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Facts Fluency Quick Reference Multiplication mia Division CUSD Math Coaches Attp://mathlusd.weebly.com/facte-fluency.tm/ EIGHT GOALS FOR MULTIPLICATION/DIVISION SUCCESS Once a child is fluent with the multiplication facts in a goal, begin work on the related division facts. Goal 1 - 10s Mult: 10x2, 10x3, 10x4, 10x5, 10x6, 10x7, 10x8, 10x9, 10x10 Divi 20:2, 30:3, 40:4, 50:5, 60+6, 70+7, 80+8, 90+9, 100+10, 20+10, 30+10, 40+10, 50:10, 60+10, 70:10, 80:10, 90:10 2x5, 3x5, 4x5, 5x5, 6x5, 7x5, 8x5, 9x5 10:2, 15+3, 20:4, 25+5, 30+6, 35+7, 40:8, 45:9, 10:5, 15:5, 20:5, 30+5, 35+5, 40+5, 45:5 2 2x2, 2x3, 2x4, 2x6, 2x7, 2x8, 2x9 4:2, 6:3, 8:4, 1216, 14:7, 1658, 18+9, 6:2, 8:2, 12:2, 1442, 1642, 18:2 Mult: 4x3, 4x4, 4x6, 4x7, 4x8, 4x9 Divi 12+3, 16+4, 246, 28:7, 32:8, 36+9, 12+4, 24:4, 28:4, 32:4, 36:4 Mult: 3x8, 6x8, 7x8, 8x8, 9x8 Div: 2413, 48+6, 56+7, 64:8, 72+9, 24:8, 48:8, 56:8, 72:8 Goal 6 - 3s Mult: 3x3, 3x6, 3x7, 3x9 Div: 943, 18+6, 2147, 27+9, 18:3, 213, 27:3 Goal 7 - 6s Mult: 6x6, 6x7, 6x9 Div: 36+6, 42+7, 5449, 42:6, 54:6 Goal 8 - 9s and 7s Mult: 7x7, 9x7, 9x9 Div: 4947, 63+7, 63+9, 81+9 © Valerie Henry, August 2017 .,, www.ellipsismath.com Research-Based Strategies for Building Facts Fluency 1, Teach new material in small chunks (5-7 items) 2, Teach division facts right after related multiplication facts 3, Daily practice, 5 to 10 minutes per day in class a, Concrete-Representational-Abstract b, Charting Activities 4, Immediate feedback ‘a, Number Talks/Sharing Strategies b, Choral Practice ce, Games 5. Avoid timed tests during learning phase a. The more frequently students took timed tests, the more they counted and the less they memorized (Heer a 04 Concrete Representational Abstra ‘Students manipulate hands- Students draw and observe | Numbers and mathematical fon, concrete materiais diagrams, or watch the symbols teacher touching and moving hands-on materials, gguzsgaees Beggpgeaes "| * Pecerereres | BESSS5RRRR | 7 Learning Trajectory Lovel 1: Counting All (With Fingers or Mentally) 3X4= (1,2,3,4) (516,7,8) (9,10,11,12) 3X4 = 3,6,9,12 Level 2: Counting On {With Fingers or Mentally) ‘7x! 25, 30, 35 Lovel 3: Part-Whole Thinking: Distributive Property, Associative Property, Doubling & Halving, Using Known Facts 7x5 = (5x5) + (2x5) = 25 + 10 = 35 8x7 = 2x (4x7) = 2x28 = 56 (Henry, 2017) Concrete Activities (Multiplication/Division Goals) Itis important to start each new goal with concrete activities until about 80% of students demonstrate conceptual understanding. Then move onto representational (visual) activities, Show Me- Hands Together With Friends | Show Me- Linker Cubes With Friends © All Goals (First use 5 consecutive * All Goals (First use 5 consecutive multiplication multiplication facts at a time. Introduce related facts at a time. introduce related division facts division facts when students have conceptual when students have conceptual understanding understanding of multiplication facts). of multiplication facts) “eo [tot | 102 | 1033 | 104 © Using multiple students, linker cubes and 5 facts for a goal, have students show a product with friends (make an array). © Using multiple students in a group, © Using a short story (see Show have students show a product using Me-Hands) students show a story their hands with their group. with the cubes . oa] WY YY ey ©. Using a short story such as "Ten teddy bears were playing outside. Each bear invited 3 friends to play. Now how many teddy bears are playing altogether?” Students show story with hands. Based on District Purchased Factswise Training 2016-2017 Show Me- Counters With Friends Show Me-Abacus with a Friend ‘© All Goals (First use 5 consecutive ‘muttiplication facts at a time. Introduce related ‘All Goals (First use 5 consecutive multiplication division facts when students have conceptual facts at a time. Introduce related division facts understanding of multiplication facts) when students have conceptual understanding cof multiplication facts) © Using multiple students,counters and 5 facts for a goal, have students © Using multiple students, abacus and show a product with friends. 5 consecutive facts for a goal, have © Using a short story (see Show students show a product with a Me-Hands) students show a story friend. with the counters. © Using a short story (see Show 0000000000 Me-Hands) students show a story with the abacus . o =a Based on District Purchased Factswise Training 2016-2017 Representational Activities (Multiplication/Division Goals) When 80% of students demonstrate conceptual understanding and fluency with representational activities and patterns, then move onto abstract practice to increase accuracy, speed and flexibility with strategies. Show Me- 100 Charts (in sheet Protectors) 4. All Goals: Using mixed muttiplication/di facts: Each time teacher says a fact, have students recite, then circle the product on the 100 chart. 