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TM

Seeing IT

VistaView for Network Latency

ii Part Number: 20_300_009_22
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VistaView for Network Latency

iii About this book Congratulations on your purchase of InfoVista. daily monitoring. With InfoVista you can interrogate resources in your Information System (IS). and generate reports on resource behavior. and trend measurement. . VistaViews are turnkey applications for IS SLA reporting and analysis. calculate key performance indicators. You use these reports to monitor your Service Level Agreements (SLA) and proactively manage your IS resources. These reports cover a range of user needs including problem tracking. VistaView for Network Latency provides a set of pre-configured reports specifically designed to monitor multiple technologies using the ping. They run over the standard InfoVista “engine”. the Information System Quality of Service manager.

and the tasks which can be performed with the product. This chapter provides an overview of the product and its main functionalities. Chapter 2 . • Comments and Suggestions At the end of this book. InfoVista User’s Guide This manual describes the client graphic interface.Getting Started. Your remarks will be examined thoroughly and taken into account for future versions of InfoVista. you’ll find a remarks form. VistaViews (of which this book describes one) This is a set of manuals describing each of the standard libraries provided for InfoVista. the methodology of modeling the Information System. VistaView for Network Latency . This chapter describes individual reports in detail. InfoVista Reference Manual This manual documents the syntax of all commands used by the client software in text mode. We welcome any comments you may have on our product or its documentation. This book This manual is divided into the following sections: • Chapter 1 .The Reports. InfoVista Quick Start This manual gives rapid (default) procedures for installing and starting the system and describes how to produce your first reports using templates from the standard libraries.iv InfoVista documentation The InfoVista documentation set comprises the following volumes: InfoVista Installation Guide This manual describes the installation of the product. The PDF files can be viewed with the viewer software. Documentation supports The InfoVista documents listed above are provided on paper and also as PDF files on the software distribution media. It also explains how to model your resources and get reports up and running as quickly as possible.

. . . . . . . . . . . 20 What can it do? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 The Reports . . . . . 6 Quality of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Customizing the model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 What can it do? . . . 5 Measurements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .for Nodes Report . . . . . . 17 IP Node Availability Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Modeling an IP node. . . . . . . . . . . 14 IP Node Group: Availability Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 What can it do? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Table of report templates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 The Graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Default values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 The Graphs & Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Drill Downs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 See Also Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Problem area addressed by the library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Reachability and response time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Why group IP nodes?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Modeling the resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Quick Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Modeling a group of IP nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Network Manager’s Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Roadmap for modeling the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

vi VistaView for Network Latency .

The indicators in the reports have multiple formulas in order to embrace this sort of heterogeneous environment. They do not require the monitored resource to support SNMP. weekly. . It contains monthly. daily. Prerequisites The reports which monitor IP nodes and IP node groups use the ICMP (ping protocol). hourly and real time reports which can be used to monitor IP nodes and IP node groups.Chapter 1 Getting started The VistaView for Network Latency contains report templates for general purpose monitoring of multiple technologies using the ping.

During an update or migration.2 Quick Start Quick Start This section is for experienced users of InfoVista. this file is copied to disk and automatically installed on the InfoVista server. It means that any IP device can be monitored with these reports. Using the traditional ping function. we recommend you read the whole of Chapter 1 before starting. your InfoVista object tree will contain Network Latency. See the InfoVista Installation Guide for details. If you are new to InfoVista. During installation of InfoVista V2. After installation. If the target responds to a ping packet then we can say it is reachable and the time taken for the response packet to be received is the response time of the path between the server and the target. the library InfoVista Problem area addressed by the library The Reachability & Response Time library uses the ping protocol to measure system availability. Installation The VistaView for Network Latency is delivered as an InfoVista library file called InfoVista_Network_Latency.ivl. the library file is simply copied to disk. the InfoVista server sends a number of ping packets to a target system. You must install it manually.1. VistaView for Network Latency . the target does not need to support SNMP. This is a major advantage. With this function.

to ping the target. We are not locked in to an InfoVista-centric point of view. We recommend the following procedure. If we want to measure response time of paths between other network devices. etc) to represent the device. the InfoVista server requests another system. You need to specify: Getting started . refer to InfoVista Standard Model Library. Of course the method is limited to systems supporting the proxy ping function. it measures the response time of the path from the InfoVista server to the device. Modeling an IP node Step 1 Create an instance of a device vista (Router. such as a Cisco router. or to measure the reachability of a target as seen by some device other than the InfoVista server. one of the most common difficulties is finding system parameters quickly. Step 2 Edit the property values associated with the device. If there is no specific vista available for the device. Also. The major advantage of this method is that we can monitor the path between any two devices in the IP network. When you are setting up InfoVista reports in a new environment. Switch. we must use the proxy ping protocol. use the SnmpNode vista.Quick Start 3 TARGET PROXY PING Router PING InfoVista However. this configuration measures the reachability of a device. as seen by the InfoVista server. With the proxy ping protocol. Roadmap for modeling the network For details on the vistas used for modeling IP nodes.

