Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 
Is American Law Really the Same as Muslim Shariʹah, As Ground Zero Mosque Imam  Rauf Boasts?  Author:  Kelly OʹConnell    Date:  Sunday, September 26, 2010   http://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/28083  This article examines classic Islamic law, the “Shari’ah,” regarding crime and punishment.  Recently, the “Ground Zero Imam” Egyptian Feisal Abdul Rauf claimed Muslim and  American law were essentially the same. He said,1 “What’s right with America and what’s  right with Islam are, in fact, very much in sync… I call America a Sharia compliant state.” But  what would being a “Shari’ah compliant state” really mean? To understand this, we need to  study the details of Shari’ah law.   One way to better understand Muslim Shari’ah law, is by taking a particular sub‐category,  such as crime and punishment, to see how Islam treats these topics. While analyzing this  issue, the reader will undoubtedly begin to realize Shari’ah and American law are not so  similar, and that perhaps Rauf is wildly bluffing (or something else). He claims American law  is similar to Muslim because they are both “from God,” while ignoring the fact mankind has  created many Gods over millenniums, each mostly opposed to the rest.  Of course, Islamic views of crime and punishment have shifted occasionally over the  centuries, and the Shari’ah varies between regimes and Muslim schools. This essay gives a  general picture of the Shari’ah on these topics.  I General Introduction to Islamic “Shari’ah” Law  The foundation of Islamic Shari’ah law is the Qur’an; combined with the Sunna, or the  Prophet’s model behavior; the consensus of the four schools (Ijma), and analogical reasoning  (Qiyas), according to Shari’ah: The Islamic Law2 by Abdur Rahman I. Doi. These sources are  considered divine.  The Qur’an is believed to have “co‐existed with God Himself in a heavenly book, known as  the ‘Mother Book’” written in Arabic from all eternity,”[a] writes David Forte in Studies in  Islamic Law;3 Classical & Contemporary Application.  The Shari’ah seamlessly combines public, private and religious law, featuring elements of  ancient codes, such as revenge. For instance, at a public execution for a crime against a  person, the victim will normally be present in the crowd, viewing the impending death. The 
Page 1 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

punishment is owned by the victim or their kin, and only they can stop the killing from  taking place, normally by acceptance of blood‐money (diya).  II General Description of Shari’ah Criminal Law  To Western eyes, the Shari’ah presents a disorganized and incomplete description of Criminal  Law. According to Joseph Schacht,4 in Introduction to Islamic Law,5  There exists no general concept of penal law in Islam. The concepts of guilt and  criminal responsibility are little developed, that of mitigating circumstances does  not exist; any theory of attempt, complicity, of concurrence is lacking. On the  other hand, the theory of punishments, with its distinction of private vengeance,  hadd punishments, ta’zir, and coercive and preventative measures, shows a  considerable variety of ideas.  As Forte points out, one cannot actually say there is a modern Muslim penal code, writing,  “Islamic law does not possess a concept of penal law comparable to that of modern systems.  Instead, it categorizes its offenses by the types of punishment they engender.”  Therefore, in terms of punishments, there are five basic categories. Behavior with a  specifically prescribed punishment is under hadd. Discretionary punishment for various acts  are under ta’zir, where the judge sets whatever penalty he chooses. Personal revenge, where  retaliation or blood‐money (diya) is applicable, is under jinayat. Offense against the state  receive administrative penalties, or siyasa. And crimes where the appropriate, or chosen  response, is personal religious penance, are under kaffara.  III Criminal Procedure  Shari’ah legal procedure is a somewhat counter‐intuitive process. Rules for choosing the  proper court and applying correct procedures, essential for American Due Process, are  virtually non‐existent in Islamic law. Rudolph Peters writes in Crime and Punishment in  Islamic Law,6  There are very few general principles in Islamic criminal law. The classical books  of fiqh do not contain chapters dealing with general notions or rules. Those that  exist are either mentioned in each chapter devoted to a specific crime or they  must be found by deduction.  The most important local players in the Muslim legal system are the judge (qadi), the police  (shurta), and the Islamic “inspector of the market” (muhtasib), says Schacht. The latter is an  official who made sure weights and measures were accurate, but also became a keeper of  public morality and justice, including overseeing the police force. The muhtasib controls the  system, but the qadi is independent in his decisions. Yet, the state at the highest levels may 
Page 2 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

