You are on page 1of 30

10-0101-PA.

qxd 7-31-2001 3:04 PM Page 15

LESSON

1.1
NAME _________________________________________________________ DATE ___________

Practice A
For use with pages 3–8

Name the operation indicated by the expression.


m
1. 7 % m 2. 12 $ x 3. t!12" 4.
3

Evaluate the expression for the given value of the variable.


5. x # 5 when x " 4 6. y % 4 when y " 19 7. 3x when x " 2.5

Lesson 1.1
8. w # 8 when w " 3.6 9. 7 % x when x " 2.9 10. 24 $ a when a " 6
g m 5
11. when g " 72 12. when m " 2.7 13. ! t when t " 16
8 3 8
2 2 24
14. h!2.5" when h " 100 15. # x when x " 16. when y " 6
3 3 y

Calculate the simple interest earned.

Simple Interest " Amount of deposit ! Interest rate (decimal) ! Time (years)

17. deposit $500 18. deposit $250 19. deposit $2000


4% interest 5% interest 6.5% interest
1 year 0.5 year 1.5 years

Find the average speed for the given distance and time. Include the
units of measure in your answer.
20. An airplane travels 800 miles in 120 minutes.
1
21. A friend jogs 2 miles in 2 hour.
1
22. A car travels 240 kilometers in 22 hours.

In Exercises 23 and 24, use the diagram In Exercises 25 and 26, use the diagram
below. below.
14 ft
4x 5 ft
3x
6 ft
x
5 ft
5x 2x
23. Write an expression for the perimeter of the
25. Write an expression for the perimeter of the
triangle. figure shown.
24. Find the perimeter, in feet, if x " 4 inches.
26. Find the perimeter, in yards, if x " 10 feet.

Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc. Algebra 1 15


All rights reserved. Chapter 1 Resource Book
20-0102-PA.qxd 7-31-2001 3:22 PM Page 29

LESSON

1.2
NAME _________________________________________________________ DATE ___________

Practice A
For use with pages 9–14

Write the expression in exponential form.


1. three to the fourth power 2. seven squared 3. x cubed
4. y to the fifth power 5. 3 to the wth power 6. 6a cubed
7. 4 $4$4$4$4 8. a $a 9. 2$2$2
10. x$x$x$x$x$x 11. 5$5$5$5 12. 3x $ 3x

Evaluate the power.


13. 42 14. 16 15. 92
16. 24 17. 33 18. 105

Evaluate the expression for the given value(s) of the variable(s).


19. x3 when x ! 2 20. a2 when a ! 10
21. 3x when x ! 5 22. 14 # y2 when y ! 3
23. !x # y"4 when x ! 5 and y ! 3 24. a2 " b3 when a ! 7 and b ! 1

25. Floor Area Jeff plans to cover the floor of 26. Cubical Package A cubical box is con-

Lesson 1.2
his room with 1 foot square tiles. If the room structed in order to package a gift. If the edge
is a square that measures 10.5 feet on each of the cube is 8 inches, how much material is
side, how many tiles will he need? needed to make the box? (The surface area of
a cube is S ! 6s2 where s is the edge length.)
1 ft
1 ft

10.5 ft 8 in.

8 in.
10.5 ft
8 in.

27. Safe Storage A safe has a cubical storage 28. Area Rug A circular area rug has a radius of
space inside. What is the volume of a safe 3 feet. How much area does the rug cover?
with an interior length of 2 feet? (The area of a circle is A ! %r2 where
% # 3.14 and r is the radius.)

2 ft

3 ft

2 ft

2 ft

Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc. Algebra 1 29


All rights reserved. Chapter 1 Resource Book
31-0103-PA.qxd 8-1-2001 9:28 AM Page 44

LESSON

1.3
NAME DATE

Practice A
For use with pages 16–22

Name the operation that would be performed first.


1. 16 " 8 ! 4 2. 2 #9$3 3. 10 $ !8 " 6"
4. 16 $ 8 #2 5. 16 ! 8 $ 4 " 2 6. 5 # !4 ! 2"2

Evaluate the expression for the given value of the variable.


7. 3 ! 2x2 when x % 2 8. 30 " 3x2 when x % 3 9. 2y2 ! 5 when y % 3
1
10. 4 # 2a3 when a % 10 11. 2y2 " 3y when y % 4 12. 6 ! x3 when x % 2

24 x
13. a2 $ 5 ! 3 when a % 5 14. 32 " when n % 6 15. ! x2 " 2 when x % 9
n 3

Evaluate the expression.


