You are on page 1of 23

TRABAJO DE:

INGLES
TEMA:
TRABAJO ENCARGADO
PRESENTADO POR:

QUISPE BUSTINCIO
JUAN CARLOS
INTRUDUCCIÓN

EL PRESENTE TRABAJO ESTA COMPUESTO


POR RESUMEN DE UNA PAGINA QUE NOS
ESCARGO LA MISS. TIENE COMO PROPOSITO
MEJORAR NUESTRA HABLA Y
COMPRENSION EN INGLES.
DEDICATORIA

Dedico este trabajo a mi familia.


A la miss mary, quien ha estado en todo
este tiempo en clases
Y a todos los que me prestaron ayuda
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Climate Change

Is Human Activity Primarily


Responsible for Global Climate
Change?
Temperatures on earth have increased
approximately 1.8°F since the early 20th
century. Over this time period,
atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases
such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and
methane (CH4) have notably increased.
Both sides in the debate surrounding
global climate change agree on these
points.

The pro side argues rising levels of


atmospheric greenhouse gases are a
direct result of human activities such as
burning fossil fuels, and that these
increases are causing significant and
increasingly severe climate changes
including global warming, loss of sea ice, sea level rise, stronger storms, and more
droughts. They contend that immediate international action to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions is necessary to prevent dire climate changes.

The con side argues human-generated greenhouse gas emissions are too small to
substantially change the earth’s climate and that the planet is capable of absorbing those
increases. They contend that warming over the 20th century resulted primarily from
natural processes such as fluctuations in the sun's heat and ocean currents. They say the
theory of human-caused global climate change is based on questionable measurements,
faulty climate models, and misleading science.
Early Science on Greenhouse
Gasses and Climate Change

scientists have known of the


heating potential (greenhouse
effect) of gases such as CO2
since at least 1859, when
British physicist John Tyndall
first began experiments leading
to the discovery that CO2 in the
atmosphere absorbs the sun's
heat.

On Feb. 16, 1938 engineer Guy S. Callendar published an influential study suggesting
increased atmospheric CO2 from fossil fuel combustion was causing global warming.
Many scientists at that time were skeptical of Callendar's conclusion, arguing that that
natural fluctuations and atmospheric circulation changes determined the climate, not CO2
emissions.

In Mar. 1958 US climate scientist Charles Keeling began measuring atmospheric CO2 at
the Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii for use in climate modeling. Using these
measurements, Keeling became the first scientist to confirm that atmospheric CO2 levels
were rising rather than being fully absorbed by forests and oceans (carbon sinks). When
Keeling began his measurements, atmospheric CO2 levels stood at 315 parts per million
(ppm).

In 1977 the US National Academy of Sciences issued the report "Energy and Climate"
concluding that the burning of fossil fuels was increasing atmospheric CO2, and that
increased CO2 was associated with a rise in global temperatures.

On June 23, 1988 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) scientist
James Hansen presented testimony to the US Senate stating directly that increases in CO2
were warming the planet and "changing our climate." At the time, MIT meteorologist
Richard Lindzen criticized these findings, arguing that computerized climate models were
unreliable and that natural processes would balance out any warming caused by increased
CO2.

Formation of the IPCC and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was created in 1988 by the
World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment
Programme (UNEP) to review research on global climate change (as of Feb. 2015, there
were 195 IPCC member countries). The IPCC issued its first assessment report in 1990
stating that "emissions resulting from human activities are substantially increasing the
atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases," resulting in "an additional warming
of the Earth's surface."

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was signed
by US President George Bush on Oct. 13, 1992. The goal of the convention was the
"stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would
prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system."

Each UNFCCC member state gained representation in the Conference of Parties (COP).
Starting in Mar. 1995 with the COP 1, the conference of parties has met every year for a
conference on climate change.

The Kyoto Protocol and Other International Conferences on Climate Change

In Dec. 1997 over 161 nations met in Kyoto,


Japan to negotiate a treaty to limit greenhouse
gas emissions and work toward the objectives of
the UNFCCC. The resulting Kyoto
Protocol, signed by President Bill Clinton, set
binding targets for 37 industrialized countries
and the European Union to reduce greenhouse
gas emissions roughly 5% below 1990 levels by
2012.

President George W. Bush withdrew the United


States from the Kyoto Protocol in Mar. 2001
due to Senate opposition and concerns that
limiting greenhouse gas emissions would harm
the US economy. From July 16-27, 2001 the
COP 6 conference (conference of signatory
parties to the UNFCCC) took place in Bonn,
Germany, and the final amendments to the
Kyoto Protocol were made. 179 countries reached a binding agreement without US
participation.

On Mar. 2, 2008 the Heartland Institute sought to challenge the idea that human activity
was causing climate change by holding its own international conference on climate
change. At the conference, 98 speakers including PhD climate scientists from major
universities argued that global warming was most likely a natural event.