legally intervene at any time and make political decisions involving the accused which  completely derail justice.  Police may beat suspects, not to extract a confession, but merely remind the accused his duty  to be truthful, according to There was no office of public prosecution under classic Shari’ah  doctrine, although the muhtasib occasionally came to fill this roll as defender of public morals.  Most cases were launched by private prosecutions from victims. Only verbal testimony  (shahada) is considered evidence, with exceptions made for proof made by smell of alcohol for  drunkenness or pregnancy indicating illicit sexual activity. Written documents are merely  allowed as memory aids.  IV Muslim Criminal Law Theory  A quintessentially religious law, Shari’ah has set penalties, known as hadd—called  “exemplary punishments” (Qur’an 5:38).7 These are performed in public to remind residents  the wages of evil. Retribution is an important part of Muslim punishments, using the  standard of Lex Talionis, ie “eye for an eye,” to measure punishment. For example, the  murderer should be executed in the same manner his or her victim was dispatched. The  Discretionary Punishments (ta’zir) are especially meant to return offenders to the gilded path  of Allah.  V Specific Religious Crimes & Punishment Under Islamic Law  The state is generally responsible for criminal punishment, with a few exceptions, writes  Peters. The prosecuting next of kin are allowed to personally deliver the death sentence in the  case of murder. Also, a slave should be punished by their master, with the exception of  amputations, which state executioners enforce. All criminal sentences are to be carried out  immediately upon pronouncement, unless a compelling reason exists not do so.  Were an offender to commit several different crimes which cannot be punished at once, a  weight‐list is used to decide which comes first. Writes Peters,  If a person, having committed several crimes, is sentenced to a number of  different penalties, each of them must be carried out. If this is physically  impossible, the authorities must first execute those sentences that are founded on  the claims of men and then those resulting from the claims of God… If a person  has been sentenced to the removal of his eye by way of retaliation, to eighty  lashes for slander, to a hundred lashes for unlawful intercourse and to the  amputation of the right hand, the head of state or his agent must first carry out  the gouging out of the eye because that is the claim of a man, then imprison him  until the wound has healed, then carry out the punishment for calumny, etc… 

Page 3 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

A. Hudud Religious Punishments  Forte describes the religious Hadd crimes, writing “Islamic law denotes five “Quranic  offenses” which are regarded as offenses directly against Allah and which compel specific  punishment.” These crimes are Unlawful Intercourse (Zina), False Accusation of Unlawful  Intercourse (Kadhf); Drinking of Wine (Shurb); Theft (Sariq), and Highway Robbery (Qat’ Al‐ Tariq).  1. Unlawful Intercourse—Zina: This occurs when a person has sexual relations with anyone  not their spouse, nor a concubine (Shari’ah accepts sexual slavery). Technically, adultery is  not a crime as no woman has exclusive rights to her husband, and the husband has no  exclusive bond with his wife, despite this being an offense against Allah. The crime of Zina  can also occur if a man takes and sleeps with a fifth wife while the four previous yet live,  weds a close relative or girl before she undergoes puberty, or commits necrophilia, writes  Forte.  Proof of Zina must be provided by four adult Muslim males or a confession. The crime  should have occurred within the last 30 days. On a discrepancy of testimony, of even a  technical irregularity, the four can then receive the punishment for Zina themselves. Peters  explains that if a man has sex with a slave not his, he owes her master a fine. A woman who  reports a rape but cannot prove it occurred via four witnesses can then be prosecuted for Zina  with her unproved accusation acting as a confession.  Zina Penalty:  The punishment here can be stoning, lashing, or both, depending upon the school. A stoning  should only be applied to one convicted of unlawful intercourse, who is mentally competent,  is a free person, and has already experienced lawful sexual relations in a marriage. For all  others, it is either one 100 lashes for a free person, or 50 for a slave. All homosexual relations  fulfill the Zina requirements, although the penalty is simply death instead of whipping,  according to Peters.  2. False Accusation of Unlawful Intercourse—Kadhf: This occurs when a competent adult  slanders another competent adult, who is a free Muslim, with false charges of Zina. Claiming  someone is illegitimate also qualifies. Proof for this occurs via normal Islamic means, using  oaths of witnesses, or by confession. Under a special rule, a husband may charge his wife  with infidelity without risk if he uses the li’an procedure, which Forte describes as “...if he  swears four times by Allah that he is speaking the truth and, at a fifth oath, calls down a  curse upon himself if he is lying.” The woman, as a defense, may repeat the exact procedure.  If either one refuses the li’an, they are considered guilty, ipso facto, and receive the lashes.  Kadhf Penalty: The punishment for kadhf is 80 lashes for a freeman, or 40 for a slave. 

