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PA Environment Digest

An Update On Environmental Issues In PA
Edited By: David E. Hess, Crisci Associates
Winner 2009 PAEE Business Partner Of The Year Award Sen. Ray Musto Retiring Harrisburg, Pa September 27, 2010

EPA Says PA Chesapeake Bay Pollution Reduction Plan Has Serious Deficiencies The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week said Pennsylvania's plan to reduce nutrient and sediment pollution going to the Chesapeake Bay has "serious deficiencies" and failed to demonstrate an ability to actually fully deliver necessary and promised pollution reductions. EPA said the plan lacks specific funding, policy and program commitments to fully comply with pollution reduction milestones. At the same time, EPA released a draft Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), a mandatory plan designed to restore the Chesapeake Bay and its streams, creeks and rivers. (see separate story) Among those steps will be adopting a limit of technology standard for wastewater treatment plants, assigning specific nutrient reduction standards to urban stormwater management programs, controlling erosion and sedimentation on all construction, requiring more permits for farming operations and more. Among the EPA comments were--- PA WIP very weak compared to the amount of N, P, and sediment PA must reduce. Strategies do not equate to the reductions PA is proposing, nor provide reasonable assurance that nutrient and sediment targets will be met by the 2017 and 2025 milestones; -- Agriculture: No detailed program capacity description, gap analysis, and strategies/timeframes to fill gaps; -- Agriculture: No detailed plan for how to ensure compliance with existing regulatory programs; -- Urban Stormwater: Most of the strong stormwater concepts described in the WIP are in policies, guidance and manuals, with questionable enforceability and accountability; -- Wastewater: Many permits that have been issued with limits that will not become effective until after 10/01/2010, some as late as 2014, contrary to the permit schedule provided in the WIP; and -- Growth: Offset program is not water quality-oriented for agricultural credit generation. Offset and trading credits cannot be generated until source achieves baseline TMDL compliance. There is no discussion how the “core four” practices meet base line TMDL compliance.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation issued a statement last week saying Pennsylvania's Watershed Implementation Plan failed to meet EPA standards and said many more resources were needed to meet water quality cleanup standards. The PA Farm Bureau also stressed the need to provide more funding to improve farm conservation programs. Four public meetings to take comments on Pennsylvania's Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation are scheduled from October 18 to 21. A copy of the EPA evaluation is available online, along with comments on each of the state Watershed Implementation Plans. Related Stories EPA Issues Draft Chesapeake Bay TMDL With Strong Measures To Fill In Gaps In State Plan Chesapeake Bay Foundation Applauds EPA's Draft Chesapeake Bay TMDL 7 Days Left For This General Assembly, Governor To Pass Severance Tax, Fund Environment With Senate Republicans sticking to their decision of no voting days after the November election and House Democrats imploding again this week and failing to vote on a Marcellus Shale natural gas production tax or a transportation funding package, the clock continues to count down to the end of this legislative session. There are now only seven voting days scheduled until the end. Any issues not resolved and on the Governor's desk will have to wait for a new Governor and a new General Assembly in January. That doesn't mean there wasn't any movement on any of Gov. Rendell's initiatives this week. Alternative Energy House Bill 1128 (Preston-D-Allegheny) was amended to increase the solar energy mandate to 1.5 percent and then the overall Tier 1 alternative energy standard to 9 percent by 2021 and reported from the Senate Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Committee by a 7 to 6 vote. It is now on the Senate Calendar for action. Gov. Rendell had paired back his "ask" on alternative energy to just increasing the solar share instead of a general increase in the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards mandate and setting up a carbon sequestration program. Electric utilities are opposing the increase in the mandate, so it remains to be seen whether this will make it all the way through the process. Marcellus Shale Production Tax Senate Republicans are still taking the position that until the House sends them a Marcellus Shale natural gas production severance tax package, they do not plan to take any action on the issue. They are still actively meeting with interest groups to further develop their Marcellus package that includes not just the severance tax, but also a version of pooling, dealing with local ordinances and other issues. For their part, House Democrats are struggling to get agreement on how to spend any revenue raised by a severance tax. Some Western PA House Democrats don't want to vote against any tax, afraid of the political consequences back home.

Trouble is, Gov. Rendell is counting on $70 million of a prospective Marcellus Shale severance tax to fill the budget hole created by the federal government not approving all of the Medicaid money Pennsylvania expected. If that doesn't happen, he has already said there will be more state worker furloughs. (see separate article on furloughs announced this week) Transportation Funding If House Democrats were queasy about voting for a Marcellus Shale severance tax, they really don't want to vote for a transportation funding package that increases vehicle and driver fees which hit their constituents directly. Electronics Recycling The only other major environmental bill closer to final action is House Bill 708 (Ross-RChester) requiring electronics recycling funded by industry fees was amended and reported from the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action. It is expected to be referred to Senate Appropriations Committee. Click here for a list of other environmental bills and issues pending. NewsClips: Lawmakers Break Without Taking On High-Profile Measures Environmentalists Push Tax On Natural Gas Production Legislators Failing To Make Headway On Marcellus Shale Tax Severance Tax Supporters Frustrated By Lack Of Action Environmentalists Seek Natural Gas Tax Groups Rally For Gas Drilling Restrictions Natural Gas Extraction Tax Urged Labor Leaders Voice Support For Drilling Severance Tax NE PA Anti-Drilling Activists Bring Passion To Capitol Amid Protests, Gas Tax Talks Go On The (Gas) Meter is Running Onorato Backs Drilling Tax, Strong DEP Corbett Is Opposed To Raising Taxes, Marcellus Shale Tax Editorial: Where Is Public Debate On Marcellus Shale Pooling Law? Related Stories CBF: Legislature Must Pass Severance Tax To Fund Disappearing Environmental Programs PEC: General Assembly Must Meet Commitment To Pass Severance Tax LBFC Recommends Marcellus Shale Funding Support For Fish and Boat Commission Labor Leaders, Non-Profit Coalition Support Adoption Of Equitable Severance Tax Governor's Office Announces State Worker Furloughs, 500 Vacancies Eliminated Rendell Furloughs Stifle Process For Hearing Appeals Of DEP Actions CBF: Legislature Must Pass Severance Tax To Fund Disappearing Environmental Programs Matthew Ehrhart, Pennsylvania Executive Director for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, released this statement on the struggle to pass Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale natural gas production severance tax. “Our legislative leaders have only 7 days to meet their own commitment to pass a severance tax that is sensible, promotes environmental restoration, and provides a share for

communities impacted by drilling like all other states with significant natural gas reserves. CBF calls on our General Assembly to not falter, but meet their commitment to Pennsylvania and pass a severance tax that makes sense. “Passing a severance tax will help restore funding that has disappeared over the last five years from the successful Growing Greener and other programs designed to meet Clean Water and other mandates. Growing Greener, in particular, has provided hundreds of millions of dollars to restore our watersheds, reclaim abandoned mines, and plug abandoned gas wells, but is today all but gone. The severance tax is an opportunity to re-establish those funds, without which Pennsylvanians will be left to bear the burden of any environmental remediation. “It is our opinion that a more significant portion of the severance tax should be allocated for funding environmental programs that actually clean up our streams, rivers and land. “As a state, and as local communities, we must demand that citizens not be left with the burden of paying for big industry mistakes. 100 years later, Pennsylvania is still dealing with the left-over environmental damage from coal mining companies that extracted our natural resources and left us with the bill. “Today we have over 19,000 miles of streams that fail to meet Clean Water Act standards. Over 4,000 stream miles and thousands of acres of land scarred and barren, all thanks to mining. Not only is this an environmental tragedy, it’s an economic burden to the Commonwealth as well, as this kind of environmental damage is extremely expensive to repair. We must have safeguards in place to protect our environment and our communities.” NewsClips: Lawmakers Break Without Taking On High-Profile Measures Environmentalists Push Tax On Natural Gas Production Legislators Failing To Make Headway On Marcellus Shale Tax Severance Tax Supporters Frustrated By Lack Of Action Environmentalists Seek Natural Gas Tax Groups Rally For Gas Drilling Restrictions Natural Gas Extraction Tax Urged Labor Leaders Voice Support For Drilling Severance Tax NE PA Anti-Drilling Activists Bring Passion To Capitol Amid Protests, Gas Tax Talks Go On The (Gas) Meter is Running Onorato Backs Drilling Tax, Strong DEP Corbett Is Opposed To Raising Taxes, Marcellus Shale Tax Editorial: Where Is Public Debate On Marcellus Shale Pooling Law? Related Stories 7 Days Left For This General Assembly, Governor To Pass Severance Tax, Fund Environment PEC: General Assembly Must Meet Commitment To Pass Severance Tax LBFC Recommends Marcellus Shale Funding Support For Fish and Boat Commission Labor Leaders, Non-Profit Coalition Support Adoption Of Equitable Severance Tax Governor's Office Announces State Worker Furloughs, 500 Vacancies Eliminated Rendell Furloughs Stifle Process For Hearing Appeals Of DEP Actions PEC: General Assembly Must Meet Commitment To Pass Severance Tax

The Pennsylvania Environmental Council called on members of the House and Senate and Governor Rendell to follow through on their commitment to enact a Marcellus Shale natural gas production severance tax to support environmental and conservation programs that have run out of money or been cut severely over the last two years. "The very successful Growing Greener Program supported now by three governors is all but out of money," said Don Welsh, President and CEO of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council. "State agencies like the departments of Environmental Protection and Conservation and Natural Resources had their General Fund budgets cut by 20 to 25 percent and more over the last two years. "A Marcellus Shale production tax is a fair way to raise the funds needed to support these worthwhile environmental programs which are needed to meet federal Clean Water Act and other mandates not funded through oil and gas permit fees; and to restore the budgets of our critical environmental protection and natural resource agencies," said Welsh. An independent study released last week by Penn State University demonstrated enacting a severance tax on natural gas would result in significant, overall economic benefits for the Commonwealth. "In recent days, we have seen a shift in the position of some legislators to support using severance tax revenue to pay for roads and other infrastructure damaged or needed to drill wells and produce natural gas." said Welsh. "We think that is a mistake. State lawmakers and the Governor need to hold the natural gas industry responsible for directly paying for the impacts of their activities on the environment, communities and public infrastructure, not through a severance tax. "We also believe linking enactment of a severance tax to complex property rights issues like pooling is a cause for concern," said Welsh. "While Pennsylvania's laws relating to the effective development of the Commonwealth's Marcellus Shale gas reserves need to be updated, members of the General Assembly do not have sufficient time in the remaining two weeks to openly evaluate any such changes." Severance tax proposals under consideration could generate approximately $100 million or more per year in state revenues. It is estimated that as many as 35,000 to 50,000 new gas wells will be drilled in Pennsylvania over the next twenty years. “The budgets of DEP and DCNR have taken budget cuts far out of proportion to other state operations, and funding levels must be returned to prior levels,” said Welsh, “This is particularly worrisome when the challenges of oversight of this rapidly growing industry, in addition to other pressing state and federal mandates, are before the agencies.” PEC supports dedicating a significant portion of a natural gas severance tax to the state’s Environmental Stewardship Fund, which is the primary means of funding Growing Greener, the single-largest investment in environmental programs in Pennsylvania’s history. Since 1999, Growing Greener has invested hundreds of millions of dollars to address some of the state’s most pressing environmental problems, spark new growth in core communities, and create new opportunities for citizens. It has successfully generated billions of dollars to the Pennsylvania economy in jobs, taxes, tourism, and other revenue. Renewing and refocusing funding for Growing Greener is an essential investment in the state’s long-term prosperity. Earlier this year, PEC has released its own report, called “Developing the Marcellus Shale” to provide specific recommendations on updating Pennsylvania’s regulatory program in

light of the rapid development of new, unconventional drilling activities across the Commonwealth. PEC considers these recommended changes to be vital to the successful development of natural gas resources. “The General Assembly and Administration must undertake an open and concerted effort to ensure that Pennsylvania’s regulatory program reflects the escalating growth of unconventional shale gas extraction” said Welsh. “DEP and DCNR have provided tremendous leadership on new challenges, but we only have one chance to get this right and that chance is now.” NewsClips: Environmentalists Push Tax On Natural Gas Production Legislators Failing To Make Headway On Marcellus Shale Tax Severance Tax Supporters Frustrated By Lack Of Action Environmentalists Seek Natural Gas Tax Groups Rally For Gas Drilling Restrictions Natural Gas Extraction Tax Urged Labor Leaders Voice Support For Drilling Severance Tax NE PA Anti-Drilling Activists Bring Passion To Capitol Amid Protests, Gas Tax Talks Go On The (Gas) Meter is Running Onorato Backs Drilling Tax, Strong DEP Corbett Is Opposed To Raising Taxes, Marcellus Shale Tax Related Stories 7 Days Left For This General Assembly, Governor To Pass Severance Tax, Fund Environment CBF: Legislature Must Pass Severance Tax To Fund Disappearing Environmental Programs LBFC Recommends Marcellus Shale Funding Support For Fish and Boat Commission Labor Leaders, Non-Profit Coalition Support Adoption Of Equitable Severance Tax Governor's Office Announces State Worker Furloughs, 500 Vacancies Eliminated Rendell Furloughs Stifle Process For Hearing Appeals Of DEP Actions LBFC Recommends Marcellus Shale Funding Support For Fish and Boat Commission In releasing its triennial performance audit of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission this week, the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee recommended that the General Assembly “consider providing additional resources to the PFBC so it can continue to make efforts to protect water resources from potential degradation by Marcellus Shale drilling efforts.” The LBFC audit specifically cited results from PFBC and state Department of Environmental Protection inspections which showed environmental and water quality problems. “These statistics suggest that, in all likelihood, Pennsylvania will continue to experience high rates of environmental, health, and safety violations at Marcellus Shale drilling sites,” the LBFC reported. “Given this new threat, we recommend the General Assembly take action…to ensure the PFBC…has sufficient resources to carry out its mission.” PFBC Executive Director John Arway, testifying before the Committee, reminded lawmakers that the Commission relies almost entirely on fishing license sales, boat registration fees, and federal funding tied to fishing and boating to support everything it does.