2. When finished, have students chant the equations in order as they point to the product on their chart. 3. Now say a random fact aloud. Have students echo the entire equation, pointing to the product on their 100 chart. 4, Discuss ways to know the facts without counting, 5. Chart the strategies discussed. Show Me- Picture Strips * All Goals: Using mixed multiptication/division facts, have students model the equation using the picture strip for that goal by showing the number of picture strips that make up the answer. © Ask students if they notice any patterns as they work with the picture strips, © Make up math stories using target goal facts and the picture strips. Have students make up their own. ‘© Chart the picture strip model stories for each equation sousnsgues Senngneees peereeerees PEeeee eee Based on District-Purchased Factswise Training 2016-2017 Patterns © All Goals © Look at patterns of the target facts using distributive property pattern grids. wa Patera ays] 2] 6] 2 wa] a6] 32] se] 0 © Have students expiain what patterns they see in the numbers. © Chart the patterns students explain, Factor-Product Number Lines * All Goals: Using mixed muttiplication/division facts, have students draw a number line to explain their strategy for knowing how the facts are related. Have them share their thinking with a friend or the group, © Chart student strategies for each equation. © Have students make up a short story that relates to the factor-product chart. © Have students recite all of the equations that can be created with each factor-product chart Based on District-Purchased Factswise Training 2016-2017 Abstract Activities (wutipiication/Division Goals) Use abstract activities & formative assessments to increase fluency (accuracy, speed & flexibility with strategies). It’s not just about speed & accuracy. Ultimately, we want students to use strategies flexibly to solve problems with greater numbers and complexity. Clap Facts Games Teacher says the fact such as 8x6 and © All Goals: then uses a hand signal for walt. Give students 2 or 3 seconds and then clap your hands, at which time the students choral respond with the answer. © Sand 4 inarow © Racing to 100 © Division War © Multiplication © How Many to 100? Which Strategy Do You Like Best? © AllGoals © With student input, make a poster with the key strategies they've developed for any challenging facts of the target Number Talks. © AllGoals © Focus on part-whole thinking © Use progression (string) of problems, i.e. (5x3, 5x4, 5x5) or (5419, 45/9, 36/9). goal © Try adding a picture to solidify understanding. ties nates Cees) 195) 1s Self Assessment Facts | Know Facts | Need to Work © AllGoals On © Students use goal flash cards to sort facts they know and facts they don't. © Students talk about strategies that will help them with the facts they need to work on o Have students keep track of this in a Facts Journal. Which strategy can use thoip seth thee ft? Based on District-Purchased Factswise Training 2016-2017 CLE LDS LD LD SS AA ANON LALA AAA A CAAA @ CA DAG ALAN AAA A DLA AAA AAAS LALA CAA ACA RE CACAO cS CLACAC = Ae CAC AAC GP A Az GD AN Ae CL = = P= ' ATA LA A LA AA AA ACA CA RE LAA AA ACA CAAA CAA A CARE LACAA AAA CACA KA ACA CAC CMLL LALA AA AAA AACN i S 3) S| 3/d & 3) S| 3/3 eer) S d| 3/3) s B BB) DD B Bi BD B BD Di) Bi B 2p)ozl0gl23 2329.23.93 23123 Spap sh oh shee SPER IE SE 2303 23123 23 23/03139123129 IP IPIP ISIS oh BH oH AIS SHIP IH eS aH BRIS IE SF Flowers by 8's Array ee aaa © Valerie Henry, August 2017 ,,, www-ellip: pasa ath.com ve woo'pewsisdie man “* £10z IsnBny ‘AueH ausIeA © ~~ 8s © @@ Aeny 5,¢ Aq saiddy ‘fe 8 68 be 68 6° 8 ah hh 08" @: Aeuy 5, Aq saiddy Apples by 6's Array a =) =) 06 wus yl o @uvv—ve@s@ 6 , Apples by 6's Array i] ] al | Mal ad a | > ‘eee u =. > = ; =) ” = 66.6 sf © Valerie Henry, August 2017 ,,, www.ellipsismath.com }OW FONPOAq-10}904-10}904 bel }|Zel|OZL|80L| 96 | 78 | 22 | 09 | By | YE | ve | el cEL|LZL/OLL}| 66 | 88} 22 | 99 | SS | by | EE | ee | LL OZLJOLL|OOL] 06 | O8 | OZ | 09 | OS | OF | OE | OZ | OL 80L} 66 | 06 | L8 | 22 | €9 | pS | SH | 9E} 22) BL} 6 96 | 88) 08 | 22 | +9 | 95 | 8h | OF | 2E | v2) 9L | 8 v8} 242 | 02] €9 | 9S | 6b | 2b | SE} 82] le;/rl) 2 eZ | 99 | 09 | 7S | 8h) ev | 9€ |} OF | ve | BL) elL| 9 09} SS | 0S | Sh | Ob | SE} OE] S2}|02}SL)/OL| §S 8b | by | Ob | 9E |) ZE | 82) v2) 02) 