16. 5 ! 2 " 3 17. 12 " 6 ! 1 18. 10 #2$4
19. 4 ! 3 #2 20. 8 # 3 " 10 21. 5 " 14 $ 7
22. 2 ! 36 $ 4 23. 10 $ 5 ! 3 #2 24. 4 " 20 $ 10 ! 7
25. 3 # 22 !1 26. 2 # 32 $3 27. 4!2 ! 3" " 18

Two calculators were used to evaluate the expression. They gave differ-
ent results. Which calculator used the established order of operations?
28. 12 4 " 2 # 1 ENTER
!

Calculator 1: 5 Calculator 2: 17
29. 5 "3 ! 4 " 2 ENTER
Calculator 1: 7 Calculator 2: 22
30. 2 " 6 # 3 $ 3 ENTER
Calculator 1: 5 Calculator 2: 13
31. 10 5 " 4 $ 10 ENTER
!
Lesson 1.3

Calculator 1: 8 Calculator 2: 2

32. Shotput During a track meet, Kelly throws 33. Sales Tax You want to buy a newly released
the shotput 36 feet, 35 feet, and 37 feet. CD. The CD costs $17 plus 6% tax. Write an
Write an expression that represents the expression that represents how much money
length of his average throw in feet. Evaluate in dollars you need to buy the CD. Evaluate
the expression. the expression.

34. Fish Tank You have two fish tanks. The


first has a length of 4 feet, a width of 2 feet,
and a height of 3 feet. The second has 3 ft
length 3 feet, width 2 feet, and height
1 ft
1 foot. Write an expression that represents
the total amount of water in cubic feet both 2 ft 2 ft
tanks will hold. Evaluate the expression. 4 ft 3 ft

44 Algebra 1 Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc.


Chapter 1 Resource Book All rights reserved.
42-MCRB1-0104-PA.qxd 9/7/01 11:36 AM Page 58

LESSON

1.4
NAME DATE

Practice A
For use with pages 24–30

Decide whether the following is an expression, an equation, or


an inequality.
1. 5x ! 9 # 12 2. 7x " 2 3. 3x " 2 ≥ 12
4. 5.5 # 3x " 9 5. 19 < 4a 6. 89 " 2a " 39

Check whether the given number is a solution of the equation.


7. 2x ! 3 # 7; 4 8. 4x ! 2 # 10; 1 9. 3x " 5 # 1; 2
10. 6 # 2x " 8; 6 11. 17 " 4a # 13; 1 12. 5a " 3 # 2a; 3
13. 4y " 6 # 2y; 3 14. y ! 3y # 2y ! 4; 3 15. 5x ! 3 # x ! 7; 1
m 10
16. 4 ! # 12; 9 17. x2 " 6 # 30; 6 18. 3n ! # 17; 5
3 n

Write a question that could be used to solve the equation. Then


use mental math to solve the equation.
19. x " 5 # 3 20. x ! 2 # 6 21. 4 ! x # 6
22. 12 " x # 5 23. 4t # 20 24. 30 $ x # 6
x 18
25. #3 26. #3 27. x3 # 8
2 m

Check whether the given number is a solution of the inequality.


28. x " 5 ≤ 7; 9 29. x ! 3 > 7; 4 30. 3 ! x < 8; 5
31. 10 " x > 2; 9 32. 2x ! 1 ≥ 10; 6 33. 4x " 3 ≤ 5; 2
x
34. 3 " > 0; 2 35. 6x ! 1 ≥ 8x " 7; 2 36. 5x ! 1 ≥ x " 3; 4
2

37. Locker Installation Suppose your school is 38. Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty’s
replacing some of its lockers. When the old torch has 14 lamps that give off 14,000 watts
lockers are removed there is a space 144 of light. You want to know how many watts
inches long. Each new locker has a width of 8 are given off in one lamp if all the lamps are
inches. You want to know how many new identical. You write the equation
lockers can be installed. You write the equa- 14x # 14,000 to model the situation. What
tion 8x # 144 to model the situation. What do the 14, x, and 14,000 represent? Use
do the 8, x, and 144 represent? Use mental mental math to solve the equation.
math to solve the equation.
Lesson 1.4

