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English
for Secretaries
and
Administrative
Personnel

teacher’s book

Marisela Toselli
Ana María Millán
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Teacher’s Book Contents

CD-Rom contents ............................................................................................................ 3

Student’s Book contents ................................................................................................ 4-5

Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 6-8

Objectives and teaching notes


Unit 1 Locating people ........................................................................................ 9-14
Unit 2 People at work ........................................................................................ 15-20
Unit 3 Dealing with numbers ............................................................................ 21-26
Unit 4 Taking and giving messages ................................................................ 27-32
Unit 5 Receiving visitors .................................................................................... 33-38
Unit 6 Forms, envelopes and letters .............................................................. 39-44
Unit 7 Requests .................................................................................................... 45-50
Unit 8 Quotations and orders .......................................................................... 51-56
Unit 9 CVs and application letters ................................................................ 57-62
Unit 10 Inter-office memos ................................................................................ 63-68
Unit 11 Reading skills ............................................................................................ 69-74
Unit 12 Describing qualities ................................................................................ 75-80
Unit 13 Office duties ............................................................................................ 81-86
Unit 14 Office equipment .................................................................................... 87-92
Unit 15 Working with computers .................................................................... 93-98

Worksheets ...................................................................................................................... 99-107

Worksheets answer key ................................................................................................ 108-110

Speaking evaluation chart ............................................................................................ 111

Workbook answer key .................................................................................................. 112-118

Transcripts
Student’s Book transcripts ...................................................................................... 119-124
Workbook transcripts .............................................................................................. 125-128

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CD-Rom Contents

Unit 1 Locating people 1 Making and receiving calls


2 Telephone expressions

Unit 2 People at work 1 Places in a company


2 Description of a company

Unit 3 Dealing with numbers 1 Understanding numbers


2 Number discrimination

Unit 4 Taking and giving messages 1 Taking a message


2 Taking a written message

Unit 5 Receiving visitors 1 A visitor arrives


2 Starting a conversation

Unit 6 Forms, envelopes and letters 1 Looking at formal letters


2 A letter from the bank

Unit 7 Requests 1 Formal and informal language


2 Completing a formal letter

Unit 8 Quotations and orders 1 Booking a hotel room over the phone
2 Confirming a reservation by fax

Unit 9 CVs and application letters 1 Introduction


2 Nora’s résumé (or Curriculum Vitae)

Unit 10 Inter-office memos 1 Read an e-mail


2 The e-mail

Unit 11 Reading skills 1 Talking about buildings


2 Talking about what companies do

Unit 12 Describing qualities 1 Advertising slogans


2 Words that sell

Unit 13 Office duties 1 A job vacancy


2 Asking questions

Unit 14 Office equipment 1 Prepositions of time


2 By

Unit 15 Working with computers 1 A mobile phone


2 Product analysis

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Student’s Book Contents


Module Unit Grammar Vocabulary
unit one
Locating people

unit two
17-12

13-18
Future with will;
Question words; to be

Present simple: ques-


When a person is not
available; Spell it!

Company organigram;
People at work

unit three
2 tions, for habit;
Possessive adjectives

Past tense of to be
Frequency adverbs

Cardinal and ordinal

3
19-24
Listening Dealing with numbers numbers; Numbers in
Maths

unit four
4
25-30
Taking and giving messages

unit five
Past simple ; Verb +
object pronoun

Review of grammar in
Time expressions

Greetings; Introductions;

5
31-36
Receiving visitors module Offering; Prepositions of
place

unit six 37-42 Punctuation Salutations and closings;

unit seven
6
Forms, envelopes and letters

43-48 Present continuous


British English vs
American English

Company advertising
Requests
7
Writing unit eight
Quotations and orders
8
49-54 Grammar in context Orders, payments and
prices

unit nine
9
55-60
CVs and application letters

unit ten 61-66


Past simple questions

Grammar in context
Jobs

Requests
Inter-office memos
10
unit eleven
Reading skills
11 67-72 Grammatical structures
in context
Types of text

unit twelve
Describing qualities
12 73-78 Should Adjectives

Reading unit thirteen


Office duties
13 79-84 Relative clauses Jobs; money

unit fourteen
Office equipment
14 85-90 The passive Office equipment

unit fifteen
15
Working with computers

Grammar and language reference


91-96

97-105
Comparatives and
superlatives
Computer terminology

Glossary 106-112

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Language Focus Cultural awareness Speaking


Polite requests Pronunciation: Social titles: Mr., Mrs. or Miss Survey: Social titles
the /i/ sound

Asking about jobs Pronunciation: Company hierarchy Debate: Hierarchies


/i/ vs /i/

Telling the time Pronunciation: Punctuality Debate: Punctuality


the /ɵ/ sound

Polite questions Pronunciation: Names and gender Debate: Maiden names


the –ed suffix

Small talk Stress and intonation Meeting and greeting in diffe- Survey: Greetings in
rent countries other countries

Common phrases Punctuation Writing style Personal style in writing

Opening sentences; Gerunds Internet abbreviations and Debate: Promotional


Inquiries; Closing respon- acronyms advertisements
ses

Opening and closing sen- E-mail writing E-shopping Debate: Shopping on


tences the Net

Closing sentences in Irregular verbs Body language Debate: Body language


application letters in different countries

Referring to previous Cognates Emoticons Debate: Emoticons


communication; Asking
someone to do something

Using dictionaries Grammatical structu- The English language Survey: The English lan-
res in context guage

Descriptive words Connectors Stereotypes Debate: Stereotypes

Job interview strategies Nominal groups Gender roles in the workplace Debate: Jobs and gender

Asking for help Prepositions and pre- Technology and office jargon Debate: The use of office
positional phrases jargon

Using comparisons Comparatives and Business and the Internet Survey: Favourite websi-
superlatives tes

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Introduction

English for Secretaries and Administrative Personnel is an English course for business
students or people working in business or office-related fields. It is suitable for business
schools, technical / vocational schools, as well as for in-company training programmes.
English for Secretaries and Administrative Personnel has been designed to meet the
needs of secretaries and other professionals who wish to undertake administrative
tasks in English, both orally and in written form. The materials cover topics common to
typical office activities, as well as to more personal areas related to office work, such as
socialising or receiving visitors and making them feel comfortable. The course also aims
to develop the students’ general knowledge of the social customs and attitudes of the
English-speaking world.
The basic aim of English for Secretaries and Administrative Personnel is to develop
language skills (listening, speaking, writing and reading) in English, while at the same
time focusing on the central need of the secretary and office worker: to receive and to
transmit information precisely and efficiently.

Course Components
English for Secretaries and Administrative Personnel is a one-level course comprising of a Student’s
Book and a Workbook, both with an audio component. The Student’s Book is accompanied by a
CD-Rom of interactive business situations. The Teacher’s Book includes step-by-step instructions,
reinforment actvities, answer keys to the Student’s Book and Workbook activities and evaluation
material in the form of photocopiable worksheets.

Student’s Book Pack Teacher’s Book


Includes: Includes:
• Audio CD and CD-Rom • Audio CD and CD-Rom
• Integrated Grammar and language • Student’s Book and Workbook answer keys
reference and Glossary • Evaluation worksheets

Workbook Online Learning Centre


• Listening component available on Student’s
Book Audio CD

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Student’s Book • Focus on Grammar


The Focus on Grammar and Focus on Language sections
The Student’s Book is divided into three modules of five highlight important grammar or language points related
units each, which cover the four principle learning skills: to the unit topic. In turn, these are cross-referenced to the
• Listening & Speaking: Units 1-5 Grammar and language reference or to the Glossary at
• Writing: Units 6-10 the back of the Student’s Book.
• Reading: Units 11-15 • Key Vocabulary
This organisation offers teachers the flexibility to choose the The Key Vocabulary boxes highlight essential vocabulary,
teaching style that best suits the needs of their students. give hints on usage and provide information such as the
Teachers can cover these three modules in different ways: contrast between British and American English, or the
a In the order they appear in the Student’s Book: starting appropriate register for greetings, etc.
with Unit 1 and continuing through to Unit 15.
b One unit per module: Unit 1, then Units 6 and 11, • Cultural awareness
followed by Units 2, 7, and 12, etc. Cultural information, fundamental in learning another
c Integrating the three modules: using the Listening & language, is presented in the form of brief texts in the
Speaking module as the core of the course and Student’s Book. These allow students to become aware
introducing material from the other modules. of cultural differences both inside and outside the
workplace. These texts provide knowledge of today’s
world, essential to modern business and overall success.
How the modules work
The Cultural awareness sections act as a springboard to
• Listening and Speaking class discussion or surveys about stereotypes, body
The aim of the Listening & Speaking module is to develop language, gender roles in the work place, etc.
the skills that will enable office workers to understand
and produce oral messages in English, thus allowing them • Pairwork and Group work
to communicate effectively by telephone and in person. These activities give students the opportunity to work one
The practice of oral skills is not restricted exclusively to the on one or in small groups with their classmates. Students
Listening & Speaking module. Close attention is paid help each other practise important concepts or difficult
throughout the course to pronunciation, spoken fluency language.
and overall comprehensibility. • Grammar and language reference
• Writing The Focus on Grammar and Focus on Language sections
This module focuses on the production of written texts in the Student’s Book are cross-referenced to the nine-
related to specific tasks. These include internal and page Grammar and language reference at the back of the
external office correspondence, such as inter-office Student’s Book. This provides a useful self-study tool for
memorandum, quotations, faxes, e-mails, etc. Special those students who wish to find more detailed grammar
emphasis is placed on the typical structures found in explanations or notes on language usage.
business letters and in formal and informal texts. • Glossary
• Reading The main vocabulary and language from the Student’s
The main objective of this module is the development of Book is grouped, by unit, at the back of the Student’s
reading techniques. The reading texts are divided into two Book in the Glossary. Students should be encouraged to
types: on the one hand, office-related materials such as copy the glossary words and phrases into their notebooks
letters, e-mails, CVs, advertisements and memos; on the and translate them into their own language.
other hand, information texts that offer students insight
into professional, technological, historical, or cultural Workbook
aspects of the English-speaking world.
The Workbook contains 15 units relating directly to the
Student’s Book units. It provides further listening, reading
Student’s Book features and, especially, writing practice of all the main language
• Organisation points. The Workbook audio corresponding to the
Each unit is made up of six pages. The opening page listening module is provided on the Student’s Audio CD.
starts with a brief introduction to the topic, followed by The answer key to all the activities is in photocopiable
the main objectives to be studied. Two double-page form in the Teacher’s Book.
spreads present and practise the core language, through
typical business situations. The unit ends with a cultural
awareness text.

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Audio CD • Transcripts
The Audio CD transcripts for the Listening & Speaking
The Student’s Book and Workbook audio material from module of the Student’s Book and Workbook are
the Listening and Speaking module is available on the provided in the Teacher’s Book. See pages 119 to 128.
Audio CD. The audio component is intended to be used • Photocopiable Workbook Answer key
in class, but may be used by the student at home for The solutions to the Workbook activities are grouped
personal study. together on photocopiable pages at the back of the
Teacher’s Book. See pages 112 to 118.
CD-Rom • Student Evaluation
The CD-Rom that accompanies the Student’s Book provides The Teacher’s Book offers three different types of evaluation:
additional exposure to business-related situations. It offers – Optional speaking evaluations
thirty interactive exercises, two per unit, on a variety of These are a variety of speaking activities students can
topics: letters, phone messages, CVs... These activities also do as an individual evaluation or in pairs or small
provide further practice on key grammar points and lexis, groups. They appear on the last page of every Teacher’s
as well as activities that expand on the Student’s Book and Book unit. They cover important structures, language
Workbook material. or concepts studied in the unit. When evaluating these
The CD-Rom is easy to use. Students select a unit and activities, teachers can use the Speaking Evaluation
activity from the main menu on the CD-Rom interface Chart in the Teacher’s Book, page 111.
and follow the activity instructions. Each activity provides – Continuous evaluation
a pop-up window with the answers, so students can Teachers who prefer a more continued evaluation of
check their work once they have completed each task. their students throughout the year, can reuse selected
Student’s Book and Workbook activities to chart
progress. These are identified in the Teacher’s Book
Teacher’s Book with the following icon e . These activities can be
The Teacher’s Book reproduces the Student’s Book in full used as spoken or written evaluation.
colour in an easy-to-use wrap-around format. It provides – Formal evaluation
step-by-step guidelines for each lesson, suggestions for Worksheets
reinforcement and expansion activities, evaluation There is a photocopiable revision Worksheet every
materials in the form of photocopiable worksheets, and two units. Each worksheet covers the essential
suggestions on how to exploit the CD-Rom. material from the two units in question and can be
used as revision, or as a formal written evaluation.
Answer keys are on pages 108 to 110.
Teacher’s Book features
At the end of each module there is a comprehensive
• Organisation exam that covers the most important elements of
The first page of every unit summarises the language each module. Each worksheet section gives a
focus, key vocabulary and structures. It also lists the suggested score. See pages 99 to 107.
specific business tasks and skills the students will be
practising. Teachers can ask the Warm up questions • Optional CD-Rom review
provided to stimulate previous knowledge of the topic of These are optional activities to review or test students on
the unit. Detailed lesson plans are provided for the other their work with the Student CD-Rom. These activities
pages of the Student’s Book, and include the Answer key appear within the lesson notes on the last page of every
to all the activities. unit in the Teacher’s Book.

• Teacher’s file
Teachers with few teaching hours can concentrate on the Online Learning Centre
main lesson plan activities. Teachers who have classes The Online Learning Centre provides support for both the
with more hours, or who teach students at a higher level, teacher and the student. More and more learners are
can consult the Teacher’s file for each lesson where they becoming autonomous and taking advantage of this
will find the following information: instructional medium. Teachers will find a wealth of
– Suggestions for optional reinforcement or expansion material to download and use in the classroom.
activities for the Student’s Book activities.
– The exploitation of the Workbook activities.

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unit one 1
Locating people
One of the first, and probably one of the most frequent situations a secretary or office worker has
to face, is that of locating people within the office. This can take the form of direct face-to-face
contact or indirect conversations on the phone.
In this unit, students will find examples of different types of conversations in the office. They will
practise pronunciation, sentence and word stress and intonation, as well as structures that show
courtesy towards the client.

Skills objectives
• To be able to understand the gist of a
conversation
unit one 1
• To identify the use of will in listenings and Locating people
readings
• To practise pronunciation and intonation
Introduction
• To practise conversations with a partner One of the first and probably one of the most frequent situations a secretary or an office
Language focus worker has to face is that of locating people. In this unit you will find examples of different
types of conversation that may take place in the office or on the phone.
• The alphabet: revision of pronunciation
• Polite requests using modal verbs:
(Can, Could, May) Objectives
• Will: resulting decisions, promises, offering /
• To talk to new people in the office
asking for help
• Use of question words • To talk to clients on the phone
• Present simple revision • To spell out words
• Pronunciation of the short vowel /i/ sound • To make polite requests
Key vocabulary • To practise the /i/ sound
& structures • To learn common acronyms
• not available; busy; away
• leave / take a message
• abbreviated; refer to
• on holiday / vacation
• Could you spell that, please?
• Good morning / afternoon / evening
• Excuse me...
Business tasks
• To answer the telephone
• To ask people to spell their names
• To talk to clients in a polite and courteous
manner
• To understand and use acronyms
• To address clients appropriately: Mr., Miss,
Mrs. or Ms.

Additional material 7
• Grammar and language reference, pages
97 and 104
• Glossary, page 106
• Workbook, pages 3, 4 and 5 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 1 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • Do you like talking on the telephone?
page 14
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • How do you feel about talking to people you don’t know?
Book, page 14 • How do you feel about meeting new people?
• Do you make friends easily?
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unit one
Locating people
1 unit one 1
Locating people

Listening Listening

1 Students concentrate on understanding the


gist of each conversation.
Play CD 1.1 once all the way through.
Then ask students to match each dialogue to
a picture. Which one does not match?
Answers: 2, 4, 1 (Picture 3 does not match.)
1 2 3 4

Focus on Grammar
Will is often used in these types of business 1 1.1
Listen to the dialogues and match them to
focus on Grammar
the scenes above. Which one doesn’t match?
situations:
V = Visitor R = Receptionist C = Client Will
a resulting decisions: It’s hot in here. I’ll turn A Full form Short form Negative
on the air-conditioner. V: Good morning. My name is Paul Phillips. May I speak I will I’ll will not
to Mr. William Smith? you will you’ll (won’t)
b promises: I’ll call you next week. R: I’m sorry, Sir. Mr. Smith isn’t in. What can I do for you? we will we’ll
c offering / asking for help: Shall I carry that they will they’ll
B he will he’ll
for you? Will you give this to Mr. Stevens, R: Collins Electronics. Good afternoon. she will she’ll
please? C: Good afternoon. Mrs. Doris Robinson, please. it will it’ll
R: Name, please?
Refer students to the Grammar and language C: Henry Higgins. I’m her lawyer.
Grammar reference, page 97.

reference, Student’s Book, page 97. R: Hold on a moment, Mr. Higgins. I’ll put you through.

C 2 Cover the dialogues and listen again. Which


C: Good morning. May I speak to the Personnel ones use will?
2 Repeat CD 1.1 without pausing. Students
Manager?
cover the text and say which dialogues use will. R: Who’s calling, please? 3 Choose a dialogue and act it out with a
Read these three sentences and students C: It’s Tim Harrison from K & S Co. partner.
R: Just a moment, please. I’ll see if he’s available at the
repeat them without reading them. See moment. 4 Use will to say things you will do.
Teacher’s file. Example: I’ll call my mother.
D
Answers: B: I’ll put you through. C: I’ll call V: Excuse me, could I see Mr. Johnson?
back later. D: He’ll see you in a minute. R: May I have your name, please?
V: Tom Blackburn, from New Instant Technology.
R: Please sit down. He’ll see you in a minute.
Workbook, page 3.
3 Give students a few minutes to practise their
e dialogues. To suggest a “telephone” situation, 8
ask them to sit back to back. Volunteer pairs
come to the front of the class and act out their
dialogues. See Teacher’s file.
Teacher’s file
4 Revise different uses of the future tense. Read
the example, showing different situations in Student’s Book Workbook, page 3
Answer key, p. 112.
which the phrase could be used: We need 2 Read these sentences and ask
someone to help us with this... I’ll call my students to explain if the sentence 1 Students listen and complete the
mother. That’s not nice! I’ll call my mother! with will represents a planned action: dialogues. (Transcript 1.1, p. 125.)
See Teacher’s file. I need some help. I’ll call my mother. 2 Students listen to the dialogue once
It’s Mother’s Day tomorrow. I’ll call and try to answer as many questions
my mother. as they can. If done in class, repeat
3 In pairs, students create a new the recording as many times as
dialogue for the unmatched necessary. Students compare their
picture, 3. answers. (Transcript 1.2, p. 125.)
e This activity can be reused later to 3 Students practise using the correct
evaluate students’ progress. preposition: in, on, at, through.
4 Students practise using will in the
question form.

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unit one 1
unit one
Locating people
1
Locating people

Speaking Speaking
focus on Language 1 Ask someone to do something. Be polite as
in the example. 1 In pairs or small groups, students take turns to
Polite requests Example: • come back later
Could you come back later, please? practise formal and informal requests.
Can I see Mr... ? More formal
1 come back later
Will you call... ? Could you wait... ?
Can you spell... ? May I speak to Mr... ? 2 repeat that
Take a seat, please. Would you like to... ? 3 call back later Focus on Grammar
Wait a moment. 4 call tomorrow morning
5 spell that again
Company policies will require office workers to be
Hold on a moment.
6 wait a few seconds courteous and polite not only to clients and visitors,
Grammar reference, page 104.
7 speak a little louder but to fellow workers as well.
2 1.2
Listen to the following conversations. Pay attention to the pronunciation and intonation. Modal verbs are used for polite requests: can, will,
1 May I speak to Mr. William Johnson? 4 Excuse me, I’d like to talk to Mrs. Hamilton. or more formal could, would or may. For example:
I’m sorry, sir. He isn’t in. Wait a moment, please. I’ll see if she’s in. Can I see you for a moment?
2 Excuse me, could I talk to Miss Robinson? 5 Good afternoon. May I speak to Mr. Johnson?
I’m afraid she’s busy right now. Just a moment, please. He’ll see you in a minute. The imperative. We can use the imperative for
3 Good morning. Can I see Mr. Harrison? 6 This is Mary Smith. May I speak to Mrs. Hills? polite requests in English, but we need to “soften”
I’m sorry, madam. He’s abroad on business. Hold on a moment, please. I’ll see if she’s available now. the language by adding please. For example: Have
a seat, please.
Comprehension
Refer students to the Grammar and language
3 1.3
Listen to the following telephone KEY VOCABULARY reference, Student’s Book, page 104.
conversation and answer these questions.
When a person is not available…
• What is the name of the company?
• Who’s calling? She’s out for lunch.
• Is Miss Johnson available? He’s away on a business trip. 2 Play CD 1.2. Pause so students can repeat
He’s busy.
• Why?
He’s not available at the moment.
the receptionist’s answers. See Teacher’s file.
1.3 She’s on holiday / vacation.
4 Listen again and write down the caller’s
He’s at / in a meeting.
part in your notebook.
3 Play CD 1.3. once and give students time
Receiver: Morris & Sons Company. Good morning. Glossary, page 106.
Caller: _______. to answer as many of the questions as they
Receiver: I’m afraid she’s busy at this moment, sir. 5 1.4
Listen to the dialogue. Then listen again can. Play the CD a second time so they can
Any message? and write down the receiver’s part in your complete their work. They can answer the
Caller: _______. notebook.
questions orally or in their notebooks.
Receiver: ________.
Caller: Hello, I’d like to speak to Mr. Walter Halls,
(Transcript 1.3, p. 119.)
please.
Receiver: ________.
Answers: Morris and Sons Co. Paul Smith.
Workbook, page 4, activities 5-6. Caller: Mr. Willis. No, she isn’t. She’s busy.
Receiver: ________.
No, Madam. Mr. Willis. W-I-L-L-I-S
9
4 Repeat CD 1.3. Students write or say the
caller’s part. See Teacher’s file.
Answers: Hello. My name’s Paul Smith. Could
Teacher’s file I talk to Miss Johnson? No, thank you. I’ll call
back later.
Student’s Book 4 & 5 Conversation practice
Before they write the missing
2 Before playing the recording, 5 Play CD 1.4. Students write or say the
information, students repeat the
students, in pairs, copy the sentences missing information orally. receiver’s part. (Transcript 1.4, p. 119.) See
on separate pieces of paper. They Students choose either dialogue Teacher’s file.
place them all face up in front of 4 or 5 and practise with a partner.
them. Play the CD. The students Answers: International Airlines. Sheila
Volunteers can read them out in
match the sentence pairs. front of their classmates. speaking. Mr. Hall is away on business, sir.
Who’s calling? Mr. Wells?
Additional practice Workbook, page 4
Students use phrases from the Key Answer key, p. 112.
Vocabulary box to make similar Key Vocabulary
conversations with a partner: 5 Students can complete this exercise
in small groups. There are many ways to answer when a person is
Can I speak to Mr. Smith? I’m sorry, not available. Sometimes your boss might even ask
sir. He’s not available. They can even 6 In pairs, students fill out the
telephone conversation and practise you to screen calls . This means you might tell
explain why he / she isn’t available:
He’s in Munich until Friday. reading the dialogue out loud. Refer unwanted callers that he / she is away or in a
them to the dialogues on pages 8 meeting all morning.
and 9 for sample language.
Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s
Book, page 106, by copying and translating the
words from the lesson.

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unit one
Locating people
1 unit one 1
Locating people

Let’s practise! Let’s practise!


When answering the phone or receiving a message, the secretary or office worker may frequently have problems
understanding the name of a person, place or date. In English, spelling out a word is very common practice for
1 In order to spell misunderstood words, students solving this problem.
need to correctly pronounce and review the
letters of the alphabet. Play CD 1.5, pausing so
focus on Grammar
1.5
1 Listen and repeat after the recording.
students can repeat the alphabet. Insist on the A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O
difference between difficult pairs: G and J; E P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Question words
and I; D and T; B and V. See Teacher’s file. 1.6
“Wh” question Use
2 Listen and write in your notebook the Who? people
words the speaker is spelling out. Then, Where? places
check your answers with a partner. What? things
2 Play CD 1.6. Pause so students can write When? time
what they hear. (Transcript 1.6, page 119.) Group work
The meeting is in Bangladesh.
Choose a famous person or place and spell Where? Could you spell that, please?
Answers: 1 Montreal; 2 Edinburgh; 3 Susan the name to your group. Write in your
Mr. Jentzend is arriving next Monday.
Finnley; 4 Paul Phillips; 5 Mahoney Road; notebook the words your classmates spell. Who? Can you spell it, please?
6 Mel Gibson Examples: I’ll be there on Thursday.
Claudia Schiffer Vancouver Pablo Picasso When? Can you spell that, please?
Did you get the jpeg files?
Key Vocabulary KEY VOCABULARY The what? Can you spell that, please?

Spelling Grammar reference, page 97.


In pairs, students practise asking for names to be
spelt out, using the different expressions in the box. When names, addresses or other information is
not clear when talking face to face or on the 3 Say the question word that corresponds to
phone, ask the person to spell out the word. the expressions in italics; then use different
You can use the following expressions: expressions to ask someone to spell it.
Group work Polite Example:
Spell it, please.
With their books closed, spell out the examples Spell that, please.
Mr. Rivas is arriving next June.

in the book. Students open their books and Can you spell that?
Who? Can you spell it please?
1 Helen is at a meeting in Kenya.
check their answers. They repeat the same More formal
2 I’m staying at the Old Belize.
Could you spell that, please?
activity in groups of 4 or 5. Encourage them to Could you spell that again, please? 3 Rodney Hills is my boss.
4 Pauline will call you back.
use spelling questions from the Key Vocabulary Glossary, page 106. 5 The seminar is in Munich.
box.
Pairwork
Say, then spell your name to a classmate.
Focus on Grammar Then exchange roles.
A common phrase erroneously used by second
language learners is Could you repeat that, please? Workbook, page 5.

If you are not specific about what it is that you do


not understand, the speaker will most likely repeat 10
the entire phrase exactly as he / she had said it
before. Ask students to spell a specific word from
the Key Vocabulary box or to use question words:
Who? Could you spell your boss’ surname please? Teacher’s file
Where? I’m afraid I don’t understand the name of
the place. Could you spell it for me, please? Student’s Book Workbook, page 5
Answer key, p. 112.
1 Alphabet triangle
When practising pronunciation, 1 Students ask questions using a
3 Students practise in pairs or as a large group.
students can learn to group letters question word that refers to the
See Teacher’s file. phrase in italics.
according to their sounds:
Answers: 1 Where? Could you spell that B C D E G P T V Z* (*Am.) 2 Students answer the questions first
please?; 2 Where? Spell it, please; 3 Who? F L M N S X Z* (*Br.) orally with a partner or in small
Can you spell his name, please?; 4 Who? Can A H J K groups.
you spell that?; 5 Where? Could you spell the Q U W 3 Students listen to WB CD 1.3 and fill
I Y in the missing information. Then,
city please?
O they decide which question word
R best represents the information they
Pairwork 3 Bad connection wrote down. (Transcript 1.3, p. 125.)
Students can spell their name, the name of a Ask students to imagine they are 4 In pairs, students continue filling out
different classmate or the name of a famous speaking on a mobile phone and that this chart as an extension of the
there is a bad connection. Do the pairwork activity in their Student’s
person. See Workbook, page 5, activity 4.
activity, but muffle the words in Book.
italics or replace them by imitating
static or background noise. Ask
students to think up other examples
and to “muffle them” to a partner.

12
01 - Unidad 1 22/5/06 20:34 Página 13

unit one 1
unit one
Locating people
1
Locating people

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Pronunciation: the /i/ sound

focus on Grammar
1.7
1 Listen and repeat.
1 Explain to the class that each vowel in
it his Miss It’s busy
in list big It’s on his list To be English has a long sound (the name of the
Mr. Mrs. million It’s ringing
Full form Short form
letter; in this case, /ai /) and a short sound
little sister minute It’s open
I am (not) I’m (not) (in this case, /i/). This pronunciation section
finish visit busy It’s a pity
office business this He isn’t in
you you’re (not) examines the short sound of the letter “I”. Play
we are (not) we’re (not)
Willis Phillips Miller He’s in his office
they they’re (not)
CD 1.7. Insist on the closed /i / sound as they
six sixty sixty-six His sister is in
he he’s (not) / he isn’t repeat.
fifth sixth give Mr. William Phillips
she is (not) she’s (not) / she isn’t
Sit down Mrs. Willis In a minute It’s sixty-six
it it’s (not) / it isn’t
Grammar reference, page 97. Focus on Grammar
The verb to be in the present simple uses the short
2 Choose five words from the listening and write them in your notebook.
sound of the letter “i” in its third person form. Ask
Pairwork students to compare the sound of I’m not (long
With a partner, write a dialogue about locating people. Use words and sentences from the unit. /ai /) versus he isn’t (short sound /i / in both is and
the contraction n’t).
Acronyms
Acronyms are letters that represent the abbreviated form of names, places and objects. They can be formed from the
initial letters of a name, such as USA for United States of America, or parts of a series of words, such as radar: 2 Students listen to the recording CD 1.7
radio detecting and ranging. again and write down five words as they hear
Examples:
them. Then they check the spellings with a
USA = The United States of America UK =The United Kindgom (of Great Britain)
WWW = World Wide Web CPU =Central Processing Unit partner.
DNA = Deoxyribonucleic Acid ROM =Read-Only Memory
3 Read the following sentences after your teacher. Note that some acronyms are pronounced Pairwork
letter by letter, others as one word.
a AIDS is a very serious disease. c NAFTA is an association of American countries.
After writing their dialogues, students practise
b Spain joined the EC over twenty years ago. d The price of the equipment was $2,000 FOB. and present their dialogues to the rest of the
class. See Teacher’s file.
4 Which of the acronyms in the examples are the same in your language?

3 AIDS and NAFTA are pronounced as words.


EC and FOB are pronounced as individual letters.
Workbook, page 4, Acronyms. Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 1. There is no specific rule as to how acronyms
should be said or read. As a rule of thumb, if an
11 acronym is pronounceable, it is probably said as
a single word. When writing, you should write
out the phrase or words in full first before using
the acronym.
Teacher’s file
4 As a large group, discuss the different acronyms.
Student’s Book 4 Internet work Write a list on the board dividing the acronyms
There are many acronym web pages
1 Ms. into those that are the same, those that are
on the Internet. Students (alone or in
Although not included in the listening, groups) can look up other acronyms similar and those that are completely different.
tell students there is another title used that may be of use to the class. Can they see any common traits among any of
for women (Ms.) that also uses the short the groups? See Teacher’s file.
/i/ sound. See Student’s Book, page 12 Workbook, page 4
about specific practice with these Answer key, p. 112.
Answers: The following acronyms are
different titles (Mr., Miss, Mrs., Ms.). probably common in the students’ native
Acronyms
Pairwork language: WWW, CPU, ROM, as it is common to
Pairwork use anglicised words in everyday conversation,
This can be turned into an informal
As an extension of the Student’s
evaluation. Evaluate students on the especially in the field of computers.
Book activities, students can go back
correct use of unit terms and Certain acronyms may be similar to L1, but
to page 4 and work on the acronym
phrases, pronunciation and section. They may need to look up with the letters switched around: AIDS, NAFTA,
intonation and body language. Tell the meanings of some of the EC, DNA, because of the varying word order in
students what you will be looking for acronyms in a dictionary or on the different languages.
ahead of time so they can practise Internet.
these things, especially body
language. To be an office worker, 1 In pairs or small groups, students
spell out the acronyms they have Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 1.
they must display courtesy and See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
confidence and you will be looking looked up previously in a dictionary
or from the Internet work activity. page 14.
for this during their dialogues.

13
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unit one
Locating people
1 unit one 1
Locating people

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

In English-speaking countries, men use the title Mr. Mr., Mrs. or Miss?
before their surname. For women, however, this
The use of titles such as Mr., Mrs. tradition — in some areas of work they
topic is more complicated. This article deals with
(pronounced “misses”) and Miss has prefer to keep their single names. In these
the social and cultural meanings behind the experienced some changes over the cases the word Mrs. has to be replaced by
different titles Mrs., Miss, Ms. It also examines the centuries. These are contracted forms of the the word Ms. (the pronunciation is
words master and mistress, which were different from ‘Miss’) since the social title
sometimes “uncomfortable” situations that may originally titles of courtesy, but by the Mrs. refers only to a married woman using
arise when trying to be “politically correct”. mid-1600s, these abbreviated forms and her husband’s last name. The term Ms. is
their current pronunciation became socially also very useful when writing if we don’t
Students reread the article. As a large group, accepted titles. During the nineteenth century, the word know the marital status of the woman we are addressing.
discuss the follow-up questions. Mrs. began to be used to refer to a married woman, and The word Ms. seems to be an abbreviation or blend of
Miss to a single woman. both Miss and Mrs. and was first used by Mario Pei in The
In English-speaking cultures, women traditionally Story of Language, written in 1949. However, be careful
Survey begin to use their husband’s last name when they get because not all women use or prefer this title... so, use it to
married. However, these days, not all women follow this be on the safe side, but take note if someone corrects you!
Working in small groups, students ask each other
which title they prefer. Afterwards, they can present
their information on pie charts, bar graphs or line

?
What is the customary use of titles in your country?
graphs. What are the advantages of this traditional practice in English-speaking countries?
What are the disadvantages?
Find out about the use of titles in three other countries abroad.

OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION Survey


Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. Interview female classmates and see which social title is most popular.
1 Describe to each student his or her role
individually. Then ask students to act out
the scenario. Don’t forget!
Student 1: You have just flown in from Miami
• Polite requests: Can I take a message?
and are visiting a subsidiary overseas. It is
• Spelling: Could you spell that, please?
difficult for you to understand the person • Simple future: He’ll see you in a minute. I’ll call tomorrow.
greeting you, so you will have to ask him / her • The alphabet: E, I, G, J, W, Z...
to repeat and spell names and places. • Pronunciation /i/: it, finish, busy
You need to arrange a meeting tomorrow • Social titles: Mrs. (married woman using her husband’s name)
afternoon with the Sales Head from this office. Miss (young girl or single woman)
Ms. (adult woman)
Student 2: You are greeting an important
person from your subsidiary in Miami because
Mr. Sheridan, the head of the Sales department 12
is in a meeting until 2:00 pm. You will be
happy to take your visitor to the Four Shores
hotel where he / she will be staying.
OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
2 Describe the role of each student in the
Ask the following questions. Students answer
mock telephone conversation. The caller the questions with suitable responses.
uses the information on the strip of paper.
The receptionist answers the telephone 1 Could you put me through to the Sales
and takes the message. department, please?
Write the following information on strips 2 I’d like to speak to Ms. Parker.
of paper: 3 Who’s calling?
a)Your name: Mr. / Mrs. Thompson 4 Would you like to leave a message?
Your company: Morris and Sons 5 Is that (name of student)?
Who you are calling: Mr. Alexander Gale
Your message: Asking about last week’s Sample answers: 1 Hold on a moment,
invoice. Have him call back. please. I´ll put you through. 2 I’m afraid she’s
not available at the moment. 3 It’s (name of
b)Your name: Mr. / Ms. Vachinsky student). 4 That’s O.K., I’ll call back later.
Your company: K & S Insurance 5 Speaking.
Who you are calling: The Personnel Director
(Don’t know his/her name...)
Your message: You’ll call back later.

14
02 - Unidad 2 22/5/06 20:43 Página 15

unit two 2
People at work
Secretarial or administrative jobs are found in almost any area of work: education, health,
construction, government, sports, travel, commerce, etc. In one way or another, all these areas are
related to business.
In this unit, students will look at a company organigram and will define the activities of each
department. They will ask about people’s jobs, as well as describe their jobs to people. They will
also practise pronunciation and intonation.

Skills objectives
• To listen for specific information
• To identify the use of the present simple
unit two 2
tense in listenings and readings People at work
• To practise pronunciation and intonation
• To practise conversations with a partner
Introduction
Language focus Secretarial or administrative jobs are found in almost any area of work: education, health,
• Present simple revision: habits, job construction, government, sports, travel, commerce, etc. In one way or another all these areas
descriptions are related to business, which is a human activity found in all societies.
• Frequency adverbs
• Possessive adjectives Objectives
• Pronunciation of the long vowel /i / sound
• To learn how to address clients in a polite manner
• Contrast the short /i / and long /i / vowel
sounds • To talk about habitual actions at work
• To describe a daily work schedule
Key vocabulary
& structures
• To practise phone conversations
• Hold on a moment • To revise possessive adjectives, frequency adverbs and time expressions
• I’ll put you through • To learn vocabulary and expressions commonly used in conversations at work
• an appointment • To contrast the /i/ and the /i/ sounds
• salary, benefits, job training, job title /
position, hierarchy
• frequency adverbs: always, usually,
sometimes, often, rarely, never
• everyday / daily, once / twice a fortnight
Business tasks
• Transferring callers to different departments
• Understanding company structures and
hierarchies
• Describing your job position to others
• Talking to clients and co-workers in a
courteous and polite manner

Additional material 13
• Grammar and language reference,
pages 98 and 99
• Glossary, pages 106-107
• Workbook, pages 6, 7 and 8
• CD-Rom, Unit 2 Unit warm-up questions
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
page 20
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • What job would you like to have?
Book, page 20 • What do you find most attractive about that job?
• What are the typical jobs within a modern company?
02 - Unidad 2 22/5/06 20:43 Página 16

unit two
People at work
2 unit two 2
People at work

Listening Listening
1 Look at the organigram. Define the activities of each department.
1 The class looks at the organigram in their Example: The Marketing department involves publicity, market research...
books and describes the other four
departments in the company. Encourage them
Thornton & Thiennes Associated
to use other expressions besides the one in the
example: In the Finance department, we
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
cover...; The Human Resources department
deals with... MANAGING DIRECTOR
See Teacher’s file.
FINANCE HUMAN RESOURCES PRODUCTION & PURCHASING MARKETING SALES
Credit Computing Personnel Affairs Purchasing Publicity Training Manager
2 Play CD 2.1. Pause after each dialogue Accounts Banking Benefits Training Manufacturing Market Research District Managers
and ask: What department does he / she need? Salaries Foreign Trade Unions Entertainment Transport Marketing Policies Sales Representatives
Marketing Planning
Who does he / she need to talk to? Students
write in their notebooks the department and
the name of the person to speak to in each 2 2.1
Listen to the dialogues and write the C
case. name of the person to speak to in each case. R: Computer Service. Good afternoon.
C: I’m interested in renting some equipment. Who may
R = Receptionist C = Client V = Visitor
Answers: Dialogue 1: Sales department; A
I speak to, madam?
R: Mr. Simpson, from the Rental Department. I’ll put
Mr. Phillips; Dialogue 2: Production and R: Thornton and Thiennes Associated. Good morning.
you through to his secretary. Her extension is busy.
C: Good morning. I’d like to speak to someone about
Purchasing department; Mr. Robert Rogers. Can you hold on a moment?
the MCM machine, please.
Dialogue 3: Rental department; Mr. Simpson R: Hold on a moment, sir. I’ll put you through to the
R: Yes, I’ll hold on.

Sales Department.
C: Could I have the name of the Sales Manager? 3 Cover the dialogues and listen again. Which
3 ones use the present simple?
Repeat CD 2.1. Students cover the text R: It’s Mr. Phillips.

and say which dialogues use the present B Pairwork


simple. R: Good morning, sir. What can I do for you? Look at the organigram again and ask and
V: Good morning. I work for Printer Manufacturers, a answer about the correct department.
Answers: Dialogue B: I work for Printer Canadian company. Could I have an appointment
Example:
Manufacturers, a Canadian company; You have with the Purchasing Manager?
Student A: I’d like to speak to someone about my
R: You have to ask his secretary, Miss Jones. She’s
to ask his secretary, Miss Jones. She’s upstairs, upstairs, in office number 6. salary, please.
in office number 6; It’s Mr. Rogers Dialogue C: V: May I have the name of the Manager, please? Student B: I’ll put you through to the Finance
Her extension is busy R: Certainly. It’s Mr. Rogers. Robert Rogers. Department.
V: Thank you very much. • my salary • publicity
• benefits • manufacturing my product
• market research • training new people
Pairwork
14
Students look at the organigram and read
through the example in the book. They take
turns as caller and receptionist. See Teacher’s
file.
Teacher’s file
Answers: my salary: Finance department;
publicity: Marketing department; benefits: Student’s Book Pairwork
Human Resources department; manufacturing In pairs, students choose one of the
1 Divide the class into small groups. exchanges from the pairwork activity
my product: Production and Purchasing Ask students to imagine they have and think up a short dialogue, using
department; market research: Marketing set up a small company. They need activity 2 as a model. Volunteer pairs
department; training new people: Sales to make a company organigram and read their dialogues to the class.
department. assign jobs to each group member.
Additional practice
Tell students that they have to give
a presentation about their new
department. They need to describe
their department and elaborate on
the different areas it covers.