9L] 21 | 8 v 9€ | €€ |} OF | 22} pe} le] Bl] St) el| 6 9 € ve | ce | 02] BL) 9L | vl | 2b ]olj| 8 9 v ¢ cL} LL] OL} 6 8 2 |9 S v € é L Investigating x5 Patterns x 5 Patterns 5 10 15 | 20 25 | 30 35 | 40 45 | 50 Similarities between the double hands and the product table: Differences between the double hands and the product table: ‘What patterns have you found? How can these patterns help you learn these facts? © Valerie Henry, August 2017 ,., www.ellipsismath.com 29 Investigating x8 Patterns a3232% 33 2333 23 35 23 Baas ae 23.3 % aoe ba Taeeas x 8 Patterns 13h 39) 8| 16] 24| 32] 40 33 reap agagagg 33a} SPAR MP HAABP [as | 56 | 64 | 72| 80 Similarities between the array and the product table: Differences between the array and the product table What patterns have you found? How can these patterns help you learn these facts? © Valerie Henry, August 2017 ,,, www.ellipsismath.com Investigating x3 Patterns eeeee esee0e e2e0\00 x3 Patterns 3 6 9 12 [15 | 18 21 | 24 [27 30 Similarities between the array and the product table: Differences between the array and the product table ‘What patterns have you found? How can these patterns help you learn these facts? © Valerie Henry, August 2017 .., www.ellipsismath.com 5 Racing to 100 Number of players: 2 or more Materials: Cards for the target division goal Hundreds Chart (or Two Hundred Chart) 2 counters for each player (different colors for each player) Directions: 1. Place the cards face down ina draw pile in the center of the table. 2. Oneach student's turn, the student draws a card from the draw pile, 3. The student states the problem and the quotient (e.g.,"30 + 3 = 10"). 4, The student then moves her/his marker that number of squares on the Hundreds Chart {in the above example, that would be 10 spaces). The first marker can be used to remind, a student of her/his starting point until the second marker is correctly placed. 5. The first player to reach 100 (or beyond) wins the game. Division War Number of players: 2 or more Math Skills: Division facts fluency (any goal) Materials: Division Goal Cards (for any goal) ~ should have at least 10 cards per player Directions: Deal out all cards equally, face down. For each turn, each player turns over the top card of her or his deck, finds the quotient, and then announces the problem and the quotient (eg, 15+5=3). The player with the largest quotient wins all of the cards from that turn from all the students, If there is a tie, a second round is played between those involved in the tie, and the winner of that second round wins all the cards from both rounds (© Valerie Henry, August 2016 ... wwrw-ellipsismath.com 96 Four ina Row Materials: Game board for every two students, paper clip for each game board 1. Player #1 places paper clips on two numbers of his/her choice, finding the sum of those two numbers and placing a marker on the corresponding sum on the game board. 2. Player #2 moves only one of the paper clips, finds the sum of those two numbers and places a chip (different color) on the corresponding sum on the game board. 3. Players keep taking turns until one player has four numbers in a row. How Close to 100? «This game is played in partners. Two children share a blank 100 grid. © The first partner rolls two number dice. ‘* The numbers that come up are the numbers the child uses to make an array on the 100 grid. They can put the array anywhere on the grid, but the goal is to fill up the grid to get it as full as possible. * After the player draws the array on the grid, she writes in the number sentence that describes the grid. The second player then rolls the dice, draws the number grid and records their number sentence. The game ends when both players have rolled the dice and cannot put ‘any more arrays on the grid. ¢ How close to 100 can you get? Variation Each child can have their own number grid. Play moves forward to see who can get closest to 100. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 at 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 41 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 | 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 738 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 © Valerie Henry, August 2017 ,,, www.ellipsismath.com THREE IN A ROW with 10s i 60 20 90 40 | 50. +80 30 | 100 70 | | 2.3 _ | 65678 910 Pee THREE IN A ROW with 5s - xX 40 10 45 15 35 25 30 50 20 23/456 7 6 9 |10 FOUR IN A ROW with 2s, 4s, & 8s 18 20 28 36 40 12 32. 64 16 24 48 10 72 32 14 56 | «]a) (al ]«]]°]> THREE IN A ROW with 8s 64 24 16 40 56 80 32 48 72 (2/345 678910 € 3 youcubed at Stanford University How Close to 100? YPYDNeE ee P nono ot xR MK OK oouonowon