In Dec. 2009 the COP 15 conference took place in Copenhagen, Denmark. The resulting
Copenhagen Accord, signed by 114 nations including the United States and China, called
for "deep cuts" in human greenhouse gas emissions in order to make sure that earth's
temperature rises no more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

In Apr. 2010 Bolivia hosted an alternative to the UN COP conferences. The World
People's Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth was attended by
representatives from nearly 130 countries. The People's Agreement reached at the
conference demanded that developed countries lower CO2 levels back to 300 ppm (from
389 ppm), and rejected the Copenhagen Accord for its "insufficient reductions in
greenhouse gases." It stated that "[c]limate change is now producing profound impacts
on agriculture and the ways of life of indigenous peoples and farmers throughout the
world."
In 2012 the COP 18 conference was held in Doha, Qatar. At the conference the COP
expressed "grave concern" that member states were not lowering greenhouse gas
emissions fast enough to meet the Copenhagen Accord's mandate to prevent the earth's
temperature from rising more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

In Dec. 2015, the COP 21 met in Paris where 195 countries, including the United States,
adopted the Paris Agreement. The agreement’s central aim was to prevent global
temperatures from rising more than 1.5°C - 2°C above pre-industrial levels. Under the
agreement, all countries were required to create a national plan to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions and report regularly on their individual progress towards meeting their
emission reduction goals. Then President Obama called the agreement a "turning point
for the world” that "establishes the enduring framework the world needs to solve the
climate crisis.”

On June 1, 2017, President Trump announced his intention to withdraw the United States
from the Paris Agreement and ordered the federal government to "cease all
implementation" of the agreement. President Trump said the Paris Agreement had
imposed "draconian financial and economic burdens” on the United States and created
"serious obstacles" to energy development. On Nov. 7, 2017, during the COP 23 UN
climate talks in Bonn, Germany, Syria announced that it would sign the Paris agreement
on climate change, leaving the United States as the only country that has rejected the
global pact.

US Debate over Climate Change Heats Up

Al Gore's documentary An Inconvenient Truth premiered in 2006 and was seen by over
5 million people worldwide. The film argued that human-caused climate change was real,
and that without immediate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, catastrophic climate
changes would severely disrupt human societies, leading to a possible collapse of
industrial civilization.
In 2007 the IPCC released its Fourth Assessment Report stating that "warming of the
climate system is unequivocal" and that "most of the observed increase in global average
temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely [90% confidence] due to the
observed increase in anthropogenic [man-made] greenhouse gas concentrations." The
IPCC and Al Gore received a Noble Peace Prize for their climate science work in Oct.
2007. In response to the IPCC findings, a group of scientists formed the
Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC) to compile a report
challenging the science behind man-made climate change. Their Mar. 2, 2008 report,
"Nature, Not Human Activity, Rules the Climate," was published by the Heartland
Institute.

From 1998-2009 the US government appropriated $99 billion for work related to climate
change. $35.7 billion (36%) of that total came as part of the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009.
On Apr. 2, 2007 the US Supreme Court ruled (5-4) in Massachusetts v. EPA that
greenhouse gases met the criteria to be considered pollutants under the Clean Air Act. In
response, the US EPA announced in 2009 that greenhouse gases "threaten public health"
and are "the primary driver of climate change." In its June 23, 2014 decision in Utility
Air Regulatory Group v. EPA, the US Supreme Court upheld the EPA's authority to
regulate greenhouse gas emissions from stationary sources such as power plants.
In May 2013, President Barack Obama tweeted to his millions of Twitter followers that
"Ninety-seven percent of scientists agree: #climate change is real, man-made and
dangerous." The 97% number was taken from Cook’s 2013 meta-study of 11,944 peer-
reviewed papers on climate change. The study’s authors found that, of the 3,974 studies
that took a position on human-caused climate change, 97.1% agreed that human activity
is causing global warming. [1] The study’s methodology was criticized by skeptics who
point to the fact that only 65 of the 11,944 (0.5%) of the abstracts endorsed the position
that human activity is primarily responsible (+50%) for global warming.

On Sep. 21, 2014 the largest climate march in history took place in New York, NY, with
over 400,000 people marching to demand that world governments take immediate action
to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

How Will Climate Change Affect Us?

According to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, 2014 was the hottest year on record
across the globe since 1880 when record keeping began. The 10 warmest years in this
135-year period occurred between 1998 and 2014.

As of Jan. 2015, CO2 levels were 399.96 ppm, up from 315.7 ppm when measurements
began in 1958. These CO2 levels are reportedly higher than at any time in the last
650,000 years when levels fluctuated between 180 and 300 ppm.

As of 2010 the US had 4.5% of the world's population but was responsible for about 28%
of all global greenhouse gas emissions. In 2011 global emissions of human-produced
CO2 were about 34 billion tons, the equivalent of about 408 billion shipping containers
full of greenhouse gases.

Predictions about how climate changes will affect civilization range from a Department
of Defense report detailing catastrophic weather events and a "significant drop in the
human carrying capacity of the Earth’s environment," to an Oregon Institute of Science
and Health report detailing "an increasingly lush environment of plants and animals."

Latest IPCC Findings, National Climate Assessment, and Counterpoints

On Sep. 27, 2013 the IPCC announced that it is now "extremely likely [95% confidence]
that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the
mid-20th century."