“This includes trying to keep pace and stay ahead of the current and projected impacts of energy development to fishing and boating recreation and on the resources the PFBC is mandated to protect,” said Mr. Arway. “If the Commission received a portion of a severance tax, we would be in a much better position to work with industry and other agencies to ensure that aquatic resources are protected during the planning, development, and production of the Marcellus Shale natural gas field.” Bringing attention to the ongoing debate in Harrisburg, Mr. Arway asked the legislature to take advantage of the “historic opportunity to allocate a portion of the proceeds to conservation and to dedicate a part of its revenues to the Commission to protect the future health of our aquatic resources and the fishing and boating recreation they provide.” The Marcellus Shale drilling industry has come into Pennsylvania in full force and has substantially increased the responsibilities of conservation agencies like the PFBC. Since 2001, the PFBC has tripled the number of oil and gas well permit reviews it conducts each year, and Mr. Arway said his staff are struggling to keep up with the everincreasing volume. Within the past year, PFBC staff also have conducted approximately 175 field views of gas well sites and have observed water quality degradation from a number of these facilities. “This limited field presence is completely inadequate if we are expected to live up to the charge given to us by the General Assembly in 1909 to enforce water pollution laws and – just as importantly – to work with other agencies and the industry to try to prevent problems before they occur," Mr. Arway said. Referring to the Commission’s formal response found in the appendix of the audit, PFBC Board of Commissioners President William Worobec explained that “we must diversify our funding streams if we are going to meet the growing expectations being placed on the Commission as we implement our mission on behalf of all Pennsylvanians, visiting anglers and boaters, and our fragile natural resources.” A copy of the audit is available online. Visit the Fish and Boat Commission Marcellus Shale issue webpage for more information. NewsClips: Environmentalists Push Tax On Natural Gas Production Legislators Failing To Make Headway On Marcellus Shale Tax Severance Tax Supporters Frustrated By Lack Of Action Environmentalists Seek Natural Gas Tax Groups Rally For Gas Drilling Restrictions Natural Gas Extraction Tax Urged Labor Leaders Voice Support For Drilling Severance Tax NE PA Anti-Drilling Activists Bring Passion To Capitol Amid Protests, Gas Tax Talks Go On The (Gas) Meter is Running Onorato Backs Drilling Tax, Strong DEP Corbett Is Opposed To Raising Taxes, Marcellus Shale Tax Related Stories 7 Days Left For This General Assembly, Governor To Pass Severance Tax, Fund Environment CBF: Legislature Must Pass Severance Tax To Fund Disappearing Environmental Programs PEC: General Assembly Must Meet Commitment To Pass Severance Tax

Labor Leaders, Non-Profit Coalition Support Adoption Of Equitable Severance Tax Governor's Office Announces State Worker Furloughs, 500 Vacancies Eliminated Rendell Furloughs Stifle Process For Hearing Appeals Of DEP Actions Labor Leaders, Non-Profit Coalition Support Adoption Of Equitable Severance Tax Saying it is necessary for to preserve the environment and to ensure sustainable future budgets, labor leaders joined today with leaders from the Southeastern Pennsylvania Budget Coalition and the Better Choices for Pennsylvania Coalition to call for passage of an equitable severance tax by the October 1st deadline. "The natural resources of the Marcellus Shale belong to the people of Pennsylvania and over the next few days our legislature must pass an equitable severance tax that sets a reasonable tax rate, limits unnecessary exemptions and loopholes, and encourages the hiring of Pennsylvania workers" said Rick Bloomingdale, President of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO. The state budget passed in July includes a commitment to vote on a severance tax on removal of natural gas from the Marcellus Shale reserve in Pennsylvania by October 1st. The General Assembly is counting on $70 million in revenue from a Marcellus Shale tax. "If the legislature does not pass a bill by the end of this session they will have to make a third round of budget cuts this year," said Kathy Jellison said, President of SEIU Local 668. "A fair tax is necessary to protect the environment, to compensate communities impacted by industry activity and to prevent additional cuts to early childhood education, libraries, state parks, services for seniors and care for people with disabilities." Pennsylvania has been hit hard by the economic downturn. Since 2008 there have been $3 billion dollars in budget cuts impacting public safety, consumer protections and essential services across the Commonwealth. "Women Against Abuse was forced to deny 4,671 requests for shelter in 2009," said Molly Callahan, Legal Center Director for Women Against Abuse. "This is nearly triple the number of requests denied in 2008." An equitable severance tax in Pennsylvania will generate significant revenue that will grow over time as new wells come into production. The severance tax is an important long term source of state revenue to support core services such as education, health care, early childhood education and it is necessary to pay for the environmental and infrastructure costs associated with increased drilling. "Lawmakers must to do the right thing when developing this proposal and pass a strong natural gas severance tax – not one rife with tax breaks for industry," said Wendell Young, IV President of UFCW Local 1776. For more information, visit the Clear Choices Coalition website. NewsClips: Environmentalists Push Tax On Natural Gas Production Legislators Failing To Make Headway On Marcellus Shale Tax Environmentalists Seek Natural Gas Tax Severance Tax Supporters Frustrated By Lack Of Action Groups Rally For Gas Drilling Restrictions Natural Gas Extraction Tax Urged Labor Leaders Voice Support For Drilling Severance Tax NE PA Anti-Drilling Activists Bring Passion To Capitol

Amid Protests, Gas Tax Talks Go On The (Gas) Meter is Running Onorato Backs Drilling Tax, Strong DEP Corbett Is Opposed To Raising Taxes, Marcellus Shale Tax Related Stories 7 Days Left For This General Assembly, Governor To Pass Severance Tax, Fund Environment CBF: Legislature Must Pass Severance Tax To Fund Disappearing Environmental Programs PEC: General Assembly Must Meet Commitment To Pass Severance Tax LBFC Recommends Marcellus Shale Funding Support For Fish and Boat Commission Governor's Office Announces State Worker Furloughs, 500 Vacancies Eliminated Rendell Furloughs Stifle Process For Hearing Appeals Of DEP Actions Governor's Office Announces State Worker Furloughs, 500 Vacancies Eliminated The Governor's Office of Administration this week announced the furlough of 50 employees and abolish 500 vacant positions in order to meet FY 2010-11 spending levels. None of the reported furloughs cover the departments of Conservation and Natural Resources or Environmental Protection, however, there are more furloughs for the Department of Agriculture-- 4-- and the Environmental Hearing Board-- 3 (25 percent of the Board's compliment). There is no break down at this time on which agencies will have their overall compliment reduced by the elimination of vacancies. There is no doubt vacancies will be abolished in most agencies and with the freeze in hiring new employees still in place, it will mean a further reduction in staff agencies have available to do their work. Click here for a copy of the announcement. NewsClips: Rendell Announces 50 State Layoffs Rendell Lays Off 50 To Balance Budget Related Stories 7 Days Left For This General Assembly, Governor To Pass Severance Tax, Fund Environment CBF: Legislature Must Pass Severance Tax To Fund Disappearing Environmental Programs PEC: General Assembly Must Meet Commitment To Pass Severance Tax LBFC Recommends Marcellus Shale Funding Support For Fish and Boat Commission Labor Leaders, Non-Profit Coalition Support Adoption Of Equitable Severance Tax Rendell Furloughs Stifle Process For Hearing Appeals Of DEP Actions Rendell Furloughs Stifle Process For Hearing Appeals Of DEP Actions Joel Bolstein, an environmental attorney with Fox Rothschild, provided this analysis of the impact of state employee furloughs made by the Rendell Administration this week at the Environmental Hearing Board which hears appeals of actions by the Department of Environmental Protection-When Governor Rendell announced that only 50 state employees would need to be eliminated as a result of this year's budget hole, most of us breathed a sigh of relief. That is, until

we discovered that 3 of those 50 state employees being let go would come from the Pennsylvania Environmental Hearing Board (EHB). For those of you unfamiliar with the EHB, it is an administrative board that hears appeals of final agency decisions from the PADEP. So, for example, if one of your clients receives a permit with terms that you believe are inconsistent with the regulations, you can file an appeal with the EHB and seek to have those objectionable conditions removed. Moreover, if one of your clients is issued an Order from the Department or is the subject of an enforcement action, you can file an appeal with the EHB and object to that action on the basis that it is arbitrary and capricious, an abuse of discretion or contrary to law. The EHB also provides an important forum for citizens and citizens groups to appeal permits that they consider objectionable. A significant body of law has been developed by the EHB which provides rules of the road for permittees, citizens and citizens groups, and the Department on a whole host of issues. I have several cases now pending before the PA EHB and I consider that a meaningful part of my practice. How did I learn that the EHB was losing three staffers? I didn't read about it in the newspaper. I read about it in the PA Environment Digest Daily Blog just a couple days ago. Since then, I've learned that the EHB has lost 5 out of 6 administrative staff as a result of the recent budget cuts. First, it lost two annuitants, which function as part-time legal assistants. Then it lost 3 more full time legal assistants. There are now only two law clerks left, one of which also serves as the Acting Secretary for the Board. Apparently, all the staffers who worked on purchasing for the Board have been cut. What do these cuts mean for you and me and others who go before the Board? These budget cuts and the loss of critical staffers endangers the core mission of the Board. It directly impacts the ability of the Board to hold trials and deliver speedy decisions on motions and adjudications. Because of the cuts, the Board has significantly less money available to pay for court reporters, which run about $1,000 a day. The loss of funds will have a direct impact on the ability of a lawyer to fully represent their clients in proceedings before the Board. In the past, if you needed 10 days to put on your case, the Board would give you 10 days. With its budget cut so severely, trials will undoubtedly need to be shortened, because the Board can ill afford to pay the administrative costs and there is no mechanism for them to charge the litigants for the court time. I've asked myself why would the Governor single out the EHB for such severe cuts? Why take 3 employees from the already small staff of the EHB instead of just cutting 3 positions from a giant Department like PennDOT? The truth is that I can not come up with an answer. Maybe the people doing the cutting didn't spend any time analyzing the impact of the cuts before they made them. If they had, they would have realized that the EHB serves a vitally important function. That function will become even more evident as the Marcellus Shale market develops and more and more litigants head to the EHB to address issues with Marcellus Shale permits and enforcement actions. A weakened EHB potentially jeopardizes the growth of that industry, in that timely and efficient permit appeals will be needed. The bottom line is it is in everyone's interest that cases before the EHB move quickly and efficiently toward a just resolution.

We've stocked the EHB with Judges that are among the best environmental lawyers in the Commonwealth. It makes no sense to treat the EHB as a second class institution. The Board serves a vitally important function. Those of us who practice before the Board recognize that it functions no differently than any other court. We'd complain loudly if Congress tried to starve the judiciary of funds needed to run fair and impartial trials. We shouldn't sit idly by while the EHB is starved of resources it needs to do the same for environmental disputes in the Commonwealth. In the lead up to the next budget, those who practice before the Board should make their legislators aware of the important function played by the Board and the need to restore its funding. Related Stories 7 Days Left For This General Assembly, Governor To Pass Severance Tax, Fund Environment CBF: Legislature Must Pass Severance Tax To Fund Disappearing Environmental Programs PEC: General Assembly Must Meet Commitment To Pass Severance Tax LBFC Recommends Marcellus Shale Funding Support For Fish and Boat Commission Labor Leaders, Non-Profit Coalition Support Adoption Of Equitable Severance Tax Governor's Office Announces State Worker Furloughs, 500 Vacancies Eliminated

Governor's Race
Corbett Releases Environmental Position Republican gubernatorial candidate Tom Corbett this week announced his plan to protect Pennsylvania's environment. Corbett has worked aggressively throughout his career to protect the environment and his plan as governor is a continuation of his commitment. Democratic candidate Dan Onorato released his plan some time ago. Corbett said, "Protecting Pennsylvania's Environment with Leadership for the Future," details multiple steps to ensure that a clean environment will be sustained for future generations. "Our environment plays an integral part in forging a new direction and a new era in Pennsylvania," said Corbett. "I will work to protect our air, land and water and I will enact policies that balance economic growth with strong environmental stewardship." Corbett's plan contains the following key areas: -- Getting the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection back to basics -- Regulating the natural gas industry -- Protecting the Chesapeake Bay Watershed; -- Revitalizing Brownfield and Grayfield Properties; and -- Promoting state parks and forests "I will direct the Department of Environmental Protection to serve as a partner with Pennsylvania businesses, communities and local governments," said Corbett. "It should return to its core mission protecting the environment based on sound science."

