion 0 - +
Resistance
Elasticity 0 - +
Welding 0 0 +
Total 0 -4 +5

Axes of rotation
Specification Reference Uniaxial Biaxial
Power Output 0 0 0
Ease of Setup 0 0 0
Feasibility 0 + +
Number of Parts 0 + -
Total 0 +2 0
Leg Attachments
Specification Reference Hinge Quick Foldable
Release Tripod
Pins
Feasibility 0 - + 0
Ease of Use 0 + + +
Volume 0 + + +
Total +1 +3 +2

Customer Interaction
Specification Reference Handles Bag
Manufacturability 0 0 +
Cost 0 - +
Ease of Use 0 - +
Total 0 -2 +3
Proposed Solution
We claim:
A solar tracking mount that:
- Tracks the sun throughout the day with little to no cloud cover
with a gear system driven by a motor
- Has a sensor that uses LED to detect sunlight
- Fits all 100W panels with adjustable mounting arms
- Has foldable legs for easy storage
High Level Assembly – Exploded View
Base Assembly

Motor Assembly
Central Column Assembly
Gantt Chart

Tasks
Project Breakdown
Work Breakdown Structure
Analysis
Experiment #1: Sensor Error
NOTES:
Location: UCI blue tables between Engineering Gateway and McDonnell Douglas
Date: 26 Jan 2018
Time: 1:15 PM
Weather conditions: Sunny day with no clouds, 65°F
Purpose: Test the accuracy of the solar sensors
The misalignment angle was measured by recording the distance of the
Procedure: edge of the shadow from the edge of the aluminum angle.
The shadows were cast from a small piece of aluminum angle that was hot
glued to the elevation arm.
An aluminum angle was included on the prototype for each axis, elevation
and azimuth.
Each sensor was tested individually and then the tests were run again with
simultaneous sensor operation.
One small piece of paper was taped parallel to the surface of the elevation
arm on each side of the aluminum angles.
The shadow-edge line was marked on this paper for each trial.
To calculate the angle of error, the inverse tangent of the height of the
aluminum angle and the shadow distance edge was calculated.
Rotation direction for the azimuth movement is defined by looking down
towards the ground.
Rotation direction for the elevation movement is defined by looking from the
solar sensor towards to the elevation motor.
RESULTS:
Max Error (Azimuth only) 15.33°
Min Error (Azimuth only) 2.57°
Max Error (Elevation
only) 18.05°
Max Error (Elevation
only) 5.93°
Max Error
(Simultaneous-Azimuth) 26.8°
Min Error (Simultaneous-
Azimuth) 2.52°
Max Error
(Simultaneous-Elevation) 20.39°
Min Error (Simultaneous-
Elevation) 9.08°
Comments: It was noted that there may be small error in the angle between the sensor's
photodiodes. Additionally, there may be small error due to the
fact that the sensors are not perfectly perpendicular to the aluminum angles.
Care was taken to minimize this error by carefully aligning
the sensors with the elevation arm. However it is expected that
approximately 2-5° of error may be attributed due to this fact.

Experiment #2: Power Gain of Azimuth and Elevation


NOTES:
Location: UCI ARC Parking Structure
Date: 16 Feb 2018
Time: 12 PM
Weather
conditions: Sunny day with no clouds
Purpose: Measure power gain for uniaxial vs biaxial setups
Experiment 1:The 100W solar panel was mounted on the T-Bracket. Beginning with
the plane of the panel aligned with the vertical. The panel was raised in 5° increments
and the current and voltage were recorded.
Experiment 2: The elevation angle was held constant at 40°. The azimuth angle was
Procedure: rotated in 5° increments and the current and voltage were recorded.
Results:
Power loss from azimuth error is negligible.