The Heartland Institute argued against human-caused global warming in its 2013 NIPCC
report which said that global warming since 1860 is the result of natural "cycles driven
by ocean-atmosphere oscillations, or by solar variations."

The US Global Change Research Program released the 2014 National Climate
Assessment on May 6, 2014. The report called climate change "a global public health
problem," stated that climate change impacts are already "visible in every state," and
concluded that human-induced "climate change is happening now." The report was
criticized by some members of Congress including US Senator James Inhofe (R-OK),
who stated that "we can all agree that natural variations in the climate are taking place,
but man-made global warming still remains a theory."

In Nov. 2014 the IPCC stated in the summary of it's Fifth Assessment Report on global
climate change that "Human influence on the climate system is clear," and that "recent
climate changes have had widespread impacts on human and natural systems." It went on
to say that continued emission of greenhouse gases "will cause further warming and long-
lasting changes in all components of the climate system, increasing the likelihood of
severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts for people and ecosystems."

According to a 2014 Pew Research Center poll, 40% of the US public believes global
warming is caused by human activity, 35% believe that there is no solid evidence that
global warming is occurring at all, and 18% believe global warming is occurring due to
natural causes. A Gallup poll taken in 2013 found that 78% of Democrats and 39% of
Republicans believe that global warming is caused primarily by human activity - a 39
percentage point gap. According to a 2015 survey by the Yale Project on Climate Change
Communications, 63% of Americans believe global warming is happening, and 48%
believe that human activity is primarily responsible.

Did You Know?

Global surface air temperature has increased by approximately 1.8°F between 1901 and
2016. According to the federal government's US Global Change Research Program, "it is
extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed
warming." [183]

A 2013 review of over 11,000 peer-reviewed studies published from 1991-2011 found
that 97% of the studies expressing a position on the issue endorsed the idea that humans
are causing global warming. [1]

A 2012 peer-reviewed study found that "up to 70% of the observed post-1850 climate
change and warming could be associated to multiple solar cycles." [2]

A 2013 peer-reviewed study found that global warming over the past 100 years has
proceeded at a rate faster than at any time in the past 11,300 years. [3]

A 2010 peer-reviewed study of the earth's climate 460-445 million years ago found that
an intense period of glaciation, not warming, occurred when CO2 levels were 5 times
higher than they are today. [4]
PRO 1
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in the "Climate
Change: How Do We Know?" section of its website, available at nasa.gov
(accessed May 17, 2017), wrote:

"The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is


extremely likely (greater than 95 percent probability) to be the result of human
activity since the mid-20th century and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented
over decades to millennia...

- Global sea level rose about 8 inches in the last century. The rate in the last two
decades, however, is nearly double that of the last century.

- The planet's average surface temperature has risen about 2.0 degrees Fahrenheit
since the late 19th century, a change driven largely by increased carbon dioxide
and other human-made emissions into the atmosphere. Most of the warming
occurred in the past 35 years, with 16 of the 17 warmest years on record
occurring since 2001. Not only was 2016 the warmest year on record, but eight
of the 12 months that make up the year - from January through September, with
the exception of June - were the warmest on record for those respective months...

- Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of surface ocean
waters has increased by about 30 percent. This increase is the result of humans
emitting more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and hence more being
absorbed into the oceans."
EN ESPAÑOL

¿La actividad humana es principalmente


responsable del cambio climático global?
Las temperaturas en la tierra han aumentado aproximadamente 1.8 ° F desde principios del siglo
XX. Durante este período de tiempo, los niveles atmosféricos de gases de efecto invernadero
como el dióxido de carbono (CO2) y el metano (CH4) se han incrementado notablemente. Ambas
partes en el debate sobre el cambio climático global coinciden en estos puntos.

El profesional sostiene que los crecientes niveles de gases de efecto invernadero atmosféricos
son resultado directo de actividades humanas como la quema de combustibles fósiles, y que
estos aumentos están causando cambios climáticos significativos y cada vez más severos
incluyendo calentamiento global, pérdida de hielo marino, aumento del nivel del mar, tormentas
más fuertes y más sequías. Sostienen que la acción internacional inmediata para reducir las
emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero es necesaria para evitar los cambios climáticos graves.

El lado opuesto argumenta que las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero generadas por el
ser humano son demasiado pequeñas para cambiar sustancialmente el clima de la Tierra y que
el planeta es capaz de absorber esos aumentos. Sostienen que el calentamiento en el siglo XX
resultó principalmente de procesos naturales como las fluctuaciones en el calor del sol y las
corrientes oceánicas. Dicen que la teoría del cambio climático global causado por los humanos
se basa en mediciones cuestionables, modelos climáticos defectuosos y ciencia engañosa.

Ciencia inicial sobre gases de efecto invernadero y cambio climático

los científicos han sabido del potencial de calentamiento (efecto invernadero) de gases como el
CO2 desde al menos 1859, cuando el físico británico John Tyndall comenzó experimentos que
permitieron descubrir que el CO2 en la atmósfera absorbe el calor del sol.