Corbett will focus on six actions within the DEP to set the tone of getting back to basics: -- Eliminate the permit backlog by directing the Secretary of DEP to review each of the permits on file to determine if they are still active and part of a job-creating economic development project. -- Create the Permit Decision Guarantee Program to ensure timely permit decisions for each permit issued by the agency. -- Establish a DEP Legacy Corps by enlisting retired DEP senior managers to voluntarily mentor future DEP managers. -- Review DEP programs, regulations and guidance documents by directing the DEP Secretary to initiate a review of all DEP programs and offices within the first three months and issue a report outlining necessary legislative or regulatory changes as well as current staffing capabilities. -- Administer DEP programs with uniformity by directing the Secretary of DEP to develop an initiative to ensure uniform administration of programs within the agency. The emerging Marcellus Shale industry is something Corbett believes should be developed responsibly and in an environmentally sound manner. Corbett says we must make every effort to protect Pennsylvania's waterways and lands by strengthening existing drilling regulations and enacting new ones. Corbett will create a bipartisan Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale Commission that will address issues regarding the industry and will reach out to local communities and address environmental concerns. Corbett's environmental goals regarding the Marcellus Shale industry include: -- Mandate Frac Chemical Disclosure by calling for mandatory disclosure of ALL additives used in the hydraulic fracing process for each well site; -- Expand pre-drill water testing: Corbett will mandate expanding the radius for pre-drill water testing. -- Increase the mandatory protections for water supplies; -- Support DEP regulatory changes to protect water supplies; -- Institute well cap inspections on a daily basis throughout Pennsylvania; -- Increase bonding amounts to ensure that companies have adequate and appropriate financial and insurance resources to protect Pennsylvania's environment; -- Tougher penalties for violations and ensuring that DEP properly trains inspectors to ensure that inspections are conducted thoughtfully and thoroughly; -- Address issues related to gas migration by calling for tougher regulations and laws; -- Direct interagency coordination of the Marcellus Shale by appointing and directing a new Energy Executive; and -- Protect the groundwater, encourage recycling and coordinate permitting Corbett recognizes that Pennsylvania's environment is one of our most precious resources. From our rivers and streams to our state parks and forests, any future protection and development must be carefully and thoughtfully considered. "As Governor, I will work to strike the balance between protecting our environment and growing economic development opportunities and jobs." said Corbett. "Our environment plays an integral part in forging a new direction and a new era in Pennsylvania." NewsClip: Corbett Touts Reform Of DEP, Drilling Rules Did You Know You Can Search Nearly 6 Years Of Digests On Any Topic?

Did you know you can search nearly 6 years of back issues of the PA Environment Digest on dozens of topics, by county and on any key word you choose. Just click on the search page. Also take advantage of these related services from Crisci Associates-Twitter Instant Updates: On Twitter, sign up to receive instant updates from : PAEnviroDigest. PA Environment Daily: provides daily environmental NewsClips and significant stories and announcements on environmental topics in Pennsylvania of immediate value. Sign up and receive as they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader. You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. PA Environment Digest Video Blog: showcases original and published videos from environmental groups and agencies around the state. Sign up to receive as they are posted updates through your favorite RSS read. You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Bills Introduced Here are the Senate and House Calendars and Committee meetings showing bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced-Session Schedule Here are the Senate and House Calendars and Committee meetings showing bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced-Session Schedule Senate Fall Session September 27, 28, 29, 30 October 12, 13, 14 November 18 (Ceremonial Session to Elect an Interim President Pro Tempore) House Fall Session September 27, 28, 29 October 4, 5, 6 November 8, 9, 10, 15, 16 Calendars House (September 27): House Bill 80 (Vitali-D-Delaware) expanding the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards and authorizing a carbon sequestration network; House Bill 894 (Phillips-RNorthumberland) establishing a Lyme Disease Task Force and assigning responsibilities to the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources without funding; Senate Bill 298 (Yaw-R-

Bradford) amends the Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act to allow the splitting off of preserved farm and forest lands used for alternative energy systems and natural gas and coal bed methane; House Bill 2405 (DePasquale-D-York) which would increase the solar mandate provisions of the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards and provide for carbon sequestration facilities; House Resolution 864 (Mundy-D-Luzerne) memorializing Congress to pass the Fracturing Responsibility and Awareness of Chemicals Act; House Resolution 879 (Haluska-DCambria) urging EPA to revise the proposed boiler MACT rule. Senate (September 27): House Bill 1128 (Preston-D-Allegheny) was amended to increase the solar standard to 1.5 percent and then the overall Tier 1 alternative energy standard to 9 percent by 2021; Senate Bill 1422 (D.White-R-Indiana) authorizing PennVEST to fund non-point source management projects including specifically urban stormwater projects; House Bill 2591 (George-D-Clearfield) authorizing PennVEST to fund non-point source management projects including specifically urban stormwater projects; House Bill 708 (Ross-R-Chester) requiring electronics recycling funded by industry fees; House Bill 2291 (D.Evans-DPhiladelphia) 2010-2011 Capital Budget projects bill. Committees House: the Consumer Affairs Committee meets to consider House Bill 2693 (Baker-R-Tioga) further providing for the regulation of pipelines by the PUC; the Tourism and Recreational Development Committee meets to consider House Resolution 884 (Levdansky-D-Allegheny) directing the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee to do an economic impact assessment of recreational water trails. Senate: the Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee holds a hearing on state Office of Homeland Security contractor naming Marcellus Shale drilling opponents as terrorists; the Urban Affairs and Housing Committee holds a hearing on the impact of natural gas industry on housing in northcentral Pennsylvania. Other: Environmental Issues Forum on Carbon Trading, Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and Conservation Committee; the Joint Legislative Budget and Finance Committee meets to consider release of reports on REAP farm conservation tax credit and Clean and Green programs. Bills Introduced The following bills of interest were introduced this week-Frac Fluids: Senate Bill 1473 (A.Williams-D-Philadelphia) requiring reports on the content of fracking fluids used in Marcellus Shale natural gas wells. Drilling Moratorium: House Bill 2754 (Payton-D-Philadelphia) enacting a statewide moratorium on Marcellus Shale drilling and establishing the Marcellus Well Drilling Study

Commission.

Senate/House Bills Moving
The following bills of interest saw action this week in the House and Senate-House Clean & Green: Senate Bill 298 (Yaw-R-Bradford) amends the Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act to allow the splitting off of preserved farm and forest lands used for alternative energy systems and natural gas and coal bed methane was reported from the House Appropriations Committee and is on the House Calendar for action. MACT Rule: House Resolution 879 (Haluska-D-Cambria) urging EPA to revise the proposed boiler MACT rule was reported from the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee RCRA Enforcement: House Resolution 826 (Goodman-D-Schuylkill) resolution memorializing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to require its offices to enforce RCRA uniformly was adopted by the House. Senate Terror List Subpoena Authority: The Senate Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee voted subpoena power for investigating the state Office of Homeland Security listing Marcellus Shale opponents as potential terrorists. NewsClips: Senate Panel Approves Subpoena Power In Terror List Probe PA Homeland Security Chief To Testify At Senate Hearing Furor Builds Over Anti-Terror Bulletins Lawmakers Asks Why His Rallies Made Terror List Bulletins Contradict Homeland Security Official's Claims State Won't Pull Terror Warning Lists Expert: Online Intelligence Bulletins Increases Risk Firm Wants Terror Alerts Off The Internet Quakers, Anti-War Rallies On Alert List Pittsburgh Mayor Didn't Receive Terror Research Reports State Homeland Security Office Releases Bulletins Tracking Activists State Homeland Security Monitoring Surprises Local Activists Bumsted: PA Spy Network Editorial: Know Difference Between Protest And Terrorism? Clean & Green: House Bill 1394 (Houghton-D-Chester) amends the Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act to allow the splitting off of preserved farm and forest lands used for alternative

energy systems and natural gas and coal bed methane removed from the Table and referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee. Solar Energy: House Bill 1128 (Preston-D-Allegheny) was amended to increase the solar standard to 1.5 percent and then the overall Tier 1 alternative energy standard to 9 percent by 2021 and reported from the Senate Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action. Stormwater Funding: Senate Bill 1422 (D.White-R-Indiana) authorizing PennVEST to fund non-point source management projects including specifically urban stormwater projects and House Bill 2591 (George-D-Clearfield) authorizing PennVEST to fund non-point source management projects including specifically urban stormwater projects were both amended and reported from the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and are now on the Senate Calendar for action. Electronics Recycling: House Bill 708 (Ross-R-Chester) requiring electronics recycling funded by industry fees was amended and reported from the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action. Capital Budget: House Bill 2291 (D.Evans-D-Philadelphia) 2010-2011 Capital Budget projects bill was amended and reported from the Senate Appropriations Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

News From The Capitol
Sen. Ray Musto Attends Last Senate Environmental Resources Committee Meeting Sen. Ray Musto (D-Luzerne), long-time Democratic Chair of the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, attended his last Committee meeting this week. He will retire from the Senate at the end of his current term. "After nearly 40 years of public service to the citizens of the northeast and seven terms serving the 14th Senatorial District, it is time to retire from the Senate," Sen. Musto said. "I have been fortunate and blessed, and I am grateful for all the kindness that has been extended to me over the years." For many years Sen. Musto has been the regarded as a leading voice on environmental issues in the Senate and as a fierce advocate for his district. He has been involved in the passage of every major state environmental law and program for the last 30 years. Among the notable environmental laws and initiatives completed as a result of Musto's work: -- Curbside Recycling: Legislation that created Pennsylvania's curbside recycling program in 1988 -- the largest in the country;

-- Land Recycling: Pennsylvania's land recycling program--Acts 2, 3 and 4 of 1995 which has become the national model program for the effective re-use of abandoned industrial property; -- Growing Greener: Act 68 (1999) Pennsylvania's Growing Greener program that has led to the protection of open spaces and farmland preservation as well as water and sewer system upgrades; -- Air Pollution Control: Helped adopt far-reaching changes to the Air Pollution Control Act (Act 95) that has led to steadily improving air quality; -- Infrastructure: Supported numerous bills to improve Pennsylvania's water and wastewater infrastructure, including a 1988 law creating the PA Infrastructure Investment Authority; -- Chesapeake Bay: Helped adopt the Chesapeake Bay Commission Agreement in 1985 committing Pennsylvania to cleanup the Chesapeake Bay; -- Water Resources: Helped pass the Water Resources Planning Act in 2002 to require a state water plan; -- Hazardous Sites Cleanup: Shepherded the Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act in 1988 through the Senate; and -- Establishment of Nescopeck State Park. "It is amazing how much can be accomplished when no one worries about who gets the credit," Sen. Musto said, attributing his long tenure in the Senate and in public service to his dedicated staff and supportive family. "My staff both in the district and Harrisburg has been quietly serving residents for nearly 40 years and doing a tremendous job meeting the needs of the local community," Sen. Musto said. "They are hard-working, honest and determined to make sure the job is done correctly." "They are great public servants who, along with my family, made great sacrifices over the years," Sen. Musto said. "Being in public service is a tough job where criticism and cynicism come with the territory; but it is also a wonderful job because you can directly make a difference in the lives of people." Sen. Mary Jo White (R-Venango), Majority Chair of the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, said, "I congratulate Sen. Musto on his nearly 28 years of distinguished service in the state Senate. In addition to being a friend and true gentleman, Sen. Musto has been a passionate advocate for the environment. "His imprint can be found on every major environmental accomplishment realized over the past three decades, including the state's landmark recycling, environmental education, Key '93, brownfields reuse, water resource planning, alternative energy and Growing Greener acts. None of these initiatives would be in place today without the guidance and support of Ray Musto. "His family's well-deserved gain will be the Commonwealth's loss. Our children and grandchildren will benefit for decades to come from a cleaner environment thanks in no small part to the work of Ray Musto." Sen. Musto is a Korean War veteran who served in the U.S. Army from 1951-53. He is a 1971 graduate of King's College in Wilkes-Barre. He holds Doctorate of Letters degrees from Kings and Wilkes Colleges. Musto has received many awards and honors for his work in the Senate. The veteran lawmaker served in the state House from 1971 to 1980. He began his career when he was elected in a special election in 1971 to fill his late father James Musto's unexpired term. Musto was then elected to Congress in a special election in 1980. In 1982, he was elected

to the state Senate. Musto has the distinction of being among only a few public servants to serve in the U.S.Congress, the state House and state Senate. The senator's term will conclude on November 30. Senate Committee Amends Pipeline Safety Bill To Increase Solar Energy Mandate The Senate Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Committee this week voted 7 to 6 to amend House Bill 1128 (Preston-D-Allegheny) to increase the solar energy mandate in Tier I of the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards to 1.5 percent. The purpose of the original bill was to increase penalties for gas pipeline safety violations. The amendment, offered by Sen. Ted Erickson (R-Delaware), also increased the Tier I AEPS standard to 9 percent by June 1, 2021. The bill now goes to the Senate floor for action and then should be referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee. Sen. Tommy Tomlinson (R-Bucks) serves as Majority Chair and Sen. Lisa Boscola (DLehigh) serves as Minority Chair. House Republicans Unveil Marcellus Works Proposal, Take Money From General Fund House Republican Policy Committee Chairman Stan Saylor (R-York) and members of the House Republican Caucus this week unveiled a package of legislation called "Marcellus Works" to create incentives for the use of the clean natural gas which is plentiful under Pennsylvania's large Marcellus Shale formation. "Pennsylvania has an abundant supply of clean natural gas," said Rep. Saylor. "By creating incentives to use that natural gas, we will increase demand, and as a result, we will help create thousands of jobs not only in the natural gas industry but also in related fields like the infrastructure, manufacturing, and service sectors. In addition, we will reduce Pennsylvania's dependence on oil, thereby reducing emissions from carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons. This is a win-win for everyone." Rep. Saylor noted the initial investment of $55 to $60 million which will come from taxes already imposed on the industry going to the General Fund. "The Marcellus Shale industry produced $389 million in state and local tax revenue in 2009 alone, and is expected to pay close to $800 million this year," Rep. Saylor said. "Our plan would use a portion of that revenue to create thousands of jobs." The proposal would take away funding from agencies like the departments of Environmental Protection and Conservation and Natural Resources that depend on the General Fund to pay staff. DEP and DCNR have already had their General Fund budgets cut from 20 to 25 percent in each of the last two years and DEP had its staff reduced by 20 percent over the last 8 years. The lawmakers noted the "Marcellus Works" plan includes four key components. 1. Transition State Vehicles to Clean Natural Gas Currently, Pennsylvania has more than 16,000 vehicles in its state fleet. Transitioning the state fleet to clean natural gas vehicles would greatly reduce the Commonwealth's reliance on oil and create a tremendous demand for the natural gas available right here in Pennsylvania.