58 Algebra 1 Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc.


Chapter 1 Resource Book All rights reserved.
51-0105-PA.qxd 8-2-2001 10:23 AM Page 70

LESSON

1.5
NAME _________________________________________________________ DATE ___________

Practice A
Lesson1.5

For use with pages 32–39

Write the verbal phrase as an algebraic expression. Use x for the


variable in your expression.
1. Three more than a number 2. Four less than a number
3. Difference of eight and a number 4. The sum of a number and one
5. Six times a given number 6. One half of a given number
7. A number divided by five 8. Seven more than twice a given number
9. Two less than a number, divided by nine 10. Two more than the product of ten and a number
11. The sum of a number and one, times three 12. The sum of a number and six, divided by two

Write the verbal sentence as an equation or an inequality.


13. Two more than a number x is ten. 14. The sum of a number y and four is 13.
15. Eight more than a number y is greater 16. The difference of a number a and two is seven.
than or equal to nine.
17. Six less than a number z is less than 15. 18. Eleven minus a number b is two.
19. The product of two and a number x is 22. 20. Twelve is less than six times a number x.
21. One more than four times a number b is five. 22. The quotient of a number t and three is eight.
23. A number a divided by two is greater 24. Four less than the product of six and a number
than five. a is eight.

In Exercises 25 and 26, which equation correctly models the situation?


25. Model Planes Your model plane collection 26. Bake Sale You make 3 batches of cookies
consists of 15 models. Each plane is either a for a bake sale. If you follow the recipe, three
propeller plane or a jet. There are 7 more batches makes 6 dozen cookies. Let d be the
propeller planes than jets. Let x be the number of dozen cookies in one batch.
number of jets. d
a. 3d ! 6 b. !3
a. x # !x # 7" ! 15 b. x # 7 ! 15 6

Airplane Speed In Exercises 27–30, use the following information.


A commercial airplane has been flying for two hours and has flown a distance
of 360 miles. How fast has it been flying?

Verbal Model: Speed of airplane " Flight time ! Distance traveled

27. Assign labels to the three parts of the verbal model.


28. Use the labels to translate the verbal model into an algebraic model.
29. Use mental math to solve the equation.
30. Check to see if your answer is reasonable.

70 Algebra 1 Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc.


Chapter 1 Resource Book All rights reserved.
62-0106-PA.qxd 8-2-2001 10:15 AM Page 84

LESSON

1.6
NAME DATE

Practice A
For use with pages 40–45

Transportation In Exercises 1–3, use the Ratios In Exercises 4–6, use the bar
bar graph, which shows the type of trans- graph, which shows the pupil-to-teacher
portation students used to go to school at ratio for public schools in 1985, 1990, and
Adams High School in a recent year. 1995.

Transportation Pupil-to-Teacher Ratio


Number of students

250 24
Elementary Secondary
21

Number of pupils
200
Lesson1.6

150 18

per teacher
100 15
50 12
0 9
10th grade 11th grade 12th grade 6
Grade 3
Bus Drive Walk 0
1985 1990 1995
Year
1. Which class has the most students driving to
school? 4. Which year had the highest pupil-to-teacher
ratio for elementary schools?
2. Which two classes have the same number of
students walking to school? 5. What was the approximate pupil-to-teacher
ratio for secondary schools in 1995?
3. What is the most common form of
transportation among 10th graders? 6. Which pupil-to-teacher ratio had the largest
overall decrease from 1985 through 1990?
Schools In Exercises 7–9, use the follow- Business The following information
ing information, which represents the fall represents a company’s revenue and
enrollment of students (in millions) in expenses (in thousands of dollars) for six
grades K–8 for public and private schools. months.
Year 1980 1985 1990 1995 Month July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Public school 27.6 27.0 29.9 32.4 Revenue 48 39 36 42 57 62
Private school 4.0 4.2 4.1 4.4 Expenses 38 58 54 48 37 51
7. How many students were enrolled in public 10. In what month were the expenses the greatest?
schools in 1985? 11. Profit is the difference of revenue and
8. What year had the fewest total students expenses. What was the company’s profit in
enrolled? November?
9. Construct a bar graph of the combined 12. Construct a line graph of the company’s
enrollment for public and private schools. revenue.