El 16 de febrero de 1938, el ingeniero Guy S. Callendar publicó un influyente estudio que sugería
que el aumento del CO2 atmosférico debido a la combustión de combustibles fósiles estaba
causando el calentamiento global. Muchos científicos en ese momento eran escépticos de la
conclusión de Callendar, argumentando que las fluctuaciones naturales y los cambios en la
circulación atmosférica determinaban el clima, no las emisiones de CO2.
En marzo de 1958, el científico climático estadounidense Charles Keeling comenzó a medir el
CO2 atmosférico en el observatorio Mauna Loa en Hawai para su uso en el modelado climático.
Utilizando estas medidas, Keeling se convirtió en el primer científico en confirmar que los niveles
de CO2 atmosférico estaban aumentando en lugar de ser totalmente absorbidos por los bosques
y los océanos (sumideros de carbono). [129] Cuando Keeling comenzó a medir, los niveles de
CO2 en la atmósfera eran de 315 partes por millón (ppm).

En 1977, la Academia Nacional de Ciencias de los EE. UU. Publicó el informe "Energía y clima"
concluyendo que la quema de combustibles fósiles estaba aumentando el CO2 atmosférico y
que el aumento del CO2 se asociaba con un aumento de las temperaturas globales.

El 23 de junio de 1988, el científico de la Administración Nacional de Aeronáutica y del Espacio


(NASA), James Hansen, presentó su testimonio al Senado de los Estados Unidos afirmando
directamente que los aumentos de CO2 estaban calentando el planeta y "cambiando nuestro
clima". En ese momento, el meteorólogo del MIT Richard Lindzen criticó estos hallazgos,
argumentando que los modelos climáticos computarizados no eran confiables y que los
procesos naturales equilibrarían cualquier calentamiento causado por el aumento de CO2.

Formación del IPCC y la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático

El Panel Intergubernamental sobre Cambio Climático (IPCC) fue creado en 1988 por la
Organización Meteorológica Mundial (OMM) y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el
Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) para revisar la investigación sobre el cambio climático global (a
febrero de 2015, había 195 países miembros del IPCC ) El IPCC emitió su primer informe de
evaluación en 1990 que establece que "las emisiones resultantes de las actividades humanas
aumentan sustancialmente las concentraciones atmosféricas de los gases de efecto
invernadero", lo que resulta en "un calentamiento adicional de la superficie de la Tierra".

La Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (CMNUCC) fue firmada
por el presidente George Bush el 13 de octubre de 1992. El objetivo de la convención fue la
"estabilización de las concentraciones de gases de efecto invernadero en la atmósfera a un nivel
que peligrosa interferencia antropogénica con el sistema climático ".

Cada estado miembro de la CMNUCC obtuvo representación en la Conferencia de las Partes


(COP). Comenzando en marzo de 1995 con la COP 1, la conferencia de partidos se ha reunido
todos los años para una conferencia sobre el cambio climático.
El Protocolo de Kyoto y otras conferencias internacionales sobre cambio climático

En diciembre de 1997, más de 161 naciones se reunieron en Kioto, Japón para negociar un
tratado para limitar las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y trabajar hacia los objetivos
de la CMNUCC. El Protocolo de Kioto resultante, firmado por el presidente Bill Clinton, estableció
objetivos vinculantes para 37 países industrializados y la Unión Europea para reducir las
emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero aproximadamente un 5% por debajo de los niveles de
1990 en 2012.

El presidente George W. Bush retiró a los Estados Unidos del Protocolo de Kyoto en marzo de
2001 debido a la oposición del Senado y las preocupaciones de que la limitación de las emisiones
de gases de efecto invernadero dañaría la economía de los Estados Unidos. Del 16 al 27 de julio
de 2001 tuvo lugar en Bonn (Alemania) la conferencia COP 6 (conferencia de las partes
signatarias de la CMNUCC) y se realizaron las enmiendas finales al Protocolo de Kyoto. 179 países
llegaron a un acuerdo vinculante sin la participación de los Estados Unidos.

El 2 de marzo de 2008, el Instituto Heartland buscó desafiar la idea de que la actividad humana
estaba causando el cambio climático al celebrar su propia conferencia internacional sobre el
cambio climático. En la conferencia, 98 oradores, entre ellos científicos del clima de doctorado
de las principales universidades, argumentaron que el calentamiento global era muy
probablemente un evento natural.

En diciembre de 2009, la conferencia COP 15 tuvo lugar en Copenhague, Dinamarca. El Acuerdo


de Copenhague resultante, firmado por 114 países, incluidos Estados Unidos y China, pidió
"recortes profundos" en las emisiones humanas de gases de efecto invernadero a fin de
garantizar que la temperatura de la tierra no suba más de 1,5 ° C por encima de los niveles
preindustriales.

En abril de 2010, Bolivia presentó una alternativa a las conferencias de la COP de las Naciones
Unidas. A la Conferencia Mundial de los Pueblos sobre el Cambio Climático y los Derechos de la
Madre Tierra asistieron representantes de casi 130 países. El acuerdo popular alcanzado en la
conferencia exigió que los países desarrollados redujeran los niveles de CO2 a 300 ppm (de 389
ppm), y rechazó el Acuerdo de Copenhague por sus "reducciones insuficientes en los gases de
efecto invernadero". Se afirma que "[c] el cambio climático ahora está produciendo profundos
en la agricultura y las formas de vida de los pueblos indígenas y agricultores de todo el mundo".
En 2012, la conferencia COP 18 se celebró en Doha, Qatar. En la conferencia, el COP expresó
"seria preocupación" de que los estados no redujeran las emisiones de gases de efecto
invernadero lo suficientemente rápido como para cumplir con el mandato del Acuerdo de
Copenhague para evitar que la temperatura de la tierra se eleve más de 1,5 ° C por encima de
los niveles preindustriales.