2. Provide Tax Credits for Clean Natural Gas Vehicles and Infrastructure Providing tax credits to private entities that convert their fleets to clean natural gas and to public and private entities that construct and use clean natural gas fueling stations will provide another incentive for the use of Pennsylvania's abundant supply of clean natural gas. The "Marcellus Works" plan would also provide incentives to create a clean natural gas infrastructure including natural gas filling stations and storage tanks. 3. Government Conversion Grants Local governments across Pennsylvania also have fleets comprising hundreds of cars, trucks, and other equipment. The Marcellus Works plan would provide incentive grants to local governments to encourage them to convert those fleets to clean natural gas vehicles. In addition, the "Marcellus Works" plan would provide incentive grants to encourage mass transit systems to convert their fleets to clean natural gas, reducing their reliance on oil and increasing demand for the clean natural gas we can produce here in the Commonwealth. 4. Clean Natural Gas Stations on the Pennsylvania Turnpike The "Marcellus Works" proposal would make the Pennsylvania Turnpike a "Clean Natural Gas Corridor" across the Commonwealth by constructing clean natural gas stations at every other service station. Making clean natural gas available along the turnpike will encourage its use by the millions of drivers who regularly use the turnpike. In addition, it will create thousands of jobs for people who will construct and man the stations. "The formula is very simple," Rep. Saylor concluded. "Pennsylvania's abundant supply of gas plus a large demand for natural gas in Pennsylvania will equal jobs for Pennsylvanians. I hope my colleagues on both sides of the aisle will join us in supporting this effort to secure Pennsylvania's energy future." Amendments containing the proposal have been filed in the House to House Bill 1489 (George-D-Clearfield) and House Bill 381 (Mundy-D-Luzerne). NewsClips: Natural Gas Use Pushed By House Republicans GOP: Shale Plan Good Job Creator Plan Would Help Create Natural Gas Jobs In PA Senate Committee Reports Out Stormwater Funding, Electronics Recycling Bills The Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee amended and reported out bills authorizing urban stormwater project funding and an electronics recycling program. The bills include--- Senate Bill 1422 (D.White-R-Indiana) authorizing PennVEST to fund non-point source management projects including specifically urban stormwater projects (amended); -- House Bill 708 (Ross-R-Chester) requiring electronics recycling (amended); and -- House Bill 2591 (George-D-Clearfield) authorizing PennVEST to fund non-point source management projects including specifically urban stormwater projects (amended). Copies of the bills and amendments are posted on the Committee webpage. Sen. Mary Jo White (R-Venango) serves as Majority Chair and Sen. Ray Musto (DLuzerne) serves as Minority Chair. Environmental Synopsis Out, Environmental Issues Forum Sept. 27 On Carbon Trading

The September issue of Environmental Synopsis is now available from the Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and Conservation Committee. The Committee is also sponsoring an Environmental Issues Forum on September 27 at noon on carbon trading in Room G-50 Irvis Building. This September Synopsis features stories on re-watering the Delaware Canal, electronics waste recycling, 8 PA counties with potential water shortages, wind energy capacity, Department of Energy stimulus funding and Chesapeake Bay restoration bill in Congress. Rep. Scott Hutchinson (R-Venango) serves as Chair and Sen. Ray Musto (D-Luzerne) serves as Vice Chair of the Committee.

News From Around The State
PEC Recognizes 40 Under 40 Environmentalists In Pennsylvania In celebration of its 40th Anniversary, the Pennsylvania Environmental Council selected 40 Pennsylvanians under the age of 40 as recipients of its 40 Under 40 Awards. Recipients were honored at PEC's 40th Anniversary Celebration at the Civic Club of Harrisburg this week. Nearly 100 environmental professionals and volunteers were nominated for this statewide honor. Nominees included volunteers and professionals in a diverse range of environmental fields throughout the entire Commonwealth including planning, research, education and advocacy. "PEC has reflected much on our past successes during our 40th Anniversary, and recognizing this next generation of environmental leaders is our way of looking to the future with a great deal of excitement," said Don Welsh, President and CEO of PEC. "We learned that these young leaders stand poised to tackle our state's most important upcoming challenges including Marcellus Shale development, renewable energy, and stormwater, among others," he said. The 40 Under 40 Recipients are: 1. Sherry Acevedo, 36. Resource Conservation Specialist, Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Easton 2. Phyllis Barber, 38, Sustainability Coordinator- Environmental Management, Highmark, Inc., Pittsburgh 3. Thomas Baxter, 31, Executive Director, Friends of the Riverfront, Pittsburgh 4. Lindsay Baxter, 27, Sustainability Coordinator, Office of the Mayor, City of Pittsburgh 5. Heather Blakeskee, 36, Programs & Advocacy Director, Delaware Valley Green Building Council, Philadelphia 6. April Claus, 37, Director of Environmental Education, Sewickley Heights Borough/Fern Hollow Nature Center, Sewickley 7. Maureen Copeland, 27, Community Programs Manager, GTECH Strategies, Inc., Pittsburgh 8. Danielle Crumrine, 32, Executive Director, Friends of Pittsburgh Urban Forest, Pittsburgh 9. Timothy Dugan, 29, Assistant District Forester, PA-DCNR- Bureau of Forestry, Elverson 10. Katherine Gajewski, 30, Director, Mayor's Office of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia 11. Marijke Hecht, 39, Director of Education, Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, Pittsburgh

12. Tara Hemmer, 37, Special Projects Manager, Waste Management of Pennsylvania, Fairless Hills 13. Robert Hughes, 38, Executive Director, Eastern PA Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Ashley 14. Stacey Kennealy, 29, Certification Program and Sustainability Director, GreenFaith, New Brunswick 15. Christine Knapp, 31, Director of Outreach, Citizen's for Pennsylvania's Future, Philadelphia 16. Christopher Kocher, 37, President, Wildlands Conservancy, Emmaus 17. Leanne Krueger-Braneky, 33, Executive Director, Sustainable Business Network of Greater Philadelphia 18. Emily Landsburg, 32, CEO, BlackGold BioFuels, Philadelphia 19. Lauren Lazzari, 29, Vice President, Investar, Inc., Johnstown 20. Megan Lehman, 29, Environmental Planner, Lycoming County, Williamsport 21. Brian Linton, 23, Founder, United By Blue, Philadelphia 22. David Masur, 38, Director, PennEnvironment, Philadelphia 23. Maura McCarthy, 36, Executive Director, Friends of the Wissahickon, Philadelphia 24. Deborah Nardone, 36, Coldwater Resource Specialist, Pennsylvania Council of Trout Unlimited, Pleasant Gap 25. Joel Perkovich, 31, Principal, Tsuga Studios and Allegheny GreenRoofs. Cheswick 26. Daniel Reilly, 36, Attorney/Associate, Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP, Philadelphia 27. Jenn Rezeli, 37, Principal, Re:Vision Architecture, Philadelphia 28. Ann Roda, 30, Market Based Programs Coordinator, Office of Water Planning, PA Dept. of Environmental Protection, Harrisburg 29. Jake Romig, 37, President/Founder, Ecostruction LLC, York 30. Todd Sampsell, 38, Deputy State Director, The Nature Conservancy, Harrisburg 31. Kristin Sewak, 35, Executive Director, Natural Biodiversity, Windber 32. Aurora Sharrard, PhD, 30, Director of Innovation, Green Building Alliance, Pittsburgh 33. Brian Shema, 34, Director of Conservation, Audubon Society of Western PA, Pittsburgh 34. Jennifer Shuey, 39, Executive Director, ClearWater Conservancy, State College 35. James Sloss, 35, Energy & Utilities Manager, City of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh 36. Amy Jo Smith, 28, Grant Manager, Economic Development Corporation of Erie County 37. Sarah Thorp, 38, Master Planning Manager, Delaware River Waterfront Corporation Philadelphia 38. Susan Turcmanovich, 38, External Affairs Manager, Pennsylvania American Water, WilkesBarre 39. Brad Waldron, 34, Vice President, Novel Geo-Environmental, LLC, Moon Township 40. Nathan Wildfire, 28, Sustainable Policy Coordinator, East Liberty Development, Inc., Pittsburgh PEC thanked the members of the Honorary Anniversary Committee for their work with PEC and their service to Pennsylvania. -- Hon. Mark Schweiker. Former Governor, Commonwealth of PA -- Hon. Tom Ridge. Former Governor, Commonwealth of PA -- Hon. Dick Thornburgh. Former Governor, Commonwealth of PA -- Hon. John Hanger. Secretary, PA Department of Environmental Protection -- Hon. Kathleen A. McGinty. Former Secretary, PA Department of Environmental Protection

-- Hon. David E. Hess. Former Secretary, PA Department of Environmental Protection -- Hon. James Seif. Former Secretary, PA Department of Environmental Protection -- Hon. Arthur A. Davis. Former Secretary, PA Department of Environmental Resources -- Hon. Nicholas DeBenedictis. Former Secretary, PA Department of Environmental Resources -- Hon. Peter S. Duncan. Former Secretary, PA Department of Environmental Resources -- Hon. John Quigley. Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources -- Hon. Michael DiBerardinis. Former Secretary, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources -- Hon. John C. Oliver. Former Secretary, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources For more information, visit PEC's 40th Anniversary Celebration webpage. EPA Issues Draft Chesapeake Bay TMDL With Strong Measures To Fill Gaps In State Plans The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week released a draft Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), a mandatory plan designed to restore the Chesapeake Bay and its streams, creeks and rivers. Along with the draft Bay TMDL, EPA put out comments on each of the Watershed Implementation Plans submitted by the Bay states. EPA said Pennsylvania's plan had "serious deficiencies." (see separate article) The draft TMDL -- which EPA is legally required to produce – sets limits on the amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment pollution discharged into the Bay and each of its tributaries by different types of pollution sources. It is designed to meet water quality standards that reflect a scientific assessment of the pollution reductions necessary to restore the health of the Bay ecosystem. The draft TMDL calls for 25 percent reductions in nitrogen and phosphorus and at least a 16 percent reduction in sediment to achieve a healthy Bay and local rivers. These reductions, which the science indicates are necessary to achieve a healthy watershed, would be achieved by a combination of federal and state actions. Development of the draft TMDL followed careful EPA review of pollution reduction measures proposed by the States and the District of Columbia earlier this month in their Watershed Implementation Plans. As a result, the draft TMDL allocations released today reflect a combination of defined state commitments and supplemental EPA measures which tighten controls on permitted “point sources” of pollution, such as wastewater treatment plants, large animal agriculture operations and municipal stormwater systems. EPA will now work with federal partners like the Department of Agriculture, to assist Bay watershed states and the District of Columbia as they revise and strengthen the implementation plans before final versions are due on November 29. “While EPA felt that the plans submitted by Maryland and the District of Columbia represented a strong start, others still contained gaps that reduced EPA’s confidence that the State could achieve all the pollutant reductions necessary to meet its contribution to Bay restoration,” said EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. “We are hopeful that the

jurisdictions will provide a greater level of assurance in their final plans, so that EPA can reduce the federal measures in the final TMDL. EPA strongly prefers to achieve the necessary pollution reductions through the state plans rather than federal actions because the states have more flexibility and can achieve reductions from a wider range of sources than EPA.” The Draft TMDL which contains evaluations of the plans and EPA adjustments for all seven jurisdictions can be found online. The TMDL is designed to ensure that all pollution control measures to fully restore the Bay and its tidal rivers are in place by 2025, with 60 percent of the actions completed by 2017. The final TMDL will be established December 31. On July 1, EPA set draft Bay-wide limits for nitrogen and phosphorus at 187.4 million and 12.5 million pounds per year, respectively, and on Aug. 13 set a range of allowable sediment pollution levels at between 6.1 and 6.7 billion pounds per year. These Bay-wide pollution limits were further divided by jurisdiction and major river basin based on state-of-the-art modeling tools, extensive monitoring data, peer-reviewed science, and close interaction with state partners. The TMDL is supported by accountability measures to ensure cleanup commitments are met, including short-and long-term benchmarks, a tracking and accounting system, and additional federal actions, if necessary, to spur progress. It will build on state programs already in place, some of which are helping reduce pollution and improve the Bay’s health – for instance, Maryland reported a record sign-up this fall for one of its most successful agricultural pollution control programs, achieving more than 150% of its two-year goal for the Chesapeake Bay. The TMDL was prompted by insufficient restoration progress over the last several decades in the Bay. The TMDL is required under federal law and responds to consent decrees in Virginia and D.C. dating back to the late 1990s. It is also a keystone commitment of a federal strategy to meet President Obama’s Executive Order to restore and protect the Bay. Public Comments The release of the draft TMDL begins a 45-day public comment period that will include 18 public meetings in all six watershed states (Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York and West Virginia) and the District of Columbia. A full public meeting schedule, including registration links for online broadcast is available on the Bay TMDL website. The website also provides instructions for accessing the draft TMDL and providing formal comments. Four public meetings to take comments on Pennsylvania's Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation are scheduled from October 18 to 21. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation issued a statement last week saying Pennsylvania's Watershed Implementation Plan failed to meet EPA standards and said many more resources were needed to meet water quality cleanup standards. The PA Farm Bureau also stressed the need to provide more funding to improve farm conservation programs. For more information, visit the EPA Chesapeake Bay TMDL webpage. Related Stories EPA Says PA Chesapeake Bay Pollution Reduction Plan Has Serious Deficiencies Chesapeake Bay Foundation Applauds EPA's Draft Chesapeake Bay TMDL