The power gain from dual axis given the error in our sensors from
experiment #1 is going to be minimal. Thus, we simplify our design to
uniaxial.
Experiment #3: Time Based Rotation
NOTES:
Location: AV
Date: 9 Mar 2018
Time: 12 PM
Weather
conditions: N/A
Purpose: Measure power gain for uniaxial vs biaxial setups
Piece of paper with 1° increments was taped to the top of Base-1. The motor and
timer were turned on simultaneously until the central column rotated the amount of
Procedure: degrees listed in the tables. The experiment was ran 5 times per experiment
Results:
With the solar panel mounted, the rotation rate is 17.7°/s
Without the panel mounted, the rotation rate is 18.7°/s
Circuit Diagram
Bill of Materials
Owner’s Manual
Table of Contents
Overview ................................................................................................................................................. xxiv
Exterior .................................................................................................................................................... xxiv
Set-Up...................................................................................................................................................... xxvi
Legs ..................................................................................................................................................... xxvi
T-Bracket............................................................................................................................................ xxvii
Seasonal Elevation Bracket ............................................................................................................xxviii
Operation ................................................................................................................................................ xxix
Technical Specifications ....................................................................................................................... xxix
Frequently Asked Questions ................................................................................................................. xxx
Troubleshooting ..................................................................................................................................... xxxi
Care/Maintenance .................................................................................................................................xxxii
Overview
The AceTrack system is a solar panel mount that
autonomously and periodically adjusts its orientation towards
the sun to achieve optimal solar intake. AceTrack has three
seasonal settings that allow it to achieve at least 20% more
power than a stationary solar panel.

Exterior

1. Extending Arms
2. T-Bracket
3. Seasonal Elevation Bracket
4. Central Column
5. Base
6. Leg Bracket
7. Leg
Interior

1. Lazy Susan Bearing


2. 50 Tooth Gear
3. 20 Tooth Gear
4. Motor
5. Motor Bracket
Set-Up
Legs

Step 1: Remove quick-release pin and adjust leg to be


parallel to the ground.
Step 2: Insert leg bracket pin back into original hole
T-Bracket

Step 1: Attach solar panel to T-Bracket and move the


elevation arms towards the edges of the panel.

Step 2: Secure elevation arms with included pin to


ensure the solar panel is firmly gripping the T-Bracket.
Seasonal Elevation Bracket

Step 1: Remove pin from seasonal elevation


bracket/central column and adjust the angle according
to the season.
Step 2: Once the angle is selected, insert the pin back
into the seasonal elevation bracket/elevation angle.
Operation
- Turn the On/Off switch to On
- When power is initiated, the system will perform an
initial scan to locate the sun’s position
- Every 2 hours, the system will rescan and reorient the
solar panel to the optimal angle
- The system will repeat this operation until the power
gain is insufficient.

Technical Specifications
Frequently Asked Questions
1. What size panels can be used?
a. AceTrack can support most 100W panels
(maximum dimension capability: 48”x29”x2.5”)

2. How do I store the apparatus?


a. Store indoors when not in use

3. Can I use this device on a cloudy or rainy day?


a. Yes, but power gain will be minimal without direct
sunlight

4. Can I leave this device on overnight?


a. Yes, but it is recommended to turn off the device
when sunlight is minimal

5. What is the best set-up location?


a. An open area that is expected to receive full
sunlight throughout the day. Avoid locations next
to objects that may cast shadows on the system

6. How much power improvement will I see from the


panel?
a. Our mount will provide between 20-25% of power
gain compared to a stationary panel.
Troubleshooting
Problem Solution
I can hear the motor but there is no This means that the gears are not
movement meshing correctly. The gear placement
can be readjusted by adjusting the
motor mount bracket to reduce the
spacing between the gear teeth.

I hear a squeaking sound coming from The squeaking sound it likely a result of
the base. insufficient lubrication. Please reference
the Care/Maintenance section

My solar panel is not securely attached Loosen the thumb screws on the T-
to the T-bracket. bracket. Slide in the extending arms
until the solar panel is securely
supported. Retighten the thumb screws
AceTrack will not turn on Power to the control system is obtained
from the junction box between the RV’s
battery and the charge controller.
Ensure there is a solid electrical
connection and ensure the solar panel
is properly connected to the charge
controller.
Care/Maintenance
Gears
It is recommended to inspect the gear system every 6 months to ensure it is
properly lubricated. If lubrication is needed, use an all-purpose lubricating oil or
automotive grease.

Lazy-Susan Bearing
It is recommended to lubricate the lazy-susan bearing periodically, as needed.
Recommended lubrication: WD-40.