16
02 - Unidad 2 22/5/06 20:43 Página 17

unit two 2
unit two
People at work
2
People at work

Speaking Speaking
2.2
1 Listen and repeat. Then practise with a partner.
1 What do you do? I’m Mr. Thornton’s secretary. I work in the Finance Department.
2 What does Miss Hill do? She’s a receptionist. She greets visitors and answers the phone. 1 Play CD 2.2. Students repeat, reproducing
3 What do they do? They’re sales representatives. They have to travel a lot. the speakers’ pronunciation and intonation. As
4 What do you do? We’re clerks. We work in the Credit Department.
5 What does Mr. Lee do? He’s an accountant. He deals with accounts and taxes.
they practise with a partner, walk around
6 What does he do? He’s an engineer. He supervises the Production Department. correcting problem areas in pronunciation.
7 What position does Elaine hold in the company? She’s a lawyer. She represents the company in court.

KEY VOCABULARY 2 2.3


Listen and answer the following Group work
Asking about someone’s job questions after the speaker. Students choose a job from activity 1. They
Example:
What do you do?
• an auditor
take turns asking each other about their
What position do you hold? fictitious jobs.
What does your boss do?
What’s your job title?
He’s an auditor.
What does he / she do? a a typist d an air traffic controller
What position does he / she hold? b an engineer e clerks Key Vocabulary
What’s his / her job title? c doctors f a union leader
Because the present simple refers to habitual
Glossary, page 106.
Now ask questions. actions, we use it when asking about someone’s
Example: job.
Group work • your boss
Now choose a job from activity 1. Answer What does your boss do? Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s
questions from your group. a you d Miss Lee Book, page 106, by copying and translating the
Example: b Mr. Freeman e those people words from the lesson.
What position do you hold? c Mr. and Mrs. Reed f Mrs. Newman

I’m a receptionist. I greet visitors.


Pairwork
Focus on Grammar
Choose a dialogue and act it out with a
focus on Grammar partner. Quickly revise the present simple with the class.
Then, in pairs make up a new dialogue Remind them that the verb for the third person
Present simple for habit using the organigram and fictitious names.
singular takes an -s.
I he
you she works / has / goes Refer students to the Grammar and language
work / have / go
we it reference, Student’s Book, page 98.
they

Grammar reference, page 98.


2 Play CD 2.3. Students answer the speaker
as in the example. (Transcript 2.3, page 120.)
Workbook, pages 6-7.
Answers: I’m a typist; He’s an engineer;
15 They’re doctors; She’s an air traffic controller;
They’re clerks; She’s a Union leader
Play the second part of CD 2.3. Students
ask questions like the one in the example.
Teacher’s file See Teacher’s file.
Student’s Book Pairwork Answers: What do you do? What does Mr.
Students follow the example and Freeman do? What do Mr. and Mrs. Reed do?
2 Students ask each other questions take turns asking and answering
and make up the answers. What does Miss Lee do? What do those
each other’s questions.
people do? What does Mrs. Newman do?
Workbook, pages 6 & 7 1 Students circle the correct article.
Answer key, p. 112. Present simple
1 Students first read through the Pairwork
Jobs
1 Students match the jobs and their summary in their workbooks. Then Students choose a dialogue to practise.
descriptions. students play WB CD 2.2 and fill in Volunteer pairs act out their new dialogues in
the blanks. front of their classmates.
2 Play WB CD 2.1 without pausing.
Students try to answer as many 2 Students complete the sentences
questions as possible. Play the CD with the correct form of the present
again so they can complete their work. simple.
e This activity can be reused later to
Indefinite articles
Focus on Grammar evaluate students’ progress.
Words beginning with a vowel take Debate
“an” unless it is a long /ju/ sound as Students discuss the questions first
in uniform, universe, use. in pairs. After a few minutes, join
Words beginning with a consonant 2 or 3 pairs together to continue
take “a” unless the word starts with the discussion.
a vowel sound as in MA or X-Ray.

17
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unit two
People at work
2 unit two 2
People at work

Let’s practise Let’s practise!


Asking questions
2.4
1 Listen and repeat to practise intonation in questions.
1 Intonation in questions is sometimes
• May I talk to Mr. Willis? • Is your boss in?
difficult for students. Play CD 2.4, pausing if • Could I speak to Mr Smith? • Are the letters ready?
necessary. Students repeat with the correct • Can I see the General Manager, please? • Is she available now?
• Could you spell that, please? • Are you busy?
intonation.
• Would you like to wait? • Who’s at reception?
• Will you call back? • What’s his name?
• Will they arrive tomorrow morning? • Where’s the meeting?
Focus on Grammar
2 2.5
Ask questions using Do or Does. Then, Pairwork
Remind students that in questions, they need to use compare with the recording. Student A: Ask questions. Choose a question
the auxiliary verb “does” for the third person 1 Does your office close on Saturdays? from below.
singular. 2 Do you have to type letters everyday? Student B: Answer using frequency adverbs
3 …you practise English with your classmates? from the box below.
Refer students to the Grammar and language 4 …Mr. Smith travel abroad every month?
Example:
reference, Student’s Book, pages 98-99. 5 …they send the invoices by post?
6 …we have to type in the numbers in the computer?
A: How often do you type letters in English?
7 …the order specify the delivery date? B: I often type letters in English.
2 ...flights arrive at Middle West Airport?
Students read the first question out loud. Now answer these questions in your

?
notebook. ...you type letters in English?
Play CD 2.5 to compare their intonation. Pause How often do...
...your boss ever travel abroad?
Does...
the CD to give students time to read the next ...you use a fax machine?

question before resuming the recording. focus on Grammar Do you ever...


...wear a uniform?
...the bank ever open on Saturdays?
Present simple questions
Affirmative Negative KEY VOCABULARY
Pairwork I work?
Frequency adverbs
you go? do not
Revise the meaning of the adverbs in the Key Do
we speak? (don’t) always sometimes
Vocabulary box and the habitual time they have to? usually rarely
often never
expressions before they begin this exercise. he like? does not
Students take turns asking each other Does she travel? (doesn’t) Glossary, page 107.
it practise?
questions and answering using frequency
Grammar reference, page 98.
adverbs. Habitual time express
ions
daily
every day
once a fortnight
every Monday
twice a year
Key Vocabulary every week / month
four times a year
every two years
Students can personalise these words in their
glossary by marking them with a “percentage of
Workbook, page 8.
frequency”. For example: always (100%);
16
sometimes (50%)

Habitual time expressions


Bring their attention to difficult words: once, twice Teacher’s file
(versus one time / two times); everyday (written
altogether); fortnight (versus two weeks / 14 days). Student’s Book Talking about frequency &
frequency adverbs
Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s Time expressions 1 Play CD 2.4. Students do the
Book, page 107 by copying and translating the In small groups, students make 3 true activity orally first. Then they fill in
words from the lesson in their notebooks. See sentences and 1 false one using the exercise.
Teacher’s file. habitual time expressions. Then they 2 Play CD 2.5. Students answer the
read them to their classmates who try questions they wrote in activity 1.
and guess which one is the false
3 Students complete the sentences
statement.
with adverbs. Refer them to the Key
Vocabulary box on Student’s Book,
Workbook, pages 7 & 8 page 16 for a list of adverbs.
Answer key, p. 112. e This activity can be reused later to
Present simple evaluate students’ progress.
3 Students use time expressions 4 Students complete the sentences
to answer the questions. Then play using the phrases in the box. In pairs,
CD 2.3, pausing if necessary. they compare their sentences.
Students compare their answers with
the listening.

18
02 - Unidad 2 22/5/06 20:43 Página 19

2
unit two
unit two
People at work
2
People at work

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Pronunciation: the /i/ and the /i/ sound
1 Do you remember the sound we practised in Unit 1? 1 Give students 5 minutes to write down as
Write down as many words as you can remember from unit 1 that take the /i/ sound. many words as they can remember from unit 1.
Example: sit, busy... Then ask them to read out their lists. If anyone
2 2.6
Listen to the /i/ sound and repeat after Possessive adjectives else has the same word, they cross it off the
the speaker. list. Did anyone think of words that no one else
repeat
seat
overseas
beeper
Could you repeat that, please?
Mr. Reed is on his leave.
focus on Grammar had on their lists?
three increase Possessive adjectives + noun
Take a seat, please.
fourteen colleague
What do you mean? my name / office
2 Read examples to the students of words
deal brief
speak achieve The meeting is at three. your department / job that have the long /i/ sound. Compare this to
his signature / age
Dean Leeds
I see! her extension / boss
the sound studied in Unit 1: /i/. Play CD 2.6.
see Tennessee
free New Zealand
Are you free? its monitor / disc Pause so students can concentrate on their
our computer / office
receive believe Our deals with the East increased.
your salary / decision
pronunciation as they repeat. See Teacher’s file.
meeting employee Who’s the leader of the team? their project/employer
leader e-mail
Let’s meet in New Zealand.
Grammar reference, page 99.
keep
leave
cheap
read My colleagues are in Leeds.
Pairwork
we East We’ll see them in Tennessee. 4 Choose 5 words from the box and write Students use expressions from activity 2 and
sentences in your notebook that include make up a short dialogue with a partner. Then
Pairwork possessive adjectives.
they change partners and practise each other’s
Make up a dialogue with expressions from the Example: Tell me about your job.
lists in 2. Practise it with different partners. dialogue.
Group work
3 Practise saying these words and decide if Write a dialogue using two sentences from
they use the /i/ or the /i/ sound. each of your notebooks. 3 Students read out the words and decide if they
Miss thirteen use the /i / or the /i / sound. This activity can be
minute receive done as a large group, in small groups or in
meeting simple
delivery receipt pairs. Some words have more than one of
these sounds.
Answers: /i/ sound: miss, minute, simple,
delivery; /i/ sound: thirteen; combined
sounds: meeting, receive, receipt.

Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 2. Focus on Grammar


17 Possessive adjectives describe who something
belongs to. Remind students that the adjective
its does not have an apostrophe like It’s (article
+ verb).
Teacher’s file Refer students to the Grammar and language
reference, Student’s Book, page 99.
Student’s Book Additional practice
With the same partner, each student
2 Write the following pairs of words on chooses one word from each pair. 4 Students choose 5 words from the box and
the board: e write sentences in their notebooks that include
One student reads the word and the
feel / fill, sheep / ship, been / bin, other student writes it down possessive adjectives. They can use words from
seen / sin, fourteen / forty correctly. activity 2. See Teacher’s file.
Explain to students that sometimes, e This activity can be reused later to
the vowel sounds /i/ and /i/ are evaluate students’ progress.
Group work
essential to differentiate words and
that mispronouncing a word can lead In small groups, students exchange their
to misunderstandings. notebooks and think how they can combine
With a partner, students practise the two sentences from each of their notebooks to
pronunciation of the pairs. create a dialogue. Once they have finished,
each group will read their dialogues to the rest
of the class.

Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 2.


See optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 20.

19
02 - Unidad 2 22/5/06 20:43 Página 20

unit two
People at work
2 unit two 2
People at work

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with the importance of company


hierarchy in certain countries like Japan. Western Company hierarchy
companies place less stress between directorial and ure of any company and
Think about the organisational struct
subordinate relations as opposed to companies in there is always a hierarchy of some
description. The Managing
ers; these are above the
the East or Middle East. Likewise, larger companies Director is above the Divisional Manag
the workers.
would have more “formal” relations between Departmental Managers, who are above
status within a company is
In some cultures, the emphasis on
workers (particularly managerial versus entry-level an example. Businesses in Japan
extremely important. Take Japan as
than companies in the West,
or mid-level employees) than smaller companies. tend to have a more vertical structure
important role in working
where status and position play a less
Students reread the article. As a large group, ny behaviour and language are
relationships. In a Japanese compa
on of the person you are talking
discuss the follow-up questions. modified according to the job positi
give a lot of importance to
to. However, Japanese organisations
to do what is best for the
group goals and every person tries
common good.
Debate
Divide the class into small groups and assign each a

?
Find out about business culture in another country and share your information with the class.
“side” to defend (pro or con). Give them a few How does your information compare with business culture in your own country?
minutes to write a short list of reasons why they In your opinion, should higher status positions keep their distance from lower status positions?
In your country, is language modified according to the person you are talking to?
defend their position. Then, bring the smaller
groups together so as to form two debating teams
Debate
(for and against).Give them a few minutes to
Are you for or against highly marked hierarchies within an organisation? Defend your position.
compile their lists into one list of arguments and
counter-arguments. One of the sides presents one
of their arguments and explains why or gives
examples. Then the next team has the opportunity
to present their counter-argument.
Don’t forget!
• Company organigrams: Human Resources.
• Position hierarchies: The Managing Director.
• Asking about people’s jobs: What do you do?,
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION What position do you hold in your company?
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. • Asking about frecuency: How often? Do you ever?
1 Describe the role play to the students. • Present simple for habitual actions: He works every Monday.
Write important information for each role She doesn’t work on Saturdays. They work every day.
on the board or on strips of paper. • Pronunciation /i/: repeat, keep, brief.

Student 1: You are an entry-level receptionist


who needs to find out who is in charge of 18
which department and what that department
does. Write a three-column chart in your
notebook: Manager / Department / Functions.
Student 2: You are training a new receptionist. OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
Answer his / her questions about people in the
company. Choose four departments from the 1 Ask students to spell these words:
organigram on Student’s Book, page 14 and accounts department, reception, recording
invent names for the heads of each studio, stock warehouse, loading bay, meeting
department. space, archives.

2 Interview students about: 2 Read these definitions of places in a


a) Office work: Do you think you would make company. Students guess the word.
a good secretary or office worker? Why? Is 1 A place for keeping papers, reports, records
there any other job that you find attractive? and documents
Why? Is there any difference between men 2 A collection of materials or products to use
and women in relation to these other types in the future
of jobs?
3 A building or place for keeping products or
b) Retirement: At what age do most people materials
retire in this country? At what age would
you like to retire? Why? What would you Answers: 1 archive; 2 stock; 3 warehouse
like to do after you retire? Is there any
difference between men and women in
relation to retirement?

20
03 - Unidad 3 22/5/06 20:45 Página 21

unit three 3
Dealing with numbers
Numbers are always present in our daily activities, either in oral or written form. They can facilitate
communication, or they may lead to serious misunderstandings. They have more or less the same
form in different languages; however, there are slight differences in the way they are used.
In this unit, students will find examples of numbers used in different contexts. They will revise the
past of the verb to be and they will learn expressions used in daily work conversations. They will
also practise pronunciation and intonation.

Skills objectives
• To listen for specific information
• To identify numbers and time expressions in
unit three 3
listenings and readings Dealing with numbers
• To practise pronunciation and intonation
• To practise one-on-one conversations with
a partner
Introduction
Numbers are always present in our daily activities, either in oral or written form. They can facilitate
• To lead group discussions communication, or they may lead to serious misunderstandings. They have more or less the same
form in different languages; however, there are slight differences in the way they are used.
Language focus
• How to read numbers in English
• Cultural differences in the use of commas Objectives
and periods in numbers
• To talk about dates, phone numbers and different currencies
• Review asking about numbers
• Revise the past tense of the verb “to be” • To use ordinal and cardinal numbers
• Pronunciation of the consonant /ɵ/ sound • To talk about time and schedules
Key vocabulary • To look at numbers in Maths
& structures • To revise the past of the verb “to be”
• thirteen, thirty, twentieth, XIX • To learn vocabulary and expressions used in daily work conversations
• fee, wages, fringe benefits, by check / cash • To practise the /ɵ/ sound
• How much / many...?; How often...?; How
far...?; How long..?
• half past; quarter past / to; at
Business tasks
• Identifying different currencies
• Talking about flights, schedules and
timetables
• Telling time
• Discussing the importance of punctuality

19
Additional material
• Grammar and language reference,
pages 98 and 100
• Workbook, pages 9, 10 and 11 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 3 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • What numbers do you usually use everyday?
page 26
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • Could you express these numbers in English?
Book, page 26 • What kind of information is given in numbers?
• How many languages can you count in?
03 - Unidad 3 22/5/06 20:45 Página 22

unit three
Dealing with numbers
3 unit three 3
Dealing with numbers

Listening Listening
1 Look at the numbers below. What do they refer to?
1 Students look at the numbers and name what Example:

they refer to. This task can be done either in • Pg. 24 = page 24
• BA915 = a flight number
small groups or with the entire class. See
Teacher’s file. Pg. 24 ZIP 12244
$5,850 IQ 140
373 - 44 - 60
Answers: page number (P. 24); hotel room 17th 1/2 BA 915
VII B.C. BA 707 1.
(Room 36); dates ( October 18, 1976 / 31st 2.
3480912
August / VII B.C.); temperatures (14º F / 15º C); Room 36 15º C 3.
postal code (Zip 12244); address (1738 £200 4.
737 58 92
4:30 14º F 55 + 58 = 113
Lorraine St.); ID number (ID 4.876.665); Ex. 2266
78%
intelligence quotient (IQ 140); currency 17.58
5.8
1738 Lorraine St. $4567
($5,850 / $4567 / £200); percentage (78%); 2nd
fractions (3/4 / 1/2); flight numbers (BA 707 / 01-35-887660 October 18, 1976 3/4
BA 915); serial number (01-35-887660); time
ID 4.876.665 EXIT 25 A 31st August
(4:30 / 17.58); telephone numbers (373-44-60
/ 737 58 92 / 3480912); decimals (5.8);
addition (55 + 58 = 113); a list (1. / 2. / 3. / 4.); 2 3.1
Cover the dialogues and listen. What numbers can you hear?
ordinal numbers (17th / 2nd); interstate sign C = Client R = Recepcionist
(EXIT 25 A); extension number (Ext. 2266). A C
C: Is this 3734460? R: Whiett Corporation. Good afternoon.
R: Yes, madam. C: Mrs. Rose Adams, please.
2 R: I’m afraid she isn’t in. Do you want to leave a
Students cover the dialogues. Play CD 3.1, C: Can I speak to Mr. Freeman?
R: I’m sorry, madam. There isn’t a Mr. Freeman here. message?
pausing after each dialogue. Ask the class to C: Yes, please. Tell her to call Mr. John Matthews, at
repeat the numbers they hear. See Teacher’s file. B 3480912, extension 506, as soon as she gets in.
R: Sanders & Sanders Ltd. Good morning. R: Could you repeat the number, please?
Answers: Dialogue 1: 3734460; Dialogue 2: C: May I speak to Miss Patricia Lee, please? C: 3480912, extension 506.
R: Do you know her extension number? R: Thank you sir. I’ll give her your message.
2266; Dialogue 3: 3480912, Ext. 506.
C: I think it’s 2266.
R: Hold on, please, I’ll put you through.

3 Students choose four numbers from the box 3 Choose four numbers from the box and write sentences in your notebook to illustrate their
e and write sentences in their notebooks to meaning.
illustrate their meaning. Ask volunteers to read Example:

some of their sentences. See Teacher’s file. She lives at number 1738, Lorraine Street.
Sample answers: My brother was born on
20
31st August; Drive on the motorway for 15
miles and take EXIT 25 A; The meeting is at
4:30; I am staying at the Plaza Hotel, room 36.

Teacher’s file
Student’s Book (Sample questions: How tall are
you?; What’s the temperature
1 Fast number game: Ask students to today?; Do you remember a friend’s
draw a 9-square grid in their notebooks. telephone number?; What is 12 X
Then they write one number from 6?; What’s your date of birth?)
activity 1 in each square. In pairs, one
of the students points to the numbers 3 Students compare their sentences in
in his / her grid at random and the small groups. Then they create short
other student has to say them as fast dialogues like the ones in their
as possible. Then they exchange roles. Student’s Book, using some of their
sentences.
2 Repeat CD 3.1 Students read the
e This activity can be reused later to
dialogues while they listen. In pairs,
they practise the pronunciation and evaluate students’ progress.
intonation. Correct any problem Additional practice
areas with individuals. Students write ten numbers in their
Additional practice notebooks. In pairs, one student
Ask students to write 5 questions in reads the numbers and the other
their notebooks. Explain that the writes them down. Then they
answers have to include a number. exchange roles.
(Eg. How old are you?). In pairs,
students take turns asking and
answering each other’s questions.

22
03 - Unidad 3 22/5/06 20:45 Página 23

unit three 3
unit three
Dealing with numbers
3
Dealing with numbers

Let’s practise numbers Let’s practise...


We can classify numbers into two groups: Cardinal and Ordinal. We can express them with words (five), Arabic
symbols (5) or Roman symbols (V).
Quickly revise the differences and special uses of
Ordinal numbers cardinal, ordinal and Roman numbers. Refer
Cardinal numbers Ordinal numbers express
Cardinal numbers sim
ply show quantity.
mainly for dates, cent
order. We use them students to the Grammar and language reference,
uries and aristocratic
ally func tion as adjectives, so they September 12th names. Student’s Book, page 98.
• Numbers usu
the plur al form . They are used in The 16th century
don’t take
perc enta ges, yea rs, time, schedules... Henry VIII
figures,
e hun dred and twen ty-five
thre
dred
1 Play CD 3.2. Students repeat the cardinal
six thousand four hun
rs and address numbers
as numbers, matching the speakers’ intonation
• We usually read yea
two separate numbers
. and pronunciation. Walk around correcting
ht Roman numbers
1358 thirteen fifty-eig problem areas in pronunciation. (Transcript 3.2,
ve
1995 nineteen ninety-fi Can you decipher these Roman numerals? Look
but: them up in a dictionary to check. page 121.) See Teacher’s file.
six
2006 two thousand and II VI C
ten
2010 two thousand and et
IV X D
ty-nine forty Willow Stre V L M
2940, Willow Street twen 2 Play CD 3.3. Students repeat the ordinal
a telephon e num ber are
• Repeated numbers in ble. numbers, matching the speakers’ intonation
them with the word dou
simplified by preceding e
t double four two thre and pronunciation. (Transcript 3.3, page 121.)
958- 4423 nine five eigh
rs.
same with double lette See Teacher’s file.
When spelling, we do the
M- I- dou ble S- I- double S- I- double P- I
MISSISSIPPI

3.2
Pairwork
1 Listen carefully to the pronunciation of these cardinal numbers.
Students take turns reading a few sentences as
2 3.3
Now listen to the pronunciation of these ordinal numbers. their partner writes down the numbers he / she
hears.
Pairwork
Read these sentences aloud. Then, write down the numbers in your notebook. Answers: a 3456; b 289; c 3000000;
a The computer was three thousand four hundred and f The repair service is fifty five pounds and forty pence. d 1492; e 3.8; f £55.40; g 8614; h 30506;
fifty six dollars. g Our new address is eighty six fourteen Oak Avenue.
b The ticket to Wales is two hundred and eighty nine pounds. h Call us on three O five O six, extension double seven three
Ext. 7732; i 0.5.
c The profit was three million last year. two.
d America was discovered in fourteen ninety two. i The percentage is point five.
e The interest rate was three point eight.
Focus on Grammar
(Workbook, p. 9)
We use these question words when asking
Workbook, page 9. questions about different types of numbers:
How often: frequency (How often do you take
21 holidays?); How many: countable nouns
(How many employees work in your
company?); How much: uncountable nouns
(How much money does he earn?); How far:
distances (How far is your office from here?);
Teacher’s file How long: measurements (longitude or time)
(How long is the meeting?); What time: time
Student’s Book 2 Play WB CD 3.2 all the way (What time does your office close?)
1 & 2 Peer teaching through without pausing. Students
Photocopy the scripts for the listenings try to fill in as much information as
on page 121. In small groups, they can the first time around.
students randomly read numbers Repeat WB CD 3.2 and pause so they
from the scripts. The others write the can complete their unfinished
numbers they hear and compare answers. (Transcript 3.2, p. 126.)
their notes afterwards. If there are any Asking for numbers
discrepancies, students discuss what 1 Students fill out the exercise
they understood and how the other individually or in small groups.
student can improve his / her e This activity can be reused later to
pronunciation. Remind students how
evaluate students’ progress.
to give constructive criticism: I think
if you said this... ; This sounds more 2 Students write similar questions in
like... ; Why not try...? their notebooks. Then they exchange
notebooks with a partner and
Workbook, page 9 answer his / her questions.
Answer key, p. 113.
Listening for numbers
1 Play WB CD 3.1. Pause so
students can write the information
requested. (Transcript 3.1, p. 126.)
23
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unit three 3
Dealing with numbers unit three 3
Dealing with numbers

Telling the time Telling the time


It is difficult to think of an office activity that is not in one way or another related to time. A secretary or office
worker will have to deal with different time expressions on a day to day basis.
1 English speakers stress important information
in a sentence, especially when relating to 1 Read the following sentences after your 3 3.4
Draw a chart in your notebook. Listen to
numbers. Read the first two sentences. teacher. the speakers and fill out the schedule times.
1 The meeting starts at 9:05 a.m.
Students underline the words they hear 2 The flight to New Orleans leaves at 11:45 p.m.
Flight number City Gate Time
stressed. Then ask the class to underline the 3 The Post Office opens at 8:15 a.m. to Miami 23
words they feel important in the last two 4 Tell him to meet me at the Institute at 5:30 p.m.

sentences. Read sentences 3 and 4. Students 2 Ask your partner questions about the
You can also tell the time using the prepositions to and
compare the words they underlined to the ones schedule.
past.
they hear stressed. See Teacher’s file. DEPT. ARR. Examples:
BA 9 1 3 -M I AM I 1 1 : 1 0 0 6:3 0 • Your seminar begins at 11:45 a.m.
Answers: 1 The meeting starts at 9:05 a.m.; Your seminar begins at a quarter to eleven.
S E S 7 1 7 -R I O 0 8: 5 0 1 2 : 5 0
2 The flight to New Orleans leaves at a quarter I B E 8 3 2 -M AD R I D 0 7: 3 0 2 2:3 0 • It was 6:40 p.m.
to twelve; 3 The Post Office opens at a quarter It was twenty minutes to seven.
C AN 5 1 5 -QU E B E C 0 4: 4 0 2 3 :0 0
• She starts work at 8:30.
past eight; 4 Tell him to meet me at the DDA 8 2 3 - L . A . 1 2: 2 0 0 8:2 5 She starts work at half past eight.
Institute at 5:30 p.m. A F L 9 0 0 -N . Y O R K 1 0: 3 0 0 9 : 1 5 • Were you in her office at 9:15?
Were you in her office at a quarter past nine?
Example:
2 Revise the way to tell the time before the class What time does the flight to L.A. leave? 4 Rewrite the following sentences in the past
begins the activity. Read the example questions What time does the SES 717 arrive in Rio? tense.
to the class and ask volunteers to answer. 1 The meeting is at 5:00 p.m.

Students work with a partner and take turns focus on Grammar 2


3
It is at 8:30 a.m.
The manager isn’t in his office.
asking each other questions about the Past tense of to be
4 The last flight is at 10:30 p.m.
5 They are happy with the new price.
schedule. See Teacher’s file. you Negative
we were Full Form Short Form
they were not weren’t
Pairwork
3 Students copy the chart into their was not wasn’t Tell a partner where you were at the
I weekend.
notebooks. Play CD 3.4. once all the way he
was
through without pausing. Students try to fill in she
it
as much information as they can the first time
Grammar reference, page 100.
around. Repeat CD 3.4. and pause so they can
complete their unfinished answers. (Transcript
3.4, p. 121.)
Workbook, page 10.

Focus on Grammar 22

Remind students that in the past tense, the verb


form for first person and third person singular is the
same.
Refer students to the Grammar and language
Teacher’s file
reference, Student’s Book, page 100.
Student’s Book Workbook, page 10
Answer key, p. 113.
1 Peer teaching
4 Students change the sentences into the past 1 Students write the questions using
In small groups, each student thinks
tense. This activity can be done orally or in their appropriate question words.
of a similar sentence and reads it to
notebooks. their classmates. The other students 2 Play WB CD 3.3. Pause after the
help their classmate with his / her caller speaks. Students write down
Answers: 1 was; 2 was; 3 wasn’t; 4 was;
pronunciation, stress and intonation. as much as they can. Replay the
5 were. listening again and pause so they can
Remind students how to give
constructive criticism: I think if you finish any incomplete sentences.
Pairwork said this...; It would be better if you Group work
said it like this...; This sounds more Students answer the questions
Give students a few minutes to prepare like...; Why not try...? individually or in small groups. Then
questions they would like to ask their partners. they ask the other students similar
2 Many European countries use a 24-
Refer them to the Focus on Grammar box, questions.
hour clock (military time). Some
Workbook, page 9 as an aid. Walk around countries use a comma (18,30), a
checking their questions and correcting period (18.30) or an apostrophe
problem areas in pronunciation. Once they (18’30). In English business, we use a
have finished their questions, they can take colon and the words a.m. or p.m. to
turns interviewing each other. distinguish between morning and
evening schedules.

24
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unit three 3
unit three
Dealing with numbers
3
Dealing with numbers

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Pronunciation: the /ɵ/ sound
3.5
1 Listen and repeat. 1 Play CD 3.5. Students repeat the speaker’s
three thirteenth throw Is that Matthew Thornton?
thirteen fifth Thanksgiving When’s your birthday?
pronunciation, intonation and word stress.
thirty think birthday Thankgiving is a holiday.
three hundred thought truth He wasn’t very enthusiastic about it.
three thousand thing thriller Classes start on Thursday. 2 Students read the sentences out in pairs or
thank you twentieth Agatha It’s three hundred and three. small groups. Walk around giving advice on
Thursday theater parenthesis Thank you, sir.
thirsty unthinkable Heathrow Airport Could you put me through to Mr. Thiennes? how to improve pronunciation and intonation.
through Matthew Thornton therapy Have you ever read Agatha Christie? See Teacher’s file.
third enthusiastic thorough The price is three thousand dollars.

2 Read out the following sentences. 3 Choose 5 words from the listening and write 3 Students choose 5 words from listening 3.5 in
1 The meeting is on Thursday 5th. sentences in your notebook.
2 What do you think about Arthur?
activity 1 and write sentences that illustrate
3 This is the third time he has called. their meaning.
4 The price is $3,333.
5 Thursday is Okay by me. Thank you.
6 Put me through to Mr. Thornton. Numbers in Maths
Point out that in English, the use of the comma and
Numbers in Maths
period in numbers might be different to other
nt to remember: Pairwork countries. Ask students to think how they use
In English it is importa
nds take a com ma (,) Look up the word “billion” in a good
• Tho usa commas and periods in their own language. They
4,985 3,900 dictionary. Is there a difference between
(.) on the left. American and British English? might check their calculators. Does it use a comma
• Decimals take a dot
0.75 point seventy five or a decimal point for marking decimals?
6.90 six point ninety
e? I’ve told you a
Is this the same in your languag
billion times not 4 Play CD 3.6. Students write the numbers
3.6
to exaggerate! they hear in their notebooks. (Transcript 3.6,
4 Listen and write the numbers you hear
in your notebook.
page 122.)

Group work
Write numbers with thousand and decimals.
Group work
The group practises saying them. Students take a few minutes to write a list of
five numbers. Then they read them to the
Workbook, page 11. Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 3.
others in their group who write them down in
their notebooks.
23

Pairwork
A billion represents a one followed by 9 zeros
Teacher’s file (a thousand million). As an older British usage,
a billion used to represent a one followed by
Student’s Book Key Vocabulary 12 zeros (one million million).
Bills, cents, dimes and quarters are all
2 The /ð/ sound is similar to the /ɵ/ currency in the United States. Notes, pence
sound, but it is voiced: the, their, this, and pennies are used in Great Britain. Student’s do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 3.
those. In small groups, students make See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
a list of words with the /ð/ sound, and 1 Students fill in the blanks with the
appropriate verb. page 26.
another list of words with the /ɵ/
sound. Then students write a tongue 2 Revise the vocabulary in the activity
twister combining the two sounds, for and in the Key Vocabulary box before
example: They both thought that Bath they fill in the sentences.
wasn’t that bad. 3 Students match the countries to their
currencies and then write an
Workbook, pages 10 & 11 affirmative sentence, a negative
Answer key, p. 113. sentence and a question.
3 Students read the paragraph first. Group work
Then play WB CD 3.4. Students Set up discussion tables in the
complete the paragraph with the classroom. Students talk in small groups
correct information. about the first question for 5 minutes.
Pairwork Afterwards, all the students move
Give students a few minutes to think to different tables so that they are
of three questions dealing with speaking to new groups of students.
times, prices or places in the text.

25
03 - Unidad 3 22/5/06 20:45 Página 26

unit three 3
Dealing with numbers unit three 3
Dealing with numbers

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with the importance of time and


punctuality in English-speaking countries. The Time
concept of “fast-food” was designed because of to avoid
cultural aspect that is worth noting
customers’ constant demand for more prompt The concept of time is an important er.
ndings when people from differe nt cultural backgrounds work togeth
misundersta t.
service. Many restaurants offer reduced or even free e of Englis h speake rs toward s time schedules is usually one of respec
The attitud
is a meetin g, an interview, or a social event, they
meals if their home delivery service is late. Common Time schedules are kept, so if there
in advance they
led time. No matter how much time
English quotes about time reflect their importance: expect it to begin and end at the schedu
are suppos ed to be kept. Conse quently it is not necessary to confirm
have been arranged, they
e in this respect.
“Time is money; Punctuality is the soul of business; set. Other cultures are far more flexibl
a meeting or a deadline previously to be kept.
activit ies carefu lly in advanc e, so they also expect appointments
Punctuality is politeness.” English speakers plan their
inkabl e”.
e cancel lation is “unth
Therefore, a last minut
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up
questions.

?
How punctual are you for appointments, dates, school or work? Give reasons for being late.
What is your attitude with respect to deadlines?
Debate Are appointments set in advance usually kept in your country?

Divide the class into small groups and assign each a


question. Give them a few minutes to gather their Debate
ideas and reasons to defend them. Then, bring the In your country, is it acceptable to arrive late? In what circumstances? Is it the same for business
and personal appointments? How late is “acceptable”?
smaller groups together as one large group. Each
small group puts forward their question and ideas,
leading the class discussion. After a few minutes,
the next group presents their question.
Don’t forget!
• Schedules and times: What time does the plane arrive?
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION It arrives at quarter to nine in the morning.
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. • Dates and phone numbers: She was born in 1898.
1 Describe the role play to the students. My number is 4-5-double 0- 6.
Write important information on the board. • Ordinal and cardinal numbers: He was Henry VIII.
It costs $698.
Student 1: You are phoning the Information • The past of the verb to be: I was there at 8:00 pm.
Technology Centre and want to talk to the They weren’t happy with the estimated cost.
person in charge of the computer training
courses. Find out the dates and costs of the
courses.
24
Student 2: You are a receptionist at the
Information Technology Centre. Mrs. Hickman
is in charge of the computer training courses.
She’s out but has left you information about
the courses: starts Aug 22-Oct 14. It costs
OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
$750. There is also an application fee. It costs Prepare flash cards with the following numbers.
$35. Show the numbers to the class one by one. In
turns, students read out the numbers and say
2 Students read the following text: what they refer to.
Henry VIII was born in 1491. He was the 2nd 1 (001) 652 596363 2 17º C 3 2.5 4 100%
son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York. His 5 IB 754 6 17:35 7 WX8 6JY 8 $70 plus 12%
reign during the 16th century is often tax 9 C-45736 10 March 21, 2007
overshadowed by his 6 marriages. He was Answers: 1 telephone number (area code);
married to Catherine of Aragon from 1509 2 temperature; 3 decimal number; 4 percentage;
to1533. His second wife, Anne Boleyn was 5 flight number; 6 time; 7 post code; 8 price;
executed for infidelity in May 1536. He married 9 serial number; 10 date.
Jane Seymour who died during childbirth in
October 1536. In 1540, Henry was married
twice, the second being executed for infidelity
on 12 March, 1542. Catherine Parr became his
last wife, until his death in 1547.

26
04 - Unidad 4 22/5/06 20:49 Página 27

unit four 4
Taking and giving messages
A common situation for secretaries or office workers is to leave messages or take a message and
pass it on to someone else.
Politeness is very important when taking messages and office workers should know how to ask
people to repeat any information they do not understand politely. In this unit, students will find
examples of common structures used in taking and giving messages.

Skills objectives


To listen for important details
To take notes while listening
unit four 4
• To practise pronunciation and intonation Taking and giving messages
• To practise one-on-one conversations with
a partner
• To summarise group discussions Introduction
There are different ways of taking or passing messages on to somebody else, but one thing is clear:
Language focus you must write them down at the very moment you take them; otherwise, they may never reach
• Asking polite questions the addressee. Besides, a message is not only the subject itself, other essential parts of it are the
names of the people and companies involved, the date and time and the phone or fax numbers.
• Object pronouns
• Revise the past simple of regular and
irregular verbs Objectives
• Pronunciation of the past simple • To listen for important details
• Using common language and structures
used in taking messages
• To take notes while listening
• To ask for important information
Key vocabulary
• To revise the past simple
& structures
• Passing on messages: He / She wants • To learn vocabulary and expressions used when taking and giving messages
you to... • To practise the different sounds of the past simple -ed suffix
• Polite questions: Would it be possible, Shall
I... ? Is that all right with you?
• Object pronouns: Take him; Call me; Send
them...
Business tasks
• Leaving messages with a person or on an
answering machine
• Taking messages and passing on the
information to a third person
• Using polite questions to ask people their
opinions or to have them do something
• Recognising different English names

Additional material 25
• Grammar and language reference, pages
99, 101 and 104
• Glossary, page 107
• Workbook, pages 12, 13 and 14 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 4 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • What would you do if someone called and your boss was not available?
page 32
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • What information would you ask for?
Book, page 32 • What do you do if you don’t understand the speaker or the message?
• What are crucial elements when taking or giving a message?
04 - Unidad 4 22/5/06 20:50 Página 28

unit four 4
Taking and giving messages unit four 4
Taking and giving messages

Listening Listening
4.1
1 Listen to the conversations and match them to the pictures.

1 Play CD 4.1, pausing so students can


match the dialogues to their pictures.
Answers: A 3; B 1; C 4; D 2

2 Students cover the dialogues. Play CD 4.1 1 2 3 4


once all the way through. Students try to write
down as much information as possible. R = Receptionist C = Caller 2 Cover the dialogues. Listen again and write
down the caller’s name and message in your
Play CD 4.1 a second time so they can A
R: Miss Jones is out for lunch, madam. Would you like notebook.
complete their work. See Teacher’s file. to leave a message?

Answers: Dialogue A: Paula Kleiner, call C: Could you tell her to ring me back when she gets
back?
focus on Grammar
back at 737 22 505; Dialogue B: Alan R: May I have your name and phone number, please? The past simple tense
Hamilton, he called; Dialogue C: Johnson C: Paula Kleiner, my phone number is 737 22 505.
Irregular verbs Regular verbs
and Johnson Ltd, sent the invoice by mail; B
come came accept accepted
have had book booked
Dialogue D: Mr. Hutchinson, received the R: Mr. Costner isn’t in, I’m afraid. Can I take a message?
leave left call called
sample. C: Would you tell him I called? ring rang like liked
R: Certainly. Your name, please? say said phone phoned
C: Alan Hamilton, from Georgia. think thought want wanted

Focus on Grammar C
Grammar reference, page 99.

R: The Manager is busy at the moment. May I take a


Quickly revise the past simple (regular and irregular Verb + object pronoun
message?
verbs). Remind students that the past tense form is C: Tell him I sent the invoice by mail, please. me Call me on Monday.
the same for every subject. Also, examine the use R: Where are you calling from, sir? you
C: From Johnson and Johnson Ltd. him Give him the phone number.
and placement of object pronouns. Refer students her
to the Grammar and language reference, Student’s D it Send it tomorrow.
us
Book, pages 99-101. R: Mrs. Moore’s at a meeting now. Do you want to
you
leave a message, sir?
them Take them to the airport.
C: This is Mr. Hutchinson. Tell her I received the samples
she sent me.
Focus on Grammar activities R: Sorry, could you spell your name, please?
Grammar reference, page 101.