En diciembre de 2015, la COP 21 se reunió en París, donde 195 países, incluido Estados Unidos,
adoptaron el Acuerdo de París. El objetivo central del acuerdo era evitar que las temperaturas
globales subieran más de 1,5 ° C - 2 ° C por encima de los niveles preindustriales. Según el
acuerdo, todos los países debían crear un plan nacional para reducir las emisiones de gases de
efecto invernadero e informar periódicamente sobre su progreso individual para cumplir sus
objetivos de reducción de emisiones. Luego, el presidente Obama calificó el acuerdo de "punto
de inflexión para el mundo" que "establece el marco perdurable del mundo para resolver la crisis
climática".

El 1 de junio de 2017, el presidente Trump anunció su intención de retirar a los Estados Unidos
del Acuerdo de París y ordenó al gobierno federal que "cese toda implementación" del acuerdo.
El presidente Trump dijo que el Acuerdo de París impuso "cargas draconianas financieras y
económicas" a los Estados Unidos y creó "serios obstáculos" para el desarrollo de la energía. El
7 de noviembre de 2017, durante la COP 23 A conversaciones sobre el clima en Bonn, Alemania,
Siria anunció que firmaría el acuerdo de París sobre cambio climático, dejando a los Estados
Unidos como el único país que ha rechazado la pacto global.

El debate de los Estados Unidos sobre el cambio climático se calienta

El documental An Inconvenient Truth de Al Gore se estrenó en 2006 y fue visto por más de 5
millones de personas en todo el mundo. La película argumentó que el cambio climático causado
por los seres humanos era real, y que sin reducciones inmediatas en las emisiones de gases de
efecto invernadero, los cambios climáticos catastróficos perturbarían gravemente las
sociedades humanas, lo que llevaría a un posible colapso de la civilización industrial.

En 2007, el IPCC publicó su Cuarto Informe de Evaluación que establece que "el calentamiento
del sistema climático es inequívoco" y que "la mayoría del aumento observado en las
temperaturas promedio mundiales desde mediados del siglo XX es muy probable [90% de
confianza] debido a lo observado aumento en las concentraciones antropogénicas de gases de
efecto invernadero [artificiales] ". El IPCC y Al Gore recibieron un Premio Noble de la Paz por su
trabajo científico climático en octubre de 2007. [146] En respuesta a los hallazgos del IPCC, un
grupo de científicos formó el Panel Internacional No Gubernamental sobre Cambio Climático
(NIPCC) para recopilar un informe desafiando la ciencia detrás del cambio climático provocado
por el hombre. Su informe del 2 de marzo de 2008, "Nature, Not Human Activity, Rules the
Climate", fue publicado por Heartland Institute.

Desde 1998 hasta 2009, el gobierno de Estados Unidos se apropió de $ 99 mil millones para el
trabajo relacionado con el cambio climático. $ 35.7 mil millones (36%) de ese total provino como
parte de la Ley de Recuperación y Reinversión de los Estados Unidos de 2009.

El 2 de abril de 2007, la Corte Suprema de los EE. UU. Dictaminó (5-4) en Massachusetts v. EPA
que los gases de efecto invernadero cumplen con los criterios para considerarse contaminantes
según la Ley de Aire Limpio. En respuesta, la EPA de los Estados Unidos anunció en 2009 que los
gases de efecto invernadero "amenazan la salud pública" y son "el principal impulsor del cambio
climático". En su decisión del 23 de junio de 2014 en Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA, la Corte
Suprema de los EE. UU. Confirmó la autoridad de la EPA para regular las emisiones de gases de
efecto invernadero de fuentes estacionarias como las centrales eléctricas.

En mayo de 2013, el presidente Barack Obama twitteó a sus millones de seguidores en Twitter
que "el noventa y siete por ciento de los científicos están de acuerdo: el cambio climático es
real, creado por el hombre y peligroso". El 97% del número fue tomado del metaestudio de Cook
de 2013 sobre 11.944 artículos revisados por pares sobre el cambio climático. Los autores del
estudio encontraron que, de los 3.974 estudios que tomaron una posición sobre el cambio
climático causado por los humanos, el 97.1% estuvo de acuerdo en que la actividad humana está
causando el calentamiento global. La metodología del estudio fue criticada por los escépticos
que señalan el hecho de que solo 65 de los 11,944 (0,5%) de los resúmenes respaldaron la
posición de que la actividad humana es la principal responsable (+ 50%) del calentamiento
global.

El 21 de septiembre de 2014, se llevó a cabo la marcha climática más grande de la historia en


Nueva York, Nueva York, con más de 400,000 personas marchando para exigir que los gobiernos
mundiales tomen medidas inmediatas para reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto
invernadero.