Page 4 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

3. Drinking of Wine—Shurb: Alcohol was not originally illegal but became so after  Muhammad was appalled at the drunkenness of Arab society. The law also applies to any  other intoxicant or drug. Proof can be provided by a confession, which can then be  withdrawn at any time without penalty. Or witnesses can attest seeing the accused drinking,  smelled alcohol on his breath, or observed him soused.  Shurb Penalty: The penalty for intoxicant imbibing is 20‐40 lashes.  4. Theft—Sariq: This must be a crime of theft involving removal by stealth of an item owned  by another of at least a certain value, kept in a locked area or under guard (hirz), says Peters.  For example, removal of a gold coin stored in an animal stable would not qualify. This crime  should be prosecuted by the government.  Sariq Penalty: Amputation of the right hand, as based upon Qur’an 5:38;8 although the  Shiites allow just four fingers of the hand amputated, according to Peters. A second, third  and fourth conviction can remove all such appendages.  5. Highway Robbery—Qat’ Al‐Tariq: The Arabs considered this the most serious kind of  crime as it threatens the calm and order of all society, according to Forte. Two types of evil  are covered here. The first is robbing travelers from distant places; whereas the second is  armed assault into a private home. Even non‐Muslims are protected under this law. There  must be at least a holdup which occurs outside the city for the penalty to apply to banditry,  states Peters. The perpetrator must be of superior force to the victim, and so women do not  qualify.  Qat’ Al‐Tariq Penalty: The first conviction for this offense merits the amputation of the right  hand and left foot of the wrong‐doer, although some schools allow a simple deportation if no  harm occurs. The second results in amputation of the left hand and right foot.  Says the Qur’an at 5:33,9  The just retribution for those who fight GOD and His messenger, and commit  horrendous crimes, is to be killed, or crucified, or to have their hands and feet cut  off on alternate sides, or to be banished from the land. This is to humiliate them  in this life, then they suffer a far worse retribution in the Hereafter.  VI. Other Shari’ah Crimes, Punishment, & Blood Money  A. Ta’zir Penalties  Discretionary penalties, or Ta’zir, are punishments delivered at the qadi’s subjective decision.  The purpose is to punish acts against man and God, and sometimes includes reparation and  repentance, writes Forte. These punishments vary in severity: 
Page 5 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Private admonition to the guilty party, sometimes by letter;  Public reprimand in court;  Public proclamation of the offender’s guilt;  Suspended sentence;  Banishment;  Flogging;  Imprisonment;  Death. 