Chesapeake Bay Foundation Applauds EPA's Draft Chesapeake Bay TMDL Chesapeake Bay Foundation President Will Baker and Pennsylvania Executive Director for CBF Matt Ehrhart issued the following statements following the release of a draft Chesapeake Bay TMDL by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Will Baker said, "Today, 30 years of failed, voluntary programs to save the Bay may be coming to an end. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) appears ready to enforce the Clean Water Act, consistent with its settlement of our lawsuit. "EPA's draft TMDL is a pollution budget. If fully implemented, it will hold the states accountable to reduce pollution to scientifically defensible levels. "Here's how EPA proposes to go forward: The states have until the end of November to improve their detailed plans to achieve the reductions articulated in today's TMDL budget. By the end of the year, EPA will finalize the pollution reduction levels based on science. And then, EPA will hold the states accountable and impose consquences they fail. "The Clean Water Act requires EPA to exercise its authority, especially for multi-state systems like the Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake Clean Water Act now under consideration will ensure that today's action and the process it sets in motion can survive the period of time required to, finally, save the Bay. Congress must pass this critical legislation. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation applauds EPA for putting a priority on clean water. “ Matt Ehrhart said. “Pennsylvania has failed to come up with enough effective ideas for reducing pollution to local creeks, streams and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay, and it has failed also to spell out how it might implement those ideas. 'EPA has concluded, in fact, that Pennsylvania’s clean-up plan ranks behind those of Virginia and Maryland. EPA also has clarified the potential consequences of Pennsylvania’s failure. It is imperative that the state use the time between now and the end of November when final plans are due to strengthen our commitment and specify how Pennsylvania will meet our obligations to citizens who have a right to clean water." Related Stories EPA Says PA Chesapeake Bay Pollution Reduction Plan Has Serious Deficiencies EPA Issues Draft Chesapeake Bay TMDL With Strong Measures To Fill In Gaps In State Plan Conservation Districts Receive Over $60,000 For Pollution Prevention Education Projects The PA Association of Conservation Districts, Inc. announces the 2010-11 Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention Educational Mini-Grant Program recipients. PACD awarded grants up to $2,500 for projects throughout the state that promote water pollution prevention strategies. Funding for the grants is provided through the Department of Environmental Protection under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act, administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. 2010-11 Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention Educational Mini-Grants: -- Adams Conservation District: Groundwater Workshops; -- Armstrong Conservation District: NPS Education Online Site Development Project; -- Berks Conservation District: Innovative Agriculture Workshop;

-- Blair Conservation district: Riparian Buffer Road Show; -- Bradford Conservation District: Nutrient Management Education and Outreach Strategy; -- Cambria Conservation District: “60 Years of Conservation” Tour; -- Cameron Conservation District: E&S Contractor / Timber Harvesters Workshop; -- Cameron Conservation District: Agriculture Producer's Workshop; -- Centre Conservation District: Ag Conservation Management/Urban Sustainability Workshops; -- Clinton Conservation District: Rain Barrel Workshop; -- Crawford Conservation District: Stormwater in the News - Educational insert; -- Cumberland Conservation District: What You Need To Know About Your Well Water and NPS Pollution; -- Cumberland Conservation District: 2011 Farmer Field Day - Farming Today and The Chesapeake Bay; -- Cumberland Conservation District: Promoting NPS Pollution Awareness through Rain Water Harvesting; -- Dauphin Conservation District: Homeowner NPS Pollution Education; -- Erie Conservation District: Ag & NPS Adult Education Schools; -- Franklin Conservation District: Leaf Pack Workshop; -- Fulton Conservation District: Winter Education Meeting-Focus on Ag; -- Huntingdon Conservation District: Portstown Park Rain Garden Demonstration Project; -- Lancaster Conservation District: Lancaster/Lebanon County Watershed Forum; -- Lancaster Conservation District: Conservation Begins At Home; -- Lawrence Conservation District: Fresh from the Farm – an NPS Pollution Reduction Approach; -- Lycoming Conservation District: Conveyor Belt Diversion; -- McKean Conservation District: Clean Water Campaign; -- Mercer Conservation District: Homestead Rain Garden; -- Mifflin Conservation District: Ag Workshop on Groundwater and Emerging Trends in NPS Pollution Control; -- Northumberland Conservation District: Twilight Meetings – Ag and BMP Practices; -- Northumberland Conservation District: Winter Conference 2011 – Agricultural Conservation; -- Pike Conservation District: Act 167 Implementation Workshop; -- Potter Conservation District: Anniversary NPS Educational Event; -- Snyder Conservation District: Women In Ag Forum; -- Snyder Conservation District: Farmer's Winter Meeting; -- Snyder Conservation District: No-Till Informational Meetings; -- Snyder Conservation District: Stormwater Workshop & Stenciling Project; -- Somerset Conservation District: 2010 Watershed Summit; -- Susquehanna Conservation District: E&S on Farm Lanes and Access Roads; -- Union Conservation District: Water Quality Awareness Campaign; -- Venango Conservation District: Rain Barrel Workshops; -- Warren County Conservation District: Hatch Run Fall Water Quality Education Festival; -- Wayne Conservation District: Managing Stormwater in Your Backyard; -- Westmoreland Conservation District: Seasonal Rotational Grazing Bus Tour; and -- Wyoming Conservation District: Conservation Resource Tour.

For more information, visit the Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention Educational MiniGrant Program webpage. EPA Takes Penalty Action Against Manheim Farm For Unpermitted Waste Discharges The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week announced it has issued an Administrative Penalty Order in the amount of $6,000 to Melvin and Moses Petersheim of Manheim Pa. for illegally discharging pollutants from their Manheim farm to a nearby stream without a required Clean Water Act permit. On April 1, EPA inspected the farm of Melvin Petersheim, who owns farmland on which he operates an egg-laying operation with approximately 36,000 hens. His brother Moses has a dairy operation with about 80 dairy cows on the same property. The inspection determined the Petersheims did not have a permit, but were discharging pollutants, including nitrogen and phosphorus from animal manure and milkhouse washwater into a tributary of Chickies Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River. On June 1, EPA ordered the Petersheims to cease discharging pollutants to the waters, or obtain the required permits, and comply with the permits by implementing the required pollution reduction measures. The farm is located in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This action is part of the Agency’s multi-state, multi-media compliance and enforcement strategy to improve water quality in local waterways and the Bay. EPA will continue conducting inspections of farms in the Lancaster County area over the coming months. For more information, visit the EPA Chesapeake Bay Watershed webpage. Foundation For PA Watersheds Offers Scholarships For Chesapeake Bay Conference The Foundation for Pennsylvania Watershed is offering eight scholarships to Pennsylvania organizations interested in participating in the Website Sprint being held by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay. This special program is being held as part of the Alliance's annual conference in Shepherdstown, WV on November 12-14. The Website Sprint gives groups an opportunity to work face-to-face with web and communications experts to upgrade or create a website for your organization. Watershed associations, land trusts, waterkeepers, conservation districts, and related organizations from anywhere in Pennsylvania are eligible. The scholarships will be awarded to organizations that can come up with a $1,000 match for the Foundation's scholarship, and otherwise fit the Foundation's grantmaking criteria. To learn more about the Website Sprint and see samples, click here. The organizers will conduct a free, orientation webinar this coming October 4, at 3:00 p.m. To register, click here. Agriculture Secretary Encourages Producers To Plant Cover Crops, Protect Natural Resources

Agriculture Secretary Russell C. Redding this week reminded Pennsylvania producers to plant cover crops this fall to keep beneficial nutrients in the soil and reduce nitrogen runoff into local waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay watershed. By planting cover crops—a small grain crop planted in the fall—producers reduce soil erosion, improve soil quality, decrease nutrient leaching, suppress weeds and attract beneficial pests. "Pennsylvania is a leader in protecting and managing natural resources," said Secretary Redding. "By implementing core conservation practices, such as planting cover crops, our producers can improve their farm's productivity along with soil and water quality." Secretary Redding noted that cover crops are one of four recommended practices outlined in the brochure "Core Conservation Practices for Your Farm." A collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania departments of Agriculture and Environmental Protection, the State Conservation Commission, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the brochure outlines key best management practices farmers can use to reduce runoff and conserve resources. The four practices detailed in the brochure are: -- Plant cover crops to prevent erosion and reduce fertilizer needs; -- Install streamside buffers to capture nutrients and protect waterways; -- Use no-till and low-till planting techniques to minimize soil movement; and -- Create and implement nutrient management plans for all farm acreage. These four practices are also key components of Pennsylvania's work to improve the water quality throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. As the source of more than 50 percent of the fresh water flowing into the bay, the actions of Pennsylvania's farmers are critical to bay restoration efforts. Pennsylvania's farming community already accounts for 50 percent of the agriculture-related nitrogen reductions made throughout the entire watershed. "Pennsylvania farmers are the front line defenders of our natural resources," Secretary Redding noted. "The 7.8 million acres our farmers manage and care for provides food for our citizens, as well as a living for our farm families. It is of vital environmental and economic importance that we are proactive in our conservation efforts, and I am proud of the work our farmers have done on this front." Support for implementing these and other conservation practices is available through the Resource Enhancement and Protection, or REAP program. REAP provides tax credits to farmers who adopt best management practices that reduce run-off, erosion and sedimentation. To date, $28.1 million in tax credits have leveraged $57.13 million in private funds to support conservation work across the state. For more information, visit the State Conservation Commission webpage. Cabot Refutes Reports Of Carter Road Water Contamination By Fracking Fluid Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation disputes facts and inferences made in wire and published reports that claim xylene, ethyl benzene and toluene have recently been found in water samples taken from properties on Carter Road in Dimock Township in Susquehanna County, Pa.

Cabot has not used any of the above-mentioned chemicals for hydraulic fracturing in its operations near Carter Road and has scientific data to confirm this. The media reports include claims of affected water by a local water tester Daniel Farnham, who is working for the plaintiffs in a lawsuit against Cabot, and Victoria Switzer, one of the plaintiffs in that suit. Cabot has reviewed sample results analyzed by Mr. Farnham prior to the time when Cabot commenced drilling in the area. These sample results confirm the presence of many of these chemicals in water samples taken from Carter Road properties in 2008, prior to natural gas well drilling in the area. Cabot notes an automobile and truck repair garage is situated near the properties tested. All of the chemicals mentioned in the media reports are commonly used in automotive fluids. Xylene, ethylbenzene and toluene are primary constituents of car and truck fuel and are the chemicals relied upon by the Department of Environmental Protection to investigate and clean up gasoline spills. A published article also reported that Ms. Switzer claims she and two of her neighbors have experienced ‘soapy water’. Surfactants, the active ingredient in consumer soap products, were also present in the 2008 samples taken by Farnham & Associates from properties in the Carter Road area. Mr. Farnham also is reported to have seen "troubling spikes" of contaminants after rain events this past summer. He is reported as saying this is the result of a "disturbed aquifer." Cabot notes that hydraulic fracturing occurs approximately a mile beneath these shallow fresh water aquifers. Experts agree that there is no possible connection between deep hydraulic fracturing and these aquifers, and also agree that spikes of contamination after rainfall are indications of surface spills. Extensive testing performed this year in cooperation with the PA-DEP has confirmed that Cabot's operations have not caused any such surface contamination. Since commencing operations in Susquehanna County in 2006, Cabot has invested more than $500 million and created more than 300 full-time jobs through Company staff additions, and those of its vendors and suppliers. Cabot operates its facilities in full compliance with environmental and oil and gas drilling regulations and continues to implement measures to achieve our goal of zero incidents. Cabot remains committed to safe and secure operations in Susquehanna County, to being a good neighbor in the many communities in which it operates, and to being a responsible corporate citizen. NewsClip: Cabot Says Dimock Water Contaminated Before Drilling Fish & Boat Commission To Host October 4 Program On Marcellus Shale In Williamsport The Fish and Boat Commission will host a special program on Marcellus Shale drilling during its regular quarterly meeting in Williamsport on October 4 starting at 7:00 p.m. The evening session allows members of the public who cannot attend during normal business hours the opportunity to hear about current issues and to interact with Commissioners, the executive director and agency staff. Titled “Water Quality and Marcellus Shale: An Aquatic Resource Perspective,” the evening meeting will feature several guest speakers. The agenda includes: -- Welcome - John Arway, PFBC Executive Director;

-- Pine Creek Water Dogs - Jerry Walls, Retired Director, Lycoming County Planning Commission; -- In-Stream Data Loggers - Len Lichvar, District Manager, Somerset Conservation District and PFBC Commissioner; -- Perspectives, Concerns, and Responses of a Municipal Water Supply - Walt Nicholson, Interim Executive Director, Williamsport Sanitary Authority and Williamsport Municipal Water Authority; -- Fish and Boat Commission Roles, Observations, and Recommendations - Tom Kamerzel, PFBC Director of Law Enforcement, and Mark Hartle, Chief, Aquatic Resource Section, Division of Environmental Services, PFBC; and -- Closing Remarks - Bill Worobec, President, PFBC Board of Commissioners. Commission committees will meet beginning at 10:15 a.m. on October 4, and again at 8 a.m. on October 5. Formal consideration of the agenda by the full Commission will begin at approximately 10:45 a.m. on October 5. All committee meetings and the formal meeting are open to the public. A complete copy of the meeting schedule and the full agenda is available online. PA Securities Commission Takes First Enforcement Action Involving Marcellus Shale In its first enforcement action marking its increased scrutiny of investment activities involving natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale formation, the Pennsylvania Securities Commission this week announced it has ordered a halt to the offer and sale of unregistered securities in Pennsylvania by a Gibsonia (Allegheny County) firm. The Commission issued a Summary Order to Cease and Desist against McKelvey Gas Co. (MGC) as a company and Albert T. McKelvey as an individual, both with an address in Gibsonia. MGC was offering for sale investments in a Marcellus Shale gas well drilling project. McKelvey was listed as the owner of MGC. The offer and assertions made to prospects by McKelvey represent violations of Pennsylvania securities law. The Commission found that earlier this month, McKelvey placed an advertisement entitled "Investment Opportunity" in a Pittsburgh-area newspaper. The ad stated "Here is an opportunity to earn money from the Marcellus shale gas well drilling." The ad specified a minimum investment is $5,000; that "all investment notes are locked in for thirty-six months" and investors will earn 6 percent interest the first year, 6.5 percent interest the second year and 7 percent interest the third year. The ad further stated that interest was to be paid at the end of each twelve month period; and that "wells produce for 20 to 30 years." A staff investigation revealed that at least one Pennsylvania resident observed the ad and telephoned McKelvey. McKelvey, according to Commission documents, told the resident that as an investor he would receive an "interest certificate" with a corporate seal; that the certificate would be an "official state document" and would be "just like having a U.S. Savings Bond paying interest"; and that as long as investors kept their money with MGC, they would receive a one-half percent increase in interest annually, without limitation. McKelvey further stated, according to the PSC, that he is "bonded to do 500" wells and only needed eight to be able to repay investors; and that the prospect did not need to know anything about oil and gas as MGC would do everything.