¿Cómo nos afectará el cambio climático?

De acuerdo con el Centro Nacional de Datos Climáticos de NOAA, 2014 fue el año más caluroso
registrado en todo el mundo desde 1880, cuando comenzó el mantenimiento de registros. Los
10 años más cálidos en este período de 135 años se produjeron entre 1998 y 2014.
A partir de enero de 2015, los niveles de CO2 fueron 399,96 ppm, por encima de 315,7 ppm
cuando las mediciones comenzaron en 1958. [10] Estos niveles de CO2 son supuestamente más
altos que en cualquier momento en los últimos 650,000 años cuando los niveles fluctuaron entre
180 y 300 ppm.

A partir de 2010, EE. UU. Tenía el 4,5% de la población mundial, pero era responsable de
aproximadamente el 28% de todas las emisiones mundiales de gases de efecto invernadero. En
2011, las emisiones mundiales de CO2 producido por los seres humanos fueron de alrededor de
34 mil millones de toneladas, [16] el equivalente a unos 408 mil millones de contenedores de
envío llenos de gases de efecto invernadero.

Las predicciones sobre cómo los cambios climáticos afectarán la civilización abarcan desde un
informe del Departamento de Defensa que detalla eventos climáticos catastróficos y una "caída
significativa en la capacidad humana de transporte del medio ambiente de la Tierra" hasta un
informe del Instituto de Ciencia y Salud de Oregon que detalla " cada vez más exuberante
entorno de plantas y animales ".

Últimas conclusiones del IPCC, evaluación climática nacional y contrapuntos

El 27 de septiembre de 2013, el IPCC anunció que ahora es "muy probable [95% de confianza]
que la influencia humana haya sido la causa dominante del calentamiento observado desde
mediados del siglo XX".

El Instituto Heartland argumentó contra el calentamiento global causado por los humanos en su
informe NIPCC 2013 que decía que el calentamiento global desde 1860 es el resultado de "ciclos
naturales impulsados por oscilaciones océano-atmósfera o por variaciones solares".

El Programa de Investigación de Cambio Global de los EE. UU. Publicó la Evaluación climática
nacional de 2014 el 6 de mayo de 2014. El informe llamó al cambio climático "un problema de
salud pública mundial", declaró que los impactos del cambio climático ya son "visibles en todos
los estados" y concluyó que inducido "el cambio climático está sucediendo ahora". El informe
fue criticado por algunos miembros del Congreso, incluido el senador estadounidense James
Inhofe (R-OK), quien afirmó que "todos podemos estar de acuerdo en que las variaciones
naturales del clima están teniendo lugar, pero el calentamiento global artificial sigue siendo un
teoría."
En noviembre de 2014, el IPCC declaró en el resumen de su Quinto Informe de Evaluación sobre
el cambio climático global que "la influencia humana en el sistema climático es clara" y que "los
recientes cambios climáticos han tenido un impacto generalizado en los sistemas humanos y
naturales". Continuó diciendo que la emisión continuada de gases de efecto invernadero
"causará un mayor calentamiento y cambios duraderos en todos los componentes del sistema
climático, aumentando la probabilidad de impactos graves, generalizados e irreversibles para las
personas y los ecosistemas".

Según una encuesta del Centro de Investigación Pew 2014, 40% del público estadounidense cree
que el calentamiento global es causado por la actividad humana, 35% cree que no hay evidencia
sólida de que el calentamiento global esté ocurriendo y 18% cree que el calentamiento global
está ocurriendo debido a a causas naturales Una encuesta de Gallup realizada en 2013 encontró
que el 78% de los demócratas y el 39% de los republicanos creen que el calentamiento global es
causado principalmente por la actividad humana, una brecha de 39 puntos porcentuales. Según
una encuesta de 2015 del Proyecto Yale sobre Comunicaciones de Cambio Climático, el 63% de
los estadounidenses cree que el calentamiento global está ocurriendo, y el 48% cree que la
actividad humana es la principal responsable.

¿Sabías?

La temperatura global del aire en la superficie ha aumentado aproximadamente 1.8 ° F entre 1901 y
2016. Según el Programa de Investigación de Cambio Global de EE. UU. Del gobierno federal, "es muy
probable que la influencia humana haya sido la causa principal del calentamiento observado". [183]

Una revisión de 2013 de más de 11,000 estudios revisados por pares publicados entre 1991 y 2011
encontró que el 97% de los estudios que expresaron una posición sobre el tema respaldaron la idea de
que los humanos están causando el calentamiento global. [1]

Un estudio revisado por pares en 2012 encontró que "hasta el 70% del cambio climático y el
calentamiento observados después de 1850 podrían asociarse a ciclos solares múltiples". [2]

Un estudio de 2013 revisado por pares encontró que el calentamiento global en los últimos 100 años
ha avanzado a un ritmo más rápido que en cualquier momento en los últimos 11.300 años. [3]

Un estudio de 2010 revisado por pares sobre el clima de la Tierra hace 460-445 millones de años
descubrió que un intenso período de glaciación, no de calentamiento, ocurría cuando los niveles de
CO2 eran 5 veces más altos que en la actualidad. [4]

PRO 1

La Administración Nacional de Aeronáutica y del Espacio (NASA), en el "Cambio climático:


¿cómo sabemos?" sección de su sitio web, disponible en nasa.gov (consultado el 17 de mayo
de 2017), escribió:

"La tendencia actual de calentamiento es de particular importancia porque la mayor parte de


ella es extremadamente probable (más del 95 por ciento de probabilidad) de ser el resultado
de la actividad humana desde mediados del siglo XX y continuar a un ritmo que no tiene
precedentes.
- El nivel del mar mundial aumentó aproximadamente 8 pulgadas en el siglo pasado. La tasa en
los últimos dos años, sin embargo, es casi el doble que en el siglo pasado.