Metal Frame
Use a damp wash cloth and mild soap to remove dirt from the AceTrack
structure.
Statement of Conformance
Acceptance Test Procedure

Approved By:

LAURIE, KASHIF VICENTE


(Document Manager)

CURRENT DOCUMENT STATUS


Version Number 1
File Name AceTrack Solar Tracking Mount
Delivery Date 3/9/2018
Owner UCI MAE Projects
Description Acceptance Test Procedure
TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 1
2 ACCEPTANCE TEST APPROACH ............................................................................................... 1
3 ACCEPTANCE TEST PROCESS ................................................................................................... 1
3.1 Establish Acceptance Test Framework 1
3.2 Plan Acceptance Test Activities 1
3.3 Develop Acceptance Test Cases 2
3.3.1 Sources for Test Cases Error! Bookmark not defined.
3.3.2 Structure for Acceptance Test Error! Bookmark not defined.
3.3.3 Test Procedures Development 5
3.4 Set Up the Acceptance Testing Environment Error! Bookmark not defined.
List of Exhibits

Exhibit 1: Solar Sensor Acceptance Test Schedule .......................................................................... 2


Exhibit 2: Single Axis for Solar Panel Acceptance Test Schedule .................................................... 2
INTRODUCTION
This document is the Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) for the AceTrack Solar Tracking Mount.
The acceptance test verifies that the system works as required and validates that the correct
functionality has been delivered. The ATP establishes the acceptance test framework used by the
team to plan, execute, and document the acceptance testing. It describes the scope of the work
performed and the approach taken to execute the tests created to validate that the system
performs as required. The details of the ATP are developed according to the requirements
specifications, and must show traceability back to those specifications.

ACCEPTANCE TEST APPROACH


In order to test the validity of the AceTrack Solar Tracking Mount, numerous tests were
performed to determine the effectiveness of the solar sensor as well as the efficiency of utilizing a
single axis vs a dual axis arrangement in our tracking system. This approach provided the best
results, because it provided a more in depth look of the accuracy of our system tracking the sun.

ACCEPTANCE TEST PROCESS


The work breakdown structure provides a detailed look at the planning and execution of the
test. Team meetings were held on Sundays and Wednesdays. On Sunday, the task was given to
someone to create a plan to test the [solar sensors, Single Axis Vs Dual Axis]. On Wednesday,
the plan would be presented to the rest of the team and feedback would be provided. The
following Friday-Sunday, the test would be performed and data would be collected.

Establish Acceptance Test Framework


The Acceptance Test Plan establishes the acceptance test framework used by the plan to
execute, and document acceptance testing of the AceTrack Solar Tracking Mount.

Plan Acceptance Test Activities


A successful acceptance test effort requires plannning. The team identifies the tasks that
need to be accomplished, including milestones. The functional requirements and procedures are
the primary drivers for identifying those tasks. The acceptance test schedule is the timeline of
acceptance testing activities and deliverable due dates. For each acceptance testing effort, a test
schedule is developed identifying the major test preparation, test execution, and test reporting
activities, as well as providing interim checkpoints to measure the progress of acceptance
testing. The project manager monitors the acceptance test effort.
Exhibit 1: Solar Sensor Acceptance Test Schedule

Planned
Actual
Deliverable/
Activity Completion Completion
Checkpoint
Date
Date

Plan Acceptance Testing for


11/29/2017 Preliminary Acceptance Test
11/29/2017
<Solar Sensor> Schedule

Acceptance Test Environment


Establish Acceptance Test Environment 11/29/2017 11/29/2017
Inventory
Draft Acceptance Test Plan
Conduct Acceptance Test Readiness Matrix
11/29/2017 11/29/2017
Review Completed Test Readiness
Review Checklist
Execute Tests 12/1/2017 12/1/2017 Acceptance Test Progress
Acceptance Test Summary
Complete Acceptance Testing 12/1/2017 12/1/2017
Report
Document Acceptance Testing 12/1/2017 12/1/2017 Final Acceptance Test Report

Exhibit 2: Single Axis for Solar Panel Acceptance Test Schedule

Planned
Actual
Deliverable/
Activity Completion Completion
Checkpoint
Date
Date

Plan Acceptance Testing for


2/07/2018 Preliminary Acceptance Test
2/07/2018
<Single Axis for Solar Panel> Schedule