MGC failed to make material information available to the prospective investor which also represents violations of Pennsylvania law including disclosure of-- the financial condition of MGC; the financial risks of the program; the identity and relevant background of the corporate officers of MGC; MGC's operating history; that the program is not registered in Pennsylvania; and that in or about April 2006, McKelvey was convicted in the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania of impersonating a Marine Corps officer. The Commission ordered McKelvey Gas Co. and Albert T. McKelvey to stop offering and selling the program in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in violation of the 1972 Act. According to the Commission, any further solicitations or sales made by MGC, McKelvey or their affiliates in Pennsylvania will constitute further violations of the 1972 Act. The Commission issued a request for any person who is or was solicited by or has information about MGC or McKelvey to immediately notify the Pennsylvania Securities Commission by calling the toll-free line 800-600-0007 (PA only); in Harrisburg: 717-787-8061; in Pittsburgh: 412-565-5083; or, in Philadelphia: 215-560-2088. NewsClip: Marcellus Investment Operation Shut Down 832 Students Learn About The Environment At Millbrook Marsh Nature Center ClearWater Conservancy awarded over $5,800 in funding to local schools for Fall 2010 field trips to Millbrook Marsh Nature Center. Award recipients include: 3rd and 4th graders from all of the State College Area elementary schools, kindergarteners from all of the Bellefonte Area elementary schools, kindergarten through 5th graders at St. John the Evangelist school in Bellefonte, 4th graders at Nittany Christian School, 1st graders at Wingate Elementary School in the Bald Eagle School District, 4th graders at Centre Hall Elementary School in the Penns Valley School District, and 2nd graders at Philipsburg Elementary School in the Philipsburg-Osceola School District. Altogether, 832 children will have the opportunity to learn about their local environment through ClearWater's long-standing "Students~Communities~Streams~Connections" program, which pays the $6 per student fee at the Nature Center and the costs of transporting the children to and from the field trip. Millbrook Marsh Nature Center offers a variety of programs, events, and activities to the community, in addition to leading school groups through educational field trips. Thanks to Cliff and Doris Wurster, State of the Art, and the Centre County Community Foundation for contributing to the Connections program in this past funding cycle. Also a great big thanks to everyone who participated in our first ever Strides for Nature 6K Run/Walk to benefit ClearWater’s Connection program. That new event raised $1,500 towards this project. Watch for details when we do it again next year (probably in May), and help us spread the word! If you or your business would like to contribute towards this exceptional program, please send your contributions to ClearWater Conservancy, 2555 North Atherton Street, State College, Pa 16803. Please note Connections in the memo line. For a contribution of $275, you can "adopt" a classroom. Or choose a multiple of $275, and increase the number of students that you can reach in this meaningful way. When you see their faces on these field trips, you know that this is an experience they will remember for a lifetime. Donations of any size are welcome.

Capital RC&D Sponsors South Mountain Geobash On October 16 Capital Resource Conservation and Development Area Council will launch south central Pennsylvania’s newest outdoor adventure opportunity – the South Mountain Geotrail on October 16. The unveiling of the Geotrail will be celebrated with a public event held at Pine Grove Furnace State Park in southern Cumberland County. The Geobash will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Iron Master's Mansion in Pine Grove Furnace State Park. The “Geobash” is a family-friendly celebration and educational event - and all are welcome to join in the celebration. The new South Mountain GeoTrail is a collection of geocache sites designed to encourage exploration of the region in a fun and unique way. Attendees of the Geobash will have the opportunity to participate in a “geohunt,” enjoy wares from a variety of vendors, and to simply discover more about the area and its residents. “Geocaching is an outdoor activity in which participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit to locate ‘caches’ hidden in out-of-the-way locations,” said Susan Parry, Capital RC&D Coordinator. “These caches are usually waterproof containers that hold a logbook, as well as trinkets for participants to trade. It’s like a treasure hunt.” The South Mountain GeoTrail features up to 50 geocache sites throughout the Blue Ridge Mountain Range and nearby towns. The Geotrail sites are located throughout York, Adams, Cumberland, and Franklin Counties covering a range of almost 50 miles. “Caches can be found in some of the region’s most spectacular natural areas and cultural sites,” said Parry. “The trail was designed to highlight the uniqueness of the region. We have chosen sites that feature the natural beauty, agricultural landscapes and farmers’ markets, and even hiking trails, like the Appalachian Trail; there’s something for everyone,” said Parry. Geocache sites were chosen by Capital RC&D in collaboration with the South Mountain Partnership, with input from members of the communities surrounding the trail. The trail, sponsored by the South Mountain Partnership through a grant from the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, will encourage tourism and interest in the area. “We are anticipating wide public support and interest in the Geotrail,” said Shireen Farr, Director of Tourism for Cumberland Valley Visitor’s Bureau. “This is a great opportunity for residents and visitors to get outside and explore what this region has to offer,” said Farr. The event offers concurrent educational programs, like “Geocaching 101” and “Caching with Kids.” There will also be a Geohunt on-site and other opportunities for the novice or pro Geocachers. “Geocaching is something that anyone can get involved in,” said Parry. “In fact, it has become so popular that there is now a Geocaching Boy Scout badge,” Parry said. Local Boy Scout Troop 121 from Shippensburg will be participating in the GeoBash to earn that badge. “We have at least five Boy Scouts who will be attending the event,” said Scoutmaster Dave Olah. “Geocaching is an excellent opportunity for the boys to explore the natural area while learning more about the history, culture, and agricultural heritage,” said Olah. Scouts from the area will also be assisting The Capital RC&D in maintaining the trail. The Geobash was financed in part by a grant from the Cumberland Valley Visitor’s Bureau.

Attendance is free, but pre-registration is required by October 8. To sign up, please visit the Capital RC&D website. Westmoreland Land Trust Asks For Property Suggestions There may be land in your community that the Westmoreland Land Trust would be interested in preserving. The Westmoreland Land Trust is an independent, 501(c)(3) organization, formed in late 2007. It has preserved more than 100 acres of open space in four Westmoreland County communities in the past two years. And there may be parcels in your community that would be a good match for the trust’s efforts. The land trust looks for such things as: land that offers a scenic vista, tracts that help to create a larger greenway corridor through the county, areas that are ecologically sensitive, places that are historically significant, and land that has other benefits for our community. The land trust’s volunteer board evaluates the benefits of each parcel according to established criteria, and it can acquire properties through easements, donations, and outright purchases. If you know of any properties that you would like the Westmoreland Land Trust to consider, please contact them by sending email to: westmorelandlandtrust@gmail.com. DCNR Secretary Invites National Public Lands Day Participation Volunteers will have the opportunity to improve State Parks by taking part in National Public Lands Day events across Pennsylvania on September 25, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary John Quigley said. "Last year, National Public Lands Day brought together more than 150,000 volunteers across the nation to refurbish and restore public places," Secretary Quigley said. "The number of our state parks participating will double this year as more volunteers, a vital cornerstone in our park system, don work gloves and boots and tackle an array of important projects." Marking its 16th year and billed as the nation's largest hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance public lands Americans enjoy, National Public Lands Day is offered by the National Environmental Education Foundation to encourage and salute public contributions in parks, forests and open lands across the nation. "Whether it's a planned litter pickup at Erie County's Erie Bluffs State Park, or tree plantings at Colonel Denning State Park in Cumberland County, National Public Lands Day gives each of us a chance to contribute to the betterment of our public lands for this and future generations of Americans," said Secretary Quigley. "This Saturday, local volunteers will have a unique chance to give something back to their country, their community, and the state parks that serve them. I encourage everyone to consider lending a helping hand." In 2009, 12 Pennsylvania State Parks, three environmental education centers, and one conservation area hosted National Public Lands Day events. This year, 23 state parks and two environmental education centers will host volunteer groups in the national effort to improve and preserve habitat on public lands. Project details, registration and other information can be found online.

The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources will oversee National Public Lands Day volunteer workdays at the following sites: Bald Eagle State Park, Centre County; Big Pocono State Park, Monroe County; Black Moshannon State Park, Centre County; Canoe Creek State Park, Blair County; Colonel Denning State Park, Cumberland County; Cook Forest State Park, Clarion County; Cowans Gap State Park, Fulton County; Erie Bluffs State Park, Erie County; Frances Slocum State Park, Luzerne County; Jennings Environmental Education Center, Butler County; Kings Gap Environmental Education and Training Center, Cumberland County; Laurel Hill State Park, Somerset County; Little Buffalo State Park, Perry County; Nescopeck State Park, Luzerne County; Parker Dam State Park, Clearfield County; Pine Grove Furnace State Park, Cumberland County; Presque Isle State Park, Erie County; Prince Gallitzin State Park, Beaver County; Promised Land State Park, Pike County; Pymatuning State Park, Crawford County; Raccoon Creek State Park, Beaver County; Ralph Stover State Park, Bucks County; Ryerson Station, Greene County; and Sinnemahoning State Park, Cameron County. In addition, French Creek State Park is participating in a National Park Service event at nearby Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks County. Meanwhile, the Outdoor Channel cable network has partnered with National Public Lands Day to highlight eight different events nationwide-including those at Kings Gap Environmental Education and Training Center, Cumberland County. Together with Comcast PA, the program has helped promote the day, recruit volunteers, and secure prizes for the Kings Gap opportunity. The volunteer registration period for Kings Gap has now closed. To participate at one of the other opportunities in a state park, contact that park's offices before September 25, to pre-register and inquire about possible inclement weather, starting times, meetings places and other details. Pennsylvania volunteers will join a workforce across the country that is committed to carrying on the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps, the "tree army" that exemplified land stewardship from 1933-1942 by preserving and protecting America's natural heritage. The National Environmental Education Foundation, which has managed and coordinated the annual all-day effort from its start in 1994, estimates that the volunteers' work, along with community contributions of food, tools and equipment, will result in improvements valued at more than $8 million. National Public Lands Day is a public-private partnership involving DCNR and many other state, federal, and local land and conservation agencies. The National Environmental Education Foundation manages, coordinates and generates financial support for the program. For information, visit DCNR's Conservation Volunteer Program and State Parks webpages. Game Commission 2011 Calendar On Sale

With the holiday gift-giving season coming up, the Game Commission is pleased to announce that its popular 2011 wildlife calendar now is available. "The 2009 and 2010 calendars sold out quickly, so don't delay and order today," said Carl G. Roe, Game Commission executive director. The 2011 calendar includes approved hunting and trapping season dates from January 1-June 30, and tentative season dates for July1-December 31, as well as a reminder about National Hunting & Fishing Day in September, and many other interesting bits of information about wildlife and the outdoors. The 2011 calendar features a year's worth of dramatic wildlife photos taken by current and retired agency employees, including: Jacob Dingel, radio dispatcher in the Northwest Region Office; Timothy C. Flanigan, retired Bedford County Wildlife Conservation Officer; Coy D. Hill, retired Deputy Wildlife Conservation Officer from Fulton County; and Hal Korber, Game Commission photographer in the Harrisburg office. Each month features a full-color photo of a different wildlife species. This calendar's subjects are: fox squirrel; a flock of snow geese; golden eagle; great blue heron; a ruffed grouse chick; groundhogs; magnolia warbler; river otter; eastern meadowlark; chipmunk; white-tailed buck; northern cardinal. Also included are photo inserts of Game Commission employees conducting many wildlife management tasks. And, as in past years, there is plenty of room for writing in appointments and other personal important dates and scheduling information. The calendar also provides a brief overview of the Game Commission and a list of contact information for the agency's Harrisburg headquarters and six region offices. To purchase a calendar, priced at $8.95 (plus tax and shipping), call the Game Commission at 1-888-888-3459 (toll-free) or visit the agency's website.