- La temperatura promedio de la superficie del planeta ha aumentado alrededor de 2.0 grados


Fahrenheit desde finales del siglo XIX, un cambio impulsado principalmente por el dióxido de
carbono y otras emisiones creadas por el hombre a la atmósfera. La mayor parte del
calentamiento se produjo en los últimos 35 años, con 16 de los 17 años más cálidos registrados
desde 2001. No solo se registró el año más cálido, sino ocho de los 12 meses que componen el
año, de enero a septiembre, con la excepción de junio, fueron los más cálidos registrados en
esos meses respectivos ...

- Desde el comienzo de la Revolución Industrial, la acidez de la superficie del océano ha


aumentado en aproximadamente un 30 por ciento. Este aumento es el resultado de que los
humanos emiten más dióxido de carbono a la atmósfera y, por lo tanto, se absorben más en
los océanos. "
EL RESUMEN DEL TEMA

¿La actividad humana es principalmente responsable del


cambio climático global?

La actividad de los seres humanos tiene una influencia cada vez


mayor en el clima y las temperaturas al quemar combustibles fósiles,
y que estos aumentos están causando cambios climáticos
significativos y cada vez más severos incluyendo calentamiento
global, pérdida de hielo marino, aumento del nivel del mar, tormentas
más fuertes y más sequías. Sostienen que la acción internacional
inmediata para reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero
es necesaria para evitar los cambios climáticos graves.

Las enormes cantidades de gases así producidos se añaden a los


que se liberan de forma natural en la atmósfera, aumentando el
efecto invernadero y el calentamiento global.

Gases de efecto invernadero

Algunos gases de la atmósfera actúan como el cristal de un


invernadero: retienen el calor del sol e impiden que se escape fuera.

Muchos de esos gases se producen de forma natural pero, debido a


la actividad humana, las concentraciones de algunos de ellos están
aumentando en la atmósfera, sobre todo las de:

 dióxido de carbono (CO2)


 metano
 óxido nitroso
 gases fluorados

El CO2 es un gas de efecto invernadero producido principalmente por


la actividad humana y es responsable del 63% del calentamiento
global causado por el hombre a partir de enero de 2015, los niveles
de CO2 fueron 399,96 ppm, por encima de 315,7 ppm cuando las
mediciones comenzaron en 1958. Estos niveles de CO2 son
supuestamente más altos que en cualquier momento en los últimos
650,000 años cuando los niveles fluctuaron entre 180 y 300 ppm.
Su concentración en la atmósfera supera actualmente en un 40% el
nivel registrado al comienzo de la industrialización.

Los otros gases de efecto invernadero se emiten en menores


cantidades pero son mucho más eficaces que el CO2 a la hora de
retener el calor y en algunos casos mil veces más potentes.
El metano es responsable del 19% del calentamiento global de origen
humano y el óxido nitroso, del 6%.

Causas del aumento de las emisiones

La combustión de carbón, petróleo y gas produce dióxido de


carbono y óxido nitroso.

En 1977, la Academia Nacional de Ciencias de los EE. UU. Publicó


el informe "Energía y clima" concluyendo que la quema de
combustibles fósiles estaba aumentando el CO2 atmosférico y que el
aumento del CO2 se asociaba con un aumento de las temperaturas
globales.

Los gases fluorados causan un potente efecto de calentamiento,


hasta 23.000 veces superior al producido por el CO2.
Afortunadamente, estos gases se emiten en cantidades más
pequeñas y la legislación de la UE prevé su eliminación progresiva.

Calentamiento Global

Actualmente, la temperatura media mundial es 0,85 ºC superior a la


de finales del siglo XIX. Cada una de las tres décadas anteriores ha
sido más cálida que cualquiera de las precedentes desde que
empezaron a registrarse datos, en 1850.

Los mayores estudiosos del clima del mundo consideran que la


actividad humana es muy probablemente la causa principal del
aumento de la temperatura registrado desde mediados del siglo XX.