The past simple C: H-U-T-C-H-I-N-S-O-N.

In groups of three or four, students prepare flash


Workbook, pages 12-13.
cards with regular and irregular verbs in their base
form. One group shows their cards to another 26
group, who say the past form of the verb in the
flash card and make up a sentence with it.

Object pronouns Teacher’s file


Write the following sentences on the board.
Student’s Book 2 Play WB CD 4.2. Pause so
Students, as a large group, identify the verb
students can fill in the message
object in the sentences. Then, individually, they 2 Volunteer students read the
forms. (Transcript 4.2, p. 127.)
replace the objects with the appropriate dialogues instead of playing the CD.
The rest of the class takes notes in Pairwork
pronoun.
their notebooks. Students replace some of the
1 Mrs. Parker told Lisa to send the fax as soon information from one of the
as possible. dialogues in activity 1 to create a
2 Will you give Mr. Hamilton our phone Workbook, page 12 new conversation. Give them 5
number? Answer key, p. 113. minutes to practise.

3 Could you take Mr. Hamilton and me to the 1 Play WB CD 4.1. Pause so
airport? students can write the information
requested. (Transcript 4.1, p. 126.)
4 Tell Miss Hobson and Mrs. Robbie I’ll be out
of the office tomorrow.
Answers: 1 Mrs. Parker told her to send the
fax as soon as possible. 2 Will you give him
our phone number? 3 Could you take us to
the airport? 4 Tell them I’ll be out of the office
tomorrow.

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unit four 4
unit four
Taking and giving messages
4
Taking and giving messages

Giving messages Giving Messages


4.3
1 Look at the examples below and ask 3 Listen and leave a message about a
questions by putting the verb in parentheses future action. 1 Students ask polite requests as in the examples.
into the past or future form. Example:
Ask them to put the verb in parentheses into
Examples: Mr. Clifton is busy at the moment.
• (ring) Could you tell him I rang? • Call back / this afternoon. the past or future form. They can complete this
Could you tell him I’ll ring again this Could you tell him I’ll call him back this in pairs, in small groups or as a large group.
afternoon? afternoon ?
• (come) 1 ring / tomorrow morning Answers: Could you tell him I rang? / Could
(come) next week 2 arrange another meeting / next week you tell him I’ll ring again this afternoon?;
• (phone) 3 meet / at the bank at 11:15 a.m.
4 see / the Director / on Friday
Could you tell him I came? / Could you tell him
(phone) tomorrow
• (book) 5 interview / again next week I’ll come again next week?; Could you tell him
(book) next Friday 6 confirm / the prices that I phoned? / Could you tell him I’ll phone
• (accept)
(accept) next week Passing on messages again tomorrow?; Could you tell her I booked
Messages often take the following structure:
the restaurant? / Could you tell her I’ll book the
4.2
2 Listen and leave a message about a past Mr. X / wants / you / to do something. restaurant next Friday?; Could you tell her I
action.
4.4
accepted the deal? / Could you tell her I’ll
Example: 4 Listen and report back a message.
Would you like to leave a message? Example: Miss Lee / the Production Manager /
accept the deal next week?
• Mr. Clifton / Mr. Harris / call ring him tomorrow morning.
Tell Mr. Clifton Mr. Harris called, please. Miss Lee, the Production Manager
1 Miss Jackson / Mr. Brown / call wants you to ring him tomorrow morning. 2 Play CD 4.2. Students listen and complete
2 Mrs. Jones / Mr. Hall / sign the contract 1 Mr. Burrows / the firm lawyer / ring him tomorrow the message about a past action.
3 him / I / pick up the documents yesterday evening morning.
4 her / Mr. Thomas / leave for Paris this morning 2 Dr. Lawrence / Mr. Maugham / arrange another
5 Dr. Lane / we / postpone the meeting appointment for next week.
6 Mr. Dawson / the lawyer / accept our offer
3 Play CD 4.3. Students listen and complete
3 Miss Marshall / your husband / meet him at the bank
at 11:15 a.m. the message about a future action. See
4 Mr. Duffy / Mr. Berkeley / see the Director on Friday. Teacher’s file.
5 Mrs. Frazier / the Personnel Manager / interview the
applicant again next week.
6 Miss Nicholls / the Chief Buyer / confirm the prices.
4 Revise the structure used in the activity.
Groupwork
Use the information below to pass on messages to your classmates.
Play CD 4.4. Students use the information they
hear to report back the messages.
The Director wants you to pick him up.
Mr. Lang wanted the lawyer to set a new date.
The engineer would like the accountant to pay the client.
My boss asked us to sign the contract. Group work
Based on the structure from the listening,
Workbook, page 13. students report messages to the others in their
27 group using the structure model in their books.
See Teacher’s file.

Focus on Grammar
Teacher’s file (Workbook, p. 13.)
Remind students that the past tense form in English
Student’s Book 1 Students cover the dialogue. Play is the same for all persons. Refer students to the
3 Students write the messages WB CD 4.3. Students write in their Grammar and language reference, Student’s Book,
about future actions in their notebooks the verbs they hear in the pages 99-100.
notebooks. Play CD 4.3. Students past. (Transcript 4.3, p. 127)
check their answers. 2 Students fill out the exercise
Group work individually and compare their
Chain message: Working in groups answers in small groups.
of three, students combine all the 3 Students write 6 sentences using
activities on the page. Student 1 verbs from the grammar box.
gives student 2 a past or future Additional practice
message. Student 2 relays the Students omit the verb in the
message to the third student using sentences and exchange notebooks
the structures they had practised with a partner. Students complete
earlier in the group work activity. their partner’s sentences. Then they
Workbook, page 13 check each other’s answers.
Answer key, p. 113.
Pairwork
This is a revision of the group work
activity in the Student’s Book.
Students complete the sentences
with a suitable verb.

29
04 - Unidad 4 22/5/06 20:50 Página 30

unit four 4
Taking and giving messages unit four 4
Taking and giving messages

Let’s practise! Let’s practise!


Polite questions
Focus on Language When asking somebody to do something it is frequent to add a polite comment or question to confirm the request
or to elicit some kind of answer from the speaker.
Polite questions let us show others we are
interested in their opinion. It makes conversations focus on Language
civil and courteous. They are sometimes used as a Polite questions
polite form of imperative: Would it be possible to Is that possible? Is that all right with you?
photocopy these by 2 o’clock? instead of Would it be possible? Shall I call him back?
Would that be possible? Do you want me to call him/her back?
Photocopy these by 2 o’clock.
Grammar reference, page 104.
Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s
Book, page 107, by copying and translating polite 1 4.5
Listen to the following dialogues. Pay attention to the speakers’ pronunciation and intonation.
questions from the lesson in their notebooks. How do the polite questions affect the tone of the conversations?
S = Secretary B = Boss
A C
1 Play CD 4.5. Students listen for the S: Mr. Hamilton is on the line, sir. He’d like you to S: The General Manager called. He wants you to cancel the
speakers’ pronunciation and intonation. How attend a meeting in Brussels next Tuesday. Is that all Purchase Order he signed this morning. Would that be
right with you? possible?
do polite questions affect the tone of the B: Could you check my diary? Am I free on Tuesday B: I don’t think so. I sent it by fax this morning.
conversations? See Teacher’s file. next week? S: Shall I call him back and let him know?
S: Yes, sir. Tuesday’s fine. B: No, no, I’ll do it. Pass me through to him, please.
B: O.K. Tell him I’ll be there at 8 o’clock.
Pairwork D
B S: Mr. Stuart is calling from MacPherson’s. He’d like you to
Students put the phrases of the two dialogues S: Mr. Hussein’s secretary called this morning, sir. Mr. join them for a meeting. Would it be possible?
Hussein wants us to give him a 5% discount on his B: Let’s see. What time is it?
in order with the help of a partner. Then they
last quotation. Do you want me to call him back? S: It’s ten past twelve, sir.
take turns reading dialogues with another pair B: Let me talk to the Sales Manager first. B: O.K. Tell him I’ll be there in twenty minutes.
of students to compare their work. See S: Yes, sir. Do you want me to put you through to him?
B: Yes, please.
Teacher’s file.
Answers: Pairwork
1 A: Mr. Drysdale wants to talk to you right Put the following conversations in the correct order.
1 -Pass me through to him, please. 2 -It’s about the balance sheet. He says it’s urgent.
away, sir.
-Is he on the line? -What is it about?
B: Is he on the line? -Yes, sir, he’s waiting. -Mr. Dreyfuss wants you to phone him as soon as you get
-Mr. Drysdale wants to talk to you right away, sir. here. Shall I call him back?
A: Yes, sir, he’s waiting. -Yes, call him back, please.

B: Pass me through to him, please. 2 Make up your own conversations using the phrases in the language box.
2 A: Mr. Dreyfuss wants you to phone him as
soon as you get here. Shall I call him back? 28 Workbook, page 14.

B: What is it about?
A: It’s about the balance sheet. He says it’s
urgent.
B: Yes, call him back, please.
Teacher’s file
Student’s Book Then, they search for the other
2 Students make up similar dialogues using polite sentence pair in order to form their
1 Replay CD 4.5. and ask complete dialogue.
e questions from the Focus on Language box. comprehension questions.
e This activity can be reused later to
This activity can be done in pairs or small Dialogue A: Who’s calling? What
groups. See Teacher’s file. evaluate students’ progress.
does he want? Where will they meet?
Dialogue B: Who does the boss Workbook, page 14
need to speak to first? What do they Answer key, p. 114.
need to talk about?
1 Answering machines record
Dialogue C: Who signed the Purchase
outgoing and incoming messages.
Order this morning? Why can’t they
Outgoing messages are those you
cancel it?
record for others to hear when they
Dialogue D: Where does Mr. Stuart
call. Play WB CD 4.4. Students listen
work? What time is it? What time
and read the outgoing messages.
could they meet?
(Transcript 4.4, p. 127.)
Pairwork
2 Play WB CD 4.5. Pause after
Dialogue search. Turn this task into a each caller speaks. Students write
group activity. Two groups of 4 each down as much as they can. Replay
copy a dialogue onto a sheet of paper. the listening and pause so they can
They cut each sentence strip. Each finish any incomplete information.
student walks around the classroom (Transcript 4.5, p. 127.)
looking for their sentence “partner”.
30
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unit four 4
unit four
Taking and giving messages
4
Taking and giving messages

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Pronunciation: the -ed suffix
4.6
1 Listen and repeat. 1 The pronunciation of the –ed suffix in
Pronunciation of the past verbs is very important in English since there is
If the verb ends in sounds such If the verb ends in vowel sounds If the verb ends in /d/ or in /t/ merely a slight difference between the past and
as: /s/ / f/, /k/, /ʃ/, /tʃ/, /p/ the or in sounds such as: /z/, /m/, /l/, the ‘-ed’ is pronounced as…
‘-ed’ is pronounced as… /r/, /n/ the ‘-ed’ is pronounced as…
present tense of regular verbs. Play CD 4.6 and
/t/ /d/ / id / ask students to listen closely to the
pass passed try tried end ended pronunciation of the final consonant. See
ask asked prepare prepared attend attended
Teacher’s file.
work worked propose proposed recomend recommended
laugh laughed call called rent rented
like liked deliver delivered interrupt interrupted
finish finished phone phoned want wanted Group work
Play CD 4.7. Students listen and repeat.
Then, in groups of 4, students practise on their
Groupwork
own, taking turns reading the questions and
4.7
Now listen to the words used in context. Then, practise the dialogues with your classmates. answers.
A
1 Did you pass the call on to Mr. Spencer? I passed it on a few minutes ago, sir.
2 Did he like the new furniture? Yes, he liked it very much.
2 Students work in small groups of 3 or 4 and
3 When did you finish? I finished yesterday morning.
4 What did he ask for? He asked for the new price list. create a new dialogue using questions from the
B group work activity. Give them a few minutes
1 When did they deliver the goods? They delivered them last Friday.
2 Who did you call? I called the Manager.
to practise. Then they act out their dialogues in
3 Who did he phone? He phoned the safety equipment supplier. front of their classmates.
4 What did she prepare? She prepared the annual budget.
C
1 What did they want?
2 When did it end?
They wanted a salary raise.
It ended last semester.
Keep in mind
3 What did you attend? We attended a seminar. Remind students that the interrogative and negative
4 What did you rent? I rented a car.
form of the past simple tense need the auxiliary
verb did. Refer students to the Grammar and
2 Invent a short dialogue with your
group. Act it out for the rest of the language reference, Student’s Book, pages 99 and
Keep in mind
ive form of the past tense
class. 100.
The interrogative and the negat
stays in the infinitive
do not use the ‘-ed’ suffix. The verb
auxiliary verb.
form and the past is applied to the
Keep in mind activities
Write the following sentences on the board.
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 4. 29 Students turn the sentences into the interrogative
and negative form.
1 I booked the hotel for Mr. Drysdale yesterday.
2 Ms. Hamilton came to see you this morning.
Teacher’s file
3 The employees wanted a salary raise.
Student’s Book Additional practice 4 They delivered the goods last week.
Students write 5 sentences in the
1 Pronunciation of the -s / -es 5 I wrote the report two days ago.
past simple, explaining what they did
suffix: The pronunciation of the –s / the day / weekend before. Students
-es suffixes for the present simple has read their sentences to the class. Answers: 1 Did you book the hotel for Mr.
similar rules. In groups, students
Group work Drysdale? / I didn’t book the hotel for Mr.
classify the words in the listening into
Find someone who… Students Drysdale; 2 Did Ms. Hamilton come to see you
the following categories: /s/; /z/; /iz/.
take the sentences they wrote in the this morning? / Ms. Hamilton didn’t come to
Answers: /s/: ask, work, laugh, activity above and turn them into see you this morning; 3 Did the employees
like, rent, interrupt, want; /z/: try, questions. Then they walk around want a salary raise? / The employees didn’t
prepare, call, deliver, phone, end, the class asking the questions to their want a salary raise; 4 Did they deliver the
attend, recommend; /iz/ pass, finish, partners. If the answer to the goods last week? / They didn’t deliver the
propose. question is “yes” they write down goods last week; 5 Did you write the report
his / her name next to the question. two days ago? / I didn’t write the report two
They need to write one name down days ago.
for each question.
Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 4.
See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 32.

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unit four 4
Taking and giving messages unit four 4
Taking and giving messages

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with peculiarities of English names.


There are many first names that are unisex. Middle
names or middle initials can be a second first name
In English, it is not always possible to mother’s maiden name such as in John Hello, my name’s Robin.
or the mother’s maiden name. Many women in know the gender of a person from his or F. Kennedy (John Fitzgerald Kennedy).
English-speaking cultures still take their husband’s her name. This is because there are Middle names and initials are very Hi, I’m Robin, too.
names that are used by both men and common in the US and in fact they are
last name when they get married. When divorced, a women, for example, Robin, Kelly, sometimes required for official forms.
woman can choose to keep her husband’s last Leslie... When women get married, they drop
A peculiarity of names in their family name (maiden name) and
name or take back her maiden name. English–speaking countries is the initial take on their husband’s family name.
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread after the name of a person. It may However, this is changing. Women now
represent a middle name, as in Frank L. often choose to keep their maiden name
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up Taylor (Frank Leonard Taylor) or the for professional or personal reasons.
questions.

Debate
?
Do you know any names that can be used for both men and women?
What is the tradition in your country in relation to names?
Divide the class into small discussion groups. Give Is the mother’s maiden name represented by an initial? If not, how is it represented?

them a few minutes to discuss the questions. After a


few minutes, bring the smaller groups together as Debate
one large group. Each small group summarises what Do women in your country keep their maiden name after they marry? In your opinion, should
they discussed and any important points that arose. women keep their maiden name or not? Do you think this custom is sexist?

OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION


Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. Don’t forget!
1 Write these messages on the board. • Leaving messages: I’m calling from Hamilton Inc.
Students use the information from the • Giving messages: Ask her to call me back when she can.
messages to recreate one of the Tell her we sent the goods by post.
conversations between the receptionist • Asking polite questions: What do you think?
and the caller. Shall I send them a fax?
• Past simple: Could you tell him I rang?
Message 1: He cancelled the meeting.
To: Brian Hall
From: Harry Scott
Message: The tickets to Berlin are available in
his office. Please call him.
30
Message 2:
To: Debbie Morrison
From: Adam Smith
Message: Came to see you. Urgent matter.
OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
Message 3:
To: Tim Stanfield Write the following message from CD-Rom
From: Carlos Romero activity 2 on the board. In pairs, students try to
Message: Called at noon. Out till Thursday. reconstruct the conversation that led to the
E-mail him the results of last month’s inventory. message. Then a volunteer pair performs the
conversation in front of the class.
2 In pairs, students relay messages to each 12:30 p.m.
other. Student 1 uses verbs like: tell, ask Kevin- James Wood from Limatec called
or remind. Student 2 uses expressions like:
-can’t make meeting on Thursday
wants, would like...
Is Friday morning at 11:30 O.K.?
(Eg: T: Send the package regular freight.
S1: Tell ... to send the package regular freight.
S2: ... would like you to send the package
regular freight.)
a) Take her to the airport.
b) Deliver the goods by January 1st.
c) Sign the contract with the supplier.
d) Postpone the meeting until 12:00.
e) Set a new date for the presentation.
f) E-mail everyone in Personnel.

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unit five 5
Receiving visitors
Sometimes when receiving visitors, you must act as host / hostess in order to make the visitor feel
welcome and comfortable. You may offer them something to eat or drink as well as strike up a
polite conversation. This informal small talk or chit-chat deals with basic, non-personal topics. In
these situations, intonation and word stress are crucial to make your message clear, sociable and
courteous.
In this unit, students will find examples of common structures and topics used in small talk.

Skills objectives
• To listen for important details
• To start and lead a conversation with
unit five 5
visitors Receiving visitors
• To practise pronunciation, intonation and
sentence stress
Introduction
Language focus Office work not only implies being efficient and qualified in specific functions but also being
• Using common language and structures for helpful and polite when dealing with people, especially visitors.
small talk When receiving visitors, the first important step is greeting them and introducing yourself.
Sometimes it’s necessary to offer them a seat, or a cup of coffee. And many times, visitors
• Giving directions around the office
need accurate directions to find their way around the office. Finally, small talk also plays an
• Sentence intonation and word stress important role: short conversations about the flight, the weather or other common topics that
Key vocabulary puts the visitor at ease.
& structures
• Greetings: How do you do? Nice to meet Objectives
you. May I take your coat?
• To greet visitors
• Small talk: How was your flight? What was
the weather like when you left? What’s • To give directions
your hotel like? • To learn ways to be hospitable
• Prepositions of place: near, behind, in front • To make polite conversation
of, next to, opposite, between • To practise sentence stress and intonation
Business tasks
• Starting and leading simple informal
conversations (small talk)
• Recognising the greeting customs of
different cultures
• Respecting the concepts of personal space
in different cultures
• Reception tasks: guiding a visitor around
the office

31

Additional material
• Glossary, pages 107 and 108
• Workbook pages 15, 16 and 17 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 5 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • Do you like meeting new people? Why?
page 38
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • What are some common topics of conversation when first meeting someone?
Book, page 38 • Do you find it easy or difficult to start a conversation with someone you’ve just met?
• What should you do when you have to attend to a visitor who’s waiting in your office?
05 - Unidad 5 22/5/06 20:51 Página 34

unit five 5
Receiving visitors unit five 5
Receiving visitors

Listening Listening

1 Play CD 5.1, pausing if necessary so


students can match the dialogues to the
pictures.
Answers: A 2; B 3; C 4; D 1
1 2 3 4

Key Vocabulary 1 5.1


Listen to the following dialogues and D
When greeting, it is customary to repeat the same match them to the correct pictures. Now V: Good morning. I’m Paul Fitzgerald. Mr. Hall is
name the characters in each scene. waiting for me.
greeting as the person speaking: How do you do? / S: I’m afraid Mr Hall is in a meeting at this moment,
V = Visitor S = Secretary M = Mr. Norton
How do you do?; It’s nice to meet you. / (It’s) nice but it won’t take long. Take a seat, please.
A
to meet you. As an office worker, you should V: Good morning. My name’s Richard Dale.
V: Thank you.
S: Would you like a cup of coffee while you wait?
always use the more formal version even if the S: Mr. Dale? How do you do? I’m Mr. Jensen’s secretary.
V: I’d love one! Thank you.
visitor uses a more informal one. Quickly revise the V: How do you do?
S: Could you wait a few seconds, please? I’ll tell Mr.
example phrases in the Key Vocabulary box. Jensen you’re here. KEY VOCABULARY
Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s Formal greetings
Book, pages107-108, by copying and translating B
How do you do?
V: Good morning. I’m Marcelo Simone. I have an
the words from the lesson in their notebooks. appointment with Mr. Norton.
I’m delighted to meet you.
I’m (very pleased to meet you.
S: It’s very nice to meet you, Mr. Simone. I’m Mr. It’s (very) nice to meet you.
Norton’s secretary. It’s (very) good to meet you.
Key Vocabulary activities V: Nice to meet you, too.
S: Come on in, please. Mr. Norton, this is Mr. Simone. Informal greetings
Write the following information on different strips of M: How do you do? Pleased / Nice / Good to meet you.
paper and make copies for each student in the V: How do you do? Hello
Hi
classroom: C
Introductions
Mr. Parker, client, formal; Miss Hudson, head of V: Good afternoon. I’m Pamela Harrison. I have an
I’m Mary Simpson.
appointment with Mr. Hall.
department, informal but polite; Mrs. Lee, S: Good afternoon, Miss Harrison. Mr Hall will see you
My name’s Mary Simpson.
receptionist, formal; Mr. Hamilton, visitor, informal in a minute. Can I take your coat? Glossary, page 107.
V: Yes, please. Thank you.
In groups, students role play different greetings
2 Cover the dialogues and listen again. Have
according to the information they have on their they used formal or informal greetings?
strips of paper.
Pairwork
Workbook, page 15.
Choose a dialogue and act it out with a
2 Students cover the dialogues. Replay partner.
32
CD 5.1, pausing after each dialogue. Did they
use formal or informal greetings?
Answers: Dialogue A: formal; Dialogue B:
informal (visitor); formal (secretary); Dialogue Teacher’s file
C: informal; Dialogue 4: informal.
Student’s Book Additional practice
Students complete the task in pairs.
Pairwork Pairwork
They take turns asking a question and
Students choose one of the dialogues and act Students can change the names and
searching for an answer that matches.
language used in the dialogue chosen
it out in front of the class. Give them a few 3 Play WB CD 5.2. Students read
for a more informal or formal style.
minutes to practise the dialogue if necessary. the questions first so they know what
See Teacher’s file. Workbook, page 15 information to listen for. Play the first
Answer key, p. 114. dialogue all the way through and
1 Students write the correct pause. Students answer as many
response to the greetings. Play WB questions as possible. Play the second
CD 5.1. so students can check their dialogue. Students answer the
answers. (Transcript 5.1, p. 127.) questions for the second dialogue.
e This activity can be reused later to Replay WB CD 5.2, pausing to
evaluate students’ progress. allow students time to check
incorrect or unfinished answers.
2 Students match the questions and
(Transcript 5.2, p. 127.)
answers.

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unit five 5
unit five
Receiving visitors
5
Receiving visitors

Speaking Speaking
Small talk
After greetings and introductions, start short conversations with visitors. The topics should be of general interest, Key Vocabulary
nothing too personal. You can offer something to eat or drink, talk about the trip, accommodation, the weather, etc.
Small talk is a light informal conversation you might
KEY VOCABULARY Flights have with a client or visitor. The topics can be
Offering 2 5.3
Listen to the conversation. Pay attention varied, but not personal: offering refreshments,
May I ...take your coat?
to the pronunciation and intonation. talking about the trip, accommodation or the
...help you? S = Secretary V = Visitor weather. To avoid any possible misunderstandings,
...offer you something? S: How do you do, Miss Lane? How was the flight? never invite conversation about politics, religion or
Can I get you something? V: Fine.
Would you like a… ? S: Was it a direct flight?
stereotypical cultural differences. Students can
What would you like to… ? V: Yes, I usually travel direct. personalise the Glossary, Student’s Book, page 108,
How about a… ?
by copying and translating the words from the
Pairwork
Flights lesson in their notebooks.
How was the flight? Substitute the phrases in blue above with
It was fine. / rather long. / too long as usual. questions and answers from below. Then,
There was an awful thunderstorm. practice with a partner.
There was a very long stop in...
1 Play CD 5.2. Students listen to the
Did you have a good trip?
I had to change planes twice. How long did it take you to get here? questions and choose the answer they hear.
The flight was delayed.

Glossary, page 108.


About two and a half hours. I usually like flying. Answers: 1 A cup of tea, please; 2 A cup
Too long, I’m afraid. No, it stopped in Brussels.
of coffee for me, please with a dash of milk;
Offering 3 Only if it’s not too much trouble for you;
Around the building
1 5.2
Listen and select the answer from below.
4 I’d love one; 5 No, thank you.
3 Look at the pictures. Then say where to find
A cup of coffee for me, please. places in the building you are in now.
With a dash of milk. A cup of tea, please. Example: The bathroom is next to the classroom
2 Play CD 5.3. Students listen to the
No, thank you. I’d love one.
Only if it’s not too much trouble for you. speakers’ intonation and pronunciation. Play
1 What would you like to drink? CD 5.3 again. Students repeat what they hear.
2 May I offer you something to drink? See Teacher’s file.
3 How about a cup of tea while you wait? near behind next to
4 Would you like a cup of coffee?
5 Can I get you something to drink?
Pairwork
opposite in front of between
Using the structure of the listening, students
replace the information highlighted in blue
from the dialogue with the phrases in the Key
Workbook, page 16. Vocabulary boxes.

33 Answers: S: How do you do, Miss Lane? Did


you have a good trip?; V: Too long, I’m afraid;
S: Was it a direct flight?; V: No, it stopped in
Brussels.
Teacher’s file
3 Revise the basic prepositions in the illustrations.
Student’s Book partner. Walk around the class e Students imagine they work at a reception desk
correcting problem areas in in the building they are in. They have to tell
2 Divide the class into two groups. pronunciation.
Replay CD 5.3 and pause after each visitors how to get to certain places.
speaker. One group repeats the Key Vocabulary
secretary’s dialogue and the other You’re welcome is more common in
group repeats the visitor’s dialogue. American English. Not at all is common
Then students choose a partner from in British English. Don’t mention it is
their opposite group and practise informal.
their roles without the CD. 2 Students answer the questions
e This activity can be reused later to according to the floor plans on the
evaluate students’ progress. page. This task can be completed
individually or in pairs.
Workbook, page 16 e This activity can be reused later to
Answer key, p. 114. evaluate students’ progress.
1 Play WB CD 5.3. Students pay Additional practice
attention to the speakers’ intonation In pairs, students’ take turns asking
and pronunciation. Give them a few for other places on the floor plans.
minutes afterwards to practise with a

35
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unit five 5
Receiving visitors unit five 5
Receiving visitors

Let’s practise! Let’s practise!


The weather Talking about countries
5.4
1 Listen to the following conversations. Pairwork
1 Play CD 5.4 and ask: Where do you think Where are the visitors from? Read the questions below. Then, in pairs, create
the visitors come from? S = Secretary V = Visitor a dialogue by choosing from the visitor’s replies.
Sample answers: Dialogue A: sunny, windy A
S: And what was the weather like when you left?
but cold (Spain in the winter); Dialogue B: V: Sunny, but windy.
very cold in the winter, snows a lot (Northern S: Was it cold?
V: Yes, a bit colder than here.
Europe, Canada...)
B
S: Are you in mid winter there?
2 Students put the dialogue in order. Then they V: Yes. And this winter has been extremely cold.
S: Does it snow?
compare their work with a partner and practise V: Quite a lot!
the dialogue together. Which part of Australia are you from?
The hotel What is it like?
Answers: Where are you staying? / At the And what about the people?
2 Put the sentences in order. Then check
Michelangelo’s. / Is it far from here? / It’s very your dialogue with a partner. How long are you going to be here?
far from here actually. It’s downtown. / And Is this your first visit to Spain?
a Where are you staying?
Have you ever been to Granada before?
what’s it like? / It’s very comfortable. / Do you b Yes, I think so. The room service is very good.
c It’s very far from here actually. It’s downtown.
have everything you need? / Yes, I think so. The d Is it far from here? Visitor
room service is very good. e At the Michelangelo’s. No, this is my first visit here.
f It’s very comfortable. It’s beautiful. I like the weather and it’s the largest city in
g And what is it like? Australia.
h Do you have everything you need? Only for a couple of days.
Pairwork From Sydney.
like...
Students use the picture and dialogue cues to What is the weather No, it isn’t. I was here in 2003.
in spring / summer? They are very friendly. They like sports and outdoor life.
create their own conversation. Then they take cold and cloudy / pret
ty warm.
turns reading their dialogues to another pair of rainy / wet and humid.
in the evening Group work
hot during the day, cool
students. See Teacher’s file. 5.5
Listen to the speakers and answer them in
?
What is the hotel like your notebook. Check with the recording.
It’s a bit too noisy.
utif ul park.
What’s the weather / hotel like? It’s overlooking a bea What was the weather
like when you left?
comfortable.
The rooms are nice and getting cold / about to
snow / cold as usual
A common conversational phrase we use during The food is really grea
t. raining heavily / nice
and bright / fairly mild
lities.
small talk is the structure: What is / was ... like? The There are plenty of faci
d.
It has everything I nee
answers that appear in the language boxes are It’s too far from downtow
n.
Workbook, page 17.
often used to describe hotels or the weather.
34

Small talk
Students create a short “small talk”
conversation using some of the phrases that Teacher’s file
appear on Student’s Book, pages 33 and 34.
Give them a few minutes to practise and then Student’s Book 3 Play WB CD 5.4 all the way
present their conversations to their classmates. e This activity can be reused later to through without pausing. Repeat the
After each, ask the rest of the class a couple of recording again if necessary. Students
evaluate students’ progress.
comprehensive questions: Where is the visitor write four questions about the
from? What is / was the weather like? What is dialogue. Then in small groups, they
the visitor’s hotel like? take turns asking and answering
Workbook, page 17 each others’ questions.
Answer key, p. 114.
(Transcript 5.5, p. 128.)
Group work 1 Play WB CD 5.4, pausing after
Pairwork
each question. Students answer the
e Students recreate the dialogue.
Play CD 5.5. Pause after each speaker so questions. Repeat WB CD 5.4 and
students have time to write their answers in pause so that volunteers can read
their notebooks. Replay CD 5.5, pausing so their answers. (Transcript 5.4, p. 128.)
volunteers can read their answers to the class. 2 Students write questions for the
answers in the activity. This can be
completed individually, in pairs or in
small groups.

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unit five 5
unit five
Receiving visitors
5
Receiving visitors

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Stress and Intonation
The production and understanding of a foreign language not only implies the correct pronunciation of the sounds
but also the correct stress and intonation of words and sentences. Sentence stress refers to special emphasis given to 1 The correct sentence stress makes your
certain syllables within the sentence. ideas clearer to the listener. Names, verbs or
the last word of the sentence are usually
5.6 5.7
1 Listen to the following conversations. 2 Listen to the stress and intonation of
stressed. Play CD 5.6 and ask students to listen
Pay attention to the pronunciation and these sentences. Write the stressed words in
sentence stress. your notebook. closely to the intonation of the sentences. See
S = Secretary V = Visitor 1 I’m Maureen. How do you do? Teacher’s file.
How do you do?
A
2 Nice to meet you.
V: Good morning. I’m Alexis Mouskuori. How do you do? 2
Nice to meet you, too. Play CD 5.7. Students listen to the stress
S: How do you do? 3 Can I take your coat? and intonation of the sentences. Repeat the
Yes, please.
B listening more than once if necessary. Students
4 What would you like to drink?
V: My name’s Harold Hackman, from Montreal. A cup of coffee, please. can complete this task either individually, in
S: Mr. Hackman. Nice to meet you. 5 Can I get you something to drink? pairs or in small groups.
Only if it’s not too much trouble.
V: Nice to meet you, too.
6 How was the flight? Answers: 1 I’m Maureen. How do you do? /
C Fine, thank you. How do you do?; 2 Nice to meet you / Nice to
V: Good morning. I’m Patricia Nichols.
7 Where are you from? meet you, too; 3 Can I take your coat? / Yes,
From Salzburg.
S: Miss Nichols. Oh, we’ve talked on the phone so
please; 4 What would you like to drink? / A
8 What is it like?
It’s a beautiful city. cup of coffee, please; 5 Can I get you
many times. Pleased to meet you. l’m Sarah Lee.
9 Where are you staying? something to drink? / Only if it’s not too much
V: Pleased to meet you too, Miss Lee. At the Plaza’s. trouble; 6 How was the flight? / Fine, thank
10 Are you planning to stay here long?
you; 7 Where are you from? / From Salzburg;
No, I’m leaving tomorrow.
Pairwork 8 What is it like? / It’s a beautiful city; 9 Where
5.8
Listen and say the stressed words in the questions. Practise asking and answering them with a are you staying? / At the Plaza’s; 10 Are you
partner. planning to stay here long? / No, I’m leaving
a Where do you come from? d I’m Pamela. How do you do? tomorrow.
b Excuse me. Where’s the General Manager’s office? e What is your country like at this time of the year?
c What’s the best season to visit your city? f Would you like a cup of coffee?

Pairwork
Play CD 5.8. Students listen and say the
words that are stressed. Then they practise in
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 5. pairs, taking turns reading the questions with
the correct word stress and intonation.
35 See Teacher’s file.
Answers: 1 come 2 Excuse; Manager’s
3 season; city 4 Pamela; do? 5 country; year
6 coffee
Teacher’s file
Student’s Book 7 eighteenth 8 thirtieth Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 5.
9 thirty 10 thirteen See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
1 Word stress: Ask students to draw 11 seventy 12 century
3 columns in their notebooks and page 38.
13 eleventh 14 arrival
write the following headings: Stress 15 available 16 schedule
on 1st syllable; Stress on inner 17 twentieth 18 application
syllable; Stress on last syllable 19 minutes 20 kilometers
Read the list of words below. Students
listen carefully to the stress within Pairwork
individual words and place the words As an extension activity, students can
under the appropriate heading. create a short dialogue with the
questions in the activity by
You can provide students with the rearranging their order and making
following words as an example: up answers for them. They practise
thousand (1st syllable); departure (inner their dialogue for a few minutes and
syllable); seventeen (last syllable) read it to another pair of students.
1 thousand 2 seventeen
3 departure 4 manager
5 fortieth 6 decimals

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unit five 5
Receiving visitors unit five 5
Receiving visitors

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with greeting customs in different


countries. Many European, Latin American and Meeting and
Arabian countries kiss on the cheek when greeting. g reeting
These countries also tend to have a concept of When meeting and greeting people we generally
personal space that is much closer than that of use certain fixed expressions that go with certain
English-speaking countries. gestures, such as shaking hands or kissing. Some
Europeans, for example, kiss on both cheeks
Personal space deals with that physical area a person when they meet. Brazilians kiss three times and in
considers his / her territory. It is the distance at some other Latin American countries people
usually kiss on one cheek when they meet. In
which one feels comfortable when talking to other English-speaking countries people shake hands
people. Too great a distance may be considered only when they meet for the first time, and they
don’t usually kiss when they greet.
“cold” and being too close to the person may be
considered “rude” This amount of space depends
on culture, but it may also depend on the person’s

?
How do people greet each other in your country?
position in society. The higher the position, the Is it different in work situations?
larger space it demands. English speakers usually Are there any differences between men and women when greeting?
In what country do people kiss on the mouth when greeting each other?
stand at a greater distance when speaking than, for
example, Arabs or Latin Americans.
Survey
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread the In pairs or small groups, choose a country and find out how people greet each other there.
article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up questions.

Survey
Divide the class into pairs or small groups. They look
Don’t forget!
up other countries on the Internet and then summarise • Greeting visitors: How do you do?
what they have found with their classmates. It’s nice to meet you.
• Being hospitable: Would you like a cup of coffee?
Can I take your coat?
• Making polite conversation: How was your flight?
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION What’s the weather like there?
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111.
What is your hotel like?
1 Students role-play talking to a foreign Are you planning to go sightseeing?
visitor. Describe their roles and write
important information as cues for them
either on the board or on sheets of paper. 36
Student 1: You are a visitor from abroad.
Think of your name, nationality, job title, and
the hotel you are staying at.
Student 2: Introduce yourself and others in the OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
company. Make small talk as your visitor waits
to enter a meeting. Talk about the weather, Ask students the following questions about the
flights or hotels. conversation in the CD-Rom activities:
1 Who is Mr. Duncan?
2 Make up a conversation putting into 2 Who is Kara Thompson?
practice what you have learned. Be polite 3 Why is Mr. Duncan in the office?
and helpful. Take turns talking about one 4 What places do they mention in their
of the following topics. conversation?
a)A foreign country or city you are familiar with 5 Name two topics from the conversation
b) The weather 6 Are they from the same country?
c) A book you read / A film you saw 7 Is the conversation formal or informal?
d) Vacations and holidays Explain your answer.
Answers: a visitor; 2 a secretary; 3 He wants
to talk business; 4 Wales, Brighton, Sydney,
Brisbane, Australia; 5 the weather, where they
were born, where they live now and holidays;
6 No, they aren’t. She is from Australia and he is
from Wales; 7 informal, but courteous.

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unit six 6
Forms, envelopes and letters
Common office tasks include filling in forms, addressing envelopes and writing letters and e-mails.
In this unit, students will learn how to write clear and concise letters using common letter
structure, as well as standard business-letter formats and envelope-addressing styles. They will also
learn how to fill in application forms correctly.

Skills objectives
• To read for important details
• To organise the information of a letter
unit six 6
correctly Forms, envelopes and letters
• To interpret style and tone of a letter
• To practise letter-writing
Introduction
Language focus A large part of office work involves written communications. Some of these writing activities
• Using common language and structures involve filling in forms, addressing envelopes and writing letters. The purpose of filling in forms
used in letter-writing is to provide information for companies and institutions in an orderly and easy-to-read format.
Letters should always be as clear and simple as possible.
• Abbreviations in formal and informal
writing
• Formal and informal salutations and Objectives
closings • To fill in forms
Key vocabulary • To address envelopes
& structures • To write business letters
• Forename, surname, marital status
• To distinguish between American and British English
• Thank you for your letter..., We would be
grateful... • To learn some abbreviations used in business English
• Messrs., Av., Ms. • To focus on punctuation: the period in abbreviations
Business tasks
• Recognise parts of a letter: salutation; lines
of reference, purpose and closing
• Know how to fill in a form correctly
• Formal and informal writing styles
• Address envelopes correctly
• Use appropriate abbreviations

Additional material 37
• Grammar and language reference,
page 105
• Glossary, pages 108 and 109
• Workbook, pages 18, 19 and 20 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 6 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • Do you write letters?
page 44
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • What type of letters do you usually write?
Book, page 44 • Have you ever written a business letter? What was it for?
• What did you have to keep in mind when writing the letter? (style, tone, neatness...)
06 - Unidad 6 22/5/06 20:53 Página 40

unit six 6
Forms, envelopes and letters unit six 6
Forms, envelopes and letters

Writing letters Writing letters


Business English letters are usually brief and precise. The purpose is clearly stated and there is no room for
Business letters use short and direct sentences and irrelevant information. Though there are different types of letters (applications, orders, circulars, letters of complaint,
letters of request) they all look alike because their form or layout contains similar parts.
follow a standard format.
Essential parts must appear in a standard business OPTIONAL
PARTS
ESSENTIAL
PARTS
letter. Addresses and dates always appear in the 501 Oak Drive a Printed letter-head,
same place, giving business letters a standard 1 Subject line
Washington, DC 22063
sender’s address
Air-conditioning systems
format that is easy to read. Sept. 24, 2006 bDate
2 Reference Your Ref.:
The sender’s address is either on the top right- Our Ref.: c Inside address
(name / job title)
hand corner or centred. Home Services Inc. company name
19, Henderson St. street address
The date is written under the sender’s address and Detroit, Michigan, 31720 city,
state / province, postal code
may be expressed in different ways. (See British Dear sir or madam:
.............................................................................................................
versus American English, Student’s Book, page 40.) .............................................................................................................
.............................................................................................................
dSalutation

.............................................................................................................
The inside address includes either the name of the e Body (content: i.e. purpose
and details)
Best regards,
addressee or his / her position or both if you know
CC:Martin Elliot f Closing
them. 3 Copy notation
Luisa Talbot Ken Wood
Sales Manager
gSignature
Optional parts like the reference or subject lines, 4 Typist’s initials KW/pa
copy notations or the initials of the typist appear on hWriter’s name

more formal corporate letters. i Job title

A reference refers back to a previous letter, fax, 1 Read the letter and answer the following questions in your notebook.
quotation, order No. or file this letter is answering. 1 Who signed this letter? 2 What is this letter about?
3 Who has a copy of this letter? 4 Who typed up this letter?
A subject line describes the theme or subject of
the letter. It is very short and concise. Salutations and closings
Copy notations include the names of people who The salutation is the way you greet the person you are writing to. There are two styles, formal or informal. The most
common punctuation style is with a comma (, ); but many American companies still use the colon (:).
will receive a copy of the letter.
Formal salutation: Less formal salutation:
Typist’s initials include the initials of the person who Dear Sir, / Madam, Dear Sir: / Madam: (Am.) Dear Mr. / Mrs. / Miss Morris, Dear Mr. / Miss Stanfield:

signs the letter (in capitals) and the person who typed • When writing to a company in general, use: Dear Sir or Madam followed by (,) or (:).
it (in small case letters). If the letter is accompanying
any enclosures, we include this information directly • Close your letter in the same style you used in the salutation:
Formal closing: Less formal closing:
after these initials. For example: KW / pa Yours sincerely, (addressee’s name is known) Sincerely, Sincerely yours, Kind regards,
Enclosures: 2 Yours faithfully, (addressee’s name is not known) Cordial wishes, Best regards,

Workbook, page 18.