Video Blog
Over 100 Volunteers Help With Susquehanna River Cleanup In Clinton County The Susquehanna River Cleanup and Great Island Adventure on September 11 attracted over 100 volunteers to help with the cleanup in Clinton County. Over 9 tons of tires and another half ton of trash was collected in 3 hours. The event was organized by Elisabeth Lynch-McCoy and Clinton County Cleanscapes along with a number of other groups. Our business, Sunken Treasure Scuba Center has been working with Elisabeth and Cleanscapes since it's inception. Click here to view photos from the event. PPL Solar Power Project Helps East Lycoming School District Go Spartan Green The East Lycoming School District is well-versed in the traditional three R’s of education: reading, ’riting and ’rithmetic. Thanks to three PPL-owned companies, the school district in

central Pennsylvania has added a fourth “R” to the curriculum for its 1,700 students: renewable energy. East Lycoming School District has partnered with PPL Renewable Energy, Millennium Design Builders and the McClure Company, PPL-owned businesses, to develop and build a 600-kilowatt solar project that can provide about 50 percent of the power for Hughesville Junior/ Senior High School. The renewable energy generated by this project will be purchased by the district under a long-term agreement with PPL EnergyPlus, which is also marketing the renewable energy credits. This project is partially funded by a $1,000,000 Solar Energy Grant through the commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the Commonwealth Financing Authority. The project is the latest in a series of energy efficiency measures and renewable energy projects implemented by the school district and developed by McClure. Through those projects, which included the addition of air conditioning and proper ventilation in more than 230,000 square feet of district facilities, the district has already reduced its annual electrical energy use by 540,000 kilowatt-hours from 2002, a 19 percent reduction. “Through our partnership with McClure and PPL Renewable Energy, we have been able to go green – or, as our students might say, ‘Go Spartan Green,’ ” said David Maciejewski, the district’s business manager. “Not only have we improved the air quality and energy efficiency of the school buildings, but we’ve improved the learning environment for our students as well.” The partnership began by targeting changes that would provide a high return, such as replacing lighting in school buildings, upgrading system controls, and retrofitting existing heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems. The school district’s Ashkar Elementary School is the first facility in Lycoming County to be certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an Energy Star facility. A pioneer in renewable energy use among public school systems, East Lycoming also has planted hybrid willow, a short rotation woody crop, to provide fuel (wood chips) for a new biomass heating system at the Hughesville Junior/Senior High School. “It’s more important than ever for businesses and school districts to operate efficiently,” said Mike Kroboth, president of PPL Renewable Energy. “PPL’s energy services companies and renewable energy business provide our customers with both energy savings and renewable power solutions.” The East Lycoming School District, which is in rural Lycoming County in central Pennsylvania, was established in 1957 and serves 1,700 students from prekindergarten to Grade 12. The district encompasses 147.6 square miles and includes seven townships (Penn, Jordan, Moreland, Mill Creek, Franklin, Wolf and Shrewsbury) and two boroughs (Hughesville and Picture Rocks). The district includes three elementary schools (Ashkar, Ferrell and Renn) and Hughesville Junior/Senior High School. McClure is a mechanical contracting, engineering and energy services organization delivering comprehensive energy solutions. Headquartered in Harrisburg, McClure provides HVAC, plumbing, power, process piping systems and energy efficiency solutions for industrial, commercial and institutional customers. PPL Renewable Energy develops, owns, operates and maintains renewable and clean energy projects in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, with a portfolio of projects that totals more than 40 megawatts of electricity generation – enough to power 20,000 homes.

These include solar panel installations, fuel cells or landfill gas-to-energy projects in Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut and New Jersey. Millennium Design Builders engineers and constructs solar and biogas renewable energy facilities throughout the mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions of the United States. PUC, Agencies, Utilities, Community-Based Organizations Say Be Energy Wise While warm fall temperatures keep many from thinking about the increases utility costs that come with the winter heating season, the Public Utility Commission joined other state agencies, utilities and social-service organizations to work with community-based organizations on how to "Be Energy Wise." About 200 health and human service agency professionals gathered at the Holiday Inn/ Pittsburgh Airport in Moon Township for a special Be Energy Wise event. As rate caps expire for the remaining 60 percent of the state's electric customers, attendees focused on shopping for electric service and using PAPowerSwitch.com. They also will learn more about programs available to help low-income utility consumers restore and maintain service such as the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program and the Dollar Energy Fund as well as utility Consumer Assistance Programs, Low Income Usage Reduction Programs and hardship funds. This event also featured a series of panel discussions from experts on electric rate caps and PAPowerSwitch.com as well as low-income issues such as conservation and funding options. Pre-registration was required and attendees will receive a resource guide with contact information about presenters. The Be Energy Wise program has grown out of the Be Utility Wise events, which were created in the 1980s, with the mission to educate consumers, health and human service providers about utility-related issues, social service programs and provide educational resources to enhance the quality of life for consumers in PA. The PUC partners with utilities, other state agencies and consumer organizations on these events. Be Utility Wise's annual conference is made possible by sponsorship and participation from the PUC, PAPowerSwitch.com, Allegheny Power, Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania, Conservation Consultants Inc., Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Western Pennsylvania, Holy Family Institute, Peoples Natural Gas, Duquesne Light Co., Equitable Gas Co., Dollar Energy Fund, OASIS, Pennsylvania American Water Co., Department of Environmental Protection, Department of Public Welfare, T.W. Phillips Gas and Oil Co., Pennsylvania Career Link/Fayette County. EPA Names Swarthmore Church Energy Star Award Winner The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recognized small businesses and congregations for their achievements in the fight against climate change, including the Swarthmore Presbyterian Church. Swarthmore Presbyterian Church in Delaware County is only the second congregation in the history of the Energy Star Congregations Awards to win the award for two consecutive years. They achieved this rare honor with the combination of a strong continuing effort at energy efficiency coupled with a dynamic outreach campaign to their membership and community.

Through effective energy management practices and innovative efficiency solutions, all nine organizations demonstrate that no matter the size, it is possible to save money and use significantly less energy and to power the buildings where Americans work, play, and learn. The nine organizations all used different tactics to save energy in their buildings. Examples include installing programmable thermostats, lighting sensors, insulation, and a white roof; upgrading to more efficient LED and compact fluorescent lighting and Energy Star qualified equipment; and supporting employee energy-conscious behaviors. Together, these award-winning organizations reduced annual greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from the annual electricity use of more than 650 homes, while saving more than $850,000 on their energy bills. The 2010 Energy Star Small Business and Congregations Award winners used tools and resources provided by EPA’s Energy Star program to develop their plans and measure and track their accomplishments. By strategically managing the energy performance of their facilities, these small businesses and congregations cut utility costs without sacrificing features, convenience, style, or comfort while making significant contributions to a cleaner environment. The small business award winners are AutoFair Companies (Manchester, N.H.), Dagher Engineering (New York, N.Y.), Engineering Excellence (Cincinnati, Ohio), and Patriot Subaru (Saco, Maine). The congregations award winners are First Baptist Church of Orlando (Orlando, Fla.), First Parish Needham (Needham, Mass.), Lakewood Church (Houston, Texas), Saint Alban’s Episcopal Church (Monroe, Ga.), and Swarthmore Presbyterian Church (Swarthmore, Pa.). Learn more by going to the 2010 Energy Star Small Business Awards and Energy Star Congregation Awards webpages. EPA: Nationwide Green Power Community Challenge Underway The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is kicking off its national “Green Power Community Challenge,” a year-long campaign to encourage cities, towns, villages, and Native American tribes to use renewable energy and fight climate change. Purchases of green power help to prevent greenhouse gas emissions and also help accelerate the development of new renewable energy capacity across the United States. To participate in the challenge, a local government must join EPA’s Green Power Partnership and use green power in amounts that meet the program’s purchase requirements. The local government must also conduct a campaign to encourage local businesses and residents to collectively buy or produce green power on-site in amounts that meet EPA requirements. More than 30 cities and towns in Alaska, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Maryland, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin have become green power communities, and are collectively buying more than 900 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green power annually, equivalent to the carbon dioxide emissions (CO2) from the electricity use of nearly 80,000 average American homes. The campaign is designed to expand upon the successes of the program, aiming to double the total aggregate amount of green power used by EPA Green Power Communities. As part of the national campaign, communities will compete to see which one can use the most green power and which one can achieve the highest green power percentage of total electricity use.

There will be a separate award for each category with national recognition and special attention from EPA. The winners will be announced in September 2011. During the challenge, from September 20, 2010, to September 1, 2011, communities will be ranked for the two award categories on EPA’s website on a quarterly schedule; EPA will also provide technical assistance to help participants increase their green power usage. Green power is generated from renewable resources such as solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, biogas, and low-impact hydropower. Green power resources produce electricity with an environmental profile superior to conventional power technologies, and produce no net increase of greenhouse gas emissions. For more information, visit EPA’s Green Power Community Challenge and Green Power Communities webpages. Black Bear’s EnviroFest Focuses On Global Warming October 10 The Black Bear Film Festival’s free EnviroFest, co-sponsored by the Grey Towers Heritage Association, supports innovative and independent films while recognizing Pike County’s history as the birthplace of the American conservation movement. EnviroFest will be held on October 10 from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Grey Towers National Historic Site, in Milford, of Black Bear Film Festival weekend. EnviroFest, coordinated by Heron’s Eye Communications, offers a diverse and provocative collection of free environmentally-focused films, dialogues and information booths in three venues on the grounds of Grey Towers: The Pool Terrace, The Letter Box and The Bait Box. This year, a group of students from the Delaware Valley High School Leo Club will host a 10/10/10 celebration at EnviroFest to raise awareness about climate change. The students’ effort is part of 350.org's 10/10/10 Global Work Party, and one of more than 3,000 actions scheduled around the world. 350.org was founded by renowned environmentalist Bill McKibben. “10/10/10 is a day for communities all over the world to educate people about climate change and promote a more environmentally sound future,” says DV Junior Marygrace Kennedy, leader of the student effort. The students will introduce each EnviroFest film and will be stationed throughout the Grey Towers grounds to bring McKibben's message along with their enthusiasm. The 10/10/10 celebration will conclude at 4:30 p.m. with a group photo of the students and EnviroFest attendees, which will be posted to 350.org. “The youth of our region are ready to join with the rest of the world to tackle the issue of climate change!” adds Kennedy. Public parking is free at Grey Towers and picnicking is encouraged. Popcorn—made onsite by Dan Brinkerhoff with his peddle-powered Incredible Galilee Popcorn Machine—will be available for a donation to the Grey Towers Heritage Association, a non-profit organization working to connect the community to Grey Towers and the Pinchot family legacy. No reservations or tickets are needed for EnviroFest. There is no charge to attend. For more information visit the Black Bear Film website or call 570-409-0909.

Spotlight

Quecreek Mine Rescue Foundation Accepting Donations For Chilean Miners The Quecreek Mine Rescue Foundation, in partnership with the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies, and Somerset Trust Company, are now accepting donations to help the families of the 33 miners trapped since August 5 in an underground coal mine in Chile. "Many visitors to the Quecreek Mine Rescue Site since the accident in Chile has asked how they can help the families of the trapped miners," said Bill Arnold, Director of the Quecreek Mine Rescue Foundation. "In response to those requests, we are working with several local partners in the Somerset community to accept donations and make sure they get directly to families of those 33 miners. "No one except someone involved in a mine accident like we had here in Somerset can understand the worry and pain an accident like this can cause,” said Arnold. “We thought we could help in this small way to give back to another group of mine families going through the same thing. No doubt they offered their own prayers and support for our miners when they were trapped." The Foundation will be working with the international Red Cross to guarantee the money goes directly to the families of the miners Jeff Cook of Somerset Trust, "We are happy to help the Quecreek Mine Rescue Foundation in any way we can to give aid to the families of the trapped Chilean miners." "This is another excellent example of how the Community of Somerset is again coming together for the good of the common man," said Mike Kane, Executive Director of the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies, To make a donation, stop by the Quecreek Mine Rescue site or send a donation to Quecreek Mine Rescue Foundation, 151 Haupt Road, Somerset, PA 15501. Please note on your check the donation is for the Chilean Miners. We will also be setting up a secure link on the Foundation website, www.9for9.org to make donations directly to the Chilean Miners fund. On July 24, 2002 miners broke through into an abandoned, water-filled mine flooding the Quecreek Mine with over 150 million gallons of water. Nine miners scrambled to safety, but nine were trapped in a pocket of air in the dark, cold, water filled mine. They were rescued four days later through the combined efforts of state and federal mine rescue agencies and hundreds of workers and volunteers. Now more than 10,000 visitors a year visit the rescue site looking to learn more about the "Quecreek Miracle." The site became part of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission Historical Marker Program in 2006. Contact the Quecreek Mine Rescue Foundation, or make a donation, by writing: 151 Haupt Road, Somerset, PA 15501, calling 814-445-4876 or by visiting www.9for9.org. NewsClip: Progress From Trapped Miners In Chile Opportunity To Bid On DEP Mine Reclamation Project In Butler County The Department of Environmental Protection published notice of an opportunity to bid on a mine reclamation project in Butler County.