Forte says many crimes are covered by Ta’zir that for some reason have eluded Hadd  penalties, such as apostasy (ridda —although some schools consider this hadd), wine selling,  homosexual activity, bodily harm or murder, bestiality, perjury, slander and usury.  B. Fines & Blood Money  Fines are paid to the state, whereas blood‐money (diya) goes to a victim or kin, based upon  his blood‐status. Bloodprice is the victim’s worth, only calculable against that of the accused,  which controls the punishment. A person cannot receive retaliation for killing a person of a  lower bloodprice. For example, a Muslim cannot be executed for murdering a slave or  member of the protected classes, being Christians or Jews, deemed dhimmis, i.e. the People of  the Book (Bible).  C. Public Scorn, Imprisonment & Banishment  A common punishment is public exposure to scorn (tashir). Achieved by shaving the culprit’s  head, or covering his face with soot (especially for false witnesses) and parading him sitting  backwards on an donkey, through the community, with a town‐crier announcing his sins.  Banishment (nafy, taghrib) is associated with two crimes—simple banditry and illegal sex. If a  woman is banished for being sexually immoral, a male relative must travel with her to make  sure she stays chaste. Imprisonment (habs) is not normally used for penal law, but as a means  to encourage debtors to pay.  D. Retaliation  Retaliation for injuries (qisas ma dun al‐nafs) comes as Lex Talionis, eye‐for‐eye punishment in  the form of amputations, blinding, and infliction of wounds the victim received. A recent  Saudi case involved a man sentenced to judicial paralysis10 for severing the spinal cord of  another. This should not be done till the victim has healed, in case he dies.  E. Theft & Amputation  Muhammad probably borrowed amputation (qat) for theft from the pagan Quaraysh tribe,  who inflicted this punishment on rival tribesmen caught stealing, says Forte. While Muslim 
Page 6 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

jurists claim amputation is to prevent recidivism, it more likely originated as judicial revenge.  The hand is removed at the wrist, the stump cauterized in boiling oil, at the criminal’s  expense, and the hand can be hung around the thief’s neck for three days. Cross‐amputation  (al‐qat min‐khilaf) is a punishment for brigands, ie highway robbers.  F. Flogging (Jald)  Flogging by leather whip is a very common punishment under the Shari’ah. The executioner  administers this penalty, but should not raise the whip arm above the shoulder. The more  serious a crime, the harder the executioner should flog the criminal. For example, one  convicted of illegal sex should be beaten more severely than one guilty of drinking alcohol.  Men are whipped standing, women seated. Men are stripped to the waist, while women are  allowed to keep on clothes. As advised in Qur’an 24:2,11 the punishment should be public.  The blows are to be spread over the body, except for dangerous places, like the head or  genitals, as the purpose for whipping is not death.  G. Executions: Beheading, Stoning & Other Means  There are many ways to execute a criminal under Shari’ah. Typically, the mode of execution is  beheading by sword,12 as done at famed Chop‐Chop Square13 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. But  the crime defines the manner. For example, homosexuals are executed in typically dramatic  fashion, by stoning, beheading, thrown from a high wall or building, hanging, immolated by  fire, or buried alive (despite male homosexuality reportedly being rampant in the Middle  East, according to Raphael Patai’s Arab Mind).14  Execution may be used as retaliation, done by the kin of the victim, according to Qur’an  16:12615 & 2:194,16 which calls for the murderer to be executed in the same manner as he killed  his victims. Only if this would result in extended torture will the sword be substituted. The  Government will inspect the proposed execution weapon and decide if the person can handle  it properly. If not, then a substitute executioner will be arranged.  Death by Stoning (Rajm), or lapidation, is delivered by a crowd with the ultimate intent of  killing the victim, writes Peters. The stones used should neither be too large, which would  kill the criminal too quickly, nor too small, which would delay the job. The proper size is a  stone which fills the hand. Women are to be dug into the earth up to their waists before the  event. If the conviction is based upon accusations, the accusers are the first to throw. If the  conviction is based upon a confession, the state representative is first to toss.  For Highway Robbery (Qat’ Al‐Tariq), if a killing resulted during an attempted robbery, the  punishment is beheading by sword. If a murder occurred during an actual theft, the  punishment is execution by crucifixion (salb), the body left dying three days. Unlike a normal  murder, the family of the victim cannot choose blood‐money (diya) instead of execution. 
Page 7 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