1 38
Examine the different parts of the letter. Then
students answer the questions as a group.
Answers: 1 Ken Wood (The Sales Manager);
2 air conditioning systems; 3 Martin Elliot and Teacher’s file
Luisa Talbot; 4 p.a. (Ken Wood’s secretary).
Workbook, page 18 order to understand these addresses
Addressing envelopes better, it is best to recognise certain
Salutations and closings
characteristics. The last line of
The salutation is the way you greet the person you Examine the essential and optional American addresses includes the city,
are writing to. A formal style addresses them as Sir parts of the envelopes with the class. a two-letter abbreviation of the state
or Madam. A polite yet less formal style uses the Call their attention to the differences in and a 5 to 9-digit zip code (San
American and British styles. Diego, CA 91122). British addresses
person’s actual name (Dear Mr. or Ms. Smith,). This
style is not necessarily considered informal, but it is • When we address a business include the city and a postal code
common in business when we wish to give our envelope, we must be sure to that includes letters and numbers
include all the necessary information (Oxford OX1 1DZ).
reader a certain sense of “closeness” to the
all on the same side of the envelope. Additional practice
company. They must never be hand-written Addresses: There are many Internet
The closing is what most reflects the letter’s overall and should follow the same style or sites that allow you to look up world
style. Less formal closings try to end the letter on a font as the actual letter. All essential postal codes. Assign different
more “personal” note; whereas formal closings parts must be included. The optional countries to groups or pairs of
stress you are ready to do business. For this reason, parts are information for the postal students. They look up example
the more personal style of informal closings would workers or the receptionists handling postal codes for different countries
the office mail. and write imaginary addresses for
not be appropriate when we do not know the
person we are writing to. • Different countries have different them.
styles of writing their addresses. It is
best to copy the address as it appears
on their website or previous letter. In

40
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unit six 6
unit six
Forms, envelopes and letters
6
Forms, envelopes and letters

Writing letters
The body of the letter
The body of the letter is the main content. It may start with a reference to another letter or fax previously received Focus on Language
or sent. Then it must include a statement of purpose of the present letter. Finally, it usually includes closing lines to
express a more personal wish or comment related to the aim of the letter.
The body of the letter is the main part of the
letter. It usually starts with a reference line if the
letter is answering some previous correspondence.
focus on Language Otherwise, it would just start with a purpose line.
2 Say if these salutations and closings match.
Common phrases Correct those which are wrong. Finally, all letters have a closing sentence. Present
Reference 1 Dear Mr. Wells, / Yours sincerely continuous is often considered less formal style.
Thank you for your letter of June 16th. 2 Gentlemen: / Best regards
We refer to your fax dated... 3 Dear Sir or Madam: / Kind regards
Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s
With reference to your letter dated...
4 The Finance Manager, / Yours sincerely Book, pages 108-109 by copying and translating
Purpose
5 Messrs. Jones & Co., / Sincerely the words from the lesson in their notebooks.
6 Dear Sir, / Yours faithfully
I am writing to apply for the vacancy of...
We would like to order the following items... 7 Dear Ms. Black: / Cordial wishes
8 Madam: / Yours truly
2 Students compare the salutations and closings
Closing
I / We would be very grateful ... to receive a trial e to see if they are both in formal or informal
order. style. See Teacher’s file.
I / We look forward to hearing from you.
I’m looking forward to... (informal)
Answers: 1 less formal salutation and formal
Grammar reference, page 105. closing; 2 formal salutation and less formal
closing; 3 formal salutation and closing;
Group work 4 informal salutation and formal closing;
In small groups, identify the mistake in each sentence. Then, individually, write the corrections in 5 formal salutation and informal closing;
your notebook. 6 formal salutation and closing; 7 informal
1 Dear Mrs. 5 Sales Manager
2 April the 10, 2006 Mr. Keith Morgan
salutation and closing; 8 formal salutation
3 Lewis and Co., West Road 13, Bristol BR3 8HG. 2 Elm Street and informal closing.
4 Sirs. Sinclair and Hughes. Santa Barbara
CA 93106
Students correct the salutations and closings
which are wrong.
Sample answers: 1 Dear Sir, / Yours sincerely
OR Dear Mr. Wells, / Best regards; 2 Gentlemen:
/ Yours faithfully OR Dear Mr. / Kind regards;
3 correct; 4 Dear Sir or Madam / Yours sincerely
OR The Finance Manager / Cordial wishes;
Workbook, page 19.
39 5 Messrs. Jones & Co., / Yours sincerely OR Dear
Mr. Jones & Co., / Sincerely; 6 correct; 7 correct;
8 Madam: / Yours sincerely OR Dear Mrs. / Miss /
Ms., / Yours truly.
Teacher’s file
Group work
Student’s Book Workbook, page 19
Answer key, p. 114. Students correct the mistakes in small groups.
2 Students choose one of the
salutation / closing pairs and write a Business envelopes and letters Answers: 1 Dear Mrs. Smith; 2 April 10,
letter for it. They need to make sure 1 Students organise the information 2006 or 10 April, 2006; 3 Lewis and Co., 13
the body of the letter also matches and use it to address the envelopes West Road, Bristol BR 3 8HG; 4 Messrs. Sinclair
the formal or informal style of the correctly. and Hughes (UK) / Sinclair and Hughes (US);
salutation and closing. e This activity can be reused later to 5 Mr. Keith Morgan; Sales Manager; 2 Elm
Additional practice evaluate students’ progress. Street; Santa Barbara, CA 93106
Peer teaching: Students exchange 2 Students read the advertisement and
the letters and evaluate their style. Is write a letter of application on a
it formal or informal? Does it match separate sheet of paper. They need
the style of the salutation / closing to request an application form and a
pair? Remind students how to give job interview.
constructive criticism: I think if you
wrote this…, Do you think this is too
informal?, why not try…?
e This activity can be reused later to
evaluate students’ progress.

41
06 - Unidad 6 22/5/06 20:53 Página 42

unit six 6
Forms, envelopes and letters unit six 6
Forms, envelopes and letters

Filling in forms Filling in forms


Form-filling
1 Students look at the form and answer the The purpose of filling in forms is to provide information for companies, agencies and institutions in an orderly and
easy-to-read format.
questions. Discuss the different sections on the
1 Look at the form and
form with the class: name, sex and age, marital NAMES
First name Richard answer the questions.
status, addresses (permanent and temporary) Surname James
1 Is Mr. James in the USA
and work (profession, present position...). See Sex Male Date of Birth 9-2-85 or in Great Britain?
SEX & AGE 2 What is his current job?
Teacher’s file. Place of Birth Platteville, Wisconsin, USA
3 Is he married?
4 How old is he?
Answers: 1 In the USA; 2 He’s not working MARITAL
Married Single Divorced Widowed
STATUS 5 What month is his
at present; 3 No, he’s single; 4 He’s 21 years birthday?
old; 5 September; 6 He’s got a phone / fax. Permanent 1540 King Street; Janesburg, WI 53548 6 What kind of phone has
Temporary he got at home?
ADDRESSES
Work
e-mail
Key Vocabulary
Revise the differences between British and Profession Electrician Occupation

WORK
Present Position Unemployed
American styles. American dates have the month Tel. No. 754-5978 Fax No. 754-5978
followed by the day in ordinal numbers. British
dates have the day first and then the month. The Signature Date 25-10-2006
day is written in cardinal numbers, although it is
always read as an ordinal number followed by the
preposition of. American business salutations use a KEY VOCABULARY
Pairwork
colon and British salutations use a comma. When British versus American English
Write these dates in American
referring to names, Americans have a first name, There are some similarities and some differences in American
and British style. Then practise
and British letter-writing and form-filling styles.
middle name and last name or surname. The British reading them to your partner.
have a forename or Christian name and a surname. USA British Example: 17/8/2006

Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s Letters February 4th, 2006 4th February, 2006 August 17th,2006 (Am.)
Dear Sir: Dear Sir, 17 August 2006 (Br.)
Book, page 109 by copying and translating the Forms 2-4-2005 4-2-2005 1 30/1/93 5 9/2/2000
words from the lesson in their notebooks. 2/4/2005 4/2/2005
2 5/9/94 6 10/3/2010
4 Feb., 2005
3 21/7/92 7 8/12/05
first name forename / christian name
4 23/4/03 8 4/10/01
last name surname
Pairwork full name (forename + surname)
maiden name (woman’s surname before marrying)
Students practise writing and saying the dates
Glossary, page 109.
in American and British style. Remind them
that even though the British style writes the Workbook, page 20.
cardinal number, it is still read as an ordinal 40
number.
Answers: (American dates shown first)
1 January 30th, 1993; 30 January, 1993;
2 September 5th, 1994; 5 September 1994; Teacher’s file
3 July 21st, 1992; 21 July 1992; 4 April 23rd,
Student’s Book Pairwork
2003; 23 April 2003; 5 February 9th, 2000; 9
In pairs, they take turns asking each
February 2000; 6 March 10th, 2010; 10 March 1 Download different types of forms other information in order to fill in
2010; 7 December 8th, 2005; 8 December from the Internet. Ask students what their partner’s form: What’s your first
2005; 8 October 4th, 2001; 4 October 2001. the different forms are for (credit name? Where were you born? Could
card application, university you spell that, please?
application, seminar application, job e This activity can be reused later to
application...).
evaluate students’ progress.
Workbook, page 20
Answer key, p. 115.
Filling in forms
1 Students write what section the
information belongs to.

42
06 - Unidad 6 22/5/06 20:53 Página 43

unit six 6
unit six
Forms, envelopes and letters
6
Forms, envelopes and letters

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Punctuation
Observe how the period is used with abbreviations. Punctuation
Remind students of the need to use periods when
• The period is used with abbreviations to indicate that some letters have been omitted from the full word. Some
commonly used abbreviations in business writing are:
using common abbreviations. Some abbreviations,
like states in American addresses, no longer use a
Addresses Days
St. Street Dr. Drive N North Mon. Monday Thurs.Thursday Sat. Saturday period.
Ave. Avenue Sq. Square S South Tues. Tuesday Fri. Friday Sun. Sunday
Rd. Road Hwy. Highway E East Wed. Wednesday
Pl. Place Blvd. Boulevard W West 1 Students find the words that can be shortened.
Business enterprises They can complete this task in small groups or
Addressees
Mr. Mister Messrs. plural of Mister
LTD. Limited Corp. Corporation in pairs. See Teacher’s file.
CO. Company Inc. Incorporated
Mrs. Mistress Dr. Doctor
Ms. Miss or Mrs. Prof. Professor Others Answers: Mr. Thomas Moore; Oil Ltd. Co.; 12
a.m. Acc Ext. encl.
p.m. Attn. Tel Washington DC.
N. East Rd.; Quad Blvd; Stratford, VA 54452.
Months Dr. Henry Burns; 705 West Avenue; Apple Sq.;
Jan. January Sept. September
Feb. February Oct. October Athens, VA 01994.
Mar. March Nov. November
Apr. April Dec. December
Aug. August 2 Students create lists of abbreviations they find
• We use a period after initials of middle names e in an English dictionary. In pairs or small
John F. Kennedy Dr. J. L. Robertson
groups, students read the abbreviations they
found. The others write the abbreviations in
1 Find the words that can be shortened in the
letter and write their abbreviations in your
their notebooks. As a large group, students
September 10th, 2005
notebook. share some of the more interesting or
Mister Thomas Moore
important abbreviations they came up with.
Oil Limited Company 2 Look up lists of abbreviations in an English See Teacher’s file.
12 North East Road dictionary. Read words to a partner who
Quad Bouleverd
writes down the abbreviations.
Stratford, VA 54452
List of common abbreviations
.............................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
.......... ..........
.............................
.............................
Letters and correspondence: eg. (exempli
....................
........................................
........................................
........................................
.............................
gratia / for example); f.o.a. (for the attention
of); fyi (for your information); i.e. (id est / that
Henry Burns is); inc. (included); n/a (not applicable); re
Doctor Henry Burns
705 West Avenue
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 6.
(regarding); ref. (reference)
Apple Square
Athens, VA 01994 In the office: admin. (administration); AGM
41 (Annual General Meeting); CEO (Chief
Executive Officer); assoc. (association); exec.
(executive); hdw (hardware); H.Q.
(headquarters); Man. Dir. (Managing Director);
Teacher’s file pt-tm (part-time); R&D (Research and
Development); rep. (representative); WP
Student’s Book shows a full word, students say the (Word Processor); HoD (Head of department).
abbreviation. Finance and banking: a/c (current account);
1 Students complete the letter to Mr.
Thomas Moore. They must think of e This activity can be reused later to f.o.t. (free of tax); GDP (Gross Domestic
appropriate reference, purpose and evaluate students’ progress. Product); B/P (Bills Payable); B/S (Bills of sale);
closing lines. Additional practice c.o.d (cash on delivery); f.o.c. (free of charge);
Students make a list in their S/R (Sale or Return); t.b.a. (to be arranged);
2 Prepare some flash cards with an
notebooks of the abbreviations VAT (Valued Added tax).
abbreviation on one side and the
word that can be abbreviated on they found in the dictionary. In Deliveries: C/O (Certificate of Origin); d/o
the other. Show the flash cards to pairs, one student reads the (delivery order); ETA (Estimated Time of
the class one by one. If the flash abbreviation and the other student Arrival); ToD (Time of Delivery); mdse
card has an abbreviation, students says the full word. Then they (merchandise); p&p (postage and packing);
say the full word. If the flash card exchange roles. p.p.i. (parcel post insured); gtd (guaranteed).

Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 6.


See Optional CD-Rom Review, Teacher’s Book,
page 44.

43
06 - Unidad 6 22/5/06 20:53 Página 44

unit six 6
Forms, envelopes and letters unit six 6
Forms, envelopes and letters

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article discusses how attitudes are reflected in


writing styles. English writing style is always short Writing style
and direct. It shouldn’t be interpreted as a rude

T
here are attitudes of speakers that are clearly
attitude, but rather a professional writing style. reflected in writing. It is said that English
Give students a few minutes to reread the article. speakers, in general, are far more ‘to the
point’ when writing than writers of other cultures.
As a large group, discuss the follow-up questions. With regard to letter writing, sentences tend to be
shorter and very precise. There is no room for
unnecessary details or for ‘beating about the bush’.
Likewise, an English speaker will expect to read
a letter or memo written in clear, direct and careful
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION language.
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111.

?
Find some memos written in your native language and compare them with memos written in English.
1 Students look for the addresses of three State differences and similarities in style. Are they more / less formal? More / less elaborate?
companies on the Internet or in the phone Do you have a personal style for writing letters? How would you describe it?
Do you like writing? What do you usually write?
book, to include: a large department store, a
law firm, a university, or other organisation.
Then they label three envelopes, at least one
should be formal and another informal (using
an imaginary addressee’s name). In small groups
of four, they exchange their envelopes with
their group members. Each student writes
suitable salutations and complementary closes Don’t forget!
for letters for his / her three envelopes. They • How to start a business letter: Dear Sir:
Dear Mrs. White,
make sure that the style of the letter (formal or
Dear Madam,
informal) matches that of the envelope. • How to close a business letter: Sincerely yours,
Afterwards, they put the letters inside the Yours faithfully,
Best regards,
envelopes and return them to their original • How to address an envelope: Messrs. Brown and Sons
authors. The students discuss if their classmates’ P.O. Box 123
letters match their envelopes or not. London SE1 2TF
England

2 Write out the following scrambled letter


on the board or on strips of paper. In pairs, 42
the students arrange the letter correctly,
discussing how every piece should fit the
proper layout of a formal letter:
31st Street 21 July 1992 New York NY 17. OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
Very truly yours. I am writing to apply for the
vacancy of Assistant Director. I am referring to Read the following definitions and cues.
your advertisement dated 18 July 1994. Dear Students guess the word.
Sirs. I believe I have qualifications for that 1 A formal closing
position. Sinclair Hughes International 2 As a result in a more formal style
Consultant Office. My name is Donna Foster.
P.O. Box 744102, Cincinnati, OH 22872. 3 A synonym for answer
4 The way you write your name on a letter is
Answers: Consultant Office / Sinclair Hughes
your…
International / PO Box 744102 / Cincinnati, OH
22872 / 31st Street / New York / NY 17 / 21 5 I’m sorry in a more formal style
July 1992 / Dear Sirs / My name is Donna Foster 6 Write your name on
/ I'm writing to apply for the vacancy of 7 Dear Mr. Thornby,
Assistant Director / I'm referring to the job
8 A synonym for follow, do
advertisement dated 18 July 1994 / I believe I
have qualifications for that position / Very truly 9 A piece of paper
yours Answers: 1 I look forward to; 2 therefore;
3 response; 4 signature; 5 I’m afraid; 6 to
sign; 7 salutation; 8 to carry out; 9 slip

44
07-EFS-TB-Unit 7 22/5/06 21:57 Página 45

unit seven 7
Requests
Request letters are one of the most common types of business letters. We use them to ask for
more information about courses or products, samples, quotations or brochures. They follow the
same format as any other business letter.
In this unit, students will learn how to write clear and concise request letters and e-mails using
common structures. They will examine the use of the present continuous in letter writing and apply
this and other structures to response letters they write in answer to requests and advertisements.

Skills objectives
• To look for the important details of a
request letter in order to respond correctly
unit seven 7
• To correctly organise the information of a Requests
response letter
• To recognise the important details of an
advertisement Introduction
You write a request when you need information about goods and services and when you need
Language focus general information of some kind. A response letter answers someone’s request. It usually
• Using common language and structures accompanies the goods or service the other person has requested.
used in request and response letters
• Internet slang Objectives
• Present continuous in letter writing
• To ask for information
Key vocabulary • To request catalogues or samples
& structures
• To send a written letter or an e-mail
• brochure, price-list, catalogue, travel
package • To respond to requests
• subscribe, ask for an estimate, consider • To examine company advertising
advantages • To focus on the use of the gerund
• Thank you for your letter..., We have • To look at e-mail abbreviations
received...
• Internet slang and abbreviations:
BBL, CYO, FYI
Business tasks
• Ask for information
• Request catalogues or samples
• Send a request letter or e-mail
• Respond to requests and advertisements

Additional material 43
• Grammar and language reference, pages
101 and 105
• Glossary, page 109
• Workbook, pages 21, 22 and 23
• CD-Rom, Unit 7 Unit warm-up questions
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
page 50
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • Have you ever had to ask for information about something? (When?, where?, why?)
Book, page 50 • What type of information did you request?
• Was your request successful?
07-EFS-TB-Unit 7 23/5/06 16:34 Página 46

unit seven
Requests
7 unit seven 7
Requests

Request letters Request letters


The purpose of a request letter is to ask for information, samples, quotations, catalogues, brochures...
• Include the information that will help the receiver answer your questions satisfactorily.
1 Give students a few minutes to read the letters. • Say why you are making the inquiry.
Ask them each of the questions. They answer • State your request as a question or statement.
them as a large group. • Identify specifically what you want: catalogue, brochure, samples, information about an item or service...

Answers: 1 a Peter Stephens is asking for 1 Read the model request letters. Then answer these questions.
shipping and delivery dates. He also requests 1 What is each letter requesting?
2 Have the sender and receiver corresponded before?
information about race car tyres. b Miguel
3 What differences in style are there between the two letters?
Martín is asking about Crossbow Gift’s prices
for executive pens. 2 a Mr. Svenson and Mr. a Sept. 24/9/2006 b
Stephens have written to each other before. E. Svenson
Miguel Martín
Monday, 24 September 2006 10:29 a.m.
b This is Miguel Martín’s first e-mail. 3 a Mr. Export Manager
Crossbow Gifts
Haga Verktyg 52
Stephens has used a more formal written style Göteborg Executive pens

for a traditional business letter. b Even though Sweden


Re: ORDER 25 Dear Sir or Madam,
Mr. Martín didn’t know who he was writing to, Dear Mr. Svenson,
he used a more informal writing style (typical We have received your letter of 6 June 2006 concerning
We are interested in your new line of Executive
pens. Please send us an offer quoting your best
of e-mails). our order for spare car parts. We would be grateful if
terms and discount for cash payment. Thank
you could confirm shipping and delivery dates.
you very much.
We would also like information about the XYZ tyres you
are producing for race cars. Cordially,
Focus on Language Yours faithfully, Miguel Martín

Request letters usually start with a reference line to Peter Stephens

whatever advertisement or catalogue you are


requesting further information from. This reference
line is then followed by a question or statement focus on Language Pairwork
Complete the following sentences with an
requesting the details or products you need. Discuss Opening sentences
expression from the language box. Check
I saw your advertisement in...
other possible opening sentences students could We are interested in...
with a partner.
use. Refer students to the Grammar and language 1 ...samples of the products you advertised in Sunday’s
Inquiry paper?
reference, Student’s Book, page 105. Students can Could you please send me / us... ? 2 ...more information about the possibility of
also personalise the Glossary, Student’s Book, page I / We would like to know if / about... subscribing to your magazine.
I would be grateful if you could inform me / us 3 ...shipping costs of text books.
109 by copying and translating the words from the about... 4 ...an estimate of the large size jackets, please?
lesson in their notebooks. I would also like information/details about... 5 ...yesterday’s newspaper.
Grammar reference, page 105. 6 ...a brochure of your travel packages to Southern
Asia?
Pairwork
e In pairs, students complete the following 44 Workbook, page 21.

sentences with expressions from the Focus on


Language box. See Teacher’s file.
Answers: 1 Could you please send me
samples of the products you advertised in Teacher’s file
Sunday’s paper? 2 We are interested in more
Student’s Book 2 Students use words from the Focus
information about the possibility of subscribing
on Language box and pairwork
to your magazine. 3 I would be grateful if you Pairwork activities in their Student’s Books to
could inform me of shipping costs of text Students choose one of the completed complete the letter.
books. 4 Could you please send us an estimate sentences from the pairwork activity
and write a request letter. 3 Students imagine they are secretaries
of the large size jackets, please? 5 I saw your for a small upholstery company. They
advertisement in yesterday’s newspaper. e This activity can be reused later to
need to write an e-mail to the
6 Could you please send us a brochure of your evaluate students’ progress. Seashell Hotel to get information
travel packages to Southern Asia? about the facilities they have.
Workbook, page 21
Answer key, p. 115. Additional practice
Students answer the request letter as
1 Students complete the requests with
if they were the Hotel Director of the
expressions from the Focus on
Seashell Hotel.
Language box in their Student’s
e This activity can be reused later to
Book.
evaluate students’ progress.

46
07-EFS-TB-Unit 7 22/5/06 21:57 Página 47

unit seven 7
unit seven 7
Requests
Requests

Response letters Response letters


Always reply promptly to routine requests from a potentially interesting client or to large and regular orders.
Focus on Language
focus on Language Opening sentences and closing responses set the
Opening sentences Closing response tone (polite, urgent) and style (formal or informal)
Thank your for your e-mail / inquiry of... I will be pleased to send you any further of the letter you are writing. Students can
We have received your letter of... information you may need.
We were pleased to receive... We look forward to receiving your order. personalise the Glossary, Student’s Book, page 109,
We will deal promptly with any order you by copying and translating the words from the
I am / We are enclosing... / are sending you a copy of... send us.
We can supply / offer... lesson in their notebooks.
Grammar reference, page 105.

1 Read the two letters and answer the questions in your notebook.
Focus on Language activities
In pairs, one of the students chooses and says an
11 June, 2006 October 21st, 2006 opening sentence to his / her partner, setting the
Messrs Evans & Co.
212 Holborn Road Mr. Philip Page tone of the response letter. The other student finds
78 Columbus Ave.
London S1
Kansas City, Kansas 96100 the closing sentence that best matches the tone of
Dear Sirs,
Dear Mr. Page:
the opening sentence. Then they exchange roles.
I am enclosing a catalogue and current price-list for Thank you for your letter dated 28 May, requesting
our Printers as requested in your letter of 11 February. information about our new line of financial calculators.
The Magna Model that you mention is an excellent Our latest model is the FCX Special that has a wider 1 Give students a few minutes to read the two
machine but it is large in size and slow for your needs. If range of functions, wider screen capacity (10 digits), in
you require a printer that works at a higher speed we comparison to the FC model, and it is programmable. letters. Students can answer the questions in
recommend the Magna Senior Model. You will find a full We can supply the FCX Special at $80, a very
reasonable price if you consider its advantages.
pairs, small groups or as a large group.
description of it on p.10 of the catalogue.
We will be pleased to send you any further information We look forward to receiving your order.
you may need. Answers: 1 Messrs Evans and Co; 2 They
Very truly yours,
asked for a catalogue and current price list for
Yours faithfully,
Gary Fisher Aldo Vito printers; 3 He is enclosing the materials they
Gary Fisher Aldo Vito asked for; 4 Because the Magna Senior model
Sales Department Sales Department
is a faster printer; 5 Aldo Vito wrote a letter on
October 21st; 6 The FCX has more functions, a
1 Who wrote a letter on 11th February? 5 Who wrote a letter on October 21st?
2 What did they request? 6 What is the difference between the FCX and FC
wider screen and it is programmable; 7 He
3 What is Gary Fisher’s response to the client’s request? models? works for the Sales department.
4 Why does Gary Fisher recommend the Magna Senior 7 What department does Aldo Vito work for?
Model?

Workbook, page 22.


45

Teacher’s file
Workbook, page 22 “formalities”. Students rewrite the
Answer key, p. 115. e-mail in a more informal, yet polite
Responding to requests style. Refer them to the Internet
abbreviations on Student’s Book,
1 Students complete the sentences page 48.
using the information in the Focus on
Language boxes. Additional practice
Individually, students respond to Mr.
Informal business e-mails Perez’s letter. They can choose to
Pairwork answer with a traditional letter or
The Internet has changed business with an e-mail.
correspondence. The quick and e This activity can be reused later to
immediate nature of e-mails leaves
little time for unnecessary evaluate students’ progress.

47
07-EFS-TB-Unit 7 22/5/06 21:58 Página 48

unit seven
Requests
7 unit seven 7
Requests

Company advertising Company advertising


1 Read the following advertisements, then answer the questions below.
1 Give students a few minutes to read the Lamps
Seeking financial independe James O’Connor & Co. Ltd. Desk
e adverts. Students can answer the questions nce?
World Furniture, Inc is looking for We are manufacturers and can
supply a wide
future franchise lamps are
individually, in pairs or small groups. See members. choice of lamps from stock. Our
colours to match
For more information on how you designed in different shapes and
Teacher’s file. can start your ts. Write for
own business bringing the best traditional and modern environmen
quality furniture
to your area, please contact Eileen further details to:
Answers: 1 James O’ Connor and Co. Ltd. Singer at World
Furniture, Inc., Sales Manager
and Messrs Smith and Rogers; 2 ABC Rentals; 256 Constitution Ave., Orlando 22 Riverside, San Diego
FL, 32801, USA, or
3 Davis Travel Association; 4 It is aimed at send an e-mail to franchise@worldfu
rniture.com.
California 20162

young tourists; 5 No. They are looking for


people who want to open their store in other Davis Travel Association WANTED
55, South West Chicago, Illinois 60688
areas; 6 She works at Davis Travel Association. Secretary with 2 year
s experience. English
YOUNG TOURIST SPECIAL!! and Spanish required
. Must know Excel and
Prepaid railway ticket plan covering July and August. Word. Contact: rjquincy
@abcrentals.com.
Includes flexible rates and travel schedules.
2 Students read the extracts from the request For further information write to:
letters and decide which letter they are Mrs. Melanie Dawson at
melanie.dawson@davistravel.com.
answering. Office equipment
Quality materials at record prices!
1 Which adverts are selling goods?
Answers: a Davis Travel Association; b World Request more information at:
2 Which company is advertising a specific job? Messrs. Smith and Rogers
Furniture, Inc.; c James O’ Connor and Co. Ltd. 3 Which advert offers services? PO. Box 375
4 Who is the target audience for the travel ad? London SE1 2TF
5 Is World Furniture, Inc. hiring people for their Orlando office?
3 Students complete the three extracts by adding 6 Where does Melanie Dawson work?

the best salutation and closing for each. In 2 Now look at the extracts from the request letters below. Which ad are they answering?
small groups, they can compare the letters they a b
have written. See Teacher’s file. t in the Norton paper and
We have seen your advertisemen I am interested in finding out more details about starting a
us about the rail special
would be glad if you could inform franchise of your business in Dayton, Ohio. Please send me
Sample answers: a Dear Mrs. Dawson, … offered for young tourists. any necessary information or forms I may need.

Yours sincerely; b Dear Ms Singer, I saw your c


Please send me a catalogue and
a price list for Desk lamps
advertisement in the Norton paper and … and state what discount you allow
for large orders.
Yours faithfully; c Messrs O’Connor & Co., I
saw your advertisement in the Norton paper 3 Write the correct salutation and closing for each letter in your notebook.
and I would like some information about the
lamps you offer. … Yours sincerely. Debate
Which advertisements best promote their companies? Explain why.

Debate 46
e Which adverts did they like best? Which
promoted their company better? Ask students
to give reasons for their opinions.
Teacher’s file
Student’s Book Additional practice

1 In small groups, students write 5 Photocopy advertisements from an


other questions about the adverts. English language newspaper. In pairs,
Encourage them to think of difficult students prepare questions for one
questions for the other group to of them. Then, they exchange the
answer. They exchange questions advertisement with another pair and
with another group. As a way to answer their questions.
make the activity fun, see who can
3 Students choose one of the
be the first to answer the other
group’s questions. advertisements used in the activity
e This activity can be reused later to
above. Then they write a request
evaluate students’ progress. letter answering the advertisement.

48
07-EFS-TB-Unit 7 22/5/06 21:58 Página 49

unit seven 7
unit seven 7
Requests
Requests

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Gerunds
The present continuous is often used in letter writing because it refers to an action we are doing at the moment, or Gerunds
at least, at the moment of writing the letter. It is formed by the present tense of the verb (to be) and the gerund of
the main verb (-ing suffix). The present continuous is common in letter-writing
Examples: because it refers to actions we are doing at the time
I’m enclosing a cheque for t25. we are writing the letter (I am enclosing...). It is also
We’re enjoying our holidays in France. often characteristic of a more informal writing style.
I’d like information about the books you are printing for young children.
You should not confuse this tense with other uses of the gerund (ing) form.
Many students confuse the present continuous with
• As a noun: I enjoy travelling and visiting friends. the gerund. Remind them that the gerund alone is
• As an adjective clause: We have received your letter concerning our order. not a tense, although it can be used as a noun or
an adjective.
1 Look at the two letters on page 45 again. 2 Complete each sentence with the correct form
Which one uses the present continuous? Which of the verb in parentheses.
one uses only the gerund? Examples: George (study) a map now?
Mrs. Jones (not come) today.
Focus on Grammar
Is George studying a map now? Revise the present continuous with the students.
focus on Grammar Mrs. Jones isn’t coming today. Refer students to the Grammar and language
Present continuous 1 The boss (read) a letter now?
2 The students (writing)?
reference, Student’s Book, page 101.
Full form Short form
3 We (not produce) this line of cars in a series.
I am I’m
4 Our company (offer) these items below its market
You You’re price. 1 Students look back at the letters on page 45 to
We are + verb (-ing) We’re + verb (-ing)
They They’re
5 They (send) the documents by fax. see which one uses the present continuous and
6 The secretary (photocopy) a form?
He He’s 7 The new PC model (not sell) very well.
which one uses the gerund.
She is She’s 8 The clerk (answer) telephone now?
It It’s
9 I (enclose) a cheque for 19.95 euros.
Answers: The letter by Gary Fisher used the
Interrogative Negative
10 The lawyers (listen) to the proposal at the moment? present continuous (I am enclosing...); Aldo
Am I I’m not Vito’s letter used the gerund (requesting
Are you + verb (-ing)? You’re information...).
we We’re not + verb (-ing)
they They’re
Is he He’s
2 Students complete the phrases with the verb in
she She’s not
it It’s the present continuous. Remind them they
Grammar reference, page 101. need to change the word order to make
questions and negative statements.
Workbook, page 23.
Answers: 1 Is the boss reading a letter now?
2 Are the students writing? 3 We are not
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 7.
47 producing this line of cars in a series. 4 Our
company is offering these items below its
market price. 5 They are sending the
documents by fax. 6 Is the secretary copying
the form? 7 The new PC model is not selling
Teacher’s file
very well. 8 Is the clerk answering the
Workbook, page 23 3 Students complete the letter by telephone now? 9 I am enclosing a cheque for
Answer key, p. 115. placing the correct verb into the 19.95 euros. 10 Are the lawyers listening to
present continuous. Ask them if they the proposal at the moment?
1 Students complete the sentences
with the correct form of the auxiliary consider the letter to be informal or
formal. Does it seem friendly? Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 7.
verb “to be”. See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
e This activity can be reused later to
2 Students put the words in order to page 50.
create sentences or questions in the evaluate students’ progress.
present continuous.
Additional practice
In groups of three, students answer
the questions from activities 1 and 2
or write questions for the
statements. Each student can
individually do four each (answering
the four questions or writing four
questions) or they can do everything
together.

49
07-EFS-TB-Unit 7 22/5/06 21:58 Página 50

unit seven
Requests
7 unit seven 7
Requests

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with the letter-writing revolution


brought on by the Internet. It has changed the way
businesses communicate with each other. Because uring the last decade the Internet has become so powerful as a
» HTH = Hope that helps
it is such an immediate medium, abbreviations are
common in informal e-mails. D means of communication that, little by little, it has created a
language of its own. There are a tremendous amount of mailings
exchanged daily around the world as millions of people are writing and
IMO = In my opinion
ASAP = As soon as possible
BBL = Be back later
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread answering personal messages, orders, complaints, reports, inquiries, etc. B/C = Because
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up This implies a lot of time sitting at the computer and typing on a keyboard. BFN = Bye for now
questions. In this world of almost instantaneous communication, abbreviations and CYO = See you on line
acronyms have developed as spontaneous and useful shorthand. Needless FYI = For your information
to say that there are thousands of these expressions circling the earth in GA = Go ahead
different chat sites, newsgroups, messenger programs and the like. GBH = Great big hug
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION Here are some of the most typical ones used nowadays.
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111.
1 Students choose a request letter to write either

?
inside or outside of class. Then, they read their Can you guess the meaning and complete the following ones?
GL = Good... JAS = Just...
letters to the teacher one-by-one or to their HF = Have... NM = Never...
classmates in small groups or pairs. Write the GFY = Good... AOB = Any other...
following list on the board for students to IOW = In other...
Now try to guess these ones. Say them aloud!
choose from: CU IC W8 4U RUOK?
a a real company in your country asking for
information or a brochure
b the Chamber of Commerce of a city, state or
province in an English-speaking country
asking for brochures or information about
Don’t forget!
• How to request information: - Could you please send me... ?
their city I would like to know about...
• How to use e-mail abbreviations: ASAP, FYI, B/C
c a university about a course or programme • The difference between present continuous and the
you are interested in gerund: English-speaking countries (gerund as an adj.)
I’m writing to inquire about your new product.
• How to respond to requests: Thank you for your inquiry...
2 Students look up other Internet abbreviations We are enclosing...

and, in small groups, share them with their


classmates. Which do they like best? Which are
the cleverest? Which are funny?
48

OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW


Read out these informal requests one by one.
Students change the style and make the
requests formal.
1 Don’t forget…
2 After our phone call
3 Come into the bank
4 Can you stop using your credit card?
5 About the things you bought…
Answers: 1 I’d like to remind you…;
2 Following our telephone conversation;
3 I would be grateful if you could come to the
bank; 4 I’m afraid we have to ask you to stop
using your credit card; 5 About your
purchases…

50
08-EFS-TB-Unit 8 22/5/06 22:40 Página 51

unit eight 8
Quotations and orders
A quotation is a letter in which a supplier or seller states which goods or services are available, at
what price and under what terms. An order is when a client accepts a certain number of these
goods or services at these terms. Because it is a type of informal contract between buyer and
seller, the items and terms must be especially clear.
In this unit, students will learn how to write these types of letters in a clear and concise way. They
will also examine how the Internet has influenced this area of business.

Skills objectives
• To look for the important details of an
inquiry in order to respond correctly
unit eight 8
• To organise the information of a quotation Quotations and orders
or order into a concise list that is easy to
follow
• To infer information about the people Introduction
A quotation is a letter in which a supplier or seller states that he is willing to supply goods or
writing from their style and language they
services at a given price and on the terms stated.
have used
Language focus
• Using common language and structures Objectives
used in quotation letters and order forms • To inquire about and give quotations
• Informal writing styles of e-mails and • To send a purchase order and a cover letter
Instant Messages
• To use grammar in context
• Writing organised and easy-to-read letters
• To choose the best quotation and place an • To look at ways to communicate inside and outside the office
order • To focus on e-mail letter writing
Key vocabulary • To read about and discuss e-shopping
& structures
• Immediate delivery, from stock, quotation
• In stock, out of stock, supply, export,
inquiry
• COD, CIF, FOB, L/C
• TIA!, ASAP, How R U?
Business tasks
• Inquire about products and prices
• Respond to inquiries
• Quote products, prices and shipping terms
• Order by mail or e-mail
• Use a form letter to write letters

Additional material 49
• Grammar and language reference,
page 105
• Glossary, page 110
• Workbook, pages 24, 25 and 26 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 8 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 56 • What are the advantages of quoting prices?
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • For both the buyer and the supplier, what are the advantages of written quotations,
Book, page 56 versus quotations provided by phone?
• What is the next step once you have found the most convenient quotation?
08-EFS-TB-Unit 8 22/5/06 22:40 Página 52

unit eight
Quotations and orders
8 unit eight 8
Quotations and orders

Inquiries and... Inquiries and quotations


Inquiries
a Divide the class into small groups and assign Quotation inquiries specifically ask about the prices of certain products or services.
• Clearly state the goods or services required.
each either the inquiry or quotation letter. Give
the groups a few minutes to read the letters.
• Explain how you wish to pay and accept delivery. focus on Language
Inquiries
Students first examine general aspects like: the Hughes & Hughes Co 20th July
34 Walton St. Opening sentences
structures of their opening sentences, closing Glasgow Please quote...
sentences and general tones and styles. Then GL2 6DP Please send me a quotation for...
Please send us your export prices for...
students take notes of the most important Dear Sir or Madam,
Your quotation of… would be appreciated.
information: what the letter is about, what the Please send me a quotation for 5 boxes of White
writer wants to achieve with this letter. Finally, Fanfold Paper, catalogue #16, size 9.5 x 11 and 10 Closing sentences
boxes of Personal Computer Diskettes catalogue #2. We would like to have the information by the end of
combine two groups so they can share the State delivery dates, and payment terms. We require
the week.
delivery within two weeks of order.
information they found about the inquiry or Yours faithfully, We expect to place a large order if your prices are
competitive.
quotation letter they analysed. See Teacher’s Marion Swanson We are looking forward to receiving this information.
file. Marion Swanson
Sales Department
Grammar reference, page 105.