when modeling devices. each morning. If you use the same instances in other reports which require SNMP. Another use for the group is to simplify the task of network monitoring. in a network with 500 nodes. always try to use instance names which are recognized by your local DNS. You may want to create several groups and run reports for each group. you may have to edit these two properties. Drag & drop a number of IpNode instances to the Contents attribute. The instance will be displayed in the Instances branch of that vista in the InfoVista object tree. to study 10 reports concerning groups of 50 nodes rather than 500 reports about one node each. Why group IP nodes? The IpNode Group vista allows you to group IP nodes together for reporting purposes. Modeling a group of IP nodes Step 1 Create an instance of the vista IpNode Group. Note: If the name of the instance is recognized by the local DNS. VistaView for Network Latency . Switch. In the procedure above.4 Quick Start • an IP address for the device. because of the rules which associate these vistas. etc. you did not edit the snmprd and snmpwr properties because the IP node reports do not use the SNMP protocol. InfoVista will complete the ip property value automatically when you create the instance (when you click OK or Apply in the instance property sheet). For example. it is much simpler. The instance will also be displayed in the Instances branch of the vista IpNode. you modeled the device with an instance of Router. The purpose of grouping instances together in the same report is to generate reports which give an overall visibility of a part of the network. Therefore. You can even create a group containing a single element. In the procedure above. you could create a group containing all the nodes on the same site. For example.

but for another. Customizing the model Default values Admin Status Large Packet Size Large Timeout Ping Delay Ping Packet Number Reachability Threshold Small Packet Size Small Timeout 1 2048 5000 1000 4 75% 32 1000 The following properties of IP Node affect indicators which use a threshold (the exception reports): Note that you can specify different values for each element.Modeling the resources 5 Modeling the resources The procedure for modeling resources is given in section “Roadmap for modeling the network” on page 4. For example. Getting started . critical path you may decide that 200 ms is the maximum acceptable. refer to InfoVista Standard Model Library. For details of the vistas and their properties. the threshold response time on one path may be 500 ms.

middle and last: Milestone Reachability Response time _ 95% _ 200ms QoS drops 0% 0% Milestone = 85% = 500ms QoS drops 50% 35% Milestone < 50% > 1000ms QoS drops 100% 70% VistaView for Network Latency .7 which means it can reduce QoS by up to 100% which means it can reduce QoS by up to 70% QOS 100 % 30% 0% when Reachability < 50% when Response time > 1000ms (timeout) When either of these factors goes beyond preset milestones.6 Measurements Measurements The reachability reports measure response time and reachability for IP nodes. The Global QoS indicator provides an indication of the level of this service.0 weight = 0. we can say that the element is capable of giving good service. Quality of Service The ultimate goal of running a network and monitoring its operation is to provide somebody with a service (usually the user!). The values of these milestones are set in the formulas used to calculate QoS. While there is sufficient margin between these indicators and the threshold values. There are 5 milestones for each factor. Each factor is given a different weight in the QoS calculation. of which the following table shows just the first. for a group of segments. Global QoS is calculated by taking into account reachability and response time. the QoS value is reduced. as follows: Reachability Response time weight = 1.

Thus the Global Response Time indicator shows the average response time for all the elements in the group. It shows the % of time that a node responded to at least one ping packet during the display period. The response time indicators give a single. Response time shows the average time between a ping packet being sent to the target and a response packet being received. Timeouts are not included in the calculation. The reachability value is averaged over the display period to provide a value of % reachability. Analysis of response time gives you a clear picture of the service which the network is providing. The use of different size ping packets simulates the effect of packet size on response time. The difference is that the results are averaged over the whole group. for example) and also for justifying new investments or the reorganization of part of your network. The effect on response time of these application types can be monitored with these two indicators. The response time distribution indicators analyze response time ranges in more detail. Reachability and response time Reachability is the principal indicator of node vitality. This information is vital for proactive management of the network (planning future upgrades. then the target is considered 100% reachable for the 5 minute period. The average response time is then calculated for the case of small packets and for the case of large packets. 4 small ping packets are sent to the target system every 5 minutes. Interactive or conversational type applications tend to generate small packets. If the target system responds to at least 1 packet out of 4. This indicator gives a good measure of whether the node was “up” during this time. Groups The reports on groups calculate the same indicators as for single elements. They show the real spread of response times exhibited by the network. Exception reports provide an excellent visual form of alert management. These indicators do not give any information on the range of response times which were actually measured.Measurements 7 The resulting Global QoS indicator gives an immediate visual indication of the operation of a group of segments. average value based on all ping response packets received. the Global Reachability indicator shows the average reachability of all elements Getting started . Exception reports are text messages which are generated if the value of an indicator is greater than a threshold value. Response time is measured by sending 4 small ping packets every 5 minutes and 4 large packets every 30 minutes. and then the number of response packets sent back by the target are counted. File Transfer type applications tend to generate large packets.