Life Expectancy In Exercises 13–15, use the line graph, Life Expectancy in the U.S.
Life expectancy (years)

which gives the life expectancy in the United States for a 80


child (at birth). 75
70
13. In which decade did life expectancy increase the least? 65
60
14. In which decade did life expectancy increase the most?
55
15. Discuss what the line graph shows. 0
19 0
19 0
19 0
19 0
19 0
19 0
20 0
00
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
19

Year

84 Algebra 1 Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc.


Chapter 1 Resource Book All rights reserved.
73-0107-PA.qxd 8-2-2001 10:07 AM Page 98

LESSON

1.7
NAME DATE

Practice A
For use with pages 46–52

Complete the sentence.


1. A ? is a relationship between two quantities, called the input and output.
2. The collection of all ? values is called the domain of the function.
3. The collection of all ? values is called the range of the function.
4. In a function, there is exactly one ? for each ? .

Does the table represent a function? Explain.


5. Input Output 6. Input Output 7. Input Output
2 5 5 0 1 1
4 6 4 0 1 2
6 5 3 0 2 3
8 6 2 0 2 4

8. Input Output 9. Input Output 10. Input Output


3 6 4 3 1 1
Lesson 1.7

4 5 13 7 0 0
5 4 9 4 5 5
6 3 4 0 2 2

Make an input-output table for the function. Use 0, 1, 2, and 3 as


the domain.
11. y ! 2x # 3 12. y ! 3x 13. y ! 9 " x
1
14. y ! x # 5 15. y ! x # 2 16. y ! 10 " 3x

Aerobics Class In Exercises 17–19, use the Monarch Butterflies In Exercises 20 and
following information. 21, use the following information.
You join an aerobics class at the local gym. The When the monarch butterfly is migrating to the
cost is $3 per class plus $10 for the initial mem- south, it has an average speed of 80 miles per day.
bership fee. 20. Write an equation that shows the relationship
17. Write an equation that shows the relationship between the number of days t and the dis-
between the number of classes n you attend tance (in miles) it has traveled d.
and the amount you pay p. 21. Evaluate the equation for t ! 2, 5, 8, and 10.
18. Evaluate the equation for n ! 1, 2, 5, 8, and Organize your results in an input-output
10. Organize your results in an input-output table.
table.
19. Draw a line graph to represent the data in the
input-output table.

98 Algebra 1 Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc.


Chapter 1 Resource Book All rights reserved.
Lesson Plan: 8.NS.A.1: Are You Rational or Irrational?
(This lesson should be adapted, including instructional time, to meet the needs of your students.)

Background Information
Content/Grade Level Number Systems/Grade 8

Unit/Cluster Know that there are numbers that are not rational, and approximate them by rational numbers.

Essential Questions/Enduring Essential Questions:


Understandings Addressed in the How can you determine if a number is rational or irrational?
Lesson What are the characteristics of a rational number?
What are the characteristics of an irrational number?

Enduring Understandings:
Rational numbers include integers, fractions, terminating and repeating decimals.
Rational numbers can be represented in multiple ways.
Any rational number can be expressed as a fraction in an infinite number of ways.
All real numbers, which include rational and irrational numbers, can be plotted on a number line.
An irrational number cannot be represented as a simple fraction.
Irrational numbers are those real numbers that cannot be represented as terminating or repeating decimals.

Standards Addressed in This Lesson 8.NS.A.1: Understand informally that every number has a decimal expansion; the rational numbers are
those with decimal expansions that terminate in 0s or eventually repeat. Know that other numbers
are called irrational.

It is critical that the Standards for Mathematical Practices are incorporated in ALL lesson activities
throughout the unit as appropriate. It is not the expectation that all eight Mathematical Practices will be
evident in every lesson. The Standards for Mathematical Practices make an excellent framework on which
to plan your instruction. Look for the infusion of the Mathematical Practices throughout this unit.

Lesson Topic Identifying rational and irrational numbers.

Page 1 of 23
Relevance/Connections 8.NS.A.2: Use rational approximations of irrational numbers to compare the size of irrational numbers,
locate them approximately on a number line diagram, and estimate the value of expressions (e.g.,
π2).
8.EE.A.2: Use square root and cube root symbols to represent solutions to equations of the form x2 = p and
x3 = p, where p is a positive rational number. Evaluate square roots of small perfect squares and
cube roots of small perfect cubes. Know that √is irrational.
8.G.B.7: Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in real-
world and mathematical problems in two and three dimensions.
8.G.B.8: Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find the distance between two points in a coordinate system.