Focus on Language Quotations


15th August 2006
We give quotations when we answer a specific inquiry asking about
Quotations and inquiries have common opening the price of goods. We write it as a letter, making sure to include:
Hamilton & Bradford Ltd.
16 Av. North East
and closing sentences. Quotations always include a • The prices of discounts, delivery dates and terms of payment. 9675 Jamestown
Oklahoma, OK, 55500
reference line. The most important line in an inquiry • The period of time for which the quotation is valid.
Dear Sir or Madam,
is its closing line. It sets the final tone of your letter
as well as what your requirements are. Students can
focus on Language Thank you for your inquiry of 20th July. We can
send shirts 10432 and ties 10433 immediately from
Quotation letters
personalise the Glossary, Student’s Book, page 110, stock. However, we regret that we cannot supply
them in navy blue before July as they are out of stock.
Opening sentences
by copying and translating the words from the Thank you for your letter of... We feel you may be interested in some of the
other colours we have in stock. I enclose samples of
lesson in their notebooks. The prices of the articles you are interested in are as follows... colours available.
Thank you for your letter dated... Shirts cost $15.20 each and ties $10.45 for orders
We are pleased to supply ... at the price of... over 100 units. We look forward to receiving your order.
With reference to you inquiry of ... and, as requested, we quote...
Pairwork Yours faithfully

Closing sentences
In pairs, students write a quotation letter with We look forward to receiving your order...
In stock Not available till 13th October
the information at the bottom of the page. See We will be pleased to receive your order...
BX214 BSS 217
Teacher’s file. Grammar reference, page 105. BX215
BX216
Credit period: 60 days.
Sample answer: Pairwork 5% additional discount for payment
Create a quotation letter with the following information. within 30 days
Thank you for your inquiry of 2nd September.
We are quoting: 50

Model Delivery Prices


BX214 In stock 18.20
BX215 In stock 17.60 Teacher’s file
BX216 In stock 20.00
Student’s Book Pairwork
BSS217 Not available until 13th October 10.50
Students use structures from the
Payment terms: 5% discount for payment a Students can write the quotation for Focus on Language box in their
within 30 days the inquiry on Student’s Book, page Students Books, page 50, to
50 or write the inquiry to the complete the inquiry letter.
Credit period: 60 days. quotation letter on the same page.
2 This is a continuation of the previous
We look forward to receiving your order. Pairwork pairwork activity. Student pairs
Sincerely, One student can write the quotation exchange the inquiry letter they
letter and the other can write an wrote earlier. They use the other
order based on the same pair’s letter to write their quotation
information. letter.
Workbook, page 24
Answer key, p. 115.
1 Students use structures from the box
to complete the sentences. Are these
structures used with inquiries or
quotations?

52
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unit eight 8
unit eight
Quotations and orders
8
Quotations and orders

Inquiries and...
Writing orders
The order letter is the way customers purchase goods and services by post, e-mail or fax. If you send the purchase Focus on Language
order by post or fax, you should accompany it with a cover letter.
When writing orders, include a reference line if you
previously asked for information. Make sure to
focus on Language James Winters clearly specify what you are ordering (names or
Order letters Friday, 5 August, 2006 16:18 pm
description of goods, models, brands, quantity, size,
Opening sentences Burrows Chinaware
Thank you for your letter / quotations of... Order from Fall catalogue
colours, materials, weight, prices, catalogue
We enclose our order for... number). If you received a quotation letter before
Please send the following articles... Dear Sir,
The prices quoted in your letter are satisfactory. Thank you for your letter of 10th July 2006. I’d be ordering, refer to the date it was received and cite
grateful if you could send me the following items
Please arrange to deliver these products...
listed in the Fall catalogue:
any terms of payment or discounts you were given.
Please inform us (when X will be in stock)
Description Quantity Article Design Price Also include the method of payment (FOB, CIF, CR,
Closing sentences cups 2 dozen 9008 Florence $20
We would appreciate prompt delivery. saucers 2 dozen 9009 Florence $20
COD, L/C), any special shipping requirements you
Please confirm delivery by... dishes 3 dozen 8344 Venice $30 may need as well as the shipping and billing
We look forward to receiving... mugs 3 dozen 2942 Camping $15
Please send these items by air freight and send addresses. Students can personalise the Glossary,
Grammar reference, page 105. the invoice to my usual address. Student’s Book, page 110, by copying and
translating the words from the lesson in their
Purchase Order
James Winters Catering notebooks.
Fax 40 Holborn St.; London W6 9EL; UK
Tel /Fax: (020) 8563 3222
To: Davis and Evans Ltd.
Att.: Peter Collins
No.: 75/1461
Date: August 2006
Please supply:
To: Messrs. Davis & Evans Ltd.
75 Riverside Road
Quantity
2 dozen
Item No.
9008
Model
Florence
Price
£20.00
Focus on Language activities
2 dozen 9009 Florence £20.00
Gloucester GL4 6YZ
Date: Aug. 1st, 2006 3 dozen 8344 Venice £30.00
Writing orders
Pages: 1 of 2 Goods required by: Delivery address: Write the opening and closing sentences in the
Sept. 1st, 2006 40 Holborn St.
Dear Mr. Collins, London W6 9EL Focus on Language box on strips of paper and give
We thank you for your quotation of 28 May and attach
our purchase order for the stated items. Payment Terms
United Kingdom
them out to the class. In pairs, students create an
Delivery is required by September 1st, 2006. 10% discount order letter to include the opening / closing
Yours faithfully, COD
James Winters James Winters sentence on their strip of paper.
General Manager James Winters
Pages: 2 of 2 General Manager

1 Students use structures from the letters to


1 Complete these sentences. complete the sentences in the activity. See
1 Please deliver the goods before... Teacher’s file.
2 Payment will be made...
3 The goods should be sent... Answers: 1 Please deliver the goods before
4 The invoice should be sent to... Workbook, pages 24-25.
September 1st; 2 Payment will be made on
5 Please despatch the item...
delivery; 3 The goods should be sent to the
51
address above; 4 The invoice should be sent to
my usual address; 5 Please despatch the item
by next week.

Teacher’s file
Student’s Book questions about them. The group
must come to a consensus as to
1 Turn this into an oral drill activity and which company they would order
ask students to read one of the from.
opening or closing phrases on
Student’s Book, pages 50 or 51. The Additional practice
person next to them completes the Once they have decided the
sentence and reads a different phrase quotation they will answer, they
for the next student to complete. write up an order fax and its
corresponding cover letter.
Workbook, page 25 e This activity can be reused later to
Answer key, p. 115. evaluate students’ progress.
Group work
In small groups, students look at the
two quotations and then answer the

53
08-EFS-TB-Unit 8 22/5/06 22:40 Página 54

unit eight 8
Quotations and orders unit eight 8
Quotations and orders

Filling in a form letter Filling in a form letter

Form letters are letters that are pre-written with the


typical structures used in a particular type of letter Light Co.
15 Hill St.
(quotations, invoices...). Computers have helped New York, NY 10017 P. Bradley
Tel: 718-330-3867 / Fax: 718-330-3870
make form letters easier to write. Any new
C. Quincy
information that is specific to a particular client is <INSERT INSIDE ADDRESS>
Sept. 24th, 2006
Duncan Co. order
left on the word processing document as a macro. Our Ref.: No. 51
Your Ref.: No. <INSERT NUMBER> Bad news! Michael just called. We can’t deliver
The computer then fills in the macro cells with the Dear <INSERT NAME>, the Rose lamps until November 15th.
With reference to your inquiry of <INSERT DATE>, we quote (It’s out of stock right now). The other two can
information, usually from some other database or these prices: be delivered immediately. Pls inform in
quotation letter.
spreadsheet program. Catalogue No. Item Quantity Delivery Date Price Thnx,
# Rose 1 dozen Immediate 15.00/ea PB
# Carnation
# Lily
1 When working in an office, there are different Prices are valid for 60 days. Allow at least 2 weeks for delivery. CQ says: Can you confirm the prices of the
Delivery: CIF Buenos Aires Lily and Carnation lamps?
e sources of inter-office communication which Terms: COD PB says: How many do they want?
P. Bradley CQ says: 5 dozen Lily and 4 doz. of the
are often used when writing a letter: internal Sales Manager Carnation.
Light Co. PB says: That would be 17.20 on the
e-mails or memos, instant message chats, PB / cq Carnation and 14.15 for the Lily.
phone messages, personal notes... In this CQ says: 14.15? I thought it was more?
PB says: No, orders of 5 doz. and up get a
exercise, students imagine they are the discount.
CQ says: What about delivery? Can these be
secretary who needs to fill out the form letter immediate?
PB says: I’ll have to ask Michael and get
on the computer screen. They use all the back to you.

information on the page to write the quotation


Telephone Message
letter. See Teacher’s file. Chris, Please change prices:
P. Bradley
• To: _____________________________________________ Rose lamps are now 16 a piece
Answers: H. Taylor
• From: ____________________________________________ Carnation lamps price is 18.40
• Message: Please quote Mr. Taylor lamp prices for:
________________________________________ NOT 17.20 .
Light Co. Cat # 1 dozen Rose colour
________________________________________________ Also, prices are only valid now for
30 days.
15 Hill St. Cat # 4 dozen Carnation
________________________________________________
Can U change accordingly?
Cat # 5 dozen Lily
________________________________________________
New York, NY 10017 Send to Duncan Co., 2, Hardy Street,
________________________________________________
P.B
Tel: 718-330-3867 / Boston, Mass. 01509
________________________________________________

Fax: 718-330-3870

1 Read all the information on this page. Then use the model form letter on the computer to write
Sept. 24th, 2006 a quotation from P. Bradley.

Duncan Co.
Workbook, page 26.
2 Hardy St.
Boston, MA 01509 52

Our ref.: No. 51


Your ref.: No. 43
Teacher’s file
Dear Mr. Taylor,
With reference to your inquiry of 20 Sept., we Student’s Book 2 Students look for synonyms in the
quote these prices: […] Vocabulary box on the page.
1 In pairs, students can role-play they
are P. Bradley and his secretary. They 3 Students match the words used
use the information from one of their together in common quotations
written correspondences (note, structures.
e-mail, IM chat) and turn it into a 4 Students write four sentences using
phone conversation. Let them each of the words in the box.
practise for a few minutes and walk Group work
around listening to students’ Students define the words and
intonation and pronunciation as they expressions in their own words.
speak. Encourage them to look at letters in
e This activity can be reused later to the unit to find their use in context
evaluate students’ progress. and help them think of similar
meanings.
Workbook, page 26 5 Students look up words or
Answer key, p. 115. abbreviations from the Key
1 Students complete the quotation Vocabulary box they do not know in
expressions with words from the box. an English dictionary or on the
e This activity can be reused later to Internet.
evaluate students’ progress.

54
08-EFS-TB-Unit 8 22/5/06 22:40 Página 55

unit eight 8
unit eight
Quotations and orders
8
Quotations and orders

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


E-mail writing
E-mail has revolutionised the office. Businesses use the Internet for external e-mails outside the office and sometimes E-mail writing
they use Instant messages or Intranet for internal e-mails. Regardless of the method, use the correct formal or
informal letter writing style you have already learned. Internet has completely changed the way the world
does business. In only a few short years, it has
Debate become a major form of publicity, marketing, sales
Look at the style used in the Instant messages on the previous page. Is it formal or informal? and communication. E-mails have completely
How do you know when to use this style? replaced company telexes and are rapidly replacing
1 Look at the following e-mails. Decide if they are formal or informal, internal or external. faxes as well. The immediate character of e-mails is
changing the style and format of traditional office
IT Department Lisa Cummings letters.
June 12, 2006 August 18, 2005
All departments Sheila Foran
Inventory application errors International catalogue Debate
Greetings,
There have been complaints about errors accessing
Hi Sheila,
How’s the weather in London? It’s hot and muggy
Students look back at Student’s Book, page 52 and
our new Unix Inventory Application. The problem is here in NY. :’-( look at the style of the Instant Messages on the
when more than one user tries to access the Can U send the Int’l version of the 2006 Winter
application when it is already processing data from catalogue? I need a copy of the European reference computer screen. Are they informal or formal?
another subsidiary. Please keep in mind that our numbers. Send it First Air ASAP.
other branches share this application and there are TIA!
When should they use an informal style of writing?
certain target times when we all coincide online. Lisa
We are currently trying to make changes to the
system; in the meantime, we recommend you use
this application later in the afternoon to avoid 1 Give students a few minutes to look at the
coinciding with European closing times.
Thank you for your patience,
three e-mails. What do they notice about their
IT Department style? Are they internal or external e-mails? See
Teacher’s file.
2 Answer these questions about the e-mails.
David Carpenter
Answers: 1 The e-mail from the IT
January 10, 2006 1 In what country do you think the first e-mail was
Jonas Riley probably written? Why? department is an internal e-mail (intranet) sent
December 2005 Financial Report 2 Is Lisa British or American? to everyone in the office, so it uses a formal
3 What do you think “TIA!” means? Look it up on the
Attachment: Dec2005 report.xls Internet.
style; 2 The formal e-mail from David
Dear Mr. Riley, 4 What department do you think David works for? Carpenter is probably internal since it deals
I have attached an Excel document with the financial 5 Do you think Mr. Riley is a colleague of David’s or with a Financial Report; 3 Lisa’s e-mail to
information you requested for the previous month of does he hold a higher position? What makes you
December. You will also find, highlighted in yellow,
think so?
Sheila is very informal since it uses emoticons,
supplementary information referring to the closeout
for the entire fiscal year of 2005. I would be happy abbreviations and acronyms. This means they
to supply you with any additional information.
Sincerely, Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 8.
probably are of the same job position and work
David Carpenter together often despite the fact that it is an
53 external e-mail (Lisa is in New York and Sheila is
in London).

2 Students look at the three e-mails more


Teacher’s file e carefully now and answer the questions. The
task can be done in pairs, in small groups or as
Student’s Book Additional practice a large group task with the entire class.
Give out at random the e-mails that
1 Students use the internal e-mailing the students wrote in the activity Answers: 1 In the United States because they
service at work or at the centre above. In pairs, students write an can avoid European closing times if they access
where they are studying to write an answer for the e-mail. Then the shared program in the afternoon; 2 Lisa is
e-mail to another student or to the volunteer pairs read the e-mail and American; 3 Thanks in advance!; 4 He works
teacher. They could also write a the answer to the class.
“general” e-mail for everyone in for the accounting or finance department;
e This activity can be reused later to 5 By the more formal language, Mr. Carpenter
class, as the IT e-mail example in the
Students’ Book. They print out their evaluate students’ progress. probably has a lower job position than Mr.
e-mails and present them to the Riley, who is probably a departmental head.
teacher.

Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 8.


See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 56.

55
08-EFS-TB-Unit 8 23/5/06 16:42 Página 56

unit eight 8
Quotations and orders unit eight 8
Quotations and orders

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with how Internet has


revolutionised shopping. It has changed how
businesses advertise themselves and their products.
The way we shop has been one of the many changes the Internet has brought
It has also changed how customers shop. The about during the last years. For people who work outside their homes,
overall convenience and non-restrictive time shopping on the Internet has been a solution for buying not only groceries
schedules allow people to shop 24 hours virtually from the supermarket but also clothes, presents, books, music and
thousands of other things. There are websites that foresaw this increasing
anywhere on the planet. Besides using credit cards, necessity many years ago and are now consolidated businesses that sell
many sites accept cheques, money orders, postal their products everywhere in the world. Other enterprises have little by
orders (Bankers Drafts) or even use their own points little entered the e-market with enormous success while others are still
exploring and learning from the new e-buying habits of their customers.
system which you would pay for through your Although there have been some problems related to payment transactions,
account or with your credit card. it seems this way of shopping has come to stay and it will continue to improve
in the future.
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up
questions.

?
Which of the following advantages and disadvantages do you associate with this way of shopping?
a It’s safe. f It’s more expensive.
Debate b It’s quick. g It’s tiresome.
c It’s cheaper. h It’s dangerous.
Divide the class into small discussion groups. Give d It’s time-saving. i It’s fun.
them a few minutes to discuss the questions. After e It’s trustworthy. j It’s always available.

a few minutes, bring the smaller groups together as


one large group. Each small group summarises
what they discussed.
Don’t forget! Debate
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION • How to ask for quotations: Please quote... Do you ever shop on the
Please send us your prices for... Net? Why? What are your
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. favourite shopping sites?
• How to quote prices: Thank you for your letter dated... The
1 Students design a request letter to write prices of the articles you are interested When was the last time you
in are as follows: bought something? What
either inside or outside of class. Then they did you buy?
• The meanings of shipping and payment vocabulary: COD,
read their letters to the teacher one-by- L/C, CIF
one or compare them orally in small • How to place orders: We are enclosing our order for...
groups or pairs with their classmates’ Please confirm delivery by...

letters. Write the criteria the students must


follow on the board: 54
You are the Manager of the
Telecommunication Royal Company (Narrow
Street, San Diego, CA 95411). Design a
quotation letter for: computer models, OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
software applications, printers and cabinets.
Address it to the Attention of Mr. Robinson Write the following information on the board:
Cruise Jr., the purchase assistant for the Type of room: single
Department of Classical Languages at Arrival time: after 11 p.m.
Clearview University. Credit card number: 4516 8966 3345 6777
Tell your students that the receptionist at
2 Students pretend to “buy” something on Golden Mile Hotel had some problems with
the Internet. They bring the following the fax that Patricia Elias sent on 17 June. He
information to class the next day to couldn’t read the type of room she needed,
discuss in small groups or pairs: her arrival time nor her credit card number, so
The name and address of the company, the he had to call her on her mobile. Students
name and price of the product, and methods think up the conversation between Patricia
of payment and delivery available. Elias and the receptionist.
Finally, students discuss which one is the
best offer and, together, write an order
e-mail for that product.

56
09-EFS-TB-Unit 9 22/5/06 22:13 Página 57

unit nine 9
CVs and application letters
Since the CV and application letter are the first step towards applying for a job, this entire unit is
dedicated to writing them appropriately. A CV should be a short one-page document describing
all the attributes a person has as a future employee. The application or cover letter accompanies
the CV. It is more personalised and is specific to each job a person is applying for.
Students will learn how to correctly organise and write these documents in order to create
effective tools in their job search.

Skills objectives
• To look for the important details and
requirements of a job advertisement
unit nine 9
• To organise professional and educational CVs and application letters
information into an informative one-page
résumé
• To use style and language to personalise an Introduction
When you want to get a job or change your present job, the first step in most cases is to look at
application letter
the job advertisements in newspapers or on the Internet. Then you must apply for a job in writing.
Language focus
• Using common language and structures
used in application letters and CVs Objectives
• How to make your training and experience • To read and understand job advertisements
seem more attractive to future employers • To write a Curriculum Vitae
• The past simple in résumé writing • To write an application letter
• Body language and gestures around the
world
• To focus on the past simple
• To discuss the importance of body language when communicating
Key vocabulary
& structures
• category, benefits, salary, wages, schedule
• required, a plus, relocation, Bachelor’s
Degree, attractive rates
• Personal details, Education, Work
experience, Additional Information, Special
skills and interests
Business tasks
• Read and understand job adverts
• Respond to job adverts with an application
cover letter
• Correctly write a Curriculum Vitae

Additional material 55
• Grammar and language reference,
pages 99-100
• Glossary, page 110
• Workbook, pages 27, 28 and 29 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 9 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • Have you ever applied for a job?
page 62
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • What steps did you take?
Book, page 62 • Have you ever applied for a job that you never got?
• What happened? Why do you think you weren’t chosen?
09-EFS-TB-Unit 9 22/5/06 22:13 Página 58

unit nine 9
CVs and application letters unit nine 9
CVs and application letters

Job advertisements Job advertisements


Companies use newspapers, job service agencies and recruiters or job search websites to post their job vacancies.
Companies place short ads about a job’s Ads are short and concise.

requirements in newspapers or with job service 1 Look at these excerpts from advertisements. What do they refer to?
agencies and recruiters. The newest format is on
job search websites where both employers and per
future employees can post their characteristics and
2 - 5 years
experience req’d. £12 to £13 hour - 40k
$35 r year
pe
details. Many times the abbreviations used in these
types of ads are specific to that occupation
(Information Technologies, Accounting...). It is Temporary
New
Firm offers a competitive
position salary and benefits package. Position Type:
another way for advertisers to know the people offers!
Full-Time Employee
answering are qualified in that field. Professional Engineering
Date Posted:
Registration a plus.
Dec. 10, 2006
Attractive EIT certification required.
Relocation
rate!! covered: No
1 Give students a few minutes to look at the ad
Bachelor’s degree in
excerpts. What do they refer to? (education, Accounting is required.
salary, wages, type of position, qualification
requirements or preferences...) See Teacher’s
Debate
file.
Look at these job ads. Which job is most 2 Once you have chosen a job, what do you do
appealing to you in terms of schedule, next? In groups, discuss the different steps to
salary or place of work. Why? follow.
Debate
Give students a few minutes to look at the three INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
BILINGUAL SECRETARY
is looking for personnel
job ads. Then students write the most important for its new branch in the Multinational seeks secretaries, male or
female, to assist top executives working JOB DETAILS
details of each job in their notebooks: job title, Middle East. If you are
in the Central and South America area. LOCATION: London, UK
qualified as an
schedule, salary, location, requirements. Now they accountant, a computer
Applicants should be English-Spanish
COMPANY: Kelly’s (Fashion Department)
bilingual, with excellent writing skills in
can compare and decide which is the most operator, a bilingual
secretary or an
both languages. Must be able to work RATE: Excellent hourly rate.
with computers and willing to travel
appealing to them. As a large group, students electrical engineer, we
most of the time.
JOB TERM: Part-time
are interested in you.
debate on the best job. Encourage them to use Excellent salary and fringe benefits. JOB CATEGORY: Sales Assistant.
Send résumé, recent SCHEDULE: Three days per week. Including Sundays.
language and structures learned in earlier units to photograph and salary Send CV and recent
BENEFITS: Clothing concessions and store discount.
requirements to Mary Ann photograph to BilSecr., 5386
defend their opinions or politely disagree: I don’t Stewart, 58 Lincoln St., Prune Blvd., START DATE: ASAP (neg.)
know if I would prefer that. But would it be Southville, Florida San Diego, CA 92115, USA or to
bilsec@jobsource.com.
CONTACT: molly_bridges@topfashion.com
60176.
possible to adapt easily to living in Florida? I would
rather have a job that would challenge me more.

Workbook, page 27.


2 Once the class has agreed on a potential job, 56
place them into small groups so they can plan
what their next line of action would be: write
a letter requesting an interview that will
accompany a résumé or CV. Teacher’s file
Student’s Book Additional practice
Do a similar activity with the example
1 Bring in examples of job job ads that were brought in to class.
advertisements either in the native Choose 5 or 6 ads. Students choose
language or in English or ask one and write an application letter for
students to bring them in. They can it. Number them and post them on
come from Internet web sites, the wall. Students match the letters
newspapers, magazines... What to their corresponding job ad (Letter
similarities and differences do they 1 / Job C). They can also do this
see? activity in small groups. In this case,
students read their application letters
Workbook, page 27 to the rest of the group, who try to
Answer key, p. 116.
guess what job the letter refers to.
1 Students look at the ad and answer
2 Based on the information in the
the questions.
application letter, students must
Group work write the job advertisement it is
Students compare their answers in applying for.
small groups. Then they use these to
write an application letter responding
to the advert.

58
09-EFS-TB-Unit 9 22/5/06 22:13 Página 59

unit nine 9
unit nine
CVs and application letters
9
CVs and application letters

CVs and résumés CVs and résumés


The Curriculum Vitae (CV) or résumé is a written account of a person’s education and employment history. The
information must be brief but as complete as possible. A CV always includes a heading, an education section (most
recent first), and a list of work experience (most recent first). If you have room, or it is relevant to the job, include
a When talking about a CV, it is important to
additional information such as languages spoken, interests, references, special skills (computer programs, other note how this term is used and in reference to
languages) or hobbies. what country. Outside the United States the
terms “curriculum vitae” or “CV” refer to a
1 Read this CV and choose the best position for this person from the job ads on page 56.
“résumé-like” document. In the US, the term
CV refers to a special résumé format specific
Michael S. Danes for teaching at university level or for scientific
325 Malcolm Rd, London, MDX 234 UK candidates. In this course, we will use the
Tel: 44813634544 terms CV and résumé interchangeably.
Personal Details b Employers read many résumés and typically
Age: 23 take less than half a minute to read one. This
Marital status: Single
affects how a CV is written in two ways:
Education
• Do not use fonts smaller than 10 point
Beginner courses: Visual Basic HTML, XML, Javascript Present (including the address block). They are hard
Advanced course in Windows XP 2003 to read and do not photocopy as well.
Microsoft Office for the Advanced Learner 2002
General accounting 2001 • CVs must be short, precise and include any
Administration and Office Work at Clark Institute 2001 information that makes the person stand out
as a candidate. To do this, it is best to create
Experience a job assessment worksheet before writing
Secretary Export Department Manager, Lester & Lester Inc. 2003-2005
Dealt with correspondence, transport, insurance
the résumé. Try answering the following
services to Latin American countries. Direct contact questions:
with Latin American customers. Performed a turn-around
of the South American operation. a In a particular job, what special things did
Typist International Communication Enterprise, San Juan, you do to set yourself apart?
Puerto Rico. 2002
b What did you do to make this job your
own? How did you take the initiative?
Additional Information
Languages Fluent in Spanish. Secondary School in Santiago, Chile.
How did you go above and beyond what
Interests Internet, reading, travelling. was asked of you in your job description?
References Mr. Richard Burns (44 81 324 8675)
c Were you promoted? Rapid or frequent
promotions may be worth mentioning.
d How did the organisation benefit from
Workbook, page 28.
57 your performance? How did you / will you
leave this employer better off than before
you worked there?

Teacher’s file 1 Examine the CV on the page with the class.


Which of the jobs on Student’s Book, page 56
Student’s Book 2 Using the style shown in the is this applicant qualified for? Is there anything
Workbook or Student’s Book, the on his résumé that makes this candidate stand
1 Students change information in the students write their own CV. If your
CV to make Mr. Danes a better out? See Teacher’s file.
students do not have much work
candidate for one of the other jobs. experience, they can create a more Answers: He is an ideal candidate for the
skills-oriented CV. Bilingual Secretary position because he is fluent
Workbook, page 28
Answer key, p. 116. Additional practice in English and Spanish and has computer skills.
Peer teaching: In small groups, His secondary school experience in Chile is an
1 Students use the information on the
students share their CVs with their additional asset applying for a job in Central
page to complete the CV. They will
classmates. The others offer and South America.
need to briefly describe the tasks for
constructive criticism in how to
each job.
improve each other’s CVs. What are
Group work its strong points? Where is it weaker?
In small groups, students discuss What other information should they
which of the jobs on Student’s Book, include?
page 56 is best for this person and
why.

59
09-EFS-TB-Unit 9 22/5/06 22:13 Página 60

unit nine 9
CVs and application letters unit nine 9
CVs and application letters

Letters of application Letters of application


The first step in applying for a job is to send a CV (résumé) and letter of application (cover letter). The CV is a
The application or cover letter that accompanies a more “generic advertisement” for yourself. The letter of application is a way to tailor your application to each specific
job. You can use your résumé over and over again to apply for different jobs, but your letter of application must be
résumé must be different and specifically tailored for specific to each job you are applying for. The purpose of your CV and its cover letter is to give a prospective
each job. The cover letter reflects the applicant’s employer all the information he or she needs to decide whether or not you will reach the next phase in the
communication skills, enthusiasm, intelligence and application process: the interview.

attention to detail. It should look attractive, well laid


June 17th, 2005
out, and be only a page long. It is also important that Mr. Dean Rogers
it be typed on the same kind of paper as your Personnel Manager
résumé. Canberra

A cover letter should be addressed to the specific Dear Mr. Rogers,


company and to the specific individual processing the
I read your advertisement in THE PRIME NEWS of June 15th for the
applications. Research or call the company to find out position of secretary in your Sales Department and I am interested in applying
INTRODUCTION

who the letter should be addressed to. This also for the post.
shows how much interest and effort you have put I obtained my secretarial diploma at the International Academy for
Secretaries in 2001 and began working with Burns and Jackson four
into your application. years ago. BODY
personal details, education,
Although I have gained experience in office work and attending customers, I
Cover letters follow a similar format and style. The work experience, why you are
do not use any of the foreign languages or accounting I have studied. Because of a good candidate for the job
introduction must include a reference line to the ad my interest and experience in these two areas, I believe I could make a direct
it is answering and clearly state the job being applied and immediate contribution to your Sales Department.
I have enclosed a copy of my CV, which details my qualifications and
for; the body needs to explain why the person is interests. I hope you will consider me for an interview. Thank you for your time CLOSING
applying and why the company should even consider and consideration.
him / her as an applicant. Point to the résumé in some
Sincerely,
way: “As detailed in the enclosed CV...” and highlight
important and relevant accomplishments, skills or
experience listed in the résumé; the closing Mary Davis

paragraph should include a reference to the enclosed


or attached CV and the request for an interview. A focus on Language
candidate should also state where to be reached and 1 Read the application letter and answer these questions.
Closing sentences
when as well as express a willingness to supply any 1 Is Ms. Davis currently unemployed?
Thank you for your time
2 How long has she worked for Burns and Jackson?
further information. Close by thanking the reader for 3 Is she happy there?
and consideration.
Looking forward to
his or her time and consideration. 4 Did it take Ms. Davis long to get her first job after finishing Secretarial School?
hearing from you soon.
5 Why does she think she might be a good candidate for this new job?
6 Would you interview Ms. Davis? Say why or why not. Grammar reference,
page 105.
Focus on Language
Workbook, page 29.
The closing is a way to add their own “personal 58
touch” by showing their enthusiasm. Ask students
other possible sentences they could use. Students
can personalise the Glossary, Student’s Book, page
110, by copying and translating the words from the
Teacher’s file
lesson in their notebooks.
Student’s Book 2 Students write a cover letter with
1 information from their CVs to answer
Read the application letter with the class. e This activity can be reused later to the Internet job advert on Workbook,
e Working individually or in small groups, evaluate students’ progress. page 29.
students answer the questions in their
Workbook, page 29 Additional practice
notebooks. They can also do the task orally as
Answer key, p. 116. Based on the information from both
a large class activity. See Teacher’s file. the ad and their personal CVs,
1 Students examine the two letters of
Answers: 1 No, she is still working at Burns students take turns role-playing a job
application and decide which is the
and Jackson; 2 For four years; 3 She likes it interview.
least well-written and why.
but feels her present job doesn’t use all of her Group work
skills; 4 No, she started working right away; Students rewrite the letter they like
5 Because she has interest and experience in the least and compare it with other
accounting and foreign languages; 6 Yes. She students in their group. Which letter
shows her work is motivated by personal did they choose? Did they make
challenges and not money. similar changes?

60
09-EFS-TB-Unit 9 22/5/06 22:13 Página 61

unit nine 9
unit nine
CVs and application letters
9
CVs and application letters

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


The past simple
Questions in the past use the past simple of the auxiliary do = did + the infinitive of the verb. Focus on Grammar
Example: verb get: Question: Did you get my message?
Yes, I got the message. The past simple is common in résumés since you are
usually talking about jobs or past actions you have
already completed. Revise basic grammatical rules
Group work
Write a suitable question in the past for these
focus on Grammar in the past simple with the students so they can
answers. The past simple avoid making unnecessary mistakes in their
1 I heard of this vacancy through the newspaper. (How... ?) Regular verbs Irregular verbs
2 She studied at the Windsor Language School. (Where... ?) arrive arrived find found
application letters and CVs. Remind them about the
3 Mr. Smith arrived this week (When... ?) graduate graduated get got auxiliary verb “did” as well as irregular verbs. Refer
offer offered read read
4 They went to the airport to meet the manager. (Why... ?)
study studied speak spoke
students to the Grammar and language reference,
5 The trip to the Bahamas took two hours. (How long... ?)
work worked think thought Student’s Book, pages 99-100.
2 Read the e-mail application letter and write the Grammar reference, page 99.
past tense of the verbs in brackets in your
notebook. Group work
Students take a few minutes to write questions
Doug Fairbain Pairwork individually in their notebooks. Then they
Wednesday 21 December 2006 11:56 a.m.
Based on the information in Mr. compare their questions in small groups.
Alfred Jones
Fairbain’s e-mail letter, which of the
Job application
jobs posted on page 56 would be best Answers: 1 How did you hear of this
Dear Mr. Jones, for him? Write an application letter for
this new job. vacancy? 2 Where did she study? 3 When did
I (find) your listing on Greatjobs.com for an Mr. Smith arrive? 4 Why did they go to the
Assistant Director in your Advertising Department.
I am twenty-one years old and currently single. Since
airport? 5 How long did the trip to the
my parents (work) for an International organisation, I Bahamas take?
(live) in Chile and Venezuela during my school years
and am bilingual in English and Spanish.
After graduation, I (study) for two semester in a
British Academy for Bilingual Secretaries where I 2 Students read the e-mail and put the verbs in
(improve) my business writing skills in English and
Spanish and (take) courses in Japanese.
e parentheses into the past simple. They can
I (work) as a part-time secretary in a Canadian complete this task individually, in pairs or in
company and as an interpreter at various seminars
and conferences. small groups. See Teacher’s file.
I am including my CV below and would be happy to
provide a Word or PDF version if you prefer. Answers: (find) found; (work) worked;
Thank you,
(live) lived; ( study) studied; (improve)
Doug Fairbain improved; (take ) took; (work) worked.
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 9.

59 Pairwork
Students discuss which job from Student’s
Book, page 56 is best for this candidate and
write an application letter for it. See Teacher’s
Teacher’s file file.
Answers: He is an excellent applicant for the
Student’s Book I lived in Chile and Venezuela during
my school years and I am bilingual in Bilingual Secretary position.
2 Past-tense tennis: Divide the class English and Spanish.
into two teams. One team names a
word in the infinitive. The other team As mentioned in the attached CV, Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 9.
has two seconds to correctly answer I studied for a year at the British See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
the past tense form. If they are Academy for Bilingual Secretaries page 62.
correct, they “toss back” a verb in where I learned business writing skills
the infinitive. If they are incorrect, it in English and Spanish and took
is a point for the first team (15-Love). courses in Japanese.
e This activity can be reused later to I have worked as a secretary in a
evaluate students’ progress. Canadian company where I set up a
new computerised system for shared
Pairwork accounting files.
Sample application letter:
I enclose my CV which I hope will be
TO: bilsec@jobsource.som
of interest to you.
FROM: Doug Fairbain
Dear Mr. Smith, I look forward to hearing from you
soon,
I read your advertisement in my local
newspaper and I am interested in Yours sincerely,
applying for the Bilingual Secretary Doug Fairbain
position.

61
09-EFS-TB-Unit 9 22/5/06 22:13 Página 62

unit nine 9
CVs and application letters unit nine 9
CVs and application letters

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with body language. Body


language is of particular importance during job Body language
interviews. It is also important when working or

H
ave you noticed how often people communicate through body
visiting abroad. When in different countries, movements or gestures? They are used as a complement or
bilingual secretaries not only need to know the replacement of verbal language depending on the situation or type
differences between the two spoken languages, but of relation we have with the other person. These gestures are part of what
is called “body language”, and although everyone is familiar with them,
between physical expressions as well. The typical they may have different interpretations in different countries.
“O.K.” gesture with your fingers, for example, is In some Arab communities, for example, stupidity can be signalled
considered obscene in some countries. by touching the lower eyelid with the tip of the forefinger, while in other
cultures the same action can mean alertness, mistrust, approval or even
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread danger. Looking someone in the eyes may be appropriate in certain
situations within some communities, but not in others. The use of the
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up
thumbs up, down or backwards can also have interesting interpretations in
questions. different cultures, so we must be careful about the use of body language or
we may get ourselves into serious trouble!

Debate

?
Students can look up what different gestures mean How many hand gestures can you think of right now? Explain two of them to the class.
How about facial expressions such as winking, blinking or licking your lips? Explain their
in different countries; the thumbs up, the V for meaning in your community.
victory sign, the O.K. hand gesture, etc. Then they How important is body language in a working environment?
can share what they have discovered with their
classmates.
Debate
In groups investigate what
Pairwork Don’t forget! the “thumbs up” gesture
means in different
Students create a short role-play in pairs using only • How to interpret job advertisements: full-time;
languages a plus... communities.
body gestures. The rest of the class tries to create
• How to write a CV: Responsible for... ; dealt with... ; direct
dialogue for their actions. contact with; performed ... duties / tasks Pairwork
• How to write an application letter: I saw your advertisement Work with a partner using
in (a newspaper) / at (website). Thank your only body language to
for your time and consideration. create a role-play in front
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION • The past simple: How did she send the quotation? of the class. Your
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. We didn’t hear the news. classmates put your actions
I sat next to the Chairman. into words.
1 Think of two positions you would like to have.
Write adverts for them stating candidates’
requirements, place, conditions of work, fringe
60
benefits, etc. Compare with a partner. Choose
the best two adverts and exchange them with
another pair of students. You and your partner
each choose one of the new adverts and write
an application letter for it. When you have OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
finished, return them to the other pair of
students along with their original ads. In small Students imagine they have applied to study
groups of four, discuss what you liked about for a Masters at a British university. They
each other’s adverts and if your application prepare a short presentation, similar to the
letters were appropriate or not. How could one they heard in CD-Rom activity 1. Students
your letters improve? Was there any need to mention the following information.
information missing? Give them a few minutes to prepare.
Where they are from
2 Students choose one of the job advertisements What they want to do
from Student’s Book, page 56 and do a mock Where they want to go
interview applying for the job. They must keep Why they want to do it
body gestures in mind as they speak.

62
10-EFS-TB-Unit 10 22/5/06 22:44 Página 63

unit ten 10
Inter-office memos
Memos are internal messages within an office. Although official “news” or company policies are
still usually written as traditional memorandums, they have been replaced with internal phone
calls or e-mails through Intranet.
In this unit, students will learn how to correctly write and interpret inter-office communication.
They will also recognise the influence of new technologies in this area.

Skills objectives
• To analyse the structure of a memo
• To interpret memos and put them in
unit ten 10
chronological order Inter-office memos
• To politely ask people for something or to
do something
Introduction
Language focus A memorandum (memo) is a written form of communication between people who work
• Using common language and structures together. It can be inter-departmental, inter-office or inter-company. Memos are either sent on
used in memos paper or by Intranet. In multinational organisations, memos written from one subsidiary to
another are sent by e-mail.
• Using polite expressions in memos to ask
people for something or ask them to do
things Objectives
• Cognates and false cognates • To interpret the structure of a memo
• Emoticons in informal e-mails and mobile
phone messages • To write inter-office memos
• To recognise what Intranet is
Key vocabulary
• To focus on cognates
& structures
• Contact me...; In response to your e-mail...; • To look at the use of emoticons or smileys
Please find enclosed / attached...
• Would it be possible to...?, Let me know if
you can...
• Intranet (Internal network system); Internet
(International network system); Emoticons
(emotional icons)
Business tasks
• To interpret the structure of a memo
• To write inter-office memos
• To learn about Intranet and how companies
apply it to everyday business tasks

Additional material 61
• Grammar and language reference,
page 105
• Glossary, page 111
• Workbook, pages 30, 31 and 32
• CD-Rom, Unit 10 Unit warm-up questions
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
page 68
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • How do you communicate with your colleagues at school or at work?
Book, page 68 • Do you use formal or informal language?
• Is there a common Intranet page where you can all connect and share files?
10-EFS-TB-Unit 10 22/5/06 22:44 Página 64

unit ten 10
Inter-office memos unit ten 10
Inter-office memos

Model memos Model memos


Like all forms of inter-office communication, memos have different purposes: to make inquiries and requests, to
provide information, reminders, confirmations, to send enclosures or attachments... Although their content may
1 Give students a few minutes to look at the two vary, electronic and “hard-copy” memos follow a similar style:
memos and decide what the purpose of each
a
writer was. Which is a traditional memo and Australian Leather Clothing Co. Sender’s Name
Sydney – London – New York
which is an e-mail? E-mail is extremely useful From: Nicole Bloomfield Date
when you have to send copies of the same Date:
To:
October 2nd, 2005
Charles Richards
e-mail to lots of people. Re: Winter Exhibit Confirmation Addressee’s name

Dear Charles,
Answers: a b To ask for a prompt reply to This is to remind you that you have to confirm our participation in the Memo’s subject
XXII Winter Exhibit to be held here in London.
another person; b c To identify a list being Mrs. Eleanor James is now in charge of the organisation.You have to
decide on the items (7 max.) we’ll be displaying and send a detailed Salutation
sent in a separate file. description of them. We have to send a letter in which we officially commit
ourselves to participating, along with the names of the people in charge,
Body
before the 30th, otherwise we’re out.
I’m sending a copy of her original letter dated September 15th.
Memos: common expressions Closing (optional)
Nicole Bloomfield
Just like in letter-writing, there are key expressions Nicole Bloomfield
Signature
used in memos. They usually have references to a cc: H. Houston
page 1 of 2
previous communication or to something you are Copy notation

attaching or enclosing with the memo. The


1 What is the writer’s purpose in memos a and b?
expressions on Student’s Book, pages 62 and 63
a To order some merchandise. c To identify a list being sent in a separate file.
are common enclosure or reference statements. b To ask for a prompt reply to another person. d To send boxes to Australia.

Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s


Memos: common expressions
Book, page 111, by copying and translating the Group work
words from the lesson in their notebooks. Referring to previous communication
Brainstorm ways to finish these
As I mentioned on the phone, we...
I received your memo about... sentences.
In response to your memo dated... 1 Contact me as soon as possible after you
Group work I received the copy of the project that you sent me... receive...
2 In response to your e-mail about...
Students brainstorm in five minutes as many 3 Let me know if you can...
different ways as they can to finish these Asking someone to do something 4 Please take a look at the ... before you ... and
Contact me as soon as possible after you receive...
sentences. Then the groups compare their Take a look at the ... and tell us what you think.
tell us what you think about it.
5 I received your e-mail about...
answers with the rest of the class. See Let me know if you can... 6 Inform your Sales Representatives that...
Teacher’s file. Please note that I have received...
Please inform your Sales Representatives that...
Please check your...
Sample answers: 1 Contact me as soon as
possible after you receive the samples. 2 In
response to your e-mail about last month’s 62 Workbook, page 30.
sales report, I think we should meet to discuss
alternative sales tactics. 3 Let me know if you
can come to the meeting in Madrid next week.
4 Please take a look at the chart before you
answer the marketing department and tell us
Teacher’s file
what you think about it. 5 I received your e-
Student’s Book e This activity can be reused later to
mail about the conference in Amsterdam.
evaluate students’ progress.
6 Inform your Sales Representatives that their Group work
In small groups of three, students 2 Students complete the sentences
financial presentations are due next Friday.
turn the activity into an oral drill task. with the verbs in the box.
One person reads the first part of the e This activity can be reused later to
sentence and the next person evaluate students’ progress.
completes it. Then he / she reads the
Additional practice
next phrase and the third person
As a group activity, students choose
completes it, etc.
three phrases and incorporate them
Workbook, page 30 into a dialogue they create. Give
Answer key, p. 116. them time to practise. The groups
1 One of the most common uses of read their dialogues from their seats.
memos is to ask someone to do
something. This activity is a written
practice of the most common polite
expressions.

64
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unit ten 10
unit ten
Inter-office memos
10
Inter-office memos

More memos More memos


b
Mark Hartley
focus on Language Focus on Language
9-25-05 Memos: common expressions
Robert Wise
The most common memos are those where you ask
Requesting something
Catalogue 2006
I’d be grateful / I would appreciate it if you could...
for something or ask someone to do something.
Attachment: models1.doc
I’d like to request forty copies of... The terms listed on Student’s Book, pages 62 and
We’d like to know how many people will be
Lester & Lester Inc. attending our...
63 are common expressions used in these types of
Dear Bob, Could you fax me the information about... ? memos. Students can personalise the Glossary,
Would it be possible to get a copy of the... ? Student’s Book, page 111, by copying and
I’m attaching the list of the models and colours available Could you tell me if... ?
for the next season in a separate Word document. If there
Sending enclosure
translating the words from the lesson in their
are any other special requirements, please let us know as
soon as possible. Attached is a copy of your original memo with... notebooks.
Best wishes, Please find attached a list of...
Mark Hartley See attached file.
cc: D. Jones
H. Lawson Grammar reference, page 105. 2 Give students a few minutes to carefully read
the two memos and answer the questions in
their notebooks.
2 Say if these statements about the memos are true or false. Answers: Memo a: 1 False. She is in charge
Memo a Memo b
of organising the XXII Winter Exhibit. 2 True;
1 Mrs. James is the President of Australian Leather Clothing Co. 1 Mark is sending a list for the 2006
2 Nicole wants Charles to confirm the company’s participation in the catalogue. 3 True; 4 False. It is in London this year.
Winter Exhibit. 2 Mark’s list is an attached pdf file. Memo b: 1 True; 2 False. It is a Word
3 Charles must choose the items that will be displayed in the Exhibit. 3 No copies were sent with this e-mail.
4 The Exhibit will take place in Sydney. 4 Mark knows the person he is writing to.
document. 3 False. Copies were sent to D.
Jones and H. Lawson. 4 True.
Pairwork
Make polite requests using some of the common expressions from pages 62 and 63. Pairwork
Example: Could you fax me the information about the new laws applying to the importation of cars in e Students use the expressions from the Focus on
this country?
1 ...new laws applying to the importation of cars in this country. Language boxes on Student’s Book, pages 62
2 ...the names and addresses of the customer of that specific area. and 63.
3 ...the two quotations for the supply of transport from port to Head Office.
4 ...the most appropriate delivery dates for the orders from Jackson and Sons. Sample answers: 1 Could you fax me the
5 ...you send me the forms by airmail.
information about the new laws applying to
the importation of cars in this country? 2 I’d
be grateful if you could send me the names
and addresses of the customer of that specific
Workbook, page 31-32.
area. 3 I’d like to request the two quotations
63 for the supply of transport from port to Head
Office? 4 Could you tell me what would be the
most appropriate delivery dates for the orders
from Jackson and Sons? 5 Could you send me
Teacher’s file the forms by airmail?

Student’s Book Debate


Students look at the e-mails again and
e This activity can be reused later to
comment on any changes they noticed in
evaluate students’ progress. the style used during the e-mail
correspondence.
Workbook, pages 31 & 32
Answer key, p. 116. Writing memos
1 Students complete the four memos
E-mail correspondence
using the information on the page.
1 Students complete the e-mails with
the information they infer from the 2 Students choose one of the subjects
other e-mails. Then they must put in the exercise and write a memo
them in the correct order. about it on a separate sheet of
paper. Remind them to use the
Additional practice
phrases on Students’ Book, pages 56
Students use the e-mail service at
and 57.
work or at the centre where they are
e This activity can be reused later to
studying to exchange e-mails back
and forth with a partner. They start evaluate student’s progress.
out using a formal style and develop Additional practice
a more informal style as they “work” Students give their memo from
together longer. They print up the Workbook, page 32 to a partner.
e-mail correspondence and present They write another memo answering
them to the teacher. their partner’s memo.

65
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unit ten 10
Inter-office memos unit ten 10
Inter-office memos

Filling in forms Filling in forms


Form-filling
Intranet An Intranet is an internal network a
within an organization (or company).
These days office workers can fill in forms and It uses Internet technologies to transfer j
b
receive and send information via their company data and send correspondence. An
Intranet helps in cutting costs, and it is
intranet. The Internet is an international network of an easy and fast way to access daily
Information. An Intranet is similar, but it works information. Generally, an Intranet is
internally within a company or organisation. different from the Internet in that it is a
i
closed network within an organization,
Companies use Intranets to share and access daily whereas the Internet is a public
information. Sometimes a company accesses its worldwide network. You can use an
Intranet through the Internet. This is especially true Intranet Server and its external
applications on the WWW or an
of very large corporations or companies with internal computing application such as
subsidiaries in other countries that need to share Lotus Notes. Companies use Intranet
information. applications for internal mail, sharing
applications and files and even
h
videoconferences.

Pairwork
Pairwork
In pairs, students match the sections of the
Match the section in the
Intranet page to their purpose. See Teacher’s Intranet page above to its c

file. purpose.
Example: 1 is a-to search the
Answers: 1a; 2g; 3h; 4b; 5e; 6f; 7i; 8c; www. g
9j; 10d. 1 To search the WWW.
2 To add or change information on
the company calendar.
3 To view the departmental calendar.
Keep in mind 4 The company name and logo.
f e d

Most large corporations have an external company 5 To share documents with your
department.
prepare their Intranet pages. Smaller companies 6 To read a profile about a company Keep in mind
might have a program that they use in-house to worker. If you need to prepare an Intranet homepage, there are different
prepare a common Intranet page for the people in 7 To contact fellow workers. programs that you can use to help you. Nevertheless, there are
8 To access frequently used Internet certain questions your Intranet page needs to answer:
a particular department. If this is the case, the three pages. • What are the main needs of your co-workers?
items mentioned in the Student’s Book help create 9 To read news or group • What are the main areas of your company that need direct
an easy yet helpful Intranet page. announcements. and simple access?
10 To search for a client on the • How can you make it user friendly?
company database.

Keep in mind activities 64


Students examine different company websites on
the Internet. How are they similar to an Intranet
page? How are they different? Are there some
pages on the web site that require a secret access
Teacher’s file
code or PIN number? Might these pages be part of
the company’s Intranet service? Student’s Book Additional practice
Peer teaching: Students exchange
Pairwork their Intranet pages with another group
You might turn this activity into a group and correct their partners’ work.
work activity. In groups of four, Remind students how to give
students design an Intranet page for a constructive criticism: I think if you
school or company. They need to included…, It would be better if…, why
include all the sections that appear in not…
the pairwork activity in their Student’s
Book.

66
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unit ten 10
unit ten
Inter-office memos
10
Inter-office memos

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Cognates and false cognates
Cognates and false cognates
focus on Language 1 Read the text and see how many cognates you
can find. Cognates are words that have a similar form or
Cognates According to the 2000 Census, 176 languages are meaning in more than one language. This is
Cognates are words whose form and meaning are spoken in the United States. Spanish, Chinese, French,
the same, or very similar, in English and in other German, and Tagalog are the most commonly spoken
common of words with Latin or Greek origin. False
languages. languages after English. Speakers of particular foreign cognates are words that have a similar form but a
Look at the words below. Are they similar to some
words in your language?
languages usually concentrate in a few states; yet, completely different meaning. What words at the
California has the largest non-English speaking
population of the United States. More than 8 million
top of the page are similar in the students’ native
important different language? Refer students to the Grammar and
Californians speak Spanish, followed by over 800,000
use paper
common simple
Chinese speakers and 600,000 people who speak language reference, Student’s Book, page 105.
Tagalog. There are more people who speak French in
False cognates are English words that have a form the states of Maine and Louisiana.
that is similar to another language, but that has a 1
different meaning.
Students read the text and write down all the
cognates they can find in their notebooks.
Grammar reference, page 105.
Answers: census, languages, united, Tagalog,
Group work
commonly, particular, usually, concentrate,
Look at these words. Are they cognates or false cognates in your language? California, population, million, Californians.
figures attend assist
cancel realise economical
actually success invest Group work
apply succeed exit
Students look at the words together and
Now look for false cognates in the text above. separate them into lists of cognates and false
cognates. See Teacher’s file.
2 Use words from above to complete these sentences in your notebook.
1 Do you ... your course regularly?
Answers: Cognates: figures (meaning
2 The program is a complete ... . The results are very promising. “shape”), cancel, assist, economical; False
3 I would like to have an ... car to go to work.
cognates: figures (meaning “numbers”),
4 Will you ... for the job in Kenya.
5 He’s a very nice person... actually, apply, attend, realise, success, succeed,
6 Will you ... him if he has a problem? invest, exit; False cognates from the text:
according, usually, large.
Debate
Does the Intranet page on page 64 answer the questions in the ‘Keep in mind’ box?
What type of company do you think could use this type of Intranet page? 2 Students complete the sentences with the
e words from the group work. They can
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 9. 65 complete this task individually or stay in their
groups. See Teacher’s file.
Answers: 1 attend; 2 success; 3 economical;
4 apply; 5 actually; 6 assist.
Teacher’s file
Student’s Book 2 Students write sentences for the Debate
other words not used in the activity. Students discuss if the Intranet page on page 64
Group work
Students think of two other cognates
e This activity can be reused later to answers the questions listed on the “Keep in Mind”
and two false cognates they know in evaluate students’ progress. section of the same page. Ask them what type of
English. Then they write sentences company could use this. It would probably be some
for them. small or medium-sized company.

Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 10.


See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 68.

67
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unit ten 10
Inter-office memos unit ten 10
Inter-office memos

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with emoticons. Emoticons are a


textual way of expressing facial gestures or body
language. The term is a combination of the words
Emoticons
“emotion” and “icon”. It started as a part of The daily use of the Internet for e-mails, chats, blogs and Some of the most popular ones, and their meanings, are the
other forms of communication has brought about the following:
Internet chats and has spread to e-mails and mobile possibility of showing or expressing emotions of joy, :-) = you are joking, you are satisfied
sadness, love, humour, etc., in a very rapid and creative way, ,-) = you are joking about something but you don’t mean it
text messages. It is considered to be very informal through signs sent together with the message. :-> = you use it after a sarcastic remark
and they are only used in business when the person :-( = you are sad
These expressive signs are called emoticons or smileys, and :< = you are very sad
you are writing to is a close co-worker or colleague. they can be understood by Internet users from anywhere in :-* = you are sending a kiss
the world. They are a combination of characters such as a
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread colon, a comma, a parenthesis, a dash, that you can type on Some websites have also created animated figures that are
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up your computer keyboard and in that way send an additional more sophisticated forms of emoticons or smileys. They are
comment to your text. small and colourful, and some of them are so cute that it is
questions. difficult to resist their charm.

?
Pairwork How often do you use the internet to communicate with other people?
a never b every day c every week
Students write an e-mail to their partners using d once a week e once a month f twice a month
emoticons.
Do you ever use emoticons or smileys when writing?
a almost never b usually c always
d sometimes e often f seldom
Debate
Students can look up other emoticons on the
Internet and share them with their classmates.

Pairwork
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111.
Don’t forget! Think up a short e-mail to a
• Memo structures: To: friend using emoticons.
In groups, students choose a company From:
Re:
description and create a user-friendly Intranet • Typical phrases used in inter-office memos: Debate
page for it. They can use the Intranet page on I received the file you sent... Share with your classmates
Student’s Book, page 64 as a model. Also I’d appreciate it if you could... other emoticons you are
Contact me ASAP about...
remind them to follow the questions of the • The difference between Internet and Intranet:
familiar with. Which one is
your favourite?
Keep in Mind section of the same page. Once public WWW vs. internal communication
they’ve completed their Intranet page, they
give an oral presentation, showing the rest of
the class their page and explaining how it could 66
be used.
a Small-medium sized company
about 70 employees
Departments: IT, Sales, Marketing, Human OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
Resources, Accounting
Read the following definitions and synonyms
b Large corporation: shoe retail
of words and expressions from CD-Rom
about 1,500 corporate employees
activity 2. Students guess the word.
must connect headquarters, two warehouses
and 4,000 independently owned franchises 1 short
in three different countries 2 very tiring
c Small non-profit research organisation 3 Now, to make a long story short
40 employees / researchers share and 4 to be informed
compare health studies from Latin America,
5 I’m going
Southern Asia, Central Africa
Answers: 1 brief; 2 exhausting; 3 Anyway;
4 To be up-to-date; 5 I’m off.

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unit eleven 11
Reading skills
Reading in our native language is often taken for granted until we need to transfer these skills
to a foreign language. Reading in English can take very little time and practice if we work on
developing certain skills that we already have as readers in our native language and use the
context and the general knowledge we have about a subject to help us understand the text.
In this unit, students will learn how to apply reading skills like skimming and scanning to
understand texts in English.

Skills objectives
• To recognise the purpose of a text from its
structure or format
unit eleven 11
• To use a dictionary as a useful reading tool Reading skills
• To recognise words and their meanings
through context and language structure
Introduction
Language focus When we learn to read as children in our native language, we rarely think of the value of this skill that will
• To recognise the function and etymology of accompany us for the rest of our lives. From then on, we take it for granted and we use it automatically
words and almost unconsciously. To read and understand what you read in English, you must develop certain
reading skills and strategies.
• To build words by adding suffixes
• To study the history and spread of English
as an international language Objectives
Key vocabulary • To recognise the purpose of a text from its structure or format
& structures • To skim and scan a text and understand its general content
• brochure, regulations, schedule, graffiti, • To use a dictionary as a useful reading tool
recipe, postcard • To study the spread of English as an international language
• skim, scan, headline
• dictionary entry, etymology, definition
• Halloween, gram, Englisc (pre-English
language)
Business tasks
• To scan letters and articles for information
• To skim letters and articles and understand
their general content and purpose

67

Additional material
• Workbook, pages 33, 34 and 35
• CD-Rom, Unit 11
Unit warm-up questions
Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 74 • What do you usually read? (Newspapers, magazines, books...)
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • Do all texts require an accurate reading from beginning to end?
Book, page 74 • What section of the newspaper is most interesting to you? Why?
• When you read a letter, what do you concentrate on first? Do you leave any parts aside?
11-EFS-TB-Unit 11 22/5/06 22:48 Página 70

unit eleven
Reading skills
11 unit eleven 11
Reading skills

Purpose Purpose
Texts have different forms and structures depending on their aim or purpose.

1 Students name the different types of texts they


e 1 Look at the different texts and label them with a word from the list below.
see. See Teacher’s file.
catalogue complaints letter dictionary biography postcard fax agenda airport schedule
Answers: a dictionary; b brochure; short story brochure regulations phone message telegram newpaper notice street sign graffitti
price list ad poem personal note
c biography; d airport schedule; e regulations;
A B C
f fax; g telegram; h ad; i personal note.
(sb): understudy (the role of) Ophelia To record and view a scrambled/unscrambled channel. Domenikos Theotokopoulos was
* She understudied Judi Dench. 1. Set the VCR/TV selector located on the front of VCR to ‘VCR’. born in 1540 or 1541 in the city of
un-der-take /nd’teik/ v. (pt. undertook, 2. Set the TV channel selector to the output channel of the Candia, the capital of the island of
Debate p.p. under-taken) 1. (start to) make
Cable Converter Box (e.g. channel 3) Crete. As a young man he moved to
oneself responsible for (sth.):
In small groups, students compare the pairs of texts undertake a mission, task, project, etc. 3. Select the channel to be recorded at the... Venice where he studied with
* She undertook the organization of Titian until 1570. Then ...
and organise them into different categories. the whole scheme.
Afterwards, they discuss their opinions as a large E F
D
group. • Visitors are allowed on Thursday and
FLIGHT DEPARTURE ARRIVAL
Sunday from 15:00 p.m. to 17:00 p.m. Maharis LTD.
You might start the debate as a large group activity BA 9 1 5 0 9: 0 5 2 2 : 3 0
• Children under 10 are not permitted in TO: Paul Miller DATE: 08/23/05
and provide students with an example before they K L M 4 5 7 2 1 : 1 3 1 7 :2 0 the wards. FAX No.: 2067 No. OF PAGES: 1
REF.: Order
start debating in small groups: L A N 8 9 7 0 8: 3 0 2 3 : 5 5 • Visitors should refrain from eating,
drinking and smoking in the wards. Please send us the following items as soon as
A A 1 1 2 0 9: 3 0 1 0 :0 5
A textbook / a novel posible:

H Item Quant. Cod. No.


A textbook is big in format. The length depends on G
K100 Camera 7 42017
the subject. Some textbooks are longer than others. MEETING JULY 10TH CANCELLED. 741244 - Clock Radio Telephone K500 Camera
Zoom Lens
3
4
42018
5360
WOULD JULY 23RD BE O.K.? • Pulse telephone with 20-digit dialing
The language they use is very clear and specific to • 17-digit redialing capacity
Zoom Lens 12 5362
JAMES O’BRIAN
the subject. They are very clearly organised and they • mute key We’re mailing cheque No. 332451
• auto redial for $2,800.
include theory and practice. A textbook is not I • adjustable ringer
• modular 14-ft.-cord
fiction although it can include fictional passages. Jill, please tell Mr. Hicks I had • black, green, grey
,
A novel is usually smaller in format. It doesn’t have to go to the bank. I ll be back
in ten minutes. $150
a specific length. The type of language depends on Thanks,
the writer. Some novels use literary language, but Pam

they can also use language specific to the type of


story (detective, romance, adventure…). There is no Debate
set organisation for a novel. It also depends on the Compare the following types of texts. What differences or similarities do they have in their
form, length, type of language or organisation?
writer, although it tends to be structured in
A textbook / a novel An ad / a manual A dictionary / a postcard
chapters. A novel is, by definition, a fictional work. A brochure / a diary A magazine article / a novel A notice / a recipe
Walk around the class correcting any problem
areas. 68

Teacher’s file
Student’s Book Aditional practice
In pairs, students create a dialogue,
1 Students can bring in examples of basing it on one of the texts from the
other types of texts (like catalogues, page. Give them a few minutes to
biographies, graffiti…). In their small prepare their dialogues and practise
groups, they can define what type of them before acting them out in front
text they are and classify them of the class. Ask them to first identify
according to their form, style, length the text that inspired their dialogue.
and type of language / organisation.
e This activity can be reused later to
evaluate students’ progress.

70
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unit eleven 11
unit eleven 11
Reading skills
Reading skills

Skimming Skimming
Skimming is a reading skill that allows us to quickly read through a text to get the gist or main idea.

Skimming is a reading technique used to quickly


1 Skim the texts quickly and answer the questions. identify a text’s main ideas. It is usually done at a
speed three to four times faster than normal
ctober 31st is a very special holiday

O for English-speaking children. On


that day they dress up as ghosts,
witches or strange creatures and go from
Mr William Phillips
Sales Manager
Athens, November 2, 2005. reading. People skim when they have lots of
material to read in a limited amount of time: when
reading a newspaper, checking if an article is of use
house to house collecting candies and T.C. Elmhurst
for a research project, seeing if an Internet article is
sweets. They knock on each door or ring the
bell and when the door is opened they call of interest or for reviewing graphs, tables, and
Dear Mr Phillips,
out “Trick or treat!” The person answering charts.
the door puts treats into the paper bags We have received your 2006 catalogue and would
they are carrying. It’s Halloween! really appreciate if you could send us the following There are many skimming strategies: reading the
Some schools have costume parades on items: first and last paragraphs, reading organisers
that day, and later in the evening children
go to parties where they eat cakes and
2 Typewriters LNM 7854309 (headings, summaries, titles, subtitles, subheadings,
1 Typewriter E - SM 5009335
cookies. They drink sweet apple cider and and illustrations). Although people can read and
Payment will be handled through the usual
play games. They tell frightening stories
procedure. comprehend at the same rate when reading off a
about ghosts and monsters and black cats!
computer screen as when reading off paper,
Regards
Peggy Smith skimming on the computer is much slower.
1 What would be a good title for this text?
2 What’s the main purpose of the text?
3 Do you celebrate this holiday in your country? Do you 1 Students read the questions for each article.
celebrate something similar?
1 What is the purpose of this letter?
Give students a few minutes to quickly skim
2 How is the letter organised to to make its purpose clear? the two articles, keeping in mind the questions
they read previously. Then they answer the
2 Read this dictionary entry quickly and answer the questions. questions in their notebooks. See Teacher’s file.

skim [skim] 1. tv. to remove something from the


1 How many different definitions are there of the word Answers: Article A: 1 Halloween; 2 To
surface of a liquid. ♦ The cook skimmed the fat from skim?
explain about the customs of the holiday of
the top of the gravy. ♦ John skimmed the bugs from 2 Which entry defines the activity you are doing now?
the surface of the swimming pool. 2. tv. to glide over 3 How do you spell the past simple of the verb skim? Halloween; 3 open practice; Article B: 1 To
the surface of something; to go over the surface of
something quickly ♦ The plane skimmed the treetops
4 Which of the following words would you NOT expect order products; 2 Using lists and short
to find in this definition?
before it crashed. ♦ The goose´s feet just skimmed the paragraphs and sentences.
surface of the lake as it landed. 3. tv. to scan reading book quickly speaking
material; to read something quickly. ♦ The student headlines slowly reading
skimmed the reading assignment before class. ♦ I
skimmed the newspaper while eating breakfast. 2 Remind students to use their skimming skills to
Workbook, page 33. quickly read the dictionary entry and answer
the questions in their notebooks. See Teacher’s
69 file.
Answers: 1 3 different meanings;
2 3 (Reading something quickly); 3 Skimmed;
Teacher’s file 4 Speaking.

Student’s Book 2 Students prepare similar questions


for a word with multiple meanings,
1 Students bring in different types of like words from Student’s Book, page
text from home or from the Internet. 68: ad, novel, manual, article, notice,
In pairs, they write questions for their letter, story, sign...
chosen texts, using activity 1 as a
model. Then they exchange their
texts and questions. Students quickly
skim the texts and answer their
partners’ questions.

71
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unit eleven
Reading skills
11 unit eleven 11
Reading skills

Scanning Scanning
When we scan an article, we quickly look for specific information.

Scanning is a reading technique used to search for


key words or ideas. People scan when looking for a 1 Read the questions below, then scan the text quickly in search of the answers.
particular answer to a question, looking up a word
in a telephone book or dictionary or for finding ...I have been working as a are often the first link or company will make a good
dates, names, or places. secretary for 15 years, and I must connection between customers and impression on them from the very
say it’s been a great experience. the company, and that first contact start.
There are many scanning strategies: seek specific I have met so many interesting may be the starting point of a Finally, their work is also
words and phrases by moving your eyes quickly people and have made many friends. prosperous business. important because secretaries and
Not only do I enjoy my work, but Secondly, they handle a lot of office workers can create a good or
down the page. Look for organisers (like numbers, I think it’s an important job, too. information, which is another bad atmosphere within the
letters, steps, or the words first, second or next) or Secretaries, either men or women, crucial element for succeeding in company; and we all know how
highlighted words (in bold, italics or a different perform a very important function the business field. If clients and important it is to feel good at
in any kind of business. First, they suppliers are properly informed, the work...
font, size or colour).

1 How long has the writer been a secretary? 4 What are the three reasons the writer gives?
1 Students read the questions one by one, 2 Does the writer like being a secretary? 5 How does the writer help you quickly identify these
3 Does this writer think secretaries are important? reasons?
scanning the text each time for the answers.
See Teacher’s file.
2 Scan the letter to answer the questions.
Answers: 1 15 years; 2 Yes, he / she does; 1 Who is sending the fax?
3 Yes, he / she does; 4 Act as first link; handle Thorpe Corporation 2 What is his fax’s reference number?
12 West Boulevard - Cambridge CB6 2LX 3 What is the quotation’s reference
lots of information; create good atmosphere; Tel.: 0223 64 1602
number?
5 Used words like first, secondly, finally. FAX No. 30021 4 When is the delivery date?
To: Frank Kleiner Date: 1/13/2006 5 Where is the place of delivery?
From: Mathews Brown No. Pages: 1
2 Students skim the letter first to gain an overall Pairwork
REF.: Quotation No. 2347
sense of the letter (type, style, purpose). Then Find a short reading passage in
English and prepare 4 questions
they read each question and scan for the We accept your quotation No. 2347 on the terms stated. Goods for your partner to answer by
answers. must be sent to our subsidiary in Bristol. scanning the text.
Would it be possible to have them delivered before the 30th?
Answers: 1 Mathews Brown; 2 His fax Looking forward to your confirmation.

reference number is 30021; 3 The quotation’s Yours faithfully,


reference number is 2347; 4 The delivery date Mathews Brown
is prior to January 30th; 5 The goods should be Chief Buyer

delivered to the Bristol subsidiary.

70 Workbook, page 33.


Pairwork
Students find a short passage from the
Internet, a book or magazines. Then they
prepare 4 questions for their partner to answer.
Teacher’s file
Student’s Book Workbook, page 33
Answer key, p. 117.
1 Debate
In small groups or as a large group, 1 Students use either skimming or
students discuss the article. Do they scanning skills to answer the
agree with the writer? What do they questions about the three texts.
think is the most important function Students can do this activity
of a secretary? individually, in pairs or in groups of
three (with each student working on
a different text).

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unit eleven 11
unit eleven 11
Reading skills
Reading skills

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Grammatical structure in context
Knowledge of specific structures in English can help you understand a text when you read. When you come across a 1 Students identify the grammatical function of
word you do not know, first look at its grammatical function. If you understand a word’s role in a certain context, it
will help you guess its meaning. the word present in each sentence.
Answers: 1 verb; 2 noun; 3 adjective;
1 What is the grammatical function of the 2 Decide if the word in italics acts as a noun 4 adverb.
word in italics in each sentence? Choose or a verb and replace it with a similar word
from the box or expression.
adjective adverb verb noun 1 Miss Hamilton, could you book a seat for me on the
2 Students decide if the word in italics acts as a
next flight to Cardiff, please?
1 Will you present a new project? noun or a verb. Then they replace it with a
2 How many people can this institution house?
2 The present you gave me is beautiful.
3 Melanie is not present now.
3 Will you ring me tonight? similar word or expression.
4 Is the book as good as the movie?
4 The manager is presently preparing the annual budget.
5 He gave her a ring for her birthday. Answers: 1 verb; buy a ticket for; 2 verb;
6 Mrs. Wong bought a new stylish house this summer.
Group work
hold; 3 verb; call / telephone; 4 noun;
Look at the words in italics and discuss their uses and meanings. Use a dictionary if necessary. publication; 5 noun; gold band; 6 noun;
1 I have been studying English since September. 3 Did you record the conversation? home / cabin / cottage.
Since he never came to class, he failed the course. That’s our best record.
Is there any record of the 2004 production costs?
2 He dressed up as a ghost for Halloween.
Do as I say!
Compact discs commercially replaced vinyl records in
the 1990’s.
Group work
The man had a very long criminal record. Students look at the words together and
decide what their meanings and functions are.
Working with a dictionary
They can use a dictionary to settle any
If you are unable to understand a word from its context, you will then need to look it up in a dictionary. The
dictionary tells us the grammatical function of a word, it’s meaning within this function, its pronunciation and its
differences of opinion.
etymology.
Answers: 1 a adverb: from that time;
graffiti [rəfi ti] 1. n. words, symbols or pictures that
1 Read the dictionary definitions and answer b conjunction: because; 2 a adverb: the same
are written, scatched or painted onto surfaces. (The
Italian plural of graffito. Treated as singular.) ♦ The the questions. as; b conjunction: in the same way that...
1 Where did the word graffiti come from?
walls of the subway station were covered with 3 a verb: to tape; b noun: accomplishment;
graffiti. ♦ I covered the graffiti on my garage door 2 What is the equivalent of a gram in ounces?
with paint. 3 What is another way of saying 1/1,000 of a kilogram? c noun: written evidence; d noun: plastic
4 What does a gram measure? sound recording; e noun: list of actions.
gram [rm] 1. n. the basic unit for measuring weight
in the metric system, equal to 1/1,000 of a kilogram or
about 1/28 of an ounce. ♦ This tablet has half a gram
Pairwork
of aspirins. ♦ This coin weighs about 5 grams. Choose an entry from a good English Working with a dictionary
dictionary and make up some questions to
ask your partner. 1 Students read each question and then scan the
Workbook, pages 34-35.
dictionary entries for their answers.
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 11. 71 Answers: 1 From the Italian word graffito;
2 A gram is 1/28 of an ounce; 3 A gram; 4 It
measures weight.

Teacher’s file Pairwork


Student’s Book 2 Students examine the functions of Students use the previous example as a model
the words in the sentences. They can and write four questions for a dictionary entry
Pairwork use the suffixes to decide if the they find in an English dictionary. See Teacher’s
Dictionaries are not only a useful tool words are nouns or adjectives. They file.
for finding multiple meanings of underline the nouns and circle the
words or their function, but they can adjectives.
also inform us of their pronunciation, Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 11.
etymology, common phrases or idioms Working with dictionaries
See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
and even offer example sentences. 1 Students read the questions and skim page 74.
Students write two more questions or scan the dictionary entries for the
reflecting these different areas. answers.
2 Students use the dictionary to
Workbook, pages 34 & 35 complete the sentences.
Answer key, p. 117.
Pairwork
Word-building Students prepare similar questions
1 Once you know the grammatical for the word boomerang that
function of a word, you can use appears in the dictionary entry at the
different suffixes to create more top of the page. Then they exchange
words. Students complete the charts questions with a partner and answer
with the correct words. the classmate’s questions.

73
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unit eleven
Reading skills
11 unit eleven 11
Reading skills

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with the history of the English


language and its current international importance.
It is used as an official language in over 60 When Julius Caesar landed in million people use English as a second
Britain about two thousand years ago, or foreign language!
countries. Seventy-five per cent of the world’s the English language did not exist. A Over the last few centuries,
technological communication is in English. It is the very small number of people probably the rise of English has been
used a language called “Englisc” about extraordinarily fast. English countries, more than any other
language of communication used by air-traffic five hundred years after the Romans’ speakers, including Scots, Irish, international language.
controllers and pilots, maritime agencies and arrival in the island of Great Britain. Welsh, Americans, and others have Without any doubt English is the
A thousand years later, around the taken their language and culture to language of technology and business.
computer programming. sixteenth century, seven million English almost every corner of the world Close to three quarters of the world’s
men and women spoke English. It is through travel, technology and the mail, e-mails and text messages and
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread now the third-most spoken native media. A recent study concluded that eighty percent of the information
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up language worldwide with over 380 the English language is used as an stored in the world’s computers is
million speakers. Yet, more than 400 official language in over 60 written in English.
questions.

?
Survey In your country, is English used more as a second language or as a foreign language?
In what sectors is English used most in your country?
Students can look up the history of English on the Why do you think English is so widely used today?

Internet or in encyclopedias to find what other Look up the etymology of these words: essay budget freight
languages influenced the creation of the English Survey
language. They share their information with their Look up the history of the English language in an encyclopedia or on the Internet. What other
classmates and write up their survey results into a languages directly influenced the creation of the English language? List some words as examples.
graph.

OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION Don’t forget!


Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111.
• How to skim a text by reading the topic sentences of
1 Photocopy different types of short paragraphs and organisational cues.
newspaper or Internet articles. In pairs • How to scan a text by moving your eyes down the page
or small groups, students prepare an oral looking for key words or specific facts.
presentation of their articles. • How to use the grammatical function and context of
words to guess meaning: He estimated about 50 people
First they must skim the article for: would attend the presentation. She sent the estimate by Fax.
the general topic • How to recognise the etymology of words
the type of article (sports, current events, in a dictionary: < L (from Latin). <OF (from Old French)
economy, tabloids...)
Then they must scan the article for: 72
why the article is important
specific details answering the 6 questions
of journalism: (who?, what?, when?, why?,
where? and how?)
OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
2 Choose a narrative text. Students read Ask students the following questions about
a passage from it. Ask them three of the CD-Rom activity 1:
following questions: 1 What do you use a warehouse for?
What type of story is it? (scary, romantic, 2 Can you define the word “headquarters”?
funny...) 3 What is a branch?
What is the writing style used? (formal, 4 How do you call a place where you can look
colloquial...) at products?
What is the scene about? 5 In what type of building are products
Who are the main characters? manufactured?
Which sentence was the most difficult for you Answers: 1 to store products; 2 the main or
to read? Why? principal office; 3 a secondary office or shop;
Which sentence did you like the most? Why? 4 a showroom; 5 in a factory.
From context, what do you think the word ...
means?
Have you read this before in your native
language?

74
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unit twelve 12
Describing qualities
Descriptive adjectives are used in business to describe positions, people, places, products and
services. The larger a student’s vocabulary is, the more accurately he / she can explain his / her
ideas and opinions.
In this unit, students will learn how to apply adjectives, connectors and reference elements to
increase their level of expression in English.

Skills objectives
• To revise skimming and scanning
techniques to read articles and letters
unit twelve 12
• To organise information with mind maps, Describing qualities
charts and Venn diagrams
• To recognise words and their meanings
through context and language structure Introduction
Do you think there are certain qualities that are typical of certain professions or activities? Businesses use
Language focus specific expressions and words to describe the people that work in their offices, the services they offer and
• To use connecting words to unite ideas for the products they create.
more formal writing
• To use adjectives to describe people and Objectives
places • To describe people, places or products
• To use reference elements and recognise
what they refer to
• To use connecting words to unite ideas
• To revise skimming and scanning strategies
Key vocabulary • To learn about the influence of other languages in the UK
& structures
• trustworthy, fulfilled, reliable, ergonomic, • To discuss the influence of stereotypes
light-weight, heavy-duty
• moody, nosy, fussy, dependable,
predictable, available, believable
• profitable, affordable, disposable,
advisable, understandable, workable
• flexi-hours, workplace, human resources
• nevertheless, even though, whereas, while,
however
Business tasks
• To describe people, places or products
• To learn about the influence of other
languages in the U.K.
• To discuss the influence of stereotypes in
business

73
Additional material
• Grammar and language reference, pages
101-102
• Workbook, pages 36, 37 and 38 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 12 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • Do you think there are personal qualities that are typical of certain professions?
page 80
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • Can you name a few qualities for a good boss? What about a bad one?
Book, page 80 • What qualities would you like or dislike in a spouse or boyfriend / girlfriend?
• What qualities would you like or dislike in a co-worker?
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unit twelve
Describing qualities
12 unit twelve 12
Describing qualities

Descriptive words Descriptive words


Texts have different forms and structures depending on their aim or purpose.

1 Students quickly skim the texts to answer the


1 Quickly skim the texts to answer the questions below.
questions.
A B
Answers: 1 A person; 2 Positive; 3 Outside MULTINATIONAL CORPORATION seeks intern for The new Plexismart workstation by Datanex Inc. is a remarkable
the company. Human Resources Department. Applicant must certify new desk designed to accommodate the modern office worker
current enrolment in accredited institute or university. at his/her workstation. Its adjustable monitor stand, ergonomic
Position requires student with initiative, integrity, and keyboard and mouse rests provide a comfortable working area
excellent communication and organization skills. Candidate that is adequate for any height. Its ultra-modern Plexiglas “look”
2 Students read the questions and then scan the must be responsible and reliable. Fluency in English and makes it an interesting and attractive addition to your office
Spanish a must. Should also be interested in assisting others decoration. Despite its light-weight appearance, its sturdy
e same three articles for their answers. See and in learning about human resources issues. Knowledge of design makes it ideal for even the most heavy-duty computer
Word and Excel a plus.Will work on various projects in order
Teacher’s file. to learn about and train in human resources operations and
use. It also offers optional drawers to keep important files or
office equipment organised and at-hand.
administration.
Answers: 1 An administrative intern for the
Human Resources Department. 2 They need C
1 Is article A describing a
someone with initiative and integrity who is
B
EETHSEN Ltd. is far from being a traditional like as long as they meet their assigned targets. For this
corporation. The company’s owner himself reason, it is common to find people at the workplace in person or a service?
also responsible and reliable. They must have has designed an unconventional uniform the evenings or at weekends. Some prefer to work at 2 Does article B talk about
which the staff proudly wear in representation of their home via Internet and only go in to the office on the
well-developed communication and company. The buildings, both at the headquarter and days when specific tasks require it. Workers are
the product in a positive or
negative way?
organisational skills, be bilingual in English and branch levels, have colourful playgrounds, green areas encouraged to take dancing lessons, do sports, or other
and common social club areas. The key words for this optional activities during traditional working hours. The 3 Is article C written by
Spanish, know Word and Excel and be enrolled company are flexibile, trustworthy, and responsible, and idea behind this company’s revolutionary work someone inside or outside
the atmosphere exudes the joy of working. Beethsen are atmosphere is that if company workers feel happy and
in an institute or university. 3 Potential clients. against routine and traditional office hours. The workers fulfilled at work, they will work better and faster and with the company?