Drill Down reports that are not running are listed on the contextual menu under Reports/Instantiate. select Reports to view the list of Drill Down reports. Use the Drill Down feature to quickly access and view related reports. and Hourly to Real Time report. see the InfoVista User’s Guide. or monitor trends in network behavior. To access the Drill Down feature: 1 2 In a report. Weekly to Daily. Click on Instantiate to create the associated Drill Down report. group to individual. such as a Drill Down from the Monthly to Weekly. etc. and include associations with other reports in the VistaView. For more information on Drill Downs. The importance of the “group” reports is that they give an overall picture of the operation of a large geographical portion of the network. which are pre-established links to other reports.8 Measurements in the group. Daily to Hourly. Drill Downs Most VistaView reports feature Drill Downs. track problems. A report may include Drill Downs to other display rates for the same resource. The Drill Down report list includes reports that are running. or individual to individual reports. Drill Downs are from group to group. In the contextual menu. See Also Box See also list box This box lists drill down reports which are associated with the report globally and VistaView for Network Latency . right-click on a table cell or a data point on a graph.

After creating a drill down report. Getting started . The effect is to give a true picture of round-the-clock utilization. By default it is active 24 hours per day and 365 days per year. By default this from 9H00AM to 8H00PM every day. The Business Hours calendar is a modifiable calendar. On the other hand. Calendars The graphs in the reachability reports use one of 2 calendars: • • The All Hours calendar is a modifiable calendar. Graphs which use the Business Hours calendar show data which is averaged only during the company working hours. The high values of throughput (for example) experienced during company working hours will be less visible in this report than in a report using the Business Hours calendar. select command View/Refresh to update this display. it tends to mask the utilization peaks. Graphs which use the All Hours calendar display data which is averaged over 24 hours.Measurements 9 which have been created already. It is active during company working hours. The effect is to show a true picture of daily working conditions and to mask the contribution due to off-peak utilization.

10 Measurements VistaView for Network Latency .

and finally a suggested way of using the report. A report section includes: an overview of the report features. a detailed description of the report. .Chapter 2 The Reports This chapter is divided into sections that correspond with each report template. including what variables are measured and how they are measured. a graphical representation of the report.

By default. response time ICMP (ping protocol) The Network Manager’s Overview and the reports marked AH use the All Hours calendar.12 Table of report templates Table of report templates The InfoVista Network Latency library contains the following report templates: Report template Network Manager’s Overview for IP nodes IP Node Group : Availability (AH) Type Daily Usage Group overview What is measured Quality of service. For details. response time ICMP (ping protocol) ICMP (ping protocol) Reachability. The reports marked BH use the Business Hours calendar. this calendar is active 24 hours per day. response time ICMP (ping protocol) IP Node Group : Availability (BH) IP Node : Availability (AH) Node availability Node availability Reachability. refer to section “Calendars”. which is active during company working hours. exceptions Technology ICMP (ping protocol) Monthly Weekly Daily Hourly Real time Monthly Weekly Daily Monthly Weekly Daily Hourly Real time Monthly Weekly Daily Node availability Reachability. response time. VistaView for Network Latency . response time IP Node : Availability (BH) Node availability Reachability.

Network Manager’s Overview .for Nodes Report 13 Network Manager’s Overview . exceptions ping Type of report Lifetime Audience Daily 3 months Executive officers The Reports . QoS.for Nodes Report What can it do? Monitored resource Usage What is measured Technology a group of nodes group overview response time.