Student Outcomes Students will be able to identify and describe rational and irrational numbers.

Prior Knowledge Needed to Support 7.NS.A.2: Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division and of fractions to
This Learning multiply and divide rational numbers.
2b. Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every
quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.
2d. Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; and know that the decimal form of
a rational number terminates in 0s or eventually repeats.

Method for determining student Use the warm-up as a starting point to determine students’ abilities to identify characteristics of numbers.
readiness for the lesson

Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?
Warm Up Teacher Notes:
Definition of Natural Numbers: Natural numbers are 1, 2,
3, 4, 5, 6…
Definition of Whole Numbers: Whole numbers are 0, 1, 2,
3, 4, 5, 6…
Definition of Integers: A positive or negative number that
can be written without fractions or decimal components.
…-5, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, …

Page 2 of 23
Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?
Definition of Rational Numbers: A rational number is any
number that can be expressed as the quotient or fraction of
𝑝
of two integers, with the denominator q not equal to zero.
𝑞
Definition of Irrational Numbers: An irrational number is
𝑎
any real number that cannot be expressed as a ratio , where
𝑏
a and b are integers and b is non-zero. Irrational numbers
include 𝜋, e, nonterminating and nonrepeating decimals.

Warm-Up:
Make a set of number cards for each group of
students. (Attachment #4)
Put students into groups of three or four. Give each
group a set of warm-up number cards.
Have the students work together to sort the numbers
using any attributes they choose. (for example,
positive, negative, fractions, decimals, whole
numbers, integers)
Lead a discussion which will allow the students to
share and discuss their sorting methods.

Questions to Summarize:
What are whole numbers?
What are integers?
What is the difference between whole numbers and
integers?
Why do we have different ways to represent
numbers?
Resort the fractions into more than one group.
Explain.
Resort the decimals into more than one group.
Explain.
Page 3 of 23
Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?
Explain why fractions and decimals can be in the
same group.
Are whole numbers integers? Explain.
Are decimals or fractions part of the integer group?
Why do you think that?

Motivation
We want the students to be able to identify and describe
rational and irrational numbers. Use the comic strip to
capture their interest. Tell them that by the end of class they
will understand the meaning behind the comic.
(Attachment #5)

Activity 1 UDL Components: Students compare rational and irrational


Principle I: Representation is present in the activity numbers using the Think, Pair, Share activity
UDL Components as students write their conclusions on chart paper for and persevere until the whole group agrees.
Multiple Means of the gallery walk. (SMP#1)
Representation
Multiple Means for Principle II: Expression is present in the activity as Students need to communicate clearly on the
Action and the students use the Think, Pair, Share activity to posters so that everyone understands each
Expression express in their own words what they perceive to be others’ thinking.
Multiple Means for the ways to group numbers. (SMP#6)
Engagement
Key Questions Principle III: Engagement is present in the activity as
Formative Assessment they explain to others what they are thinking about
Summary the activity.

Page 4 of 23
Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?

Use the warm-up activity to summarize the different ways to


organize the numbers using Think-Pair-Share. (Attachment
# 1)

After Think-Pair-Share use a Gallery Walk to summarize


them for the class. (Note to teacher: See directions below.)

Gallery Walk/Run Instructions:

Write Topics--Before class time, write the Gallery


Walk titles-Decimals, Integers, Fractions, and
Miscellaneous on large sheets of self adhering chart,
post-it paper, self supporting flip charts, whiteboards
(34" x 24"), or simply write on pieces of normal
loose leaf paper.

Post Sheets -- Post the sheets on the wall around the


class, giving sufficient separation space between
sheets.
Group Students and Assign Roles -- Arrange
students into teams of three to five. Provide each
group with a different colored marker, pen, or
crayon. Ask that each group member introduce
themselves. If cooperative learning techniques will
be used, assign roles like leader, reporter, monitor,
and recorder.
Begin Gallery Walk -- Direct teams to different
charts or "stations." Upon arriving at the station,
each team writes comments for the question posed at
the station.

Page 5 of 23
Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?
Rotate to New Station and Add Content -- After a
short period of time, say three to five minutes but the
exact time will depend upon the nature of the
question, say "rotate." The group then rotates,
clockwise, to the next station. At the new station the
group adds new comments and responds to
comments left by the previous group. To involve all
group members, switch recorders at each station.
Instructor Monitors Progress -- As groups rotate,
the instructor nurtures student discussion and
involves all group members. Be ready to rephrase
questions or to provide hints if students either don't
understand or misinterpret questions; be ready to
provide instructions for those that still don't
understand how to conduct a Gallery Walk.
Return to Starting Point -- Teams continue to
review the answers already contributed by previous
groups, adding their own comments.
Report -- In the "Report" stage, the group
synthesizes what has been written about their
original discussion question. Allow about ten
minutes for the group to synthesize comments. The
"reporter" chosen earlier, summarizes the group's
comments with the help of other group members and
makes an oral presentation to the class using the
blackboard or on an overhead projector.
Gauge for Student Understanding -- During
"Report" stage, the instructor reinforces correctly
expressed concepts and corrects for misconceptions
and errors. What, for example, did students seem to
readily understand? What did they find difficult and

Page 6 of 23
Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?
how can I adjust my teaching to accommodate
students?

The teacher will summarize the lists and post them across
the front of the classroom to be used for the next activity.

Activity 2 UDL Components: Students make sense of problems and persevere


Principle I: Representation is present in the activity in solving them as they see various
UDL Components as students use their conclusions from the gallery representations in both decimals and fractions
Multiple Means of walk to put information into categories. and notice that they can both be grouped in the
Representation same category.
Multiple Means for Principle II: Expression is present in the activity as (SMP#1)
Action and the students discuss the new categories and the
Expression placement of the cards. Students need to communicate clearly on the
Multiple Means for posters so that everyone understands each
Engagement Principle III: Engagement is present in the activity as others’ thinking.
Key Questions they explain to others what they are thinking about (SMP#6)
Formative Assessment the activity of sorting into categories.
Summary
Exploration Activity:
Copy the numbers cards for activity 2 and cut out
enough so that each group has their own set.
(Attachment #6)
Using the information that we have summarized in the
chart paper the students will work together again to sort
the numbers into the following categories:
o positive
o negative
o fractions
o decimals
Page 7 of 23
Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?
o whole numbers
o integers
o square roots
o non-repeating and non-terminating decimals
Ask the students to share how they categorized their
numbers.
Using a graphic organizer, the teacher and the students
will summarize the properties Rational Numbers,
Integers, Whole Numbers, Natural Numbers and
Irrational Numbers. (Attachment #2) (Answer Key:
Attachment #3)
Now that the graphic organizer has been created, student
groups will go back and re-sort the number cards into
the appropriate place.
Have students complete the Rational and Irrational
Independent Practice Worksheet. (Attachment # 7)
(Answer key Attachment #8)
Note to Teacher: During middle school, fractions are
augmented by negative fractions to form the rational
numbers. In grade 8, students extend this system once
more, augmenting the rational numbers with the
irrational numbers to form the Real Numbers. Have a
short discussion with the students about Real Numbers.

Closure The teacher should summarize the graphic organizer


again with the student.
Show the Comic Strip Again (attachment #5). Have one
of the students explain the meaning behind the comic.
Exit Ticket (attachment #9) Note there are three exit
tickets on a page. Answer to Exit Ticket is in
Attachment #10.

Page 8 of 23
Learning Experience
Which Standards for Mathematical Practice(s)
Component Details does this address? How is the Practice used to
help students develop proficiency?

Supporting Information
Interventions/Enrichments Students with Disabilities/Struggling Learners
Students with Teacher should create groups before class and not use random grouping in these activities. Peer
Disabilities/Struggling tutoring should evolve.
Learners Create a vocabulary wall/list and discuss meanings of words.
ELL ELL
Gifted and Talented Create a vocabulary wall/list and discuss meanings of words.

Gifted and Talented


Students should create their own comic strip describing the difference between rational and
irrational numbers.

Materials Comic Strip


Warm up Number Cards
Think Pair Share Summary Sheet
The Real Number System: Rational and Irrational Graphic Organizer
The Real Number System: Rational and Irrational Graphic Organizer Answer Key
Activity #2 Number Cards
Rational and Irrational Independent Practice Worksheet
Answer Key to Rational and Irrational Independent Practice Worksheet
Exit Ticket
Answer to Exit Ticket
Post It Chart Paper, flip chart or white boards
Markers
Technology Document camera

Resources Van de Walle, John, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics, Grades 5-8.