4 It is a comfortable working area; it has a have flexi-hours that allow them to work whenever they a more positive attitude.

modern “look”; it has a sturdy design. 5 Its


revolutionary work atmosphere. 6 open 2 Now scan the texts for these answers.
1 What profession is article A describing?
focus on Grammar
practice. 2 What are the personal qualities they are looking for? And the professional skills? Should
3 Who do you think article B is aimed at? This modal verb usually
4 What three things are highlighted about the product? implies advisability.
Focus on Grammar 5 In article C what is the most remarkable thing about Beethsen? Examples:
6 Do you think this type of company would work well in real life? Why or why not? You should be more patient.
Should is a modal verb used to give advice or She should improve her
opinions. Like other modal verbs, it does not change Survey
spelling.
He should be more tolerant.
and is the same for every subject (I, you, he, she...) In your notebook, write a list of five qualities that a secretary Should I call him now?
Refer students to the Grammar and language should have. Classmates organise them in order of importance. Should you be so rude?
Should they accept their offer?
reference, Student’s Book, page 101. What qualities did you agree on? Any differences?
You shouldn’t be late to work.
How many positive qualities do you think you have?
How do you think you could develop the ones you don’t have? He shouldn’t attend the
meeting.
Focus on Grammar activities We shouldn’t insist.
Grammar reference, page 101.
Students make up 5 sentences about things they 74
usually find difficult to do. (eg. I find it difficult to
wake up early in the morning.)
In pairs, students exchange sentences. They take
turns to give advice to each other about their Teacher’s file
problems using sentences with should. (eg. You
should go to bed early.) Student’s Book Survey
If students answer the survey follow-up
2 Students can bring in examples of questions in their notebooks, they can
Survey other types of texts. In pairs, students use their answers as an outline for
skim their partner’s article and talk writing an essay.
Individually, students write a list of 5 qualities that a about what type of text it is, what it
secretary should have. Then in small groups, they describes, if it is in a positive / negative
compare these qualities and put them in order of way, what it highlights, etc.
importance. Afterwards, they answer the follow-up e This activity can be reused later to
questions either individually in their notebooks or evaluate students’ progress.
orally as a class. See Teacher’s file.

76
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12
unit twelve
unit twelve 12
Describing qualities
Describing qualities

Adjectives Adjectives
Many adjectives have a root word that helps you understand its meaning. Sometimes the root words can be nouns
and other times they are verbs.
1 Many adjectives have a root word like a noun
NOUN adjective + y VERB adjective + able
rain rainy comfort comfortable or a verb that helps us understand its meaning.
wind windy profit profitable Refer students to the Grammar and language
sun sunny afford affordable
reference, Student’s Book, page 102. Then
boss bossy remark remarkable
dirt dirty compare comparable students categorise the adjectives according to
worth worthy dispose disposable whether they describe people, things or both.
mood moody advise advisable
luck lucky understand understandable
Venn diagrams are useful tools for organising
wealth wealthy predict predictable this type of information. See Teacher’s file.
thirst thirsty avail available
cloud cloudy believe believable Answers: People: nosy, bossy, moody,
snow snowy work workable wealth, thirsty, fussy; Things: rainy, windy,
nose nosy rely reliable
fuss fussy depend dependable
sunny, cloudy, snowy, comfortable, profitable,
affordable, disposable, advisable, workable,
Grammar reference, page 102.
understandable; Both: lucky, dirty, worthy,
1 Adjectives sometimes only describe people or things. Other times they can describe both. In your remarkable, comparable, predictable, available,
notebook, place the adjectives above into a Venn diagram like the one below. believable, reliable, dependable.
People Things
nosy snowy 2 Students complete the sentences with
lucky e adjectives from the chart. See Teacher’s file.
Answers: 1 remarkable; 2 affordable;
3 understandable; 4 comfortable; sunny;
5 available; 6 profitable; 7 nosy / moody /
2 Complete the sentences with an appropriate adjective from the chart above.
1 My boss is a ... man. He’s capable of doing anything he wants.
bossy; 8 Wealthy; 9 Fussy; 10 snowy / windy.
2 The trip is very attractive, but it isn’t ... for me. It’s too expensive.
3 Her attitude is ... but I don’t think it’s correct.
4 My new office is very ... . I have natural light almost all day, so it’s also very ... . Key Vocabulary
5 The goods were not ... at our usual supplier; consequently, we had to look for another one.
6 The business is not ... any longer, so we have to close down. Workbook, page 36
7 It was very difficult to work with her. She was ... and .... When we describe the qualities of a person or
8 ... customers do not worry about prices.
9 ... people are sometimes difficult to please.
thing, we are often expressing a point of view. It is
10 The day was ... and ... so the flight had to be postponed. important to know how to agree or disagree with
the opinions of others in a polite way. The
Workbook, page 36.
structures in the Key Vocabulary box are useful
75
when giving an opinion.

Key Vocabulary activities


Ask students to make a list of topics they like to
Teacher’s file talk about (eg. music, their favourite film / book or
Students use the people traits to sports…). In groups of four, students ask each other
Student’s Book
describe a popular celebrity. In small questions and give opinions about their favourite
1 Students organise information from groups, students try and guess who topics, using the structures in the Key Vocabulary
article C in page 74 into a Venn the famous person is. box.
diagram (About the company: /
About the workers: / Both:). 3 Students choose adjectives from the
lists they created in activity 2 to
e This activity can be reused later to
complete the sentences.
evaluate students’ progress.
Debate
Workbook, page 36 Students discuss the questions in small
Answer key, p. 117. groups or as the entire class. Refer
students to the Key Vocabulary box for
1 Students match each product to the
statements they can use to give their
best adjective.
opinions during the debate.
2 Students organise the adjectives in
the box into the correct column.
Additional practice
In pairs, students take turns
interviewing a partner about what
traits he / she might have. Then they
write a short paragraph describing
their partner using the adjectives that
came up in the interview.
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unit twelve
Describing qualities
12 unit twelve 12
Describing qualities

Languages in the UK Languages in the UK

1 Students should skim the text quickly and Although many people use the terms Great Britain or England when talking
decide which concepts are covered in the about this country, its true name is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
Northern Ireland (or UK for short).
article. See Teacher’s file. The island of Great Britain is made up of England, Wales and Scotland. The
North Channel separates Northern Ireland from Great Britain. At its closest point,
Answers: b; d; e; f; i. Scotland is only 20 km away, which explains why more than 60% of Northern
Ireland’s population descends from Scots who crossed over during the seventeenth
century. The rest of the population is Irish in origin. The Isles of Scilly and the Isle
2 of Wight, Anglesey, the Hebrides, Orkney and Shetland are also part of the UK.
Students read each question and then go back
Foreigners usually refer to people from the U.K. as ‘English’; however, people from
e and scan the text for the answers. See Scotland consider themselves Scots, those from Wales are called Welsh and people
Teacher’s file. from Ireland are Irish. Their ancestors were Celts who arrived in the British Islands
centuries before the Roman invasion. The Germanic Angles and Saxons, who gave
England its name, conquered them in the fifth and sixth centuries A.D. Later, in
Answers: 1 United Kingdom of Great Britain 1066, the Norman French conquered them. The English people and the English
and Northern Ireland; 2 It is made up of language came from this mixture of Anglo-Saxons and Norman conquerors.
A small minority in Scotland speak Gaelic, a Celtic language. The local language in Wales is still Welsh, also of Celtic origin;
England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland; but despite efforts by the government to preserve the language, only 20% of the population speaks Welsh.
3 Scots, Welsh, English, Irish; 4 Gaelic, Welsh. English is spoken throughout the UK, but there are many different accents. The English they speak in London, for example,
5 German Angles, Saxons, Norman French; ‘sounds’ different from the English they speak in Edinburgh, Liverpool or Cardiff. Not only do speakers’ accents reflect their
social or educational background, but also the other languages spoken in their area.
6 Celts; 7 A small minority speaks Gaelic and
only 20% of the population speaks Welsh.
1 Skim the text quickly. Does the article about the United Kingdom talk about the following
concepts or not?
Languages in the U.K. nowadays a The Royal Family g Its constitution
You might like to contrast the historical information b The geographical position of the country h The functions of the Prime Minister
c The form of government i English ancestors
in the reading passage with the situation nowadays d The definition of Great Britain j The Queen’s governmental functions
in the U.K. e Language(s) spoken in the country k The origin of the English flag
f Member nations of the country
Tell the class that the number of languages spoken
in the U.K. has increased dramatically over the last 2 Scan the text and answer these questions in your notebooks.
half century. Mass immigration has brought people 1 What does the UK stand for? 5 Who are the ancestors of the English?
2 What countries or regions make up the UK? 6 What is the origin of the other three areas of the UK?
from all over the world to settle in the country. 3 What are the people from these areas called? 7 How many people still speak Welsh? And Gaelic?
Recent research has found that around 300 4 What languages do some of them speak?
languages are now spoken in London.
Ask students to research more information about
the main languages spoken in the U.K. Then they Workbook, page 37.
share the information they have found with the rest
of the class. Encourage students to talk about not 76
only the languages spoken but also in which parts
of the U.K. they can be heard.

Teacher’s file
Student’s Book without repeating the actual words
used previously. Students refer back
1 Students look up information about to the text on the U.K. and write
the other concepts not mentioned in what the reference elements refer to
the reading. Then they share the in the text.
data they have found in small
groups. 2 Students create a mind map about
the different cultures that lived in the
2 Discussion British Islands. They use the text on
In small groups or as a large group, page 76 of their Student’s Books for
students discuss the article. Did they the details.
learn anything new about the U.K.?
Do you think it is important to know Group work
the origin of the English language? Students look for more information
Why might this be important to on the Internet or in encyclopedias
people learning the language? about the Celts, the German Angles,
the Saxons, the Norman French or
e This activity can be reused later to
the Romans. They present their
evaluate student’s progress. information as a written essay or as
an oral presentation.
Workbook, page 37
e This activity can be reused later to
Answer key, p. 117.
evaluate students’ progress.
1 Reference elements are used to offer
connection between sentences

78
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12
unit twelve
unit twelve 12
Describing qualities
Describing qualities

Let’s focus on… Connectors


Connectors
These words join parts of a sentence, sentences or paragraphs within a text. Connectors join parts of a sentence, sentences or
Examples: paragraphs within a text.
However and nevertheless join two sentences,
however / nevertheless
and are used to contrast ideas: I worked very hard
• During the last centuries, the powers of the government have been assigned directly to Ministers; however, there
are still important acts that require the Queen’s participation. yesterday; however, I wasn’t tired. The meeting was
• England is predominantly a lowland country; nevertheless, there are upland regions in the northern part. very long; nevertheless, we managed to finish early.
Although, though, even though, while and
although / though / even though
whereas connect ideas within the same sentence.
• Although Scotland is part of the U.K., its legal system differs in some aspects from those of England and Wales.
• Even though the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man are not part of the UK, they have a special relationship with it.
They are also used to contrast ideas: He came to
• British people like outdoor activities, though the weather is cold and windy. visit me, although he was very busy; Even though
she came early, we didn’t have time to finish our
while / whereas
project.
• Edinburgh is the capital of Scotland whereas Belfast is the capital of Northern Ireland.
• Scafell Pike, England’s highest peak, is 978 m while Wales’ highest peak, Snowdown, is 1,085 m. Refer students to the Grammar and language
• England is the most densely populated area while Scotland is the least populated. reference, Student’s Book, page 102.
Grammar reference, page 102.
1 Students look at the text on page 76, then use
the connectors to complete the sentences in
1 Look at the text on page 76. Then use the connectors to complete these sentences in your
notebook.
their notebooks. See Teacher’s file.
1 The name of the country is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, although…
Answers: 1 although many people use the
2 The authorities have taken measures to revive the use of the Welsh language, even though…
3 Cardiff is located in Wales while Liverpool… terms Great Britain or England; 2 even though
4 The English language descends from the German tongue whereas Welsh… only 20% of the population speaks it; 3 while
5 Most of Northern Ireland’s population is of Scottish origin, though many…
6 Scots come from Scotland, whereas the Welsh…
Liverpool is in England; 4 whereas Welsh is of
7 Even though people all over England speak English, there are… Celtic origin; 5 though many are Irish in origin;
8 Foreigners usually refer to people from the UK as ‘English’; however, people from Scotland… 6 whereas the Welsh are from Wales; 7 there
Pairwork
are many different accents; 8 however, people
Interview a partner. Use the connectors above to write sentences about him / her in your from Scotland are called Scots.
notebook.
a Have you ever travelled abroad?
What aspects of the country did you find interesting / different / similar to your country? Pairwork
or
b Where would you like to travel? Why?
Students interview a partner. Then they use
connectors to write sentences about him / her.
Workbook, page 38. Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 12. See Teacher’s file.
77
Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 12.
See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 80.
Teacher’s file
Student’s Book constructive criticism using the polite
expressions learned earlier in the
1 As a fun chain activity, make simple course. They should write a list of the
sentences and students connect errors they have found and then
them with connectors. As soon as choose only three or four of the
the class can no longer continue the more important ones to comment
chain, start a new one. Teacher: I on.
stayed home on Saturday... Student
1: I stayed home on Saturday Workbook, page 38
although I was invited to a party. Answer key, p. 117.
Student 2: I was invited to a party;
1 Students choose the connector that
however I decided not to go.
best completes the meaning of each
Student 3: I decided not to go
sentence.
because....
2 Students make a complete sentence
Pairwork
by matching the two expressions.
Peer teaching: Students answer the
questions themselves and write a 3 Students apply what they have
short essay about their travel learned about connectors to the
interests. Afterwards, they trade business letter.
essays with a partner. This is an e This activity can be reused later to
opportunity to offer their classmates evaluate students’ progress.

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unit twelve
Describing qualities
12 unit twelve 12
Describing qualities

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with international stereotypes. STEREOTYPES


Often our misconceptions about a country and its
people can affect the way we do business. Both All groups of people share distinctive They are often the source of popular beliefs and
characteristics that outsiders quickly perceive. even inspire ingenious jokes either about
positive and negative stereotypes can influence our Any group, community or country, has specific foreigners or our own selves. Here’s one:
decision-making and even our attitudes to foreign customs, ways of talking and behaving that “Heaven is where the police are English, the cooks
affiliates. distinguish them from the others. This is are French, the mechanics are German, the lovers
particularly evident when we travel abroad and are Italian and it is all organised by the Swiss.
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread see how people there behave or when we receive Hell is where the police are German, the cooks are
visitors from other countries. English, the mechanics are French, the lovers are
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up
To the observer, some of these Swiss, and it is all organised by the Italians.”
questions. characteristics may seem positive or negative. Do you know any others?

Debate

?
Did you find the joke funny? Why or why not?
What other customs are considered to be typically English or German?
Put students into small groups where they can
Are there any customs that are stereotypes in your country?
discuss their opinions about the two statements. What stereotypes are there of the people from different regions in your country?
After a few minutes, join the small groups together Are there stereotypes of the different people you study or work with?

and give the new group a few minutes to discuss


the two statements again. Continue until the class
Debate
can be divided into two teams (one in favour of one
Which of the following statements do you agree with most?
statement and one in favour of the other.) Refer “Attempts to categorise cultural characteristics often end up in cultural stereotypes that are unfair or misleading.”
them to the Key Vocabulary box on Workbook, “Stereotypes might possess some grain of truth.”
page 36 for opinion-giving structures.

OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION Don’t forget!


Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111.
• How to use adjectives to positively or negatively describe
1 In small groups or pairs, students compare people or things: disciplined, neat, efficient, careless, moody,
one of the following, using adjectives they impersonal
have learned in the unit: • How to connect phrases or sentences: nevertheless,
although, however, while
• A popular singer and a writer.
• How other languages influenced the English language in
• A teacher and a politician. the UK: Germanic Angles, Saxons and Norman French.
• Stereotypes of Mediterranean countries and
Nordic countries
78

2 Students prepare a publicity campaign for


an item that can be found in the classroom.
They can use adjectives they have learned
in the unit. Then, they give a publicity OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
presentation to the rest of the class.
In CD-Rom activities 1 and 2, students learn
the most powerful words in advertising. In
pairs, students make a list of the “words that
sell” that they remember from the activities.
Sample answers: easy, guarantee, proven,
money, save, now, new, results, free, safe,
health, fun…

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unit thirteen 13
Office duties
Office work entails many duties, skills and tasks. When applying for a job, it is important to recognise
the difference between the three: what you are expected to do, your own capability in achieving
these goals and what additional things you can do. In this unit, students will learn how to use the
knowledge they acquire about office duties, skills and tasks towards a productive and engaging
interview. They will also examine how the use of connectors and relative clauses can make their
speech more fluid as well as how gender may affect the jobs they are applying for.

Skills objectives
• To revise skimming and scanning
techniques to read articles and letters
unit thirteen 13
• To apply speaking strategies learned earlier Office duties
in the course to group discussions and
interviews
• To recognise words and their meanings Introduction
through context and language structure A secretary or an office worker has to perform certain activities daily, weekly or periodically, depending on
the type of organisation or company. This unit examines common tasks, duties and activities required by
Language focus certain office jobs.
• To revise sentence connectors
• To learn about relative clauses Objectives
• To correctly form nominal groups • To distinguish between skills, tasks and duties
Key vocabulary • To learn job interview strategies
& structures • To revise connectors
• to earn, to spend, to afford, to purchase, to
• To read about English in the New World.
pay, to invest
• to quit, to be dismissed / fired, to apply for, • To learn relative clauses
to be promoted • To focus on nouns and nominal groups
• salary, fringe benefits, in-service courses • To discuss gender roles in the work place
• furthermore, besides, moreover, so that
Business tasks
• To know the difference between skills,
tasks and duties
• To learn useful interview strategies
• To discuss gender roles in the workplace

Additional material 79
• Grammar and language reference,
pages 102-103
• Glossary, pages 111-112
• Workbook, pages 39, 40 and 41 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 13 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 86 • Have you ever applied for a job?
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • What do you have to do when you apply for a job?
Book, page 86 • Have you ever been interviewed for a job? By whom? What things did they ask?
What did you do?
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unit thirteen
Office duties
13 unit thirteen 13
Office duties

Job interview... Job interview strategies

Interview strategies. A résumé tells an employer 1 Read the situation below and then the three job interviews. Who is your favourite candidate?
The Personnel Manager, Mr. Wells, has to fill the position of Secretary to the Finance Manager. Below you will find parts
what you have done. The interview is the next step of three interviews of people who are applying for the job. Read each interview and complete the exercises that follow.
that lets you tell the employer what you have A B
learned from your previous experience, as well as W = Mr. Wells H = Mr. Parker W = Mr. Wells H = Miss Hobson
show your interest in the company and in the
position you are applying for. W: Mr. Parker, I understand you’re applying for W: Miss Hobson, how long have you been working as
the position of secretary in our Finance a secretary at Cotton’s Manufacturers?
Create an interview discussion. Talk not only Department. Are you working at present? H: About a year, sir. Since I graduated.
about what you are expected to do, but of new P: No, sir. I quit. W: Are you satisfied with your Job?
W: What made you quit your job? H: Very much, sir.
procedures you could help implement. Give the
P: Well, Ms. Hales, my boss, wasn’t a very W: Then, why do you want to change?
employer the idea you are resourceful and nice person. She was too bossy, too H: Because I work in a small company and, obviously,
enthusiastic and could help the company’s demanding... I didn’t like her. She asked there aren’t many possibilities of being promoted.
me to leave. Apart from the typical secretarial tasks such as
productivity. Show him / her the skills you could
W: So, you didn’t quit. You were fired. typing, filing and answering the phone, I’m in
bring to the job. P: Yes, but... I was going to quit anyway. charge of salaries, payments and taxes. I know
W: Tell me about your duties. What exactly did I can do more than that.
Stay professional. Never make negative you do there? W: Do you speak any foreign languages?
comments about former employers. P: I had to type letters and documents. I’m H: Yes, I do. In fact, I have taken several French and
very good at it; I type 150 words per Spanish courses. The only problem is that I’ve had
Leave money issues aside. Let the employer minute. I answered the phone and I was in few opportunities to practise them. I also speak a
bring up the topic first. If you are cited an amount charge of the petty cash. bit of Portuguese.
that you consider low, ask if it is a set figure or if it W: Do you have any experience with computers? W: And computers? Do you have any experience with
P: No, I prefer typewriters. I told you, my them?
is negotiable. If it is not mentioned at all during the typing speed is very good. H: Of course, where can you work now without
interview, you can politely ask at the end, taking W: I see. And what about foreign languages? knowing how to use a computer? I’m not an
your time to counter-offer if the salary is lower than P: What do you mean? expert, but I can manage quite well with the word
W: Do you speak a foreign language? processor and Excel or Lotus programs.
you expected. P: No, sir. I was never good at languages at W: Miss Hobson, how important is salary to you?
school, I’m afraid. H: Well, I think it is important, but it isn’t everything.
Asking questions. If an interviewer asks if you
Besides, I’m very young, with little work
have any questions, there are some you could ask experience. I know I have to learn many things
that show the employer you are interested and KEY VOCABULARY and keep on studying so that I can get promotion
Verbs related to money in the future.
motivated; like asking if there is room for
advancement, if you are expected to work overtime to earn to spend to cash a cheque
to make money to receive to purchase
or who might be your immediate supervisor.
to afford to invest to pay
Send a follow-up letter. Write a short thank you Glossary, page 111.
letter for selecting you for an interview. This letter
not only shows the are thoughtful and courteous,
but it can even help the interviewer choose you 80
over someone else if he / she is torn between which
candidate to choose. It could even help later when
negotiating your salary and benefits once you have
been chosen.
Teacher’s file
1 Students read the three job interviews on Student’s Book activities you are habitually in charge
e of. Skills are abilities you have to
Student’s Book, pages 80-81 and choose their 1 Make a copy of the interviews and accomplish these tasks and duties. In
favourite candidate. Based on the interview cut them up in strips of paper. In groups, students discuss the list of
strategies mentioned earlier, students compare pairs, students reconstruct one of the activities and decide if they are skills,
what the candidates did well and what they interviews. duties or tasks. Compare their
did wrong during the interviews. This task can Additional practice answers as a large group.
be done in small groups or as a large group. Students practise the dialogue they Pairwork
See Teacher’s file. have reconstructed with their Students complete the description of
partners. Walk around the class and Enrico’s job. They use the list from
listen to their pronunciation and the group work as an aid. Students
Key Vocabulary intonation. can complete this task individually or
Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s e This activity can be reused later to in their previous groups.
Book, page 111, by copying and translating money evaluate students’ progress. Keep in Mind
verbs from the lesson in their notebooks. The –ing suffix is used for changing
Workbook, page 39 verbs into nouns or for verbs that
Answer key, p. 117.
follow like / dislike.
Duties, tasks and skills
Group work
Job tasks are specific activities you
need to accomplish. Job duties are

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unit thirteen 13
unit thirteen 13
Office duties
Office duties

Job interview...
C 2 Read the three interviews and
choose the best answer.
2 Students complete the sentences about the
W = Mr. Wells H = Mr. James
1 Mr. Wells was interested primarily in the three interviews. See Teacher’s file.
candidates’...
W: Mr. James, it says here that you have worked in a shoe shop,
in a multinational company, a university, a bank and in two
a age b special skills c studies Answers: 1b; 2a; 3b; 4c.
2 ... applicants spoke foreign languages.
other local institutions over the last four years.
a Two of the b None of the c All three
J: Yes, my work experience covers very different areas.
W: Do you have any experience in finance?
3 One of the candidates, ... , had only 1 year’s Key Vocabulary
work experience.
J: Yes, of course. I worked in a bank. I took some in-service
courses while I worked there.
a Mr. Parker b Miss Hobson c Mr. James Students can personalise the Glossary, Student’s
4 ... was not computer literate.
W: So, I suppose you have worked with computers. Book, pages 111-112, by copying and translating
a Mr. James b Miss Hobson c Mr. Parker
J: Certainly. I’m an expert. I’ve got a good command of
job-related terms from the lesson in their
Windows, Lotus, Excel, Word Perfect, etc.
W: And I suppose you also speak other languages. KEY VOCABULARY notebooks.
J: Spanish, German, French and Japanese. I’m quite fluent.
Related to jobs
W: Good. Mr. James, what about salary? How much do you
expect to earn? Verbs Nouns Pairwork
J: Well, at least 20% over my last salary. It’s written there, in my to apply for qualifications
resumé. to quit fringe benefits Students copy the chart and fill it in with
to interview for (a job) taxes
W: I’m afraid that’s more than what we can afford for the position
to fire / dismiss in-service courses
information about the candidates.
you’re applying for.
to be fired / dismissed salary
J: But, considering my qualifications, I’m sure you can do
to contract / hire Answers:
something about it, can’t you?
W: There are some fringe benefits that might interest you.
to be contracted / hired Mr. Parker
to be promoted
J: I don’t know... to turn down an Years of experience: doesn’t say; special
W: Mr. James, let me ask you a question. Why have you changed application skills: fast typist; duties at previous job:
jobs so many times?
Glossary, page 111. typed letters and documents, answered phone,
petty cash; strengths: experience as secretary;
Pairwork Debate weaknesses: negative attitude, no computer
Imagine you are Mr. Wells. Copy and complete this The third interview ends with an skills, no languages.
chart, then choose the best candidate for the job. unanswered question. Answer as if
you were Mr. James. Then, answer as Miss Hobson
Candidate Years of Special Duties at Strengths Weaknesses
experience skills last job you think he should have answered. Years of experience: one year; special skills:
accounting, languages, computer skills; duties
How could all the candidates have
at previous job: secretarial tasks, accounting
improved their interviews?
tasks (salaries, payments, taxes); strengths:
has initiative, computer literate, willing to
learn; weaknesses: little experience.
Workbook, pages 39-40. Mr. James
81 Years of experience: four years; special
skills: finance, computers, languages; duties
at previous job: secretarial tasks, shoe sales,
assistant at a bank and a university;
Teacher’s file strengths: lots of languages, computer expert;
weaknesses: arrogant, asks for high salary,
Student’s Book usually used to introduce consequence over-experienced.
or result. Refer students to the
2 In pairs, students choose one of the Grammar and language reference,
three interviews and act it out for the Student’s Book, page 102. Debate
rest of the class. What is their opinion of Mr. James’ interview? How
1 Students match the sentence halves
Workbook, page 40 to create complete sentences. do they think Mr. James would have answered the
Answer key, p. 118. 2 Students use connectors to complete last question? How should he answer it?
Focus on Grammar the sentences. How would they have improved other parts of Mr.
We use the connector but to indicate e This activity can be reused later to James’ interview? What about the other two
contrast or opposition. It usually follows evaluate students’ progress. candidates?
a comma. Additional practice
The connectors besides / moreover / Refer students back to the three
furthermore are very similar; they interviews on Student’s Book, pages
show addition. A period or a semicolon 80-81. Students find examples of the
usually precedes these words and then connectors from Workbook, page 40
they are followed by a comma. So is in the interviews.

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unit thirteen
Office duties
13 unit thirteen 13
Office duties

English in the... English in the New World


1 Skim the text to find the answers to the questions.

C
anada and The United States of America are two 1 The text is mainly about the history of:
1 Students skim the text quickly and decide relatively new countries with a closely connected
a The United States and Canada
history. Their inhabitants primarily speak English
which concepts are covered in the article. and they are a part of the 38 countries and territories b Latin America
Based on these concepts, which would not be that form the Americas or “New World”. c The Caribbean
The French, who set up fur-trading settlements in 2 The text mainly discusses the time period of:
an appropriate title? central Canada, worked their way south through a The 20th century
the central United States and all the way down to b 15th-19th centuries
Answers: 1a; 2b; 3b. Louisiana. The Spanish stayed in the areas of
c the Pre-Colombian era
Florida, the Caribbean, Mexico, Baja California and
the West Coast of the United States. 3 What would NOT be an appropriate title for this article?
Large numbers of colonists emigrated from a Cultural and linguistic diversity in North America
2 Students read each statement and then go England in the 1600’s and 1700’s. Other Europeans, b Mistreatment of the Indians
such as Germans, Dutch and Swedes, also came c Canada and the U.S.: A common history.
back and scan the text to decide if they are and settled the areas of Pennsylvania, Delaware and
true or false. See Teacher’s file. New York. Both in Canada and in the U.S.,
2 Scan the text and answer True or False.
immigrants had to learn to organise and govern
themselves. This was not easy for people who came 1 The French worked their way up to Northern Canada.
Answers: 1 False: The French worked their from different cultural backgrounds, spoke different 2 Africans emigrated from Africa in search of better living
way south through central United States and languages and suffered many hardships. conditions.
English colonists, white Anglo-Saxon Protestants,
all the way down to Louisiana; 2 False: It who were larger in number, soon became the
3 Most English colonists left their country for religious
reasons.
doesn’t mention Africans; 3 True; 4 True; dominant group, and the others, not wanting to feel
4 The East Coast was the first part of the U.S. territory that
separate, began to adopt the English language and
5 False: Other Europeans such as Germans, culture. settlers arrived at.
Dutch and Swedes, also came and settled the In the 1800’s, the Chinese also embarked for the
Americas and large numbers of Italians, Greeks,
5 Germans never showed interest in immigrating to North
America.
areas of Pennsylvania, Delaware and New York; Russians, Poles, Hungarians and Rumanians soon
6 People in Quebec are bilingual in French and English.
6 True; 7 True; 8 False: By the end of the 19th followed them. By the end of the 19th century, the
old immigration group, who felt the newcomers
7 Anglo-Saxon Protestants became the leaders of the first
American colonies.
century, the old immigration group, who felt were overcrowding their cities and taking away
their jobs, no longer welcomed these new people. 8 During this century, there has been hostility towards new
the newcomers were overcrowding their cities The newcomers had to confront hostility and immigrants.
and taking away their jobs, no longer prejudice, forming ethnic neighbourhoods where 9 The English language has always played a decisive role in
they maintained their language and customs.
the assimilation of immigrants into American and Canadian
welcomed these new people; 9 True; 10 False: These customs and languages still prevail today. In
society.
Canada’s Quebec, both French and English are
St. Patrick’s Day is a special holiday for Irish spoken. In fact, Montreal is one of the largest 10 Valentine’s Day is a special holiday for Irish people in
people in Chicago. French-speaking cities today. Even the city of Chicago.
Ottawa, which is very close to the Quebec border,
has a very strong French flavour. Similarly, the

Keep in Mind
United States is famous for its ethnic heritages: New
Orleans’ French Quarter, Little Italy in New York or
Keep in mind
words in English are
the Irish St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in Chicago. Two commonly confused
The terms emigrate and immigrate are commonly Despite, or perhaps precisely because of, the
emigrat e and imm igra te:
grants
marked diversity of the immigrants that moved to country of origin. Emi
confused terms in most languages. Encourage • You emigrate from your
these vast territories in search of freedom and wealth,
e their hom es and families behind.
often leav
students to think of some type of mnemonic device the United States and Canada are two of the most
new country of residence
.
• You immigrate to your
a new language when
influential and powerful countries of modern times.
to help them distinguish the terms in English. For Immigrants often have to lear n

example: Emigrants exit their homelands. they arrive.

Immigrants import their customs when they come. 82

Teacher’s file
Student’s Book When was the American Civil war?
What important historical events
2 Survey happened in Canada?) Tourism (eg:
Divide students into small topic groups Have you ever visited the country?
dealing with the text. In their groups, Where would you like to go?)
students think up questions to ask the
rest of the class about their topic. Then Additional practice
they compile their information, draw Students can investigate something
conclusions about their topics and mentioned in the article more
present everything visually and orally thoroughly eg: Chinese immigrants in
to the rest of the class. Possible topic the United States, The history of
groups: Stereotypes (eg: What do Quebec, The French Quarter in New
you know about Americans or Orleans, The history of Pennsylvania,
Canadians? Do you base your opinions French fur-trading in the New World,
on films, news...?) General The Spanish colonisation of Florida...
knowledge of geography (eg: How Then they write up a one or two
many provinces / states do you know? page report about it. Optionally, they
How many rivers can you name?) can read or present their article orally
General knowledge of history (eg: to the rest of the class.

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unit thirteen 13
unit thirteen 13
Office duties
Office duties

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Nominal groups
Nouns are often preceded by pre-modifiers that describe them. These pre-modifiers are usually adjectives, but they can Focus on Grammar
sometimes be other nouns. This type of structure is called a nominal group. The noun being described is the nucleus.
Nominal groups are nouns acting as a nucleus
that are being described by adjectives. Refer
focus on Grammar Group work
students to the Grammar and language reference,
In your notebook, write as many nominal
Nominal groups groups as you can from the article on page 82. Student’s Book, page 102.
pre-modifiers + nucleus
seven employees
finance department
European countries Group work
Our free associations
Former British colonies In their notebooks, students write as many
Their human resources department nominal groups as they can from the English
The workers’ educational level
in the New World article on Student’s Book,
Grammar reference, see Adjectives, page 102.
page 82.
Relative clauses
Sample answers: two relatively new
Relative clauses start with a relative pronoun; they can be ‘defining’ or ‘non-defining.’ Defining relative clauses
contain information that is essential to the meaning of the sentence. Non-defining relative clauses contain additional
countries; closely connected history; fur-
information which is usually separated by commas. trading settlements; different cultural
backgrounds; the dominant group; the
focus on Grammar Pairwork English language; the old immigration group;
Discuss the differences in meaning between ethnic neighbourhoods; one of the largest
Relative clauses these sentences.
Who or Whom a person a The document which they signed today was very
French-speaking cities; the Quebec border; a
That
describes
a person, animal or thing important. very strong French flavour; its ethnic heritages;
Which an animal or thing.
Where a place.
b The document, which they signed today, was very two of the most influential and powerful
important.
Grammar reference, page 103. c The British who colonised the East were hardworking.
countries.
d The British, who colonised the east, were hardworking.

1 Identify the relative clauses in the following sentences. Are they defining or non-defining? Focus on Grammar
1 My curriculum vitae, which is very complete, needs some polishing.
2 The letter that arrived this morning is from Athens.
Relative clauses start with a defining or non-
3 The hotel where they stayed during the conference was full. defining relative pronoun. They contain either extra
4 The application forms that they handed in last month were turned down. information or information that is essential to the
5 The person who was interviewed yesterday was fired from her previous job.
6 The shop that is on the corner sells some delicious pastries.
meaning of the sentence. Refer students to the
Grammar and language reference, Student’s Book,
Workbook, page 41. Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 13. page 103.

83
Pairwork
Students discuss the differences in meaning
between the relative clauses.
Teacher’s file Answers: a The relative clause specifies
which document we are talking about. b The
Student’s Book Workbook, page 41 fact that they signed the document is just extra
Answer key, p. 118. information. c Only those who colonised the
1 Definitions
In pairs, students define objects and 1 Students combine the words to East were hardworking people. d All British
occupations using relative clauses. create nominal groups. Ask students people were hardworking.
Student 1: A doctor... Student 2: A to share their longest nominal group.
doctor is a person who cures sick 2 Students choose the best relative
1 Students read the sentences and decide if they
people. A computer... Student 1: A pronoun for each sentence.
computer is a device that processes e are defining or non-defining. See Teacher’s file.
3 Students combine the two sentences
data and numbers... by making non-defining clauses Answers: 1 non-defining; 2 defining;
eThis activity can be reused later to using who or which. 3 defining; 4 defining; 5 defining; 6 defining.
evaluate students’ progress.

Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 13.


See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 86.

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unit thirteen
Office duties
13 unit thirteen 13
Office duties

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with gender roles in the workplace.


The gender gap seems to be diminishing in certain
Gender roles in the workplace
fields, yet there are still some jobs that are typically When people think of soldiers, plumbers or electricians, they mostly think of men.
On the other hand, jobs such as a nurse or a secretary are almost always
associated either with man or woman. associated with women. In the past, people believed that biology made the
Changes in gender differences affect not only how difference and that there were jobs for men and jobs for women.
This misconception has changed significantly since women joined the labour force.
we live and work, but how we speak. In some The gradual decrease of the gender gap in the labour market has also
languages, alternative words or endings have been produced changes in language. In English, words like postman, fireman or
needed either to describe these new professionals policeman have changed to ‘gender-neutral’ words such as mail carrier,
firefighter and police officer. Some people believe gender conceptions are
or to make our speech more politically correct. changing and will eventually disappear as time passes. Perhaps then, both
men and women will feel free to work in any field they wish and be judged for
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread
their good work and not their gender.
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up
questions.

Debate
Can you think of gender neutral words in your language? Have you observed any changes?

?
Have you ever thought of working in an area that is traditionally associated with the opposite sex?

Debate
Put students into small groups where they can What jobs do you usually associate with a particular gender? Discuss these examples. Can you
discuss their opinions about the different think of any others?
professions. After a few minutes, join the small mechanic astronaut fortune-teller
computer programmer model baby-sitter
groups together and give the new group a few technician president gardener
minutes to discuss the two statements. Why do band director maid bullfighter
they think one gender may continue to work in a
particular profession over another: because of
stereotypes, tradition, lack of skills or opportunities?
What does society in their country think about
Don’t forget!
• The difference between skills, tasks and duties: computer literacy,
housewives? And “househusbands”?
send an order, be in charge of petty cash
• Different interview strategies: be polite, avoid making negative
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION comments
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. • To combine sentences using connectors: so, besides, but
• How to use relative clauses: Defining clauses for required information
1 Write the following list of jobs on the board: Non-defining clauses for extra information
shop assistant computer engineer designer
translator marketing manager telephonist
journalist bank clerk chief buyer
84
Tell students to choose a job title from the
board. Their partners will interview them
about their duties and tasks: What are you
responsible for? Which do you like or dislike
doing? Remind students to try and use some of
OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
the connectors they have learned. Tell your students that they also applied for
If students need help with a list of duties or the job vacancy at Capricornia Products from
tasks, they can use the group work activity CD-Rom activity 1, and that they have just had
from Workbook, page 39 or brainstorm an interview with the head of The Human
possible activities for the jobs on the board. Resources department. Students think of
(Eg. purchase stationery, supervise the work of questions to ask the interviewer. Give students
other people, plan advertising campaigns, work a few minutes to prepare their questions. Then
with computers, travel to different places...) volunteers read their questions in front of the
class.

2 Tell students to role play a job interview.


Assign each a role:
Student 1: You are the employer. Define the
position you are offering and the qualities you
need in a candidate.
Student 2: You are the candidate. Decide
what your abilities are and why you are leaving
your old job.

86
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unit fourteen 14
Office equipment
Technology has had a continual influence on how we do business, the machines we use to
perform its tasks and the language it is conducted in.
In this unit, students will learn how to use word collocation, like common phrasal verbs or
prepositional phrases, as well as the passive voice to have a more natural, fluent and proficient
writing style. Students will also learn about common office equipment and supplies that make their
office work easier. They will be able to describe their features as well as explain how to use them.

Skills objectives
• To describe the process involved in using a
piece of equipment: first, then, finally
unit fourteen 14
• To define different supplies or the features Office equipment
of a machine
• Recognise and use common word groups
(collocation) Introduction
Offices have changed a lot during the last decades and will continue to do so in the future. Apart from
Language focus furniture, illumination, air-conditioning, carpeting, etc., which have contributed to make them more
• Using common language and structures comfortable and functional, technology has modernised office tools and created new equipment.
used to describe office equipment and
supplies Objectives
• Using the passive voice in formal written • To learn the names of office equipment and materials
documents and letters
• Understanding the meaning of prepositions
• To read about telecommunications
and prepositional phrases through context • To describe how to use certain equipment
• Learning how technology has influenced • To examine the use of the passive voice
modern office jargon • To practise using prepositions and prepositional phrases
• To make polite requests using phrasal verbs • To discuss the constant changes in office jargon
Key vocabulary
& structures
• staples, stapler, cello tape, hole puncher,
filing cabinet
• ink cartridge, toner, feed button, dial pad,
speakerphone
• regardless of, in charge of, on behalf of,
within, between, among
Business tasks
• To read about telecommunications
• To explain how to use certain office
equipment
• To know the names of office equipment
and supplies
• To recognise the functions of common
features on office equipment

Additional material 85
• Grammar and language reference,
page 104
• Glossary, page 112
• Workbook, pages 42, 43 and 44 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 14 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
page 92 • What is telecommunications?
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • What services can you get through the telephone in your city / country?
Book, page 92 • In your opinion, what are the two most valuable pieces of office equipment used
in offices today?
14-EFS-TB-Unit 14 22/5/06 22:57 Página 88

unit fourteen
Office equipment
14 unit fourteen 14
Office equipment

Office equipment... Office equipment and materials

1 Students match the items in the list to the


picture. There are certain words that are
commonly said together, like: black and white,
brand new, state of the art or cordless
telephone. Refer students to the section on
Collocation in the Grammar and Language
Reference, page 104. See Teacher’s file.