Dr. James Grace Appointed Penn State Goddard Chair In Forest Resources Dr. James R. Grace, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has been selected as the new Maurice K. Goddard Chair in Forestry and Environmental Resource Conservation. He began his three-year term on August 23, 2010. The Goddard Chair is a faculty position unlike any other at Penn State, with a focus on providing leadership on public policy issues. Those chosen to fill it need not have extensive academic or research experience. The Chair holder is expected to spend half of his or her time on public outreach, a third on teaching, and the remainder on other scholarly activity. The Chair was established in 1983 to honor Maurice “Doc” Goddard, Pennsylvania’s “father of state parks.” Goddard directed the School of Forest Resources from 1952 to 1955 and during his subsequent tenure in state government, serving under five governors, he succeeded in establishing a state park within 25 miles of every Pennsylvanian. Goddard also oversaw the enactment of landmark environmental legislation. The establishment of the Chair reflects the desire of having an individual at Penn State who follows a tradition set by Goddard himself: fostering dialogue on important environmental issues among government, industry, academia, and the general public. Jim Grace’s responsibilities in DCNR included the direction of the bureaus of State Parks and Forestry, as well as the Bureau of Facility Design and Construction. Under his leadership, Pennsylvania’s state parks were awarded the nation's top honor as the 2009 National Gold Medal Award for Excellence in Park and Recreation Management. With 117 State Parks, Pennsylvania has one of the largest and most diverse park systems in the country. During Grace’s tenure as director of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry (1994 to 2007), the bureau incorporated the principles of ecosystem management and a landscape approach to forest management. In addition, the bureau provided more than $5 million for research and Extension activities, and more than 100,000 acres were added to the state forest system. In 1997, Pennsylvania state forests became the first public forest in the nation to be granted a certificate of good forest management by the Forest Stewardship Council. At 2.1 million acres of state forest land, Pennsylvania has one of the largest sustainable certified forests in the nation. Grace "has the qualities essential to help policy makers arrive at balanced decisions for natural resource management" and will "stimulate present and future decision makers to reach out with imagination, conscience, and eagerness to work for solutions to problems of natural resource management," write those who recommended him for the Goddard Chair. School of Forest Resources director Mike Messina agrees that Grace has the perfect experience required of the position: “Jim’s experience as a long-time conservation leader will greatly help our School maintain its important role in Penn State’s land-grant mission. His expertise complements existing strengths among our faculty quite well.” Grace previously served in a deputy secretary role in the former Department of Environmental Resources from 1987 to 1993. Prior to that he was on the faculty at Rutgers and at Penn State. As assistant professor and extension forester in the School of Forest Resources (1983-1986), Grace developed the Forest Resources publication series and newsletter, led

research on issues relating to private forest management, and served as chair of the “Year of the Forest” in 1986. The “Year of the Forest” was a yearlong event that coincided with the 100th anniversary of the Pennsylvania Forestry Association (and celebrated the Commonwealth’s forests and all the values they provide. The PFA honored Grace with the Rothrock Award for Conservation that year for his leadership of that event. Grace earned his Ph.D. in Forest Resources at Penn State in 1978 under the guidance of Dr. Russell Hutnik, with a focus on forest ecology. His previous academic training includes a B.S. in forest management at the University of Vermont in 1970 and a master’s degree in forest science at Yale University in 1972. He can be contacted by sending email to: jrg1@psu.edu or 814-867-4384. PA Resources Council Names Robert Jondreau Executive Director Pennsylvania Resources Council this week announced the appointment of Robert Jondreau to the position of Executive Director. After an extensive and thorough search process by the Executive Director Search Committee, PRC's Board of Directors agreed with the Search Committee's selection and enthusiastically endorsed Bob, who has been serving as Interim Executive Director since February 1, 2010, replacing Larry Myers who retired on January 31, 2010. Bob served on PRC's Board of Directors for over 13 years and spent three years serving as Board President. Bob holds a BS degree from Rutgers University. He began his career in the rubber manufacturing industry. While there, and subsequently in the aerospace and electronics industries, most of his professional career focused on environmental and safety issues, including 27 years at UNISYS. In 2009 Bob left UNISYS to pursue other ventures, while maintaining his position as PRC's Board President. Bob's primary goals for PRC are to help implement a sustainable financial and program strategy for the future, while maintaining the current solid base of programs and funding, and to complete the capital campaign at PRC's headquarters in Ridley Creek State Park. In Bob's own words "I hope to finish many of the projects that were started at this great facility in 2009. It has been a long term goal of the Board to get the facility in top physical shape, and I hope to play a major role in this effort, along with the staff of the eastern office. I look forward to the many challenges and opportunities that face PRC in the shaping of its future."

Grants & Awards
This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other recognition programs. NEW means new from last week. September 30-- DEP Recycling Performance Grants September 30-- PROP GreenSylvania School Recycling Contest October 1-- Friends Of The Wissahickon Photo Contest

October 15-- DEP Coastal Zone Management Grants October 15-- NOAA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Education & Training Grants October 22-- PEMA Volunteer Fire Company, Ambulance Service Grants October 25-- DEP Power Plant Air Pollution Control Technology Grants November 12-- DEP Alternative Fuels Electric Vehicle Grants ASAP-- NRCS Health Forest Reserve Program Grants December 31-- Fish & Boat Commission 2010 Photo Contest February 15-- PennVEST Water Infrastructure Funding June 30-- DEP Nitrogen Tire Inflation System Grants Other Funding Programs -- DEP PA Sunshine Solar Energy Rebates -- CFA High Performance Building Financing (Program Link) -- CFA Solar Energy Financing (Program Link) -- CFA Geothermal, Wind Energy Projects (Program Link) -- Visit the DEP Grants and Loan Programs webpage for more ideas on how to get financial assistance for environmental projects.

Quick Clips
Here's a selection of NewClips on environmental topics from around the state-Budget Lawmakers Break Without Taking On High-Profile Measures Rendell Announces 50 State Layoffs Rendell Lays Off 50 To Balance Budget A Gush Of Lobbying Over Marcellus Shale Production Tax Environmentalists Push Tax On Natural Gas Production Legislators Failing To Make Headway On Marcellus Shale Tax Environmentalists Seek Natural Gas Tax Severance Tax Supporters Frustrated By Lack Of Action Natural Gas Extraction Tax Urged Labor Leaders Voice Support For Drilling Severance Tax Groups Rally For Gas Drilling Restrictions NE PA Anti-Drilling Activists Bring Passion To Capitol Amid Protests, Gas Tax Talks Go On The (Gas) Meter is Running New Research Weighs Pros, Cons Of Severance Tax Editorial: Where Is Public Debate On Marcellus Shale Pooling Law? Onorato Backs Drilling Tax, Strong DEP Corbett Is Opposed To Raising Taxes, Marcellus Shale Tax John Baer: In PA, Tax On Rock Could Be A Gas

Op-Ed: Legislators Must Levy Reasonable Tax On Gas Drilling Columns: Agency Voices Support For Tax On Shale Drilling Other At Lafayette, A Rind Is A Terrible Thing To Waste Wayne County Fixes Waste Plan Landfill Donates 40 Acres To School District Liberty Property Green Building Achievement Office Building Plan Calls For 1,200 Square Foot Roof Garden Splash Of Green Livens Up Area Blacktops For A Day Tamaqua Schools Look At Geothermal, Solar Editorial: Use Rowhome To Save Some Green This Winter Editorial: Solar Fallacy Natural Gas Rate Offers Could Hold Traps FirstEnergy Wants Room For Nuke Waste At Beaver Valley Op-Ed: Deregulated Electricity Market Helps Spur More Innovation Utilities Square Off With Environmentalists Over Coal Ash 200 Speak Their Minds At Hearing On Coal Residue Proposal Would Restrict Disposal Of Coal Fly Ash Editorial: DDT Bike Trail Segment Opens Along The Allegheny Millvale Celebrates Heritage Trail Link Emerald View Park A Green Space Jewel Conservancy To Host Legislative Candidates Tuesday Middle Creek To Host National Hunting And Fishing Day Celebration Bat Research Continues At Gannon University Felbaum Becomes Ned Smith Center Interim Executive Director A Day On Brush Mountain

Marcellus Shale NewsClips
Here are NewsClips on topics related to Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling--Click here for this week's Marcellus Shale Examiner newsletter from DEP. Lawmakers Break Without Taking On High-Profile Measures Frack Water Scrutinized In Drought Conditions Site Tracks Marcellus Shale Industry Campaign Spending Rep. Boback Returns Gas Donation Environmentalists Push Tax On Natural Gas Production Legislators Failing To Make Headway On Marcellus Shale Tax Severance Tax Supporters Frustrated By Lack Of Action Groups Rally For Gas Drilling Restrictions NE PA Anti-Drilling Activists Bring Passion To Capitol

Amid Protests, Gas Tax Talks Go On The (Gas) Meter is Running Activists Encourage Delay In Delaware Basin Shale Drilling Feds Decline To Block Drilling In Delaware Basin Drilling Industry Emphasizes Jobs Created More Than Taxes At Stake In Gas Extraction Issue Editorial: Where Is Public Debate On Marcellus Shale Pooling Law? In PA, Natural Gas Industry Flexes Its Muscle Landowners Concerned Over Gas Companies Pipeline Company Gearing Up For Marcellus Gas Bill Transfers Pipeline Regulation To PUC Casey Wary Of Feds' Oversight Of Pipelines In PA PA's Aging Gas Lines Bring Dangers Close To Home UGI, Citrus Sign Agreement On Marcellus Wells Columbia Gas Says It Will Leave Defective Pipes In Place Editorial: Attend Now To Pipeline Safety Bubbling Susquehanna River Drawing Attention Film Takes Anti-Drilling Position Oversized Drilling Trucks A Concern In Lehman Student Enrollment On Increase In Marcellus Shale Area Schools Seismic Wave Mapping Rolls On In Southwest Senate Panel Approves Subpoena Power In Terror List Probe PA Homeland Security Chief To Testify At Senate Hearing Furor Builds Over Anti-Terror Bulletins State Officials Argue Intelligence Bulletins Were Vital Lawmakers Asks Why His Rallies Made Terror List Bulletins Contradict Homeland Security Official's Claims State Won't Pull Terror Warning Lists Expert: Online Intelligence Bulletins Increases Risk Firm Wants Terror Alerts Off The Internet Quakers, Anti-War Rallies On Alert List Pittsburgh Mayor Didn't Receive Terror Research Reports State Homeland Security Office Releases Bulletins Tracking Activists State Homeland Security Monitoring Surprises Local Activists Bumsted: PA Spy Network Editorial: Know Difference Between Protest And Terrorism? P&G Drill Site Generates Gas To Spare Natural Gas Use Pushed By House Republicans GOP: Shale Plan Good Job Creator Plan Would Help Create Natural Gas Jobs In PA PA American Water Position On Marcellus Shale Drilling Shale Baron's Donation Fuels Penn State Hockey Dreams No Cheap Skates At Penn State, Thanks To Shale Donor DRBC: Drilling Tests Allowed At 4 Sites In Wayne Op-Ed: PA Doesn't Need Federal Agency's Help Regulating Drilling

Op-Ed: In Praise Of Shale Gas Editorial: Shale Worries, Loss Of Property Rights Could Be Next Gas Well Explodes, On Fire In West Virginia Financial Marcellus Investment Operation Shut Down Gastar Inks $70 Million Marcellus Deal With Korean Firm

Watershed NewsClips
Here are NewsClips on watershed topics from around the state-Group Aims To Cut Down Pollutants In Chesapeake Bay Watershed Closer Look At Christina Watershed Basin Restoration Op-Ed: Pass Chesapeake Clean Water Act To Help Region Op-Ed: Holden Has Best Approach To Chesapeake Bay Editorial: Chesapeake Bay Cleanup, Let's Get Moving Economic Downturn Drains Dairy Farmers Judge Puts Freeze On Pay To Dairy Farmers Emmaus Aims To Protect Drinking Water Surveys Document Health Of Little Paint Creek Watershed CMU Professor Honored For Work Purifying Water Frack Water Scrutinized In Drought Conditions PA American Asks Customers To Reduce Water Use Ashland Declares Drought Warning With Voluntary Restrictions SRBC Has Own System For Determining Low Water Levels Fire Danger Rising In Western PA Editorial: Do Your Part To Conserve Water A History Lesson Along The Susquehanna River Export Flood Control Project A Go

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits
The Department of Environmental Protection published notice of an opportunity to comment on proposed Ozone Transport Commission pollution control measures and proposed regulations setting an ultra low sulfur limit on heating oil The Environmental Quality Board this week approved final regulations setting air quality standards for adhesives, sealants and solvents and flat wood paneling surface coating processes and the final lead and copper rule for drinking water. The Environmental Quality Board published a notice correcting final regulations relating to the Water and Wastewater Systems Operators' Certification Program. Pennsylvania Bulletin - September 25, 2010

Proposed Regulations Open For Comment - DEP webpage Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods - DEP webpage Rolling Regulatory Agenda - DEP webpage

Technical Guidance & Permits
No new policies published this week. Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines - DEP webpage Copies Of Draft Technical Guidance - DEP webpage Copies of Final Technical Guidance - DEP webpage

Calendar Of Events
Upcoming legislative meetings, conferences, workshops, plus links to other online calendars. Meetings are in Harrisburg unless otherwise noted. NEW means new from last week. Go to the online Calendar webpage. Click on Agenda Released on calendar entries to see the NEW meeting agendas published this week. September 27-- Senate Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee holds a hearing on state Office of Homeland Security contractor naming Marcellus Shale drilling opponents as terrorists. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building. 10:00. September 27-- Environmental Issues Forum on Carbon Trading. Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and Conservation Committee. G-50 Irvis Building. Noon. September 28-- Senate Urban Affairs and House Committee holds a hearing on impact of natural gas industry on housing in Northcentral PA. Room 8E-A East Wing. 10:00. September 28-- NEW. House Consumer Affairs Committee meets to consider House Bill 2693 (Baker-R-Tioga) further providing for the regulation of pipelines by the PUC. Room G-50 Irvis Building. Off the Floor. September 28-- NEW. House Tourism and Recreational Development Committee meets to consider House Resolution 884 (Levdansky-D-Allegheny) directing the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee to do an economic impact assessment of recreational water trails. Room G-50 Irvis Building. 9:00.

September 28-- Joint Legislative Budget and Finance Committee meeting to consider release of reports on REAP farm conservation tax credit and Clean and Green programs. Hearing Room 2, North Office. 10:00. September 30-- DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee Tourism and Outdoor Recreation Working Group meeting. Fish and Boat Commission, Harrisburg. 10:00. (formal notice) October 4-- Last Day To Register To Vote For November 2 Election. October 12-- NEW. Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. (formal notice) October 19-- CANCELED. Environmental Quality Board meeting. Rescheduled to October 12. (formal notice) October 26--DEP Board of Coal Mine Safety meeting. Fayette County Health Center, Uniontown. 10:00. (formal notice) November 17-- CANCELED. DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Advisory Board. There are no further meetings scheduled in 2010. (formal notice) DEP Calendar of Events Environmental Education Workshop/Training Calendar (PA Center for Environmental Education) Senate Committee Schedule House Committee Schedule

You can watch the Senate Floor Session and House Floor Session live online.

Stories Invited
Send your stories, photos and videos about your project, environmental issues or programs for publication in the PA Environment Digest to: DHess@CrisciAssociates.com. PA Environment Digest is edited by David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and is published as a service to the clients of Crisci Associates, a Harrisburg-based government and public affairs firm whose clients include Fortune 500 companies and non-profit organizations. For more information on Crisci Associates, call 717-234-1716. PA Environment Digest was the winner of the PA Association of Environmental Educators' 2009 Business Partner of the Year Award.

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