If a node is in error for more than 30 minutes at a time (6 successive exceptions). It is calculated as the average of the QoS measured on each node in the group. open the daily IP Node Group: Availability report to pin point the problematic node. If the group of nodes is large. “File Transfer” type applications which transfer large quantities of data tend to generate large packets. Any dramatic change should be investigated. then open the hourly IP Node: Availability report for that path. This table generates an exception report each time one of the response times of a node for large packets (F. These two indicators show how response time is affected by packet size. It is calculated as the average of the response times of the individual nodes.14 Network Manager’s Overview . then a small drop in the global QoS may indicate a large drop in service level of a single node. Use this table to quickly recognize trouble spots. to investigate in more detail. This shows you how the network is responding to your specific utilization needs. The preset threshold values for each node are configured with property values on the instance of Node which is used to model the node. Exception Reports An exception is a text message which records an unusual event. The default values have been VistaView for Network Latency . The size of packets which transit through the network is determined by the type of application. Use this graph as an immediate visual alert to possible problems in the network. Any drop in QoS should be investigated.) or for small packets (Int. An increasing response time suggests an increase in network load.for Nodes Report The Graphs & Table Global Response Time This graph shows the average response time of all the nodes in the group. Thus “Interactive” applications such as telnet or transactional applications with short requests and responses. The Interactive indicator shows the response time for short ping packets. If you note a sudden change in response time. Check the Exceptions table to see which node is malfunctioning. tend to generate short packets. Global QoS Global QoS shows the overall level of Quality of Service provided by the group of nodes. Reports are generated every 5 minutes while a node is in error and the table shows all the exception reports generated during the last 2 days.T.) is greater than the preset thresholds or the reachability is less than the threshold. This drop will generally be associated with an exception report. The File Transfer indicator shows the response time for large ping packets. This graph gives you an overall picture of network utilization.

If you feel that the report is overstating a problem (too many messages).for Nodes Report 15 chosen to suit most networks. The Reports . you can customize the thresholds to suit your specific environment. or understating a problem (too few messages).Network Manager’s Overview . Each exception report includes the threshold value in the message.

16 IP Node Group: Availability Report IP Node Group: Availability Report What can it do? Monitored resource Usage What is measured Technology a group of IP nodes node availability reachability. response time ICMP (ping protocol) Type of report Lifetime Audience Real Time 1 week Trouble shooters Hourly 1 month Daily 3 months Weekly 1 year Monthly 3 years Network Analysts Executive Officers VistaView for Network Latency .

“File Transfer” type applications which transfer large quantities of data tend to generate large packets. A decrease in Global Reachability suggests that at least one of the nodes is not responding. Thus “interactive” applications such as telnet or transactional applications with short requests and responses. Response Time Distribution Response time distribution shows the distribution of the ping response packets. Response time distribution (interactive) takes into account all the responses to small packets for all the IP nodes in the group. according to response time.IP Node Group: Availability Report 17 The Graphs Global Reachability This graph shows the % reachability of the group as a whole. If you note a sudden change in Global response time. An increasing response time value suggests an increase in network load. Any dramatic change should be investigated. The File Transfer indicator shows the response time for large ping packets. Global Response Time Global Response time shows the average response time of all the IP nodes in the group. For a more precise analysis of group response time. This graph gives you an overall picture of the vitality of the group. The size of packets which transit through the network is determined by the type of application. One factor is simply the fact that large packets take longer to transmit. Large packet response time is generally greater than for small packets. This graph gives you an overall picture of network utilization. If the global availability value decreases permanently. tend to generate short packets. This shows you how the network is responding to your specific utilization needs. These two indicators show how response time is affected by packet size. Use these graphs to get a more precise indication of group response times and their evolution over time. look at the Vitality Analysis table to pin point the faulty node. Response time distribution (file transfer) shows the same information for large ping packets. This shows you how the network is responding to your specific utilization needs. The different packet sizes used in the report show up the different problems experienced by different The Reports . The Interactive indicator shows the response time for short ping packets. refer to the two Response time distribution graphs. It is calculated as the average of the response times of the individual nodes. It is calculated as the average of the reachability rates for each of the IP nodes in the group. look at the Vitality Analysis table to pin point the problematic node. These two graphs show how response time is affected by packet size.

such as buffer pool management or fragmentation in the routers. Large packet response time is generally greater than for small packets. Note: The real time report does not have Response time distribution graphs. The different packet sizes used in the report show up the different problems experienced by different VistaView for Network Latency . to the target system. Click on the title again to sort by decreasing value. An increasing response time may be due to the IP node being overloaded or the network path becoming congested between the InfoVista server and the IP node. The two packet sizes used for the ping function may be different for each IP node in the group. Any sudden change in position in the table or any sudden change in value should be investigated. refer to section “Customizing the model” in chapter 1. For details. There is no fixed rule for the expected values of these indicators. However it is clear that an IP node which has a low reachability figure or a high response time is not giving good service. Response time is measured by sending 4 small ping packets every 5 minutes and 4 large ping packets every 30 minutes. Reachability is measured by sending 4 small ping packets to the target at regular intervals and then calculating the % of time that the node responded to at least one ping packet during the display period. The response time is then calculated as the average of all responses to the large packets or to the small packets. open the IP Node: Availability report for that node in order to analyze the problem in more detail. In this way you can display the top IP nodes or the bottom IP nodes with vitality problems. Click on the title of a column to sort the table by increasing value. This gives you an indication of how each node is behaving. One factor is simply the fact that large packets take longer to transmit. The default values have been chosen to suit most configurations but you can adjust them to suit your environment. Normally. They are listed in the Vitality Analysis table. what is more important is any sudden change in value. These two indicators show you how response time is affected by packet size. Vitality Analysis Table The Vitality Analysis table groups together a number of indicators for the individual IP nodes in the group. If you spot a potential trouble spot. They are defined with properties on the instances of the vista IpNode used to model the devices in the group.18 IP Node Group: Availability Report applications. This indicator gives a good measure of whether the node was “up” during this time. RTT (File Transfer) and RTT (Interactive) show the average response time of each node measured with large ping packets and small ping packets respectively. A graph showing only small packet response times would possibly hide the problems experienced by larger packets. the same nodes will always be at the top or bottom of the table. Reachability is the principal indicator of node vitality.

For details. The Reports .IP Node Group: Availability Report 19 applications.) shows the size of the small ping packets. in octets. such as buffer pool management or fragmentation in the routers. of the large ping packets used to ping each IP node. A graph showing only small packet response times would possibly hide the problems experienced by larger packets. refer to section “Customizing the model” in chapter 1. Size (FT) shows the size. The ping packet sizes are initially defined with properties on the instances of vista IP Node which are used to model the nodes in the group. This data is shown for information only. Size (Int. The default values have been chosen to suit most configurations but you can adjust them to suit your environment.

20 IP Node Availability Report IP Node Availability Report What can it do? Monitored resource Usage What is measured Technology an IP node node availability reachability and response time ICMP (ping protocol) Type of report Lifetime Audience Real Time 1 week Trouble shooters Hourly 1 month Daily 3 months Weekly 1 year Monthly 3 years Network Analysts Executive Officers VistaView for Network Latency .

The File Transfer indicator shows the response time for large ping packets. This indicator gives a good measure of whether the node was “up” during this time. The InfoVista server sends 4 small ping packets every 5 minutes to the target system. These two graphs show you how response time is affected by packet size. The two graphs analyze in detail the response times which the IP node is exhibiting. The distribution graphs give a detailed analysis of response times and their evolution over time. This shows you how the network is responding to your specific utilization needs. Response Time Distribution Response time distribution shows the distribution of the ping response packets. according to response time. A graph showing only small packet response times would possibly hide the problems experienced by larger packets.IP Node Availability Report 21 The Graph Reachability Reachability is the principal indicator of node vitality. tend to generate short packets. Thus “Interactive” applications such as telnet or transactional applications with short requests and responses. “File Transfer” type applications which transfer large quantities of data tend to generate large packets. A temporary problem may be due to an overloaded node or a congested network. Large packet response time is generally greater than for small packets. The different packet sizes used in the report show up the different problems experienced by different applications. such as buffer pool management or fragmentation in the routers. This shows you how the network is responding to your specific utilization needs. The Interactive indicator shows the response time for short ping packets. and then counts the number of response packets sent back by the target. One factor is simply the fact that large packets take longer to transmit. Response time is measured by sending 4 small ping packets every 5 minutes and 4 large packets every 30 minutes. A permanent problem suggests a node that went off line. The size of packets which transit through the network is determined by the type of application. These two indicators show how response time is affected by packet size. Response time distribution (File Transfer) takes into account all the responses to large packets. Reachability is then calculated as the % of time that a node responded to at least one ping packet during the display period. The Reports . Response time distribution (interactive) takes into account all the responses to small packets. Response Time Response time shows the average response time of an IP node. It is measured as the average time between a ping packet being sent to the target and a response packet being received by the InfoVista server. A drop in Reachability means that a node did not respond to one batch of ping packets.

These parameters are set with properties of the instance of IpNode which you used to model the monitored device.22 IP Node Availability Report Note: The real time report does not have Response time distribution graphs. The ping packet sizes used are displayed at the top of the respective graphs as well as the timeout value. The default values have been chosen to suit most configurations but you can adjust them to suit your environment. VistaView for Network Latency .

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