2 Students use words from the picture to


complete the definitions. See Teacher’s file.
Answers: 1 Air-conditioning unit; 2 In-tray;
3 Liquid paper; 4 Highlighter; 5 Paper clips.

Pairwork
Using the model as an aid, students take turns 1 Match the items in the list to the picture.
staples and stapler cordless telephone hole puncher air-conditioning unit
asking and answering questions about the photocopier markers calculator liquid paper
items in the illustration. paper clips sellotape highlighter folder
scissors rubber in-tray filing cabinet
Sample answers: What can you type? / You
can type letters; What can you put away? / 2 Use some of the words above to complete these definitions.
You can put away folders in the filing cabinet; 1 Equipment that controls the humidity and temperature of the air in the room.
2 A shallow, open container for holding papers or documents.
What can you run out of? / You can run out of 3 A substance applied to paper in order to erase misspelt words or unwanted marks.
liquid paper or markers; What can you use to 4 A marker that covers written words with transparent colouring in order to draw attention to them.
rub out mistakes? / You can use liquid paper or 5 Metallic fasteners that hold papers together temporarily and which can be easily removed.

a rubber; What can you do to fasten papers Pairwork


together? / You can use paper clips or staples Ask your partner questions using the verbs below. Answer using items from the illustration.
and a stapler. What can you use to highlight Student A: What can I turn on or off? Student B: You can turn off the air-conditioning.
important parts of a document? / You can use turn on / off type put away print use to (highlight) / (rub out) / (fasten) look up run out of hand in
a highlighter; What can you use to print a
document? / You can use a printer; Where can Workbook, page 42.

you look something up? / You can look


something up on the computer; What can you 86
hand in? / You can hand in a report.

Teacher’s file
Student’s Book Workbook, page 42
Answer key, p. 118.
1 Office equipment are machines that
help us complete certain office tasks. 1 Students complete the sentences
Office supplies are consumable with the words in the box.
materials we use for these tasks. In e This activity can be reused later to
pairs, students divide the materials in evaluate students’ progress.
the Student’s Book into office 2 Students choose the best phrasal
equipment or office supplies. verb to complete the sentences with
2 In pairs, students write similar the verbs in the box.
definitions for other words not used e This activity can be reused later to
in the activity. They exchange them evaluate students’ progress.
with another pair of students and
Additional practice
answer each other’s definitions.
As a group activity, students choose
Optionally, each pair takes turns
3 of the phrases and incorporate
reading their definitions so that the
them into a dialogue they create.
other pair of students answers orally.
Give them time to practise; the
groups read their dialogues from
their seats.

88
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unit fourteen 14
unit fourteen 14
Office equipment
Office equipment

Office equipment...
caller ID display paper tray
transfer button Key Vocabulary
dial pad memory pad There are common features and verbs we use in
reference to office material. The term PAX refers to
send / stop buttons
a 3-in-1 machine that acts as a phone, answering
machine and fax. Students can personalise the
handset
Glossary, Student’s Book, page 112, by copying and
translating the words from the lesson in their
microphone
notebooks.

LED call display Key Vocabulary activities


redial button
speakerphone button message buttons
Illustration definitions: Define different features
on the PAX machine. Students name them as a
large group: 1 What you pick up and use to speak
Pairwork KEY VOCABULARY with (handset); 2 What you push to dial a phone or
Ask and answer questions about the PAX
machine. Use the illustration and language
Equipment fax number (dial pad); 3 AN LCD display that says
boxes. common features who is calling (caller ID display); 4 Where you place
Student A: You are the receptionist in an accountant’s start button LED lights the paper for a FAX (paper tray); 5 You push this
office. You need to send faxes, transfer phone calls and ink cartridge / toner paper tray
take down messages received on the new answering
LCD display feed button when you want to send an incoming call to
machine. Use these questions to help you: How do I...?; someone else’s phone (transfer button); 6 You
common verbs
Where is the... ?; Where does the ... go?; Where do I... ?
to enlarge / reduce to push push one of these for easy access to phone
Student B: You are a technician for a telecommunications
to insert / place ... face down to hold numbers you use the most (memory pad); 7 You
to select to set
company. You have just installed a new phone system and to pick up to feed paper in push this when you want to send a FAX or stop it
need to explain to the receptionist how to use the new
Glossary, page 112.
(Send / stop button); 8 This is where you speak
PAX machine.
when you are not using the handset (microphone);
Example: 9 These are red or green numbers that say how
Group work
Receptionist: How do I send a Fax? Imagine you are new at work. Choose a
many phone messages are on the answering
Technician:First you insert the fax face down here. piece of office equipment and ask your machine (LED call display); 10 You push these to go
Then you dial the fax number. Finally, push the send co-workers how to use it correctly. forwards or backwards and listen to different
button. photocopier
mobile cellular phone
messages on the answering machine (message
computer printer buttons); 11 You push this button when you want
to speak without the handset (speakerphone
87 button); 12 You push this button to call the phone
number again that you had just dialled (redial
button).

Teacher’s file Pairwork


In pairs, students role-play the conversation
Student’s Book Group work
between a receptionist and a technician that
Students write simple definitions for
Pairwork the features they wrote in their list. has just installed a new PAX machine. Look at
In pairs, students invent a new the example dialogue with the class. Students
machine (for example, a machine to use the expressions from the Key Vocabulary
help them with their homework). box and illustration as an aid. Walk around as
They have to think up the common they speak, checking for their intonation,
features and explain how to use it. pronunciation and general comprehensibility.
Volunteers present their machines to
the rest of the class.
Group work
Students do a similar role play about a different
piece of equipment. Give them a few minutes
to write a short list of their most important
features and their names in English. See
Teacher’s file.

89
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unit fourteen
Office equipment
14 unit fourteen 14
Office equipment

Telecommunications Telecommunications
1 Read the following text. In your notebook, write one sentence that summarises the main idea of
1 each paragraph. Then, put the paragraphs in order.
Students read the text on telecommunications
and write a sentence that best summarises the
main idea of each paragraph. Then they put
Telecommunications
A D
the paragraphs into the correct order. These many phone functions led to the invention of other And what comes next? New gadgets are on their way that
devices that have become an indispensable part of the are even smaller, cheaper and faster. What would Alexander
Answers: A Regular phones inspired other office. Telex and fax machines simplified the process of Graham Bell say about how far his invention has gone?
orders and letters that otherwise had to be sent by mail.
forms of communication. B Modern phones
E
have many functions. C Phones have evolved B At first, their main role was to allow two people to talk
sine 1876. D What would Alexander Graham The number of functions phones have now has also together when they were in places not too far from one
changed. You can keep numbers in a phone’s memory to another. Nowadays, more than one person can
Bell think of today’s new gadgets? E Unlike dial by just pushing a button. You can automatically give communicate at a time. They may be in different countries,
today’s telephones, the first models could only and receive messages or transfer calls to other phone continents or hemispheres… even in outer space!
work over short distances. F Traditional numbers. Some models have screens that let you see
either the number you are calling, or the ID of person F
telephony has branched out into calling you. Now if we combine traditional telephony with other forms
telecommunications. of modern telecommunication such as cell phones,
C computers, scanners, printers, photocopying machines,
Correct order: C, E, B, A, F, D. Telephones, since 1876 up to now, have experienced satellites… the result is almost incredible and certainly
enormous changes. Just consider the size, shape and unimaginable for people who performed office duties fifty
function of the first phones compared to the ones we use or sixty years ago. Now conferences and meetings taking
The passive now. Not only have phones themselves evolved, but they place miles away can be attended in just the blink of an
have contributed to a revolution in communication over the eye. Likewise, we can be in direct contact with banks,
The passive, although not common in spoken past four or five decades. libraries, and information centres around the world.
English, is common in more formal written media:
books, brochures, formal business or legal letters, The passive
manuals, laws and regulations... It is common when The passive voice is not very common in spoken English, but is used as an “impersonal style” for some types of
we do not know the “source” of the action: It was written texts.
built in 1956. (We don’t know who the architect or
2 Decide if these sentences are written in active or in the passive voice. Translate those in the
builders were.) The agent doing the action can be passive voice into your native language.
mentioned at the end of the sentence only if it is 1 Only Heads of Department can access classified documents. 4 The ringer has been set on low.
relevant to complete the meaning of the message: 2 Can you take a few notes for me, please? 5 My boss received a visitor from Montreal.
3 Salaries will be paid on July 26th. 6 The connection was interrupted several times.
The TV transmission will be controlled by satellites.
(Active voice: The satellites will control the TV Pairwork
transmission.) How many passive sentences can you find in the telecommunications text above?

Workbook, page 43, activities 1-2.


2 Students decide if the sentences are in active or
passive voice. Then they translate the passive 88
sentences into their native language. Compare
their answers in class.

Pairwork Teacher’s file


Students look for passive sentences in the Additional practice
Student’s Book
telecommunications text. See Teacher’s file. Students copy the list of verbs in
Pairwork their notebooks and add every new
Answer: One. (Paragraph F: Now Students choose three active voice verb that they come across in the
conferences and meetings taking place miles sentences from the text and put book.
away can be attended in just the blink of an them into the passive voice. They can
eye.) 2 Students put the sentences into the
do the task individually or in pairs.
passive voice
Workbook, page 43 e This activity can be reused later to
Answer key, p. 118. evaluate students’ progress.
Using the passive
1 Students write the past participle of
the verbs. Then they decide which
ones are regular and which ones
irregular.

90
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unit fourteen 14
unit fourteen 14
Office equipment
Office equipment

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Prepositions and prepositional phrases
Some prepositions that we commonly associate with placement have other meanings as well. Key Vocabulary
Sometimes prepositions can have more than one
KEY VOCABULARY
meaning. This meaning is usually understood
Common prepositions
through context.
as the job or function of a person or thing
at around or inside a building / a time of day / special times or holidays
by performer of an action / before a certain time / through the use or means of
in during a time period / inside a place Key Vocabulary activities
on situated at a large physical place / during a specific day
under directly below / less than
Before going through the different meanings of the
within inside a place or group common prepositions listed in the box, brainstorm
the prepositions the class already knows. Students
Prepositional phrases
regardless of not considering, not taking into account write them in their notebooks and think of
in charge of in control of. sentences to illustrate their meaning. Then they
on behalf of in representation of, in the name of
share their sentences with the rest of the class. Do
Glossary, page 112.
they know any preposition with more than one
meaning?
1 Read the sentences and decide the use of the preposition in each case.
1 The phone call was made by the President of the Committee. 2 He’s working as a clerk.
The communication was interrupted by a terrible noise. The system functions as a data base 1 Sometimes prepositions can have more than
The visitor came by bus.
They cancelled the meeting by phone. 3 Mr. Hall’s letter is under the folder you’ve got on your desk.
one meaning. This meaning is usually
Try to be here by nine o’ clock. Employees under twenty had to take day shifts. understood through context. Students read
the sentences and decide, through its context,
2 Choose the best prepositional phrase to complete each sentence.
1 They accepted him as a new member ... his economic situation.
which definition is being used from the Key
2 I was given the same opportunity ... my lack of experience. Vocabulary box. Then they can personalise the
3 I’m writing ... the Secretary General. Glossary, Student’s Book, page 112, by copying
4 They continued hiring new personnel ... the drop in sales.
5 The plane took off ... the weather conditions.
and translating the words from the lesson in
6 The Human Resources Manager is ... in-service courses. their notebooks.
7 They demanded higher salaries ... the union members.
8 They are purchasing new equipment ... their German client. Answers: 1 a performer of an action;
9 Who’s going to be ... the invitations? b performer of an action; c through the use
10 Mr. Hamilton will not be ... the seminar.
or means of; d through the use or means of;
e before a certain time; 2 a the job or function
Workbook, pages 43-44. Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 14.
of a person; b the job or function of a thing;
3 a directly below; b less than.
89
2 Students complete the sentences with the
e prepositional phrases from the Key Vocabulary
box.
Teacher’s file Answers: 1 regardless of; 2 regardless of;
Student’s Book 2 Students complete the sentences 3 on behalf of; 4 regardless of; 5 regardless of;
with the prepositions and 6 in charge of; 7 on behalf of; 8 on behalf of;
e This activity can be reused later to 9 in charge of; 10 in charge of.
prepositional phrases in the Key
evaluate students’ progress. Vocabulary box.
e This activity can be reused later to
Workbook, pages 43 & 44 Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 14.
Answer key, p. 118. evaluate students’ progress.
See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
Prepositions and prepositional 3 Students circle the correct page 92.
phrases preposition.
1 Students fill in the chart with the 4 Students complete the sentences
correct words. They check their with in, on or at.
answers with a partner. e This activity can be reused later to

Additional practice evaluate students’ progress.


Peer teaching: Students write
sentences for 2 entries in each
column. Then they exchange their 6
sentences with a partner and correct
each other’s work.

91
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unit fourteen
Office equipment
14 unit fourteen 14
Office equipment

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with office jargon. Office jargon is


affected by the sectors that influence them the
most. In the past, because of the high ratio of men
Technology and office jargon
“Jargon” refers to terminology used by about something being 404, instead of
No need to reply, Miss
Jones, it’s an NRN.

versus women in this field, sports and military people within a specific activity or being lost or not found, it’s one of those
profession. If you use jargon well, it shows if new jargon words referring to the
jargon was often used. This, however, has proven you are proficient in the subject or not; common Internet page error. New words
to be quite “area-specific”, making it unpopular in that is to say, if you are an insider or an
outsider. Many fields have influenced office
or acronyms are also common, such as
e-tailing for electronic retailing, or NRN
international business where not everyone might jargon; but now, information technology and (No Response Necessary).
the Internet have given rise to a new office Some people seem to enjoy this form of
play cricket or baseball. Technology has influenced jargon that is used not only in e-mails and communication; others feel obliged to use
office jargon enormously in the last decade. Both other written forms but also at meetings it only to keep up with their colleagues.
and in everyday language. Regardless, sooner or later you are bound
Internet and the increased amount of “every-day” New words, phrases or acronyms are to come across these and thousands of
international communication have made introduced continually. So when you hear other such office expressions.

technological office jargon more homogeneous.

?
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread Is there any special jargon used in your work or class environment? Or in your circle of friends?
Give some examples.
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up
Think of a profession. Write three words people in this profession typically use.
questions. Can you guess what a CEO is? How about these actions: to table something at a meeting, to streamline,
to drop the ball... Where do you think they came from?
Look for websites to learn more about other office jargon. Share the information with your teacher and classmates.
Debate
Students discuss the advantages and disadvantages Debate
What advantages do you think using office jargon might have? What disadvantages?
of office jargon. If possible, divide the students into
two teams (pro and con). They create lists of
arguments in favour of their position and counter-
arguments against what the other team might say. Don’t forget!
• The names of office equipment and materials: hole punch, toner,
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION inbox
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. • How to explain the use of certain equipment: Place the page face
down on the glass. Put the lid down and press the start button.
1 In pairs, students write down as many pieces of
• The passive voice: The invoice was sent by e-mail. She was promoted
office equipment as they can. Then they
by her boss.
compare their lists with their partner’s. Finally, • How to use certain prepositions and prepositional phrases: He’s in
they define some of them to another pair of charge of the accounting department. She stayed within the budget.
students who will try and guess what they are
describing.
90

2 Either individually or in pairs, ask students


to explain how to do one of the following:
Send a fax OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
Make a photocopy
File a letter Prepare flash cards with the following
Lower the temperature of a room prepositions and prepositional phrases. Show
Transfer a phone call the flash cards to the students one by one. In
turns, students say one sentence using the
preposition or prepositional phrase shown on
3 In small groups, students discuss what phones
the flash card.
will be like in the future. What new practical
innovations would they implement? They 1 by (time) 2 by (agent in passive sentence)
design a futuristic phone and give a 3 at 4 on 5 in 6 as 7 in charge of 8 on
presentation of it to the rest of the class, behalf of 9 under 10 regardless of
explaining what it would look like and how it
would work.

92
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unit fifteen 15
Working with computers
Computers have developed very quickly and their use in business has developed just as fast. We
use them to send and share documents and files, to directly inquire about quotations and to place
orders immediately. The Internet has made simultaneous communication possible, making the
international business world smaller, yet more competitive.
In this unit, students will learn computer terminology used in the modern office. They will be able
to effectively compare products and services as well as identify those of outstanding qualities.

Skills objectives
• To revise skimming and scanning
techniques
unit fifteen 15
• To understand the gist of an article Working with computers
• To look for specific details in an article
• To compare things that are equal, unequal
or similar Introduction
• To understand the meaning of words Computers have developed at such an enormous rate in terms of capacity, efficiency and versatility that they
have invaded almost every aspect of business. In a matter of seconds, we can communicate with co-workers
through context from other subsidiaries. We can send and share documents and files with more than one person at the same
time. We can quickly and directly inquire about quotations and place orders almost instantly. One’s own
Language focus clients can receive immediate and personalised attention by accessing the company’s webpage. Computers
• To learn about the use of English in other are no longer a thing of the future; they are a definite reality in today’s business world.
countries
• To focus on the comparative and
superlative forms
Objectives
• To revise structures from previous units • To identify computer software and hardware
• To learn about the development of cell phones
Key vocabulary
& structures • To learn about the use of English in other countries
• DVD burner, CD-Rom drive, monitor, • To focus on the comparative and superlative forms
keyboard, hard drive, USB port • To read about the use of Internet in business
• card reader, Smartphone, laptop, mobile /
cell phone
• Commonwealth, throughout, better,
worse, easiest
• payments, transfers, investments,
hand-written
Business tasks
• To identify computer software and
hardware
• To learn about the development of cell
phones
• To read about the use of Internet in
business

91
Additional material
• Grammar and language reference,
pages 103-104
• Workbook, pages 45, 46 and 47 Unit warm-up questions
• CD-Rom, Unit 15 Introduce the unit by asking the class the following questions:
• Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book, • How do computers influence your life?
page 98
• Optional speaking evaluation, Teacher’s • In what ways have computers contributed to simplifying work?
Book, page 98 • In your opinion, in what areas are computers most effective?
• In what ways do you think computers have had a negative impact at work / on society?
15-EFS-TB-Unit 15 22/5/06 23:00 Página 94

unit fifteen 15
Working with computers unit fifteen 15
Working with computers

Computer terminology Computer terminology


English is without a doubt the dominant language as far as computer technology is concerned.
It is important to learn terminology for software and software applications.
Explain to the students the difference between the
terms hardware (which refers to the physical and 1 Look at the desktop computer. Name the parts of the computer using the words below.
electronic parts of a computer) and software
(which refers to the instructions which control what
the computer does; the programs).
In pairs, students draw a spidergram for the term
computer hardware and complete it with 8 words
that they already know in English. Then they share
the 8 words with the rest of the class.

LCD monitor

mouse hard drive

printer Computer key board


hardware

mouse LCD monitor hard drive DVD burner CD/DVD-ROM drive


DVD burner CD/DVD-ROM USB / FireWire ports cordless keyboard inkjet printer
drive Compare your answers with a partner.

2 Use words from above to complete the sentences.


CD-RW / 1 Highlight the item and right-click on your ... .
2 Older ... took up a lot of room on your desktop. These new LCD ones are much more compact.
CD burner
3 When you want to save information on a DVD or CD, your computer needs a ... .
4 In the mid-1980’s, the first hard ... had a capacity of 40 MB, now they have more than 500 GB!
5 For fast connections to your PC, connect your peripheral to a ... or ... port.
Other hardware vocabulary: card reader,
adapter, cooling fan, memory, modem, scanner,
sound card, speaker, microphone, video card, USB Workbook, pages 45 and 46.
/FireWire ports
92
1 Students use the words in the box to name the
parts of the computer. Then they compare their
answers with a partner. See Teacher’s file.
Teacher’s file
2 Students use words from the box to complete Student’s Book Computer software
e the sentences. Pairwork
1 In small groups or pairs, students can Students match the word processing
Answers: 1 mouse; 2 monitors; look up computer sites on the terms to their definitions. When they
3 CD/DVD-Rom drive; 4 drive; 5 USB or Internet to get information about have finished, they compare their
FireWire. other computer hardware that does answers with another pair of
not appear in the photograph. What students.
are they called in English? What are e This activity can be reused later to
these terms called in their native
language? Is this technology evaluate students’ progress.
common in their country yet? Group work
eThis activity can be reused later to It is important for students to know
evaluate students’ progress. in English the computer program
features that they commonly use in
Workbook, pages 45 & 46 their native language. Students
Answer key, p. 118. compare the terms in the menu bar
with a word processing program in
Computer hardware
their native language. What
1 Students match the computer term
similarities are there? What
and its definition.
differences?
2 Students complete the sentences
with the computer terms in the box.

94
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unit fifteen 15
unit fifteen
Working with computers
15
Working with computers

Cell phones Cell phones


Not only have cell or mobile phones changed our personal lives, but they have also changed the way we do business.

the
1 Students skim the article quickly and decide an
developed System) that enables
had 10 The first cell phones, (1G)
gue. Second communication device
to operate appropriate title for it. See Teacher’s file.
n January 2003, India in the 1980s, were analo like a mini computer.
Users with

I million cell phone subs


Every month, the
adding anot her 1.5
coun
millio n
cribers.
try was

28 million
Generation phon es
introduced in the early
(2G)

transmitted digitally. Seco


were
1990s and
nd and a Half
these phones can run
processors, spread shee
business applications.
word
ts and core
They can read
Answers: c Mobile phones – a revolution.
subscribers, up to the
. "My business
Gen erati on (2.5 G) cell phones
network, but and send e-ma ils, insp ect and make Ask your students to work in groups of three.
registered a year later operated using the same
changes to documen
ts, review or
has boomed since I start
ed using this
provided new services
such as WAP
change orders, and even pull up Each student in the group reads a different
am available to col) and
cell phone, because I (Wireless Application Proto drawings to inspect with
architects at
my clients twenty-fours
a day, and I
GPRS (General Packet
Radio Service). column of the article. Then they share the
the office space construction sites.
can save on giving up Finally, in the 21st cent
ury, Third
information they have read and try to work out
er." In India today, es (3G) mation
can had earli
doctors, to Generation Cellular phon "People who access infor
anyone from lawyers to
bers or even launched a new network
ed
protocol
connection and respond to it from
their phones, what the article is about.
chauffeurs, plum which enables high -spe that they
opolises such net and allows are going to quickly find
domestic maids in metr to access data via Inter don’t need their lapto
ps." Even
offer mobile calls.
as Delhi and Mumbai the user to exchange video people who write repo
rts and do data
act.
phone numbers as a cont entry will find themselve
s leaving their
Pairwork
phone are
rates how The functions of the cell notebook computers
behind.
The above example illust isticated and
becoming more soph
mobiles, or cell phones
as many
more useful. Mobile phon
es are not
Laptops, of course, may
never In pairs, students read each statement and scan
them , have been are now to a confluence
prefer to call
st just for voice calls; they disappear; but thanks the article for the answers.
responsible for the faste frequently used for data of technology trend s (bett er
n in history.
technological revolutio communications such
as SMS
hardware, faster cellular
networks,
ile websites, are, and a Answers: 1 True; 2 False: India experienced
municates messages, browsing mob more sophisticated softw
The mobile phone com video files. all work
and streaming audio and new ability to make them
via a cellular network
of base stations,
together) more cell phon
e users will the mobile phone boom in 1993; 3 False: In
, which are in loped into laptop.
also known as cell sites Smartphones have deve bye to the
turn linked to the conv
entional
phones with an OS (Ope
rating
be sayin g good
India today, anyone from lawyers to doctors,
telephone network. to chauffeurs, plumbers or even domestic
maids offer mobile phone numbers as a
1 Choose from below the best title for this article. contact; 4 True; 5 True; 6 True.
a Second generation mobile phones. c Mobile phones–a revolution.
b Leaving the laptop behind. d Business boom.
Survey
Pairwork survey
Read the statements and decide if they are True or False. Choose a country and find Students do a survey about a particular country’s
1 Smartphones work like computers. information about the cell phone industry. How many subscribers are
number of cell phone
2 India was the first country to experience the mobile phone boom.
subscribers there. Share the
there? How many cell phone network companies
3 Cell phones are for the younger business generation.
4 You need a cellular network in order to use a mobile phone. information with classmates are there? Are they more common among young
5 You don’t need a laptop if you have a 3G cell phone. and record the data on a people, or professionals...? Then, they share this
6 The latest cell phones transmit digitally. graph or in a table.
information with their classmates, recording their
data on a class graph or table. See Teacher’s file.

93

Teacher’s file
Student’s Book ”In the European Union, the
growth of e-waste is three times
1 Class discussion: Students comment faster than the growth of average
about the following statements: municipal waste.”
a “One out of every five people in Survey
the world is a mobile phone user.” Students write up a report about the
b E-waste refers to old electronic statistics the class has found. Remind
products like PCs, TVs, phones, them to use the comparative and
appliances or electronic toys. superlative whenever possible: Japan
has more subscribers than Spain.

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unit fifteen 15
Working with computers unit fifteen 15
Working with computers

English in other... English in other countries

1 Students skim the topic sentences of each


paragraph to decide if the statements are true

E
nglish is the most century. From around 1750 to 1950 spread of the English language.
or false. widespread language in the the British Empire was one of the After World Wars I and II, American
world. Less than fifteen most powerful empires in history. capitalism and technological
Answers: 1 True; 2 False; 3 False; 4 False; percent of the world’s population Although the colonies gradually progress contributed to the rapid
5 False. speaks English, but its importance freed themselves, about fifty world-wide spread of English
stems from what the language is countries chose to keep a through films, popular music, new
used for, not how many people connection with Britain by inventions, and later, the Internet.
2 speak it. English is the major belonging to the British In some countries, such as
Students scan the article more closely to search
language of information around the Commonwealth. Now called the Australia or Ireland, English is the
e for the answers to the questions. See Teacher’s world. Three quarters of the world’s Commonwealth of Nations, it is a dominant language, but it is widely
file. mail is written in English. Eighty voluntary “family” of fifty-three used in other countries. For
percent of the world’s electronically nations, that brings together some example, in Hong Kong, Singapore,
Answers: 1 around the world, world-wide; stored information is in English, and 1.7 billion people of different faiths, Nigeria, the Philippines and
more than half of the newspapers races, traditions and levels of Malaysia, English represents a
2 English, British, United States of America, published in the world are in economic development. The “neutral” means of communication
Commonwealth of Nations, Britain, British English. It is the major language of Commonwealth of Nations where many native languages are
Commonwealth, British Empire, World Wars I international business, diplomacy, represents almost one-third of the spoken.
science, maritime communication world’s population, with English as Historical colonialism and the
and II, Australia, Ireland, Hong Kong, and international air traffic control. part of the common language growing prosperity of many
Singapore, Nigeria, Philippines, Malaysia; One of the main reasons English heritage. English-speaking nations have
3 Fifteen per cent, three quarters, Eighty per became so widespread was due to The United States of America has contributed to the further expansion
British colonialism in the 19th also played a leading role in the of English in the world today.
cent, more than half, one-third; 4 Native
language, non-dominant language (also:
mother tongue, dialect). 1 Skim the text quickly and answer True or False.
1 This article talks about the spread of English throughout the world.
2 The Commonwealth of Nations was previously called the United Nations.
Group work 3 English is not commonly used around the world.
4 The article says that Irish colonialism helped spread the English language world-wide.
Students look up more information about the 5 This article talks about the history of the English language.
Commonwealth of Nations in encyclopedias or
2 Scan the text carefully for the answers. Group work
on the Internet. They share their information
1 Find two other ways to say “throughout the world.” Find out more about the Commonwealth of
with other groups in class until everyone has 2 Find six proper names. Nations using encyclopedias or the Internet.
the same information. See Teacher’s file. 3 Find three different terms referring to proportional What countries are members?
numbers. Who is the head of the organisation?
Sample answers: a 53 sovereign states, 4 Find two other ways to refer to someone’s “first What does this international association do?
language”.
including: Australia, Jamaica, Canada, India,
Malta, Malaysia, Pakistan, Nigeria, New
Zealand, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the United 94
Kingdom; b Its official language is British
English. It is run by a London-based Secretariat
led by a Secretary General. The Queen of
England is the nominal head of the
Commonwealth; c In the beginning, it had
Teacher’s file
more economic implications for the member Additional practice
Student’s Book
countries; now they are more social and Students can write a more detailed
political. e This activity can be reused later to
report about one specific member of
evaluate students’ progress. the Commonwealth of Nations. They
Group work give a presentation about their member
Students write a report about the state in front of the rest of the class.
Commonwealth of Nations using the Ask them to include information such
answers to the group work activity as as: what continent it is on, its capital,
an outline. the number of inhabitants, the races
that live there, the languages they
speak, their form of government, its
currency and its flag.

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unit fifteen 15
unit fifteen
Working with computers
15
Working with computers

Let’s focus on… Let’s focus on...


Comparative and superlative
When comparing people, places, objects or situations, the structures we use depend on: Focus on Grammar
• the type of comparison
• the number of elements we are comparing We use comparatives and superlatives to compare
• the number of syllables the adjective has people, places, objects or situations.
Refer students to the Grammar and language
focus on Grammar reference, Student’s Book, pages 103-104.
Comparative and Superlative
Comparing two equal elements Comparing many elements
as + (adjective) as the (1-syllable adjective) + est Focus on Grammar activities
the most + (2-or-more-syllable adjective)
Comparing two unequal elements Ask students to look up information about cities
(1-syllable adjective) + er + than Irregular adjectives around the world. They have to look for specific
more + (2-or-more-syllable adjective) + than good ➔ better ➔ best
not as + (adjective) as bad ➔ worse ➔ worst data about the city (i.e. population, climate,
less + (adjective) than languages spoken, ethnic groups…) and pictures.
Grammar reference, page 103. Then, in pairs, they share the information they
found and compare the two cities, using the
Pairwork comparative and superlative structures. (Eg.
Copy the chart into your notebook, then complete it for each sentence below. Edinburgh is smaller than Tokyo; Tokyo is more
comparison type number of elements number of syllables modern than Edinburgh.)
1 as complete as equal two two
2
Pairwork
1 His report is as complete as her report. 6 The yellow form was less common than the blue one.
Students copy the chart into their notebooks.
2 We asked for a better offer. 7 The fax is faster than airmail. Then they read the sentences and decide the
3 My job is more challenging now. 8 The new telephone system was worse than the old one. type of comparison (equal or unequal), the
4 The bus station is not as far as the airport. 9 Downtown streets are nosier than streets in the suburbs.
5 His office was the smallest. 10 Her new proposal was the best.
number of elements being compared (two or
many), and the number of syllables the
adjective has (one, two or more). See Teacher’s
file.
Keep in mind
/i/ when they Workbook, page 47.
Adjectives ending in /y/ change to Answers: 1 as complete as; equal; two; two;
take –er or -est suffixes. 2 better; unequal; two; one (irregular); 3 more
noisy ➔ noisier ➔ noisiest
easy ➔ easier ➔ easiest
Try the CD-Rom activities, Unit 15. challenging; unequal; two; three; 4 as far as;
equal; two; one; 5 the smallest; unequal;
many; one; 6 less common than; unequal;
95 two; two; 7 faster than; unequal; two; one;
8 worse than; unequal; two; one (irregular);
9 noisier than; unequal; two; two; 10 the best;
unequal; many; one (irregular).
Teacher’s file
Student’s Book Pairwork Students do the CD-Rom activities for Unit 15.
Students apply their knowledge of See Optional CD-Rom review, Teacher’s Book,
Pairwork comparative and superlative to the page 98.
Students use the chart to work computer concepts they have learned
backwards and think of other in the unit. Walk around checking
adjectives. For example, equal, two, their pronunciation and correct usage
two (as complex as, as careful as...) of the main grammatical structures.
or unequal, two, three (more difficult
than, more independent than...). Additional practice
Once students have discussed the
Workbook, page 47 items in pairs, combine them with
Answer key, p. 118. another group of students. Then,
combine another group and then
1 Students use the comparative form
another until you finally have two
of the adjective in parentheses to
debate teams. The class continues
complete the sentences.
discussing the same computer
e This activity can be reused later to hardware items, until they come to a
evaluate students’ progress. general consensus for each: An
2 Students circle the correct adjective. optical mouse is more durable than a
e This activity can be reused later to ball mouse. The best would be a
evaluate students’ progress. wheel one since it would allow you
to easily scan computer web sites or
written documents on the computer.

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unit fifteen 15
Working with computers unit fifteen 15
Working with computers

Cultural awareness Cultural awareness

This article deals with the influence of Internet in


business. Communication, vital for business, has
Business and the Internet
There is no doubt the Internet has The Internet also facilitates bank
become immediate and faster than ever. We also revolutionised our lives during the transactions: payments, transfers,
last decade. As with the invention investments, as well as consulting
use the Internet for banking purposes, job searches, of electricity, cars or penicillin, it is up-to-date accounts information.
job applications or financial data about companies one of those advances that human You can also search for jobs
history experiences from time to anywhere in the world and find all
and potential investments.
time that radically changes the information you may need:
The Internet gives companies a wealth of information people’s lives. The Internet has requirements, job description,
made communication faster than salary offered, working
at their fingertips: consumer data, financial data and ever, making it especially relevant conditions. Applications via the
even information about their competitors. in the area of business. Requests, Internet have replaced hand-
purchase orders, complaints, written job applications; and if
The obvious benefits of Internet are many. But it offers, and so many other you place your C.V. on the Web,
business affairs are done through potential employers can access it
also has many not so obvious disadvantages. e-mails that take seconds to send and may invite you for an
Business has become colder, more competitive and and receive. interview before long.
more globalised.
Give students a few minutes of class time to reread

?
How has the Internet influenced daily activities?
the article. As a large group, discuss the follow-up
Has it contributed to educational development in any way?
questions. In your opinion, what are the disadvantages of this new means of communication?

survey
Survey Make a list of the things you do via the Internet. What are your favourite websites? Compare
Students make a list of what they use the Internet for them with other classmates. Organise the information you have compiled into a bar chart called
“Uses of the Internet”.
and what their favourite web sites are. Then, in two
or three large groups, they compare them with other
classmates. Once they have discussed, organised and
compiled all their information, they give a small
Don’t forget!
presentation about their survey. Ask them to use a • Parts of a computer: LCD monitor, DVD-Rom burner
bar graph format, titled Uses of the Internet. • The importance of cell phones: Smartphones, cellular
network, analogue, digital
• The comparative: I like this one better. Her report was more
OPTIONAL SPEAKING EVALUATION complete than his.
Speaking evaluation chart, p. 111. • The superlative: the worst year, the biggest sales

1 In pairs, students role-play that one is


a salesman / woman at a computer shop.
The other student is interested in buying 96
a computer with certain features. Give
students a few minutes to prepare
a short list of each computer hardware and
software. They can use their lists as verbal
cues for this improvisational role play.
OPTIONAL CD-ROM REVIEW
Read the following definitions of words
2 Individually or in pairs, students answer related to telephoning from CD-Rom activity 1.
questions about the spread of English Students guess the word.
around the world: 1 a written promise that a company will repair
Name two main reasons why English became or replace a product within a specific period of
so widespread. time if anything goes wrong with it; 2 the part
of a machine that has contact with the user;
How did the United States aid in spreading
3 a device which makes a mobile phone move
English around the world?
slightly in order to tell you that someone is
Is English the most commonly spoken calling you; 4 using a telephone to send a
language? written message; 5 a person or company
Name three sectors where the English language which buys and sells a particular product
is used.
Answers: 1 warranty; 2 interface; 3
What other countries use English as a vibrating alert; 4 text messaging; 5 dealer.
dominant or neutral language of
communication?
What is the Commonwealth of Nations and
what does it do?

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WORKSHEET 1 UNITS 1 & 2

Name: ________________________________________ Date: ____________

I Fill in the blanks with the correct personal pronoun. IV Fill in the blanks with the corresponding possessive
<10 POINTS> adjective. <5 POINTS>
1 Mr. Hilton is from the U.K. ..................... is my new boss. 1 Mrs. Dillon is not available at the moment but
2 I work for an American company. ..................... has ......................... secretary can take a message.
subsidiaries all over the world. 2 I want to talk to Mr. Smith. May I have .........................
3 Mrs. Kim Leads wants to talk to you. ..................... is a cell phone number, please?
sales representative. 3 Maureen took the message, but .........................
4 There are two candidates for the job. ..................... speak handwriting is not clear.
fluent English. 4 The fax machines have to be delivered next week. What is
5 There is something wrong with the telephone. ......................... new price?
..................... is not working. 5 Connie and I work at the Sales Department.
6 Mr. and Mrs. Shapiro are at the hotel now. ..................... ......................... job is very stressful.
will be here in ten minutes.
7 My boss and I will fly to Mexico city next week. V Complete the following sentences with the future with
..................... ‘ll be there on Monday morning. will. <10 POINTS>
8 The mail is from our headquarters in New York. 1 When .................................................? (he, be back)
..................... arrived early this morning.
2 ................................................. available tomorrow
9 We sell electronic devices. ..................... are made in morning? (Mr. Bricks, be)
Asia.
3 We ................................................. the products until
10 Miss Smith and I are in charge of receiving visitors. June 30th. (not deliver)
..................... meet people from different countries.
4 ................................................. his offer? (you, accept)
5 He ................................................. the contract next
II Complete the following questions. <10 POINTS> week. (sign)
1 Where ..........................................................................?
I’m from Morocco. VI Fill in the blanks with the present simple tense.
2 When ............................................................................? <10 POINTS>
He’ll be back in a second. 1 Where ........................................ from? (you, come)
3 What ............................................................................? 2 Pauline is a lawyer. She ........................................ our
My extension number is 437. company in court. (represent)
4 Who ..............................................................................? 3 He often ........................................ late. (arrive)
Miss Sandra Miller is the new Sales Manager. 4 They usually ........................................ their invoices by
post. (send)
5 What ............................................................................?
5 We ........................................ very busy right now. (be)
I’m the General Manager’s secretary.
6 What time ........................................ in the afternoon?
(you, leave)
III Match the following exchanges. <5 POINTS>
7 The Personnel Manager …………………………… an
_ 1 Excuse me, can I see Mr. Phillips? appointment at 4:15. (have)
_ 2 Good morning, madam. May I speak to Miss Reed? 8 ........................................ her job? (she, like)
_ 3 This is Paul Seagal. May I speak to Mr. Dillon? 9 How often ........................................ abroad? (she,
_ 4 My name is Sarah Harrison. I have a meeting with Mrs. travel)
Freeman. 10 ........................................ their mail every day? (they,
_ 5 I’m calling from Lincolns Limited. Can you take a check)
message for Mr. Jackson?

a I’m sorry, sir. She’s not in.


b Certainly, sir. Can you wait a second, please? I’ll take note
right away.
c Just a moment, please. I’ll see if he’s available at the
moment.
d Wait a moment, madam. Take a seat, please.
e Hold on a moment. I’ll put you through to him.

III 50
© McGraw-Hill photocopiable 2006 99
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WORKSHEET 2 UNITS 3 & 4

Name: ________________________________________ Date: ____________

I Fill in the blanks with the correct object pronoun. IV Ask questions in the past simple. <10 POINTS>
<5 POINTS>
1 What ............................................................................?
1 Tell Alice I rang. He wanted an agreement.
Could you tell ............................. I rang? 2 When ..........................................................................?
2 Ask Mr. Stone to come back later. We delivered the merchandise last Friday.
Can you ask ............................. to come back later? 3 Why ............................................................................?
3 Confirm the prices. I was late because I forgot to set the alarm.
Could you confirm ............................. please? 4 Where ..........................................................................?
4 I don’t know the reasons she had. We waited for him at the subway station.
I don’t know ............................. 5 Where ..........................................................................?
5 Postpone the meeting. They were at the airport.
Can we postpone ............................. 6 How much ..................................................................?
I paid US $ 2,500 for that.
II Put the following sentences into the past simple tense. 7 How often ....................................................................?
<10 POINTS>
We met once a month.
1 Mr. Brown ......................... twice this morning. (ring) 8 How many ....................................................................?
2 The clerks ......................... at the cafeteria. (be) There were more than two hundred people.
3 The Japanese executives ......................... last night. 9 When ..........................................................................?
(leave)
He left two days ago.
4 The Personnel Manager .........