Page 9 of 23
Page 10 of 23
Attachment #1

Think-Pair-Share
Summary Sheet
Think Pair Share

Page 11 of 23
Attachment #2

Graphic Organizer Real Numbers


Rational Numbers

ii Integers

Whole Numbers

Irrational Numbers

Natural Numbers

Page 12 of 23
Attachment #3
Graphic Organizer
Real Numbers
Answer Key
Rational Numbers Fractions, Terminating and
Repeating Decimals: .5, .33333…,
2.6, 2/3, 7/2

Integers
Whole Numbers and their
opposites: …-3, -2, -1, 0,
1,2,3 … (no fractions or
decimals)
Whole Numbers
0, 1,2,3,4,5,6…
Irrational Numbers

Natural Numbers Nonterminating and


nonrepeating decimals: 𝜋, 3,
1,2,3,4,5,6…
2 , 3.121221222….

Page 13 of 23
Attachment #4

Warm Up Number Cards

2 3 1 21
3
3 4 2 9

0.24 17.8 2 15.123

_
0.2 0.27 4.157

12
0 -2 15
12

Page 14 of 23
Attachment #4 continued

3 9
16 8
0.123456324… √
25

Page 15 of 23
Attachment #5

Page 16 of 23
Attachment #6

Activity 2 Number Cards – There are two pages of cards

2 1 7 17
4
3 4 8 3

20
16.3 1.21221222... 23.64
5

_
0. 5 0.83 9.875

2 6 1
0
3 1 1

Page 17 of 23
Attachment #6 continued:

25 144 26 81

100 50 17 56

4 25
1 2
9

Page 18 of 23
Attachment #7

Rational and Irrational Numbers Name ______________________________

Independent Practice

1. Sort the numbers into 2 groups, rational or irrational. Write the numbers in the appropriate bubble.

0.8 64 0 32 -19 100 2.343443444…

3 2 12
75 6 12.67 121
7 7 5

Rational Irrational

2. Graph and label each number on the number line below. You may label the number with the letter.

A 0.75
B 3
C 9
1
D 2
2
15 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5
E
10
F 2.6
G 2
H

Page 19 of 23
Attachment #8

Rational and Irrational Numbers Name ______________________________

Independent Practice ANSWER KEY

1. Sort the numbers into 2 groups, rational or irrational. Write the numbers in the appropriate bubble.

0.8 64 0 32 -19 100 2.343443444…

3 2 12
75 6 12.67 121
7 7 5

Rational Irrational

0.8 64 0 -19 12.67 2.343443444… 32 75


3 2 12
100 6 121
7 7 5

2. Graph and label each number on the number line below. You may label the number with the letter.

A 0.75
B 3
C 9
1 D EG A B F CH
D 2
2
15 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5
E
10
F 2.6
G 2
H

Page 20 of 23
Attachment #9

Exit Ticket – Rational and Irrational Numbers Name ________________________

Describe the difference between rational and irrational numbers. You can use examples to help support your
answer.

Identify each number as rational or irrational.

7
3.676776777…. 12.67 32 49
5

Exit Ticket – Rational and Irrational Numbers Name ________________________

Describe the difference between rational and irrational numbers. You can use examples to help support your
answer.

Identify each number as rational or irrational.

7
3.676776777…. 12.67 32 49
5

Exit Ticket – Rational and Irrational Numbers Name ________________________

Describe the difference between rational and irrational numbers. You can use examples to help support your
answer.

Identify each number as rational or irrational.

7
3.676776777…. 12.67 32 49
5
Page 21 of 23
Attachment #10
Answer Key
Exit Ticket – Rational and Irrational Numbers Name ________________________

Describe the difference between rational and irrational numbers. You can use examples to help support your
answer.

Sample answer: Rational numbers are numbers that can be written as ratios. This includes fractions,
terminating decimals, repeating decimals, and integers. Irrational numbers can’t be written as ratios.
Irrational numbers include square roots that don’t work out to be ratios (no perfect answers) and decimals that
don’t repeat but that never end.

Identify each number as rational or irrational. 𝑎

7
3.676776777…. 12.67 32 49
5

Irrational Rational Irrational Rational Rational

Page 22 of 23
Page 23 of 23