Establish Acceptance Test Acceptance Test Environment


2/07/2018 2/07/2018
Environment Inventory
Draft Acceptance Test Plan
Conduct Acceptance Test Matrix
2/09/2018 02/09/2018
Readiness Review Completed Test Readiness
Review Checklist
Execute Tests 02/10/2018 02/10/2018 Acceptance Test Progress
Planned
Actual
Deliverable/
Activity Completion Completion
Checkpoint
Date
Date

Acceptance Test Summary


Complete Acceptance Testing 02/10/2018 02/10/2018
Report
Document Acceptance Testing 02/10/2018 02/10/2018 Final Acceptance Test Report

Develop Acceptance Test Cases


[In the following subsections, the process used to create acceptance test cases is defined.]
- Exhibit 1:
o Purpose: Test the accuracy of the solar sensor.
o Equipment: Solar Sensor, tape, paper, prototype
o Procedure:
1. Tape a piece of paper on the top and sides of the prototype, so that is
perpendicular to its central face. (The goal is to have the paper cast a
shadow to indicate the location of the sun.)
2. Place the prototype at an initial position and face it towards the sun.
3. Turn on the system and the prototype will adjust itself, so that it is
receiving the max amount of sunlight.
4. Look at the shadow and mark where it is at.
5. Move the prototype to a new initial point, (one turned further away from
the sun).
6. Turn on the system and the prototype will adjust itself.
7. Mark where the shadow of the sun is at.
8. Repeat steps 2-4 a few more times.
9. Observe all of the data points obtained and compare how accurate the
points were to arriving at the initial position from step 2.
o Results:
1. Pass Criteria: The Azimuth Angle was within our range of error. (<10
degrees)
2. Fail Criteria: The Elevation Angle was outside our range of error. (=25
degrees)

- Exhibit 2:
o Purpose: Test the efficiency of a single axis vs a dual axis system.
o Equipment: Solar panel, base/column/T-Bracket/Large Multimeter, Elevation
Angle Printout.
o Procedure:
1. Meet on the 7th floor of the ARC Parking Structure on a sunny & clear
day
2. Set up the Base/Column/T-Bracket and place the solar panel on the T-
Bracket so that the solar panel is elevated off the ground.
3. Position the Solar Panel at a 90 degree horizontal angle position and tape
on the Elevation Angle Printout to one side of the solar panel. (Ensure
that the 0 degrees line is running parallel with the side of the solar panel.)
4. Position the entire apparatus towards the sun so that the Solar Panel is
getting as much sunlight as it can. (Point in the general direction)
5. Position the solar panel at 0 degrees and record the current and voltage.
6. Elevate the solar panel by increments of 5 degrees and wait until the
string/weight stops moving to ensure that this is the correct angle. Once
it has stop, record the current and voltage.
7. Repeat step 7 until you get to 55 degrees.
8. After recording all of the current and voltage, calculate the power for
each angle and look at the power generation between each angle.
o Results:
1. Pass Criteria: The Azimuth Angle provided a substantial amount of power
improvement.
2. Fail Criteria: Negligible power improvement from the elevation angle.
Test Procedures Development
Test procedures provide the testers with precise steps that should be followed to execute
a test.
*Please refer to Exhibit 1 & 2 for the procedures*

Test Tools
- Elevation Angle Printout (Strings & Key/Nut/Weight)
o Similar to a protractor, this is used in order to help ensure that the solar panel
elevation angle is at the desired angle.

- Large Multimeter
o Used to measure the current and voltage of the solar panels.
.

Environment Preparation
In preparation for acceptance testing, the team identifies and addresses missing or
incorrectly configured hardware. Preparatory activities involve constructing the actual
acceptance test environment and ensuring that all of the required material to perform the test is
there. Prior to the test, the team reviews a list of affected components and the planned
activities. Deviations from the planned activities are recorded and reported to the project
manager. The team then begins the acceptance testing.

Conduct Acceptance Test Status Meetings


The professor, Terry Wang, and the team will meet periodically to discuss the status of the
acceptance testing as well as other components related to the project. This will ensure any major
issues or defects are identified in a timely manner so they can be resolved.

Related Interests