Los científicos consideran que un aumento de 2 ºC con respecto a la


temperatura de la era preindustrial es el límite más allá del cual hay
un riesgo mucho mayor de que se produzcan cambios peligrosos y
catastróficos para el medio ambiente global. Por esta razón, la
comunidad internacional ha reconocido la necesidad de mantener el
calentamiento por debajo de 2 ºC.
Formación del IPCC y la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas
sobre el Cambio Climático

El Panel Intergubernamental sobre Cambio Climático (IPCC) fue


creado en 1988 por la Organización Meteorológica Mundial (OMM) y
el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente
(PNUMA) para revisar la investigación sobre el cambio climático
global (a febrero de 2015, había 195 países miembros del IPCC ) El
IPCC emitió su primer informe de evaluación en 1990 que establece
que "las emisiones resultantes de las actividades humanas aumentan
sustancialmente las concentraciones atmosféricas de los gases de
efecto invernadero", lo que resulta en "un calentamiento adicional de
la superficie de la Tierra".

En diciembre de 1997, más de 161 naciones se reunieron en Kioto,


Japón para negociar un tratado para limitar las emisiones de gases
de efecto invernadero y trabajar hacia los objetivos de la CMNUCC.
El Protocolo de Kioto resultante, firmado por el presidente Bill Clinton,
estableció objetivos vinculantes para 37 países industrializados y la
Unión Europea para reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto
invernadero aproximadamente un 5% por debajo de los niveles de
1990 en 2012.

El presidente George W. Bush retiró a los Estados Unidos del


Protocolo de Kyoto en marzo de 2001 debido a la oposición del
Senado y las preocupaciones de que la limitación de las emisiones
de gases de efecto invernadero dañaría la economía de los Estados
Unidos. Del 16 al 27 de julio de 2001 tuvo lugar en Bonn (Alemania)
la conferencia COP 6 (conferencia de las partes signatarias de la
CMNUCC) y se realizaron las enmiendas finales al Protocolo de
Kyoto. 179 países llegaron a un acuerdo vinculante sin la
participación de los Estados Unidos.
INGLES

THE SUMMARY OF THE TOPIC

Is human activity primarily responsible for global climate change?


The activity of human beings has an increasing influence on climate and temperatures
when burning fossil fuels, and that these changes are causing significant and increasingly
severe climate changes in global warming, loss of sea ice, increased level of the sea,
stronger storms and more droughts. They argue that immediate international action to
reduce greenhouse gas emissions is necessary to avoid tipping climate changes.

The huge amounts of gases have also become those that are released naturally into the
atmosphere, increase the greenhouse effect and global warming.

Greenhouse gases

Some gases in the atmosphere act like glass in a greenhouse: they retain the heat of the
sun and prevent it from escaping.

Many of these gases are produced naturally but, due to human activity, the
concentrations of some of them are growing in the atmosphere, especially those of:

• carbon dioxide (CO2)

• methane

• nitrous oxide

• fluorinated gases

The CO2 levels were 399.96 ppm, above 315.7 The CO2 levels were 399.96 ppm, above
315.7 ppm when the measurements started in 1958. These CO2 levels are higher than
ever in the last 650,000 years when the levels fluctuated between 180 and 300 ppm.

Its concentration in the atmosphere currently exceeds by 40% the level recorded at the
beginning of industrialization.

The other greenhouse gases are emitted in smaller quantities but they are much more
effective than CO2 when it comes to retaining heat and in some cases a thousand times
more powerful. Methane is responsible for 19% of global warming of human origin and
nitrous oxide, 6%.

Causes of increased emissions

The combustion of coal, oil and gas produce carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.
In 1977, the National Academy of Sciences of the EE. UU He published the report "Energy
and climate" concluding that the burning of fossil fuels was improving atmospheric CO2
and that the increase in CO2 was associated with an increase in global temperatures.

Fluorinated gases cause a powerful heating effect, up to 23,000 times higher than that
produced by CO2. Fortunately, these gases are emitted in smaller quantities and EU
legislation refers to their progressive elimination.

Global warming

Currently, the world average temperature is 0.85 ºC higher than at the end of the 19th
century. Each of the previous three decades has been warmer than any of the previous
decades since data began to register, in 1850.

The main climate studies of the world consider that human activity is very likely the main
cause of the increase in the number of degrees of the 20th century.

Scientists consider that an increase of 2 degrees with respect to the temperature of the
pre-industrial era is the limit beyond which there is a much greater risk than what
produces dangerous and catastrophic changes to the global environment. For this
reason, the international community has received the need to keep the warming below
2 ° C.

Formation of the IPCC and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was created in 1988 by the
World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment
Program (UNEP) to review research on global climate change (as of February 2015, there
were 195 member countries of the IPCC) The IPCC issued its first evaluation report in
1990 which states that "emissions resulting from activities greatly increase atmospheric
concentrations of greenhouse gases", resulting in "additional punishment". the surface
of the Earth. "

In December 1997, more than 161 nations meet in Kyoto, Japan to negotiate a treaty to
limit greenhouse gas emissions and work towards the objectives of the UNFCCC. The
resulting Kyoto Protocol, signed by President Bill Clinton, sets binding targets for 37
industrialized countries and the European Union to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by
approximately 5% below 1990 levels in 2012.

President George W. Bush withdrew the United States from the Kyoto Protocol in March
2001 due to opposition from the Senate and concerns about greenhouse gas emissions
caused by the US economy. From July 16 to 27, 2001, the COP 6 conference (conference
of the signatory parties of the UNFCCC) took place in Bonn, Germany, and the final
amendments were made.