Apostates may renounce Islam by word or deed, including rejecting axiomatic articles of  faith, like denying Muhammad’s mission, fasting, or disrespecting the Qur’an. The apostate  (ridda) is given three days to reflect, then put to death. Some schools only execute men,  whereas the women are kept alive but flogged during the hours of prayer, according to  Peters. Frank Vogel, in Islamic Law & Legal System:17 Studies of Saudi Arabia states that  apostates are beheaded in Saudi Arabia before huge crowds on Friday afternoons, in the  public square,18 directly after prayer time has ceased.  Dhimmis, as Christians and Jews, have no inherent rights or status under the Shari’ah, being  harbis, or enemy aliens, naturally at war with Islam. It is only by way of the jizyah, or yearly  treaty of war tax, that these can qualify for temporary protection. Should a dhimmi lapse in  protection, they can be killed on the spot and their property taken without recompense,  according to Schacht. Further, any persons not Muslim or dhimmi are considered pagans and  are to be instantly killed under classical shari’ah doctrine.  Conclusion  Even the simplest person can deduce that classical Islamic Shari’ah law cannot possibly fit  into the modern world anywhere on the globe. But it is especially impossible to apply this  system in America, the land that created modern religious freedom, and let millions escape  oppression. Most alarming, the Islamic law does not change to fit into other cultures, but is  always offered as a “perfect gift,” delivered at the edge of a sword.  Is it not the most obvious fact imaginable that American law is a thousand times fairer and  safer than Shar’iah? Therefore, what kind of a mentality would want to force so much  injustice, punishment and destruction upon the American people—in the name of God &¬†  the “Religion of Peace”? That Rauf claims this antiquated, unsophisticated and brutal legal  system agrees with American law and society says much more about his intentions for his  Ground Zero mosque than it does any other topic he will ever discuss.  [a]This idea cannot help but evoke John’s description of the pre‐incarnate Christic Logos  (Word), “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was  God… No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the  Father, He has explained Him…” (John 1:1; 18).19 Undoubtedly, such imagery influenced  Muhammad’s fertile imagination when rendering the Qur’an.    
                                                            

End Notes:    1   http://therese‐zrihen‐dvir.over‐
blog.com/ext/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmZ0Qmqn3Wo&feature=player_embedded 

 
Page 8 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

                                                                                                                                                                                                           

   http://www.amazon.com/Shariah‐Abdur‐Rahman‐I‐ Doi/dp/9679963330/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1285405889&sr=1‐2    3   http://www.amazon.com/Studies‐Islamic‐Law‐David‐Forte/dp/1572921285    4   http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/ilsp/publications/wakin.pdf    5   http://www.amazon.com/Introduction‐Islamic‐Law‐Clarendon‐ Paperbacks/dp/0198254733/ref=sr_1_2?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1284852005&sr=8‐2    6   http://www.amazon.com/Crime‐Punishment‐Islamic‐Law‐Twenty‐ First/dp/0521792266    7   http://www.submission.org/suras/sura5.htm    8   Ibid.  9   http://www.submission.org/suras/sura5.htm    10    http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Medical+group+decries+Saudi+spinal+cord+tort ure+cruel+inhuman/3437044/story.html    11   http://www.submission.org/suras/sura24.html    12   http://onfinite.com/libraries/454176/97f.jpg    13   http://www.walrusmagazine.com/articles/2009.05‐field‐notes‐chop‐chop‐square/    14   http://www.amazon.com/Arab‐Mind‐Raphael‐Patai/dp/1578261171    15   http://www.muslimaccess.com/quraan/arabic/016.asp    16   http://www.muslimaccess.com/quraan/arabic/002.asp    17   http://www.amazon.com/Islamic‐Law‐Legal‐System‐ Studies/dp/9004110623/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1285494612&sr=1‐1    18   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29ZsF6RaYHY    19   http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John%201&version=NASB 
2

Page 9 of 10 

 

Kelly O’Connell – Crime & Punishment in Islamic Law 

                                                                                                                                                                                                           

  Kelly O’Connell is an author and attorney. He was born on the West Coast, raised in Las  Vegas, and matriculated from the University of Oregon. After laboring for the Reformed  Church in Galway, Ireland, he returned to America and attended law school in Virginia,  where he earned a JD and a Master’s degree in Government. He spent a stint working as a  researcher and writer of academic articles at a Miami law school, focusing on ancient law and  society. He has also been employed as a university Speech & Debate professor. He then  returned West and worked as an assistant district attorney. Kelly is now is a private  practitioner with a small law practice in New Mexico.    Kelly can be reached at: hibernian1@gmail.com    ###   

Page 10 of 10 

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful