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Public Transportation

FACT BOOK

2011

2011 PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
FACT BOOK
62nd Edition

April 2011

PUBLISHED BY

American Public Transportation Association

Fact book historical tables and
additional data are available at:
http://www.apta.com/

American Public Transportation Association
1666 K Street, N.W., Suite 1100
Washington, DC 20006
TELEPHONE: (202) 496-4800
E-MAIL: statistics@apta.com
www.apta.com

APTA’s Vision Statement
Be the leading force in advancing public transportation.

APTA’s Mission Statement
APTA serves and leads its diverse membership through advocacy, innovation,
and information sharing to strengthen and expand public transportation.

Prepared by

Matthew Dickens, Statistician
mdickens@apta.com
(202) 496-4817

John Neff, Senior Policy Researcher
jneff@apta.com
(202) 496-4812

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION FACT BOOK

American Public Transportation Association
Washington, DC
April 2011

Material from the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book may be quoted or reproduced
without obtaining the permission of the American Public Transportation Association.
Suggested Identification: American Public Transportation Association: 2011 Public
Transportation Fact Book, Washington, DC, April, 2011.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Contents
Page Page

INTRODUCTION ............................................................... 5 CAPITAL AND OPERATING EXPENSES ..................... 20

METHODOLOGY .............................................................. 6 16. Capital Expense by Mode and Type ..................... 20
17. Operating Expense by Mode and Function
NATIONAL SUMMARY .................................................... 7 Class .................................................................... 21
18. Operating Expense by Mode and Object Class .... 21
Table 19. Total Expense by Mode ........................................ 21

1. Number of Public Transportation Service Systems CAPITAL AND OPERATING FUNDING ........................ 22
by Mode.................................................................. 7
2. National Totals........................................................ 7 20. Funding Sources .................................................. 22
3. 50 Largest Transit Agencies Ranked by 21. Passenger Fares by Mode ................................... 23
Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles .... 8
4. 50 Urbanized Areas with the Most Transit Travel, MODAL DATA ................................................................ 24
Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips, Passenger
Miles, and Population ............................................. 9 22. Roadway Modes National Totals .......................... 26
23. 50 Largest Bus Agencies Ranked by Unlinked
PASSENGERS ............................................................... 10 Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles ................. 27
24. 50 Largest Paratransit Agencies Ranked by
5. Unlinked Passenger Trips by Mode ...................... 10 Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles .. 28
6. Passenger Miles by Mode .................................... 11 25. 50 Largest Vanpool Agencies Ranked by
7. Average Length of Unlinked Passenger Trips in Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles .. 29
Miles by Mode………………. ................................ 13 26. Trolleybus Agencies Ranked by Unlinked
Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles ................. 30
27. Rail Modes and Ferry National Totals .................. 30
SERVICE PROVIDED ..................................................... 15 28. Commuter Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked
Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles ................. 31
8. Vehicle Miles Operated, Vehicle Hours Operated, 29. Heavy Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked
and Speed in Transit Service by Mode ................. 15 Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles ................. 31
30. Light Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked
VEHICLES ...................................................................... 16 Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles ................. 32
31. Other Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked
9. Revenue Vehicles by Mode ................................. 16 Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles by Type of
10. Vehicle Characteristics by Mode of Service.......... 16 Rail Agency .......................................................... 32
11. Vehicle Equipment by Mode of Service ................ 17 32. Ferry Boat Agencies Ranked by Unlinked
12. Vehicle Power Sources by Mode of Service ......... 18 Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles ................. 33
33. Rail Route Mileage and Status of Future
EMPLOYEES .................................................................. 18 Projects ................................................................ 33
34. Rail Track Miles .................................................... 33
13. Employees by Mode and Function ....................... 18
CANADIAN DATA .......................................................... 34
ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ..................................... 19
35. Canadian Transit Data Summary ......................... 34
14. Energy and Emission Benefits from Public
Transportation ...................................................... 19 GLOSSARY .................................................................... 35
15. Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Mode of Service .... 19

SAFETY .......................................................................... 20

3

.. Increase of Transit Vehicle Accessibility ........ 14 4 .. 10 10............................. 12 14........................... Number of Commuters Using Transit for Their 13.............. Growth in Capital Funding by Source .......... 12 15. 12 Equipment ...... 15 Population or Highway Travel.......... Comparison of Unlinked Passenger Trips and 16............... Access Mode ...... 11 12.... TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Figures Page Page 1........ Trip Length by Mode ................... Trip Purpose ..................... 16 3...... Percent of Workers Commuting on Transit ....... 13 7... Since 1995 Transit Use Has Grown More than 11................. Vehicle Speed vs........ Growth in Operating Funding by Source ..... 20 5.... Number of Transfers to Complete Trip ............... Egress Mode ..... Days Ridden Per Week ................................................... Growth in Percentage of Buses with Passenger Work Trip ................... 17 4....................................................................................... 14 Decades ....... Passenger Fatality Rates: 2003-2008 ........................................................... 15 2........................................... 23 Passenger Miles ............................................. Transit Ridership at Highest Level in Five 9........ 14 8......... 22 6......................

published in operators given waivers from NTD reporting alternating years. Available data are expanded by standard statistical and ridership is reported from 1907.com. years ending in a particular calendar year.S. unregulated jitney. These these data with special surveys. groups of identical vehicles national total data reported in the NTD in two ways: manufactured in the same year. operators in the NTD is limited. It is available online at www. except for the section on Canada. construction and finance firms.500 in three parts. and the method to determine comparably sized transit following types of ferry service: international. United States public transportation. transit associations. rural. and some operators who The status of fixed guideways not yet open is choose not to participate in the NTD.apta. Many data items Transit Fact Book) was first published in 1943. This format allows greater detail in public and private member organizations including statistical content while improving accessibility of public transportation systems and commuter rail information. some private operators not contracting stations operated by participating transit agencies. Appendix A: transportation in the United States and Canada are Historical Tables presents primary data items for the served by APTA members.. entire time period they have been reported in Fact Books and other statistical reports prepared by APTA The Public Transportation Fact Book (formerly the and its predecessor organizations. sources. totaled for all service excludes taxicab. Also included are definitions of the public interest by providing safe.g. each individual mode. while totals dimensions. Data are also summed for and services not available to the general public. intercity. presents ridership for three tables in this book months plus quarterly and year-to-date tallies for all 5 . and military services. both all modes totaled and for segments of the general public (e.apta. reports or information for obtaining these reports is on data are calculated based on 2000 U. charter. efficient and reported data items. agencies. reports details of individual transit data listed for a particular year are necessarily agency fare structures. Systems not currently included in NTD totals are small transit The Transit Infrastructure Database. Data from rural reported. lists all fixed-guideways and requirements. Over 90 percent of persons using public The Public Transportation Fact Book. The Transit Vehicle Database.. planning. All data are online at www. INTRODUCTION Introduction The American Public Transportation Association is a The Public Transportation Fact Book is published nonprofit international association of more than 1. systems reporting data in the NTD. transit agency fiscal years rather than calendar years. school. a difficult task when using existing data rural interstate. Data for Canada were provided by the Canadian The Public Transportation Fact Book. and special application data in previous Fact Books and allow a simple systems (e. governmental individual modes.com. for the U. lists all vehicles owned by participating agencies in Public Transportation Fact Book data differ from fleets. airports.apta. Any such data are noted on published quarterly.S. published annually. with public agencies. amusement parks. It is available methods to estimate U.g. Because data are reported to the NTD based on The Public Transportation Fare Database. only. APTA members serve industry for 2009. Bureau urbanized area population categories. Federal detailed information about individual transit agencies Transit Administration (FTA).S. that is. product and service providers. academic This Public Transportation Fact Book presents institutions. operators. Appendix B: Urban Transit Association (CUTA). and equipment such as communications reported in the NTD are limited to summation of those and passenger amenities. economical public transportation services and products. These lists greatly expand similar and corporate shuttles). are reported for every year beginning in the 1920s. Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics presents six operating statistics for each This book includes only public transportation data and transit agency in size order. design. or urbanized areas. and extrapolations of the sum of data reported for all fiscal fare collection equipment. Census the APTA web site at www. (2) The Fact Book reports some data collected by APTA surveys and not The Public Transportation Ridership Report. fare collection practices.S. Where applicable. published annually. and urban park). taken from the NTD. and the equipment in stations is detailed. and state statistics describing the entire United States transit departments of transportation.com. APTA supplements that are not available from other sources. Extensive (1) Fact Book data are expanded to include all information is included on their propulsion plants. national totals. Data are based on the annual National Transit APTA produces additional data reports that provide Database (NTD) report published by the U. All Canadian data are based on calendar years. modes operated by the agency and in size order for sightseeing.

g. and prior issues predecessors are statistical expansions of sample of the Fact Book. The Census of be provided by larger van type vehicles and variable Electrical Industries: 1917." A mode of service is not always identical The Census was conducted again in 1902. Part II . sources and statistical procedures used to verify that The following year the summary of transit data. Reported in On-Board Surveys is an extensive investigation of the demographic characteristics and The APTA Primer on Transit Funding presents a travel behavior of transit passengers based on transit detailed explanation of funding programs in federal agency surveys of onboard passengers. laws authorizing funding for the transit industry. intercity. Summary data were A description of historical changes in Fact Book data published by the Census every five years through preparation is in the Methodology section of the 1937. transportation authorization law. The reported data are annually to reflect annual appropriations of federal used to estimate national total ridership that is funds for transit. 1912. In response.Street A report year is each transit agency's fiscal year that Railway Transportation. Base data are taken from the totals. service.. charter. was published and dated order to be as accurate as possible. States at the Eleventh Census: 1890. no data for individual electric railways were included. provided summary data only. by the Government Printing Office in 1895.gov/ntdprogram/. the APTA Historical Tables. but a report with data for individual railways fixed-route bus service may in specific circumstances was not published during World War I. governmental and corporate system members. and are adapted to minimize the maximum possible error. national transit agencies. and services data from other sources including state departments not available to the general public or segments of the of transportation and APTA surveys of APTA transit general public (e.g. reported for individual service modes and an aggregate total. The census of transit operations was not Public Transportation Fact Book. military. airports.. The Fact Book can be indirectly traced to the Bureau Because NTD data are collected for "report years. DC. stratified categories of similar systems based on amusement parks. It includes only public transportation data and Federal Transit Administration's National Transit excludes taxicab. Detailed statistics report the federal funds available Extensive data for individual transit agencies can be and the text describes eligible uses for these funds found at the Federal Transit Administration's National and the methods by which funds are distributed. titled the data presented in the Fact Book are improved in the Transit Fact Book 1944. specific circumstances be provided by bus vehicles. origin and destination paratransit service may in published by the Government Printing Office in 1920. 1942 Edition in March 1943. These data are supplemented by sightseeing. INTRODUCTION/METHODOLOGY participating transit agencies. urban park). unregulated jitney. 6 . ends during a calendar year. 1907.ntdprogram. Database (NTD). is to expand available data by data designed to represent the total activity of all standard statistical methods to estimate U. A Transit Database web site: new Primer is prepared for each surface http://www. and the following types of population and other characteristics.S. and it is updated Methodology The procedure for estimating total data in the 2011 All data in this Fact Book calculated by APTA and its Public Transportation Fact Book. For example. and with a vehicle type of the same name. which has been continued as the Fact Book dating policy since then. Appendix A: conducted in 1942. Data are expanded by mode in shuttles). That volume listed data for individual street railways and All data in the Fact Book are reported for "modes of aggregate data for the entire street railway industry. It is APTA policy to continually predecessor American Transit Association (ATA) seek to improve the quality of data reported in the published The Transit Industry of the United States: Fact Book. All procedures ferry service: international. a standard statistical procedure." of Census Report on Transportation in the United Fact Book data are also calculated for report years. published in Washington. for the year in which it was published. rural interstate. and special application systems (e. rural. This report presents a quick indicator A Profile of Public Transportation Passenger of the state of the transit industry shortly after the Demographics and Travel Characteristics close of the period being reported. school. Electric Railways. Data are sought from all available Basic Data and Trends.

2 took 10.1 Non-vehicle Maintenance $3.193.3 Table 1: Number of Public General Administration (Millions) $5.7 (c) Total is not sum of all modes since many providers operate more than one mode. General Administration 42. Vehicle Operations (Millions) $16. Millions) 6.1 Transit. transit Expense.0 Vehicle Maintenance (Millions) $6. Hours.200 Diesel Fuel Consumed (Gallons. Operating 390.619 Total (b. Vehicle Total (Millions) 345.4 billion trips and rode transit vehicles for 55.8 Services (Millions) $2. Unlinked Passenger (Millions) 10.556 Trolleybus 5 Employees.4 Aerial Tramway 2 Other (Millions) $1.224. Vehicle Operations 245.6 Table 4 shows the 50 urbanized areas with the most Operating Expense by Function Class: transit use ranked by unlinked trips. Other Fossil Fuel (b) Includes 5.S. Passengers (Millions) $12.995 Ferryboat 32 Revenue Vehicles with Alternative Heavy Rail 15 Power Source 39.300 providers of service for elderly and Consumed (Gallons. Number of 7.207. Table 3 shows the 50 largest transit Purchased Transportation (Millions) $5.2 Purchased Transportation (Millions) $5.6 Casualty and Liability (Millions) $851.296.4 ranges from a single cable car operator to Miles.844. Operating Total (Millions) $37.453. Average $1. Capital Total (Millions) $17.668 paratransit providers. Vehicle Revenue (Millions) 4.7 persons with disabilities. Capital 12.18 billion miles. Vehicle Total (Millions) 5.5 systems ranked in order of unlinked passenger trips.165 Vanpool 77 Employees.5 Mode Number of Systems (a) Rolling Stock (Millions) $5. Vehicle Revenue (Millions) 312.9 Utilities (Millions) $1.960 organizations ranging Trips. Fringe Benefits (Millions) $9. Guideway.344.5 Public transportation spent $55.893 Cable Car 1 Revenue Vehicles Operated at Commuter Rail 27 Maximum Service 139.326 Monorail 2 Employees.919. Vehicle in Revenue Service. Average (mph) 14. Report Year 2009 Facilities.200 States during 2009 by 7. Non-Vehicle Maintenance 38.245.0% Inclined Plane 4 Revenue Vehicles Accessible 90. 7 . Other (Millions) -$912. MTA New York City Materials and Supplies (Millions) $4. The number of Trip Length.5 Transportation Service Systems Expense.088 Maximum Service 172.640.2 The largest transit agency.233 special paratransit service providers. Millions) 660.997.9 approximately 6.926. carried passengers on 3. Stations.349.714 Paratransit (b) 6.6 (a) As of December 31.2 billion trips for 11.2 billion for service Speed.700 Employees.330. Administration Buildings $10.891 Publico 1 Employees.6 Hours. Summary data for the entire U. and each data item on Operating Expense by Object Class: that Table is shown in detail by mode in the tables Salaries and Wages (Millions) $14.c) 7.273. 2009.9 provision and capital investment in 2009.381 from large multi-modal systems to single-vehicle Miles.3 Automated Guideway Transit 7 Revenue Vehicles Available for Bus 1.0 industry is shown on Table 2. Millions) 348.212. Electricity Consumed (kWh.542. NATIONAL SUMMARY National Summary Table 2: National Totals.2 by Mode. Report Year 2009 Public transportation was provided in the United Systems.2 billion miles. Passenger (Millions) 55.224. Passengers Fares Collected. Average (Miles) 5.1% Light Rail 35 Employees.3 later this publication.3 transit agencies operating each mode of service Miles.867. Vehicle Maintenance 63.2 Fare per Unlinked Trip.219.

3 12 568. OH 45.124.8 23 Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District(AC Transit) San Francisco.4 26 212.451.940.9 27 298.8 29 199. NY 97.677.0 40 Broward County Transportation Department(BCT) Miami.151.2 36 175.0 19 408.1 34 181.241.761.247.9 21 2. CA 227.6 17 1.553.652.795.4 (a) Metropolitan Suburban Bus Auth.0 20 Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board(PCJPB) San Francisco.5 (a) 296.834.2 (a) Ride-On Montgomery County Transit Washington.616.6 45 154. CO 98.8 6 Metropolitan Transit Auth.3 35 192.599.3 48 Long Beach Transit(LBT) Los Angeles.6 7 Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transp.9 43 VIA Metropolitan Transit(VIA) San Antonio. NY 31.8 (a) 175.(Short Line) New York.667.9 30 City of Phoenix Public Transit Department(Valley Metro) Phoenix.205.062.8 33 Westchester County Bee-Line System New York.472.5 47 Pace .605.442. DC 435. MN 76.430. GA 156.109. CA 35.5 22 Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation(PATH) New York.9 (a) 274. NATIONAL SUMMARY Table 3: 50 Largest Transit Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.1 22 416.9 27 Regional Transp. CA 31.490.435.923.7 31 193.350.610.7 49 Southern California Regional Rail Authority(Metrolink) Los Angeles.4 50 151.720. UT 37. NY 80. WA 19. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www.9 (a) Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority(NFT Metro) Buffalo. Inc.4 38 Milwaukee County Transit System(MCTS) Milwaukee. NY 119.4 9 818.184. Louis.767.597.731.657.3 47 108.377.769.com.103.915.200. of Harris County. NY 3.558. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.5 36 Orange County Transportation Authority(OCTA) Los Angeles CA 66. NY 32.5 34 Hudson Transit Lines. NY 281. DC 29.293.902.7 6 1.923.2 25 301.139.8 24 MTA Metro-North Commuter Railroad (MTA-MNCR) New York.3 43 149. (a) Not among 50 largest transit agencies in this category.477.1 25 King County DOT(King County Metro) Seattle.271. CA 29.045.650. NY 3. IL 71. CA 114.6 15 549.8 46 Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.9 14 San Diego Metropolitan Transit System(MTS) San Diego.3 (a) 184.7 10 New Jersey Transit Corporation(NJ TRANSIT) New York.652.871. CA 61.7 19 Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority(MARTA) Atlanta.5 16 Denver Regional Transportation District(RTD) Denver.542.816.9 45 Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority(CMTA) Austin. District of Oregon(TriMet) Portland. Auth.2 24 1.apta. PA 68.7 15 San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District(BART) San Francisco. WA 115.269.247.4 44 81. PR 40.276. CA 12.885.504.3 41 Washington State Ferries(WSF) Seattle.1 46 93.111.2 13 MTA Bus Company(MTABUS) New York.206.7 33 222.0 30 289.341.082.8 2 1.2 42 253. NY 3.858.744.244.444. TX 39. MA 367.126.5 37 Bi-State Development Agency(METRO) St. AZ 51.985.7 41 154.329.0 11 Tri-County Metropolitan Transp.8 (a) 419. Texas(Metro) Houston.130.3 2 San Francisco Municipal Railway(MUNI) San Francisco.773.343. Inc.612.948.314. HI 78.182. FL 37.1 31 Academy Lines.5 28 Dallas Area Rapid Transit(DART) Dallas. TX 65.0 40 255.4 10 808.8 14 470. Auth.Suburban Bus Division(PACE) Chicago. TX 44.2 26 Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad(Metra) Chicago.741.975.3 3 City and County of Honolulu DOT Services(DTS) Honolulu.313.9 4 2.3 9 Port Authority of Allegheny County(Port Authority) Pittsburgh.0 35 The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority(GCRTA) Cleveland. WI 47. MD 123.510.009.7 39 Department of Transportation and Public Works(DTPW) San Juan. Commission of Southern Nevada(RTC) Las Vegas.6 7 3.108.562.403.000.3 8 467.7 39 176.1 (a) Charlotte Area Transit System(CATS) Charlotte. NV 67.839.6 3 2.389.(SEPTA) Philadelphia.8 11 327.510.697.546.522. TX 88.219.1 42 City of Detroit Department of Transportation(DDOT) Detroit.367.8 17 MTA Long Island Rail Road(MTA LIRR) New York.0 50 City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation(LADOT) Los Angeles.6 13 1.658.438.059.855.2 20 345. CA 88. WA 22.154. FL 24.166.552.4 (a) 230. NC 25. FL 103.123.2 (a) Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority(VTA) San Jose.2 1 11.972. PA 348.(MTA Long Island Bus) New York.7 44 Utah Transit Authority(UTA) Salt Lake City.0 23 319. OR 108.500.525.6 37 183.743.1 29 Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority(ST) Seattle.884.833. New York.799.739.2 16 523. MO 52.877.8 1 Chicago Transit Authority(CTA) Chicago.184.336.953.721.020.0 8 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transp.8 32 Sacramento Regional Transit District(Sacramento RT) Sacramento.6 5 1.1 (a) Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority(LYNX) Orlando.7 18 590.372. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank MTA New York City Transit(NYCT) New York.447.1 32 148.3 49 136.7 5 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston.4 18 Miami-Dade Transit(MDT) Miami.436.354.654. NY 28.1 12 Maryland Transit Administration(MTA) Baltimore.1 28 375.551.864.(LACMTA) Los Angeles. IL 521.1 21 Metro Transit Minneapolis.9 4 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority(WMATA) Washington. CA 46.843.9 48 101.6 38 190. CA 12. NY 81. 8 . IL 32. MI 38.570. CA 481.241.954.

3 35 136.538.7 10 4.947 (b) Durham.3 7 1.5 47 313. Passenger Miles.001.623.431 36 Riverside-San Bernardino. WA 189.662 18 Detroit.548 35 New Orleans. WI 49.4 45 1.649. NY 15.589. CA 24.650. TX 39.124.205 14 Atlanta.136 23 Las Vegas.944. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www.5 40 1.2 37 139.411. (a) Summed from data reported by individual transit agencies in the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database.7 25 164.907.957.903.5 2 3.7 33 130.789.503.6 30 183.5 11 813.309.567.0 24 304.659 6 San Juan.369. AZ 22.1 5 2.9 32 101.714.0 25 1.6 46 1.6 50 674.767.545.753.616.484 7 Philadelphia. and Population.9 (b) 82.916.3 28 192.2 37 851.076.1 29 1.0 (b) 64.3 2 8.2 13 631.919.616. VA 14.138 24 San Diego.497.219.459.6 14 1.191 (b) Kennewick-Richland.439 28 Columbus.5 1 21.7 9 3.049.032.107.657.651.904 3 Washington.583.157.8 38 1.6 23 2.889 21 Minneapolis-St.659.593 16 Houston.582 45 Albany.933.927 48 Orlando.2 (b) 694.216.182.7 26 222.6 48 65. CA 443.5 41 107. FL 159.493. NY 28.940.0 6 4. CA 106.9 1 17. UT 37.647 22 San Antonio.7 11 2.5 (b) 66.8 24 887.741.947.8 17 2.296.380.554 31 Sacramento.077.561.009. PA 70.712.7 28 1.424. NC 14.126.801 (b) Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.133. CA 46. LA 19.776. NATIONAL SUMMARY Table 4: 50 Urbanized Areas with the Most Transit Travel.343.810.159. CA 5.535. NY 17.0 48 749.267.0 12 512.958.067. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Unlinked Population Passenger Miles (a) Urbanized Area Passenger Trips (a) (2000 Census) (b) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank Number Rank New York-Newark.361. WA 5.649.914.1 (b) 71.1 44 818.8 6 1.2 (b) 1. VA 18.093.490.352. NM 12.616 17 Pittsburgh.8 4 2.605 12 Boston. FL 27. OH 17.193 37 Rochester.920.796 (b) Richmond.383.354 19 Portland.110.6 3 11.036 5 Baltimore. TX 73.7 47 49.312 25 Cleveland.216.4 18 374.840 11 Miami.2 17 431.557. AZ 78.539.851 (b) Stockton.596.861 1 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana.8 43 62.393.147. CT 16.4 50 37.7 44 121.3 38 85.6 39 97.923 (b) Albuquerque.4 20 299.044.9 5 3.8 19 2.5 34 2.506.357 32 St. only areas in the top 50 in unlinked trips and passenger miles are included For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2008 National Transit Database see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.932.4 12 2.4 43 153.262 27 Tampa-St. MI 54.7 31 1.599.703 39 Cincinnati. Paul. NY-NJ-CT 4.464.339 20 Charlotte.907.984.1 27 191.9 29 196.535 46 Kansas City.182 (b) Phoenix-Mesa.174.404.429.894.2 9 992.776. TX 44.425 (b) Providence.231.787.448.920 41 Salt Lake City. FL 24.5 26 1.436 15 Denver-Aurora.204.079 4 Seattle.9 22 3.307.1 30 901.9 (b) 558.8 21 327. MN 89.1 39 976.4 14 528.392 (b) Nashville-Davidson. NC-SC 25.4 27 1.8 (b) 65.4 18 718. (b) Not among 50 largest areas in this category.509 10 Honolulu.356.388.9 (b) 554. DC-VA-MD 495.1 46 63. KY-IN 15. OH-KY-IN 27.457.9 41 720.985.6 21 2. Petersburg.786.377 9 Milwaukee.303.161. Total amounts reported by each agency are included in the urbanized area in which that agency is headquartered regardless of the number of urbanized areas in which the agency operates transit service. CA 39.173.936.276.6 19 450. HI 78.487 2 Chicago.308.283 38 Virginia Beach.1 16 4.773.135.822.920 8 San Francisco-Oakland.3 33 1. TN 10.836 47 Fresno.099.228.026.1 40 54.149.292. MD 125.604. MO-IL 55.4 36 151.7 32 1.735. PA-NJ-DE-MD 368.1 15 1.0 31 255.351.8 8 1.049 13 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington.3 34 138. Louis.1 35 758.2 45 69.145.329.616.932.apta.0 4 3.308.486.019.912.5 8 2.799.062.438.3 13 3.1 42 598.989.5 3 3. NV 67.935 49 El Paso.314.500.389.816 26 Tucson.597.623.7 42 67.5 23 320.394.327.4 22 212.744 30 Louisville.2 49 70.590.787.241.396 (b) Hartford. CO 98.2 36 1.650 43 Buffalo. OR-WA 115.6 15 431.105.743.499.com. CA 14. MO-KS 16.953.446.1 49 287. OH 46.498 29 Austin. MA-NH-RI 375. TX-NM 12. Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips.733.236.055. RI-MA 21. PR 71.310.040. 9 .902.913 33 San Jose. IL-IN 633.7 7 5.915.665.674. CA 704.9 10 932.7 16 593. GA 168. TX 88.0 (b) 863.350.500.138.615.235.7 20 1.

0% 2.2 billion passenger miles.653 2002 5. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.013 357 99 2.017 2007 (a) 5.157 261 117 81 7.815 2006 5.484 344 88 2.4 billion.632 320 122 93 9. In 2009.521 2009 5.apta.849 419 105 2.6% 4.4 billion trips for a total of 55.363 2001 5. Figure 1: Transit Ridership at Highest Level in Five Decades 11 10 9 8 7 Unlinked Trips (Billions) 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 2009 All Other Heavy Rail Bus 10 .413 459 (a) 209 3. and other modes combined ridership 1.728 336 119 97 9.com. total transit ridership was an estimated 10.5% 1.678 413 105 2.623 2003 5.894 441 126 2. Ridership levels from 2006 through 2009 are the highest since 1956.573 472 191 3. Millions Report Commuter Bus Paratransit Heavy Rail Light Rail Trolleybus Other Total Year Rail 1995 4.033 251 119 80 7.731 414 114 2.575 2005 5.5 billion.393 276 117 89 8. In 2009.0% 100.5% 1.399 381 95 2.460 419 97 (a) 190 10.0% (a) Series not continuous for mode under line between 2006 and 2007.4 billion unlinked trips with bus ridership 5. heavy rail ridership 3.247 2008 5. PASSENGERS Passengers Since 1995.374 1998 5.648 396 100 2.168 2000 5.430 262 121 92 8.5% 4.855 423 125 2. Table 5: Unlinked Passenger Trips by Mode.927 407 100 121 10.381 2009 % 52.521 292 120 91 9.667 338 109 109 9. Unlinked Passenger Trips by Mode data from 1902 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.763 1996 4.997 352 93 2.808 381 107 117 9.490 465 104 212 10.868 414 103 2.5 billion.750 1999 5.748 350 106 112 9.8% 33.688 337 116 97 9. See Introduction.948 1997 5. transit systems carried passengers on 10.547 454 101 183 10.434 2004 5. transit has experienced sustained growth in ridership.452 468 190 3.692 410 111 2.

477 16.666 2001 22.818 8.902 1.821 10.808 1996 19.848 2.866 164 1.903 2004 21.022 9.437 187 843 49. Millions Report Commuter Bus Paratransit Heavy Rail Light Rail Trolleybus Other Total Year Rail 1995 18.841 9.9% 20.559 930 13.S.4% 100.199 168 1.324 2003 21.apta.233 2009 % 38.356 192 792 47.0% 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Transit Unlinked Trips Population Highway Vehicle Miles of Travel Public transportation ridership grew 34 percent from 1995 through 2009.976 11.704 735 12.070 2002 21.153 (a) 1.721 1.354 1.049 1.875 55.476 176 893 47.932 156 (a) 1.496 53.757 11.096 8.0% 25.073 2005 21.262 9.com.412 16.0% 35.284 1.0% 15.402 839 13.378 1997 19.825 9.0% (a) Series not continuous for mode under line between 2006 and 2007.377 9.093 161 1.038 754 12.663 1.3% 2.154 2007 (a) 20.035 189 663 42.604 8.3% 3.502 16.138 1.473 1. Population data are for United States resident population from the Bureau of Census Statistical Abstract and VMT data are taken from the Federal Highway Administration's monthly Traffic Volume Trends.432 188 843 48.700 173 1.143 52.719 962 14.504 853 13.339 1998 20.837 55. Figure 2: Since 1995 Transit Use Has Grown More Than Population or Highway Travel 40.353 2008 21.128 1999 21.058 14.241 9.157 2009 21.206 186 779 45.0% 0.4% 4.559 860 187 533 39.7% 30.477 11.606 1.844 1.418 1.530 957 184 604 41.678 2006 22.766 813 12.0% 5.0% 0. population (15 percent) and substantially more than the growth for vehicle miles of travel (VMT) on our nation's streets and highways (23 percent) over the same period.205 8. PASSENGERS Table 6: Passenger Miles by Mode. more than twice the growth rate of the U.244 607 10.857 2000 21.360 8.0% 20.805 2.033 49.128 182 735 44. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.056 1.0% 30.576 173 911 49.078 14. Passenger Miles by Mode data from 1977 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. 11 .548 855 14.232 1.178 1.351 656 11.0% 10.361 1.

57 percent in 2004 to 4. The longest trips are served by higher speed modes that make a limited number of stops.8 4.7% 6. The American Community Survey (ACS) is an annual survey conducted by the Census that obtains data formerly collected by the Decennial Census Long-Form.8% 6. are associated with lower speed service. Shorter trips in denser areas. PASSENGERS The number and percentage of commuters using transit as their primary means of transportation to work has inceased since the American Community Surveys have been conducted by the Census Bureau.98 million in 2004 to 6.5% 5.4 5. Commuter rail and paratransit service have very few transfers except those to local service modes for the access or egress portion of their trips.0 Vanpool Average Vehicle Speed (MPH) 35. such as commuter rail.0 40. it should be remembered that travelers on bus and local rail service often transfer to complete their trip.0 Commuter Rail 30.0 Paratransit 10.92 million in 2009. where stations are closer or street stops are frequent.0 0.0 Bus Trolleybus 5. The percentage of commuters using transit as their primary means of transportation to work rose from 4. Further information on the ACS can be found at the U. Figure 3: Number of Commuters Using Figure 4: Percent of Workers Transit for Their Work Trip Commuting on Transit 7. hence these average data understate the overall length of a complete trip on these modes. Census Bureau: American Community Figure 5: Vehicle Speed vs.0 4.6% 6. When comparing modes.6 4.0% Millions of Commuters Percent of Commuters 7.S. Census Bureau "American Factfinder" web site. 2009 45.9% 6.2 6.0 25.0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Average Unlinked Trip Length (Miles) Transit service modes meet different passenger needs. 12 . Trip Length by Mode.4% 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Source: U. including various demands for speed of travel and trip distance. Commuters who normally use another mode for work travel but occasionally ride transit are not included in these data.S.4 4.0 4.S. Census Bureau: American Community Source: U.1% 7.2 5. The number of regular commuters on transit has increased from 5.0 Heavy Rail 20.8 4.0 Light Rail 15.99 percent in 2009.

9 miles per trip. Many of these riders transfer one or Total 5. and Heavy Rail 4. The data presented are for trips. and time of day. for example. Heavy Light Trolley.6 miles per trip. it should be remembered that some surveys do not include persons below a minimum age.0 trips are taken on trolleybus. Mode Miles per Trip Commuter rail trips. The following figures describe the overall results. these results provide a reasonable assessment of the characteristics of transit users.8 bus. who are too young to complete a survey. 13 . On-board surveys are surveys conducted by transit agencies where transit riders.6 closer together.3 percent of transit trips include one transfer.0 average the longest. from more distant suburbs and Bus 3. 2009 60% 50% Unlinked 40% Trips 30% Passenger 20% Miles 10% 0% Bus Commuter Para.7 those that operate primarily in more congested central Paratransit 7. Report Year 2009 each mode varies because the average trip length on modes. Percent of Total by Mode. Modes with shorter trips are Light Rail 4. is highly variable. Other Rail transit Rail Rail bus Characteristics of Transit Passengers APTA's A Profile of Public Transportation Passenger Demographics and Travel Characteristics Reported in On-Board Surveys combined data from 150 surveys in which transit agencies asked 496. at 24 miles per trip. where origins and destinations are normally Trolleybus 1. This distinction is necessary because the number of trips taken by transit riders varies. Commuter Rail 24.3 percent of persons who ride transit transfer one time.3 more times during their trips which also contributes to a shorter average trip length per unlinked trip.com. on board transit vehicles or in stations. date. not for persons. not that 29. PASSENGERS The percentage of unlinked trips taken on each mode Table 7: Average Length of Unlinked Passenger and the percentage of passenger miles ridden among Trips in Miles by Mode. are given surveys to complete while they travel or to return later. The complete report can be read at www.8 areas. Despite some of these limitations in the survey data. Figure 6: Comparison of Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.000 passengers demographic and travel behavior questions. The shortest Ferry Boat 6. the information they provide is considered highly accurate.apta.9 communities and with a high proportion of work trips. as shown on Table 7. 1. Figure 8 should be read as 29. When examining these data. Because the surveys are already identified by mode of travel. 3.

passengeers who ride traansit at least fivve days per we eek. PASSENG GERS The most common c purpoose for a transitt trip is to go to o Fortyy percent of trransit riders trransfer one orr more work or re eturn home fro om work. include scchool trips tak ken on schoo ol buses—onlyy school tripss taken on tran nsit vehicles. Nearly tw wo-thirds of tran nsit trips are taken by regular riders. The e second mostt timess during their transit trips. Thesse data do nott comp plete their transsit journey. An A average of slightly s common iss to go to or return from scchool. and the e moree than 1. 14 .5 unlin nked trips are ta aken by each rider r to third is forr shopping or dining.

1 Other Rail Modes 8.8 3 3.331.0 7. Over one-fifth off riders accesss A littlle more than 20 2 percent of trrips are continu ued by a transit vehicle v by driving or riding to t a station orr transsferring to anotther transit veh hicle.7 Trolleybus 13. Other modes m operate e at lower speeds in denser areeas with more frequent stop seervices.8 7.7 160 0.9 345.219.3 177.0 4.9 10 0. and average speed data by mode from 1996 through 2009 can be fou und in the 2011 Public P Transporta ation Fact Book.6 312 2. Appendix A: Hisstorical Tables at www.1 12.5 14.319.3 104.3 4 4.apta.2 Vanpool 174.640.6 billion ve e miles of service.9 Vehicle milee data by mode frrom 1926 through 2009. T Table 8: Vehic cle Miles Ope erated.7 89.1 14.3 12.4 0 0. and Sp peed in Transsit Service by Mode. are e started whenn As with w accessing transit service e.0 7.9 15. and 12 percent stop.6 Total 5 5.9 1.2 37. trransit systems in the United States provide ed 4. Service Provide ed In 2009.9 10.8 20.co om.2 Ferry Boatt 4. another tra autom mobile.5 317.8 2.4 9. operating transit ehicle revenue vehicles fo or 312 million hours h of revenue service. 15 .6 3.3 6. Report Year 2009 Average Speed S Total Veehicle V Vehicle Total Vehicle Vehicle in Reveenue Mode Milees Reve enue Miles Hours Revenue Hou urs Servicce (Millio ons) (M Millions) (Millions) (Millions) (Miles perr Hour) Bus 2 2.1 0.3 Light Rail 90.011.4 4.8 1.5 10. vehicle hour h data by mod de from 1986 thrrough 2009.2 1.1 5 5. nearly 60 percent. The fastest servvice was providded by vanpoo ol and commutter rail service.3 Publico 40. PASSE ENGERS/SER RVICE PROV VIDED Most transit trips.2 31.0 174.529.4 4. most transit riders passengerss reach their trransit vehicle by b walking to a walk to their destinaation after leavving a transit ve ehicle.3 40. station or street s stop. and less than on ne-fifth by transferring from m of trrips are comp pleted by driving or riding in an ansit vehicle.0 1.1 Paratransitt 1.5 92 2. Vehiclle Hours Ope erated.3 Heavy Rail 684.7 1.5 Commuterr Rail 343. wh hich carry pas ssengers on loong trips over high speed ro outes.0 32 2.6 666.8 35.

8 98.5% 40.6% 1.047 vehicles in a typical peak period during 2009.0% 26. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.8% 6. with 65. Table 10 provides information on the characteristics of public transportation vehicles.apta.9 100. Buses are the largest fleet of vehicles.0 Vanpool 4.7% 38.0% 100.S.5% 99.0% 47. Figure 12: Increase of Transit Vehicle Accessiblity.234 1.8% 4.8 Ferry Boat 17.103 172.com.799 vehicles.4 58.apta.com.00% New Vehicles Delivered Number 3.995 Percent 37.7% 61.5 Paratransit 3.8 47.0% 9.0 Commuter Rail Locomotives 20.912 150 9.5 33. --- (a) Alternative-powered is defined as vehicles powered by anything other than diesel or gasoline.3% 10. but including particulate-trap- equipped buses.832 6.9% 6.792 69 87 0 1.3% 0.9% 76.0% 4.0% 98. transit systems operated 137. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www. The heavy rail fleet of 11.1% 85. Vehicle Characteristics data by mode from 1990 through 2010 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.587 6.5 Other Rail Modes 56.5 8.0% 39.2% 100.4% 34. (c) Self-propelled cars only Based on a sample from annual APTA Public Transportation Vehicle Database. (b) Accessible by lift.465 454 15.3% 11.2 Heavy Rail 21.893 Percent 37.5% 100.619 15.5% 4. Table 10: Vehicle Characteristics by Mode of Service As of January 2010 Percent Percent Rehabilitated Average Length Mode Average Age Alternatively Accessible (b) During Lifetime (Feet) Powered (a) Bus 7.0% 17.517 9.0% 62.2% 45. with 66.0 2.0 Light Rail 15.0% 0.6% 100. 39.7 All Modes --.5% 85. ramp.6% 21.6% 4.629 Revenue vehicles by mode data from 1926 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. or station infrastructure.377 is the largest rail vehicle fleet. 1993-2010 100% 80% 60% 40% 1993 2010 20% 0% Bus Commuter Paratransit Heavy Rail Light Rail Trolleybus Rail 16 .0% Vehicle Used in Maximum Period Service Number 52. out of a total of 169.506 vehicles available for peak service.127 54.9 100.4% 7.5% 35.6% 1.1 (c) 99.461 2.4% 59.0% 89.5% 170.8 Trolleybus 8.3% 82. while paratransit vehicles are a close second. Table 9: Revenue Vehicles by Mode Report Year 2009 Commuter Measurement Bus Paratransit Heavy Rail Light Rail Trolleybus Other Total Rail Vehicles Available for Maximum Service Number 64.0% 0.2% 0.5% 0.957 11.941 68.611 139.0% 90. VEHICLES Vehicles U.436 vehicles available for service.9% 6.3 Commuter Rail Cars 17.5 11.4% 38.1% --.068 531 18.

6% 2.6% 95.5% NA NA 13.4% Public Address System 91.6% NA NA 77.5% NA Restroom 0.0% Security or CCTV Type Camera 53. Increased security is demonstrated by the increase in buses equipped with closed circuit security cameras from 13 percent to 53 percent between 2001 and 2010.7% 49.6% 59.2% NA NA 25.1% 29.3% NA NA 54.1% Passenger-Operator Intercom 3.2% NA Automatic Passenger counter 31.2% 97.6% Electrical Outlets 1. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.4% Automated Stop Announcement 48.4% 3.8% 13.4% 31.2% 55. the heavy rail fleet from 83 percent to 99 percent. from 21 percent of the bus fleet to 60 percent. 17 . the transit vehicle fleet has reached near total accessibility to persons using wheelchairs and persons with other travel disabilities. from 32 percent to 72 percent.3% 18. VEHICLES As shown on Figure 12.0% 2.6% 69.com. Over the same period. From 1995 to 2010.3% 9. increased from 84 percent of vehicles accessible to 89 percent. Efficiency is enhanced by the growth of vehicle locator systems.2% 84.1% 22. the percentage of buses that are accessible increased from 60 percent to 99 percent. Enhanced amenities to improve passengers' trips include an increase in buses equipped with automated stop announcements from 10 percent to 48 percent in nine years and buses with exterior bicycle racks.3% WiFi 1.1% 7.5% NA = Not Applicable Based on a sample from annual APTA Public Transportation Vehicle Database.7% NA NA 20. The accessible portion of the paratransit fleet. the light rail fleet from 49 percent to 88 percent. and the trolleybus fleet from 47 percent to 100 percent. which improve the operation of bus fleets as well as improved availability of information on bus arrival times.1% 86. Table 11: Vehicle Equipment by Mode of Service as of January 2010 Commuter Amenity Bus Heavy Rail Light Rail Ferry Boat Rail Two-Way Radio 95.7% Automated Vehicle Locator or GPS 60.3% 45.1% Exterior Bicycle Rack 72.9% 55. Vehicle amenities data by mode from 2001 through 2010 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. Figure 13: Growth in Percentage of Buses with Passenger Equipment 2001-2010 80% 60% 40% 2001 2010 20% 0% Automated Stop Security or CCTV Exterior Bicycle Rack Automatic Vehicle Announcement Type Camera Locator or GPS As shown on Figure 13. the accessible portion of the commuter rail fleet went from 43 percent to 85 percent. the increase in the percentage of buses with equipment for providing customer amenities shows a dramatic effort made by the transit industry to make travel safer and easier and improve the efficiency of operation.3% 0.1% NA NA NA 22. where specific vehicles can be assigned to trips to meet a passenger's individual needs.1% 48.2% Traffic Light Preemption 5.2% 63.apta.1% 62.4% 86.9% 99.2% 94.

165390.510 2. LNG.623 Trolleybus 1. Transit agency capital employees are employees on transit agency staffs performing capitalized activities and do not include employees of vehicle manufacturers.1% 100.505 Commuter Rail 10.582 11.5% 42. Mainte.891 38.0% Heavy Rail 100. (a) 41. vehicle maintenance.271 49.0% (a) Unpowered vehicle. --.0% Trolleybus 94.799 19. 100.749 2. --.250 54.1 billion. 100.277 7. --.546 1. --.4% --. --.0% Vanpool --.0% Light Rail 98. --. Vehicle Power Sources data by mode from 1996 through 2010 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.274 28. --. --. 49.326 5.0% --. or other companies with capital investment contracts from transit agencies.com.9% 5.0% 0.0% Paratransit --. --.978 31.0% 100.203 8.com. Mode Electricity Diesel Fuel Other Gasoline Other Total and Blends (Hybrid) Bus 0. 4.261192.714 63.300 8. (b) 5.326 operating employees and 12. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.0% Commuter Rail Locomotives 11.1% 2.377 Paratransit 78. --.639100. Admin. --.619 capital employees. 100. for a total compensation of $24.917 1. and general administration. --. --.8% 1. Direct transit employees were paid a total $14. (a) >0.3% 93.0% Other Rail Modes 58.358 9.apta.0% 0.1% 65.7% --.3% 88.986 20 2.278 2. Table 13: Employees by Mode and Function Report Year 2009 Vehicle Non-Vehicle General Vehicle Operating Mode Mainte.2% 0.3% 1. building contractors.619 402.011 176 7.0% Ferry Boat --.8% 7. Capital Total Operations Total nance nance istration Bus 127.945 NR = Not Reported Employees by mode data from 1931 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.0% --.757 11. --.apta.556 42. engineering firms.319 297 212 158 1. 100. --.741 5. --. --.7% 18.006 Other 3. 100. (b) Overhead wire electric with diesel for off-wire operation.6% 100.4% --. --.256 Heavy Rail 19. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.6% 100.558 819 11. non-vehicle maintenance.609 3.265 552 1.326 12.8% 100. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT Table 12: Vehicle Power Sources by Mode of Service Percent of Vehicles as of January 2010 Electric and CNG.4% 100.223 2.2 billion and received benefits of $9.285 10.187 Total 245.786 15.301 1. Transit operating employees include workers in the functions of vehicle operations.9% --. --.6% 7.192 6.6% 0.2% 0. --.0% Commuter Rail Self- Propelled Cars 99.242 381 100.991 Light Rail 4.9 billion. Based on a sample from annual APTA Public Transportation Vehicle Database.995 195.7% --.868 33. --. Employees In 2009 the transit industry employed 390. 18 .

2 --.6 25.0 Secondary Reduction Due to Reduced Travel Distance Related to Public Transportation Related Location Decisions 3. 1. 3.885.apta.40 30.779. Public Transportation's Contribution to U.5 6.7 --.8 billion gallons of gasoline and reduce their own carbon dioxide emissions by 16. --. Both are available at www.6 4. --.6 2.5 145.9 Trolleybus 68.2 million metric tons.0 Light Rail 738. --.1 Heavy Rail 3.2 All Modes 6. --.7 95. Combined with savings from improved traffic flow due to transit's impact on reducing congestion and secondary land use and travel reduction impacts. --. --. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT Energy and Environment Riding public transportation is a significant way to cut passenger transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.S. transit passengers reduce their own use of fuel by the equivalent of 1. --.8 15. --.4 7. 0.34 3. --. Table 15: Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Mode of Service Report Year 2009 Electricity Fossil Fuels (Millions of Gallons) (Millions Mode Diesel LNG and CNG and of Kilowatt Gasoline Biodiesel Other Total Hours) Fuel Blends Blends Bus 0.6 40.38) (12.9 1.3 674.009. 0.0 --.com. --. --. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.0 --. --. 2008 and SAIC.2 --.1 71.7 37.4 100.0 Sources: ICF International. Table 14: Energy and Emission Benefits from Public Transportation Total Energy Savings (Billion Carbon Dioxide Emission Changes in Fuel Use Due To Public Transportation Gallons of Gasoline Reductions Equivalent) (Million Metric Tons) Reduction Directly from Riding Public Transportation as Replacement of Private Vehicle Miles. --.6 122. 0.3 47.1 1.com.7 --.1 Commuter Rail 1. 2007. Greenhouse Gas Reduction.0 Other 69. --.4 184.7 6.apta.7 25.0 Paratransit <0.7 660.8 455.6 --.2 (Less Fuel Currently Used by Public Transportation) (1.542. 19 . Energy Conservation and Greenhouse Gas Reduction.1 Total Savings Due to Public Transportation 4. 53.16 37. 1.80 16.3) Savings to Private Vehicle Drivers Because of Congestion Reduction Due to Public Transportation 0.2 96. transit reduces annual fuel use by the equivalent of 4.2 billion gallons of gasoline and carbon dioxide emissions by 37 million metric tons. --. --.3 Vehicle Fuel Consumption data by mode from 1945 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.5 141. Gross 1. --. Each year. --. The Broader Connection between Public Transportation.

1% 100.1% Facilities Subtotal 1.480.8 6.6 15.7 0. respectively.4 1. Heavy Light Trolley.333.751.8 80.6 5.05 Amtrak 0.0 16.03 and 0.207.5 35.4 1.7 4.5 2.5 59.0 84.0 1.03 Rail Transit 0. 20 .867. compared to 1.7 0.748. SAFETY/CAPITAL AND OPERATING EXPENSES Safety FTA data show that transit is among the safest ways to travel. Millions of Dollars Report Year 2009 Commut Para.0 565.7 158.3 557.8 1.0 14.0 237.9 114.0 22. Figure 14: Passenger Fatality Rates: 2003-2008 Motor Vehicle 1.5 6.4 0.1 39.3 0.3 10.1 244.2 1.4 0.1 20.8 0.3 36.0% --- (a) These are actual accrued expenditures.5 116.5% Rolling Stock Subtotal 2. Heavy rail investments are the largest modal capital expenditures. followed by bus capital investments.3% Maintenance Facilities 574. % of Type Bus Other Total -er Rail transit Rail Rail bus Total Guideway 100.2 billion in operating expenditures and $17. Table 16: Capital Expense by Mode and Type.0 2.8 119. transit was a $55.6 0.227.6 16.2 17.8% Administrative Buildings 159.9 461.311. at $6.9 billion spent on capital investments.0% % of Total 23. 2009 Rail Safety Statistics Report.4 560.4 2.3 227.138.05 deaths per 100 million passenger miles.439.092. or other non-money costs. Capital expense data from 1992 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. Amtrak and commuter rail also had low fatality rates of 0.3% Communication and Information Systems 240.8 1 1.02 0 0.1 6.045.6 13.8 0.7 0.2 456.0% Rolling Stock 2.42 Commuter Rail 0.103.3 9.2 0.8 5.4 10.6 1.4 1.000 passenger miles Source: Federal Transit Administration/USDOT.5 2.4% 0.2 38.0 228.1% 15.0 29. The largest type of capital investment was for guideways.2 billion.9% All Other Subtotal 484.1 4.0 2.0 6.7 412.1 410.0 178.1% 2.539.4 763.8 10.720. depreciations of value.06 Transit Bus 0.6 0.6 1.com.2% Other 140.2 1.3 404.0 1. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www. at $5.4 28.2 1.000. From 2003 to 2008 transit bus travel resulted in 0.2 526. at $4.7 5.0 182.4% Total 4.9 368.2 billion industry with $37.6 234.919.5 32.8 billion.1 billion.06 per 100 million passenger miles.7 1.4 32.1 34.7% Passenger Stations 341.4 95.5 1.4 358.686.2 50.477.1 14.9 5.4 5.844.176.383.9 3. followed by vehicles.2 0.5 13.5 1.5 37.400.058.3% 34.6 94.8% 20.7 2.7 3.42 deaths for motor vehicles.6 Fatalities per 100.7 3. and do not include debts. at $6.5 2.9 3.6% Fare Revenue Collection Equipment 103.5 57.apta.9 6. 2009 Capital and Operating Expenses In 2009.2 5.0 137.9 821.646.4 billion.4% 4.1% Service Vehicles 38.647.2 100.6 81.7 246.

9 232. Table 18: Operating Expense by Mode and Object Class.2 17.6 -912.4 361.453.00% --- Operating Expense data from 1932 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.775.245.3 133.310.349.409.0 22.5 1.5 995.5 14.3 547.8 5.6 114.966.296. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.3% 16.2 9.59% Materials and Supplies 2.5 1.164.5 528.2 6.041.9 511.4 3.577.2 16.409.4 23.6% 2. Millions of Dollars Report Year 2009 Commut.2 21.3 9.2% 12. Millions of Dollars Report Year 2009 Commut. Table 17: Operating Expense by Mode and Function Class.610. the type of activity performed.966. the type of goods or services purchased.5 995.48% Casualty and Liability 432.9 232.9 61. Heavy Trolley- Type Bus Light Rail Other Total er Rail transit Rail bus Operating Expenditures 18.8 1.3 1.9 2.apta.9 53.3 224. Among the five functions operating funds are applied to. and fringe benefits for employees of transit agencies account for almost two- thirds of operating expenses.116.65% Services 1.2 82. and non- vehicle maintenance.9 61.3 693. % of Type Bus Light Rail Other Total er Rail transit Rail bus Total Salaries and Wages 7.467.2 111.647.3 38.741.4 1.926.224.3 5.8 184.4% 13.5 100.6 3.2% 12.133. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.0 185.6 42.0 185.7% 100.8% 0.5% 100.6 89.4 143.7 3.5 6.26% Utilities 230.7 3.330.7 -873.625.1 23.6 318.5 421.1 5.3% Purchased Transportation 1.0% Non-Vehicle Maintenance 712.7 421.1 12.0% General Administration 2.310.552.538.0 Capital Expenditures 4.6% Vehicle Maintenance 3.5 995.5 2.9 314.5 6.751.9% 3.2 -9.138. Millions of Dollars Report Year 2009 Commut.595.9 232.6 -2. operations accounts for almost half of expenses.7 91.704.5 35.953.364.5 580.9 31.2 Total Expenditures 22.458. CAPITAL AND OPERATING FUNDING Operating expenses are measured in two ways: by function.6 310.2 128.193.254.9 4. Heavy Trolley. Para.3% 16.056.7 851.8% 0.0% Total 18.0 106.7 112.0% Expense data from 1932 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.03% Other -7.160.4% 13.538.730.0 55.5 6.2 5.1 427.5 95.9% 3.1 14.1 5.310.5% 2.224.5 2.com.7 4.5 6.0 4.8 37.0 4.45% Total 18.0 100% % of Total 50.apta.5 1.2 2.2 14.3 22.1 485.3 -141.212. Heavy Trolley. % of Type Bus Light Rail Other Total er Rail transit Rail bus Total Vehicle Operations 9.2 111.2 260.1 -2.625.0 100.3 547.438.6 717.5 7.1 11.2 1.344.122. purchased transportation.227.7 549.2 1.638.00% % of Total 50.4% 22.4% 10. general administration.6 2.5 1.9 255. Para.409.704.0 6.5 266.245.997.5 1.apta.625.7% 9.0 367. Para.4 517.7 119.1 5.966.8 37. wages. Table 19: Total Expense by Mode.6% 2.7 54.741.4 788.377.com.4 1.7% 100.6 14.2 2.0 4.5 14.704.0 171.2% 0.1 17.com. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.8 62. Salaries.7 4.028.7 4.919.9 196.4 363.4 0.858.0 45.6 1.245.2 % of Total 41.3 39. and by object.5 2.577.29% Purchased Transportation 1.0 4.8 37.16% Fringe Benefits 5.0 221.4 0. 21 .4% 13.8 26.4 763.842.9 368. followed by vehicle maintenance.7 1.0% --- Operating expense data from 1932 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.

892.273. together with state and local financial assistance. Passenger fares and other agency earnings account for 37 percent of operating costs.613. providing 42 percent of capital funds compared to 8 percent of operating funds.229.8% 12.147. 1995-2009 9.000 3.077.3 11.000 1.857.548.6 8.2 2.7 2.0 38. local.3 57. Directly Total Type Other ger Total Gener.3% 42.598. 30. --.7% 14.8 7. Local State Federal Total Funds Earnings Fares ated Capital Funding.000 8.6 14.1 3. and federal governments.3 42.614.156.685.2% 100.369.3 18.5% 4.8% 19. Millions of Dollars --. Table 20: Funding Sources Report Year 2009 Transit Agency Funds Government Funds Passen.5% 14.7 24.6 9.apta.548.206. CAPITAL AND OPERATING FUNDING Capital and Operating Funding Transit operations are funded by passenger fares.8 8.000 2. local.000 Millions of Dollars 6.0% Operating Funding. 5.000 4. The federal role is more significant for the capital program.917. Directly generated government funds.3% 8.229.5% 100.8% 37.8 2.2 2. Figure 14: Growth in Capital Funding by Source. Millions of Dollars 12. Millions of Dollars 12.471.com. --.275.275.8 Percent of Operating Funding 31. --.0% Total Funding.4% 21. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.3% 19. other transit agency earnings.4% 6.0% 25.3 Percent of Capital Funding --. --.315.9 10.5% 5.000 7. and financial assistance from state.8 12.000 5. in cases where the transit agency is functioning as a local government.542.5% 25. .0% 100.6% 100.000 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Federal Assistance State Assistance Local Plus Directly Generated Assistance 22 .5 18. Capital investment is funded only by government funds.6 14.1 Percent of Total Funding 21.2 2.762.0% Funding sources data from 1926 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. and state government assistance combine for 56 percent of all funding. The majority of revenue for operations comes from passenger fares.5% 22.2% 62.273.1% 74.

00 $1.273.3% NA 23.0% 30. (b) Fixed-route service only. 23 . the transit mode that represents the longest trip length for passengers.2% 33.5% 29.3% 50.2 Average Revenue per Unlinked Trip $0. Fare data from 1926 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.1 million.75 $0.000 2.3 483.50 Lowest Adult Base Cash Fare (a) $0. $374.3% 100.com.88 $1.3% NA 46. unweighted average.8% 50.88 $1.88 $1.6% 81.25 $2.1% 20.94 Median Adult Base Cash Fare (a) $1.000 Millions of Dollars 10.50 $2.00 $0.69 $2.961.1% Systems with Distance/Zone Surcharges (a) 14.6% Systems with Smart Cards (a) 18.91 $1. passenger fares are lower for bus trips and relatively similar for light rail and heavy rail. Heavy Light Trolley- Bus Total -er Rail transit Rail Rail bus Passenger Fares.00 $1.6 68.00 $24.apta.81 $1.0% 21.000 4.00 $6.18 Highest Adult Base Cash Fare (a) $7.0% 20.00 $24.20 $1.2% (a) Based on sample of systems from APTA 2010 Public Transportation Fare Database.8 2.0% 43.00 Average Adult Base Cash Fare (a) $1.00 $2.05 $2. 1995-2009 16.54 $1. (c) Fixed-route service only (d) Includes fare revenue for other modes not listed.6% 18. but in general.0% 5.801.50 $6.7% 8. CAPITAL AND OPERATING FUNDING Figure 15: Growth in Operating Funding by Source.25 $1.00 $2.3% 18.000 14.000 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Passenger Fares and Other Earnings Local Plus Directly Generated Assistance State Assistance Federal Assistance Table 21: Passenger Fares by Mode.8% NA 61.8% 45.0 390.00 $2.8% NA 7. Revenue generated from passenger fares varies across transit modes.66 $1.1 (d)12. Report Year 2009 Commut Para.000 6.8% NA 53.91 $4. The highest levels of average revenue are generated by commuter rail.00 $1.000 12.2% 18.50 $4.00 Systems with Peak Period Surcharges (a) 3. Millions of Dollars 4.1% 50.00 $2.8% 0.3 3.6% Systems with Transfer Surcharges (a) 31.6% Systems with Magnetic Cards (a) 46.84 $0.000 8.2% 6.194. Fare policies vary across agencies.09 $0.

with roadway modes on Table 22 and rail modes and ferry boat on Table 27. only the largest 50 agencies of each mode are listed. Most buses operate in fixed-route service on regular schedules. are accessible for wheelchairs by lifts or ramps. Some general paratransit services are operated during late- night and weekend hours in place of fixed-route services. and operational features. Nearly all buses 26 and 28. paratransit. 24 . followed by tables listing agency-specific information on unlinked passenger trips and passenger miles. A mode is a system for carrying transit passengers. Paratransit mode data are reported on pages transfer when boarding their bus. Bus service is provided by rubber-tired vehicles powered by engines on the vehicle. Data are presented on two summary tables of national information. By law. Bus service is a fixed route scheduled service provided in communities throughout the country. MODAL DATA Modal Data Tables 23 through 33 provide extensive detail on characteristics of the various modes of transit operations. Paratransit service vehicles travel on roads and streets but take passengers directly from their origins to their destinations. defined both by the type of vehicle they use. Paratransit service is provided primarily by vans. General paratransit service is not required by law and is often open to larger segments of the public or all riders. operating characteristics of the service they provide. described by a specific right-of-way. The mode of service in most cities is buses. and most can carry bicycles on racks in front of the bus. Given the large number of bus. Paratransit service takes passengers directly to their and passengers pay a fare or present a pass or destinations. accessible paratransit service must be provided in all areas served by regular route transit service to persons with disabilities or those otherwise unable to use fixed-route service. Bus mode data are reported on pages 26 and 27. and vanpool agencies. technology. and the travel needs of the riding public for which they are designed. Transit service is provided by a variety of modes.

Light rail mode on pages 30 and 32. Heavy rail provides Commuter rail service is characterized by high-speed. Light rail is allow quick boarding and alighting by passengers. and or in roads and streets. Commuter rail service is provided on regular railroads or former railroad rights-of-way. It is usually in denser. commuter rail. 25 . of any transit mode. Streetcar service is a type of light rail service with Light rail is a mode of service provided by single frequent stops with nearly the entire route operated in vehicles or short trains on either private right-of-way streets.: heavy rail. Trains are made up Heavy rail service is provided by electric rail cars on of either self-propelled cars or cars hauled by private rights-of-way. designed to carry a "light" load of passenger traffic compared to heavy rail.S. stations from high level platforms. data are reported on pages 30 and 32. Commuter rail mode data are reported Heavy rail service provides the greatest passenger capacity on page 30 and 31. high speed service with the ability to carry "heavy" infrequent-stop service over longer distances from loads of passengers. high-traffic areas. and light rail. MODAL DATA Three rail modes provide most rail transit service operated in the U. Commuter rail provides high-speed congestion free travel for distant surburbs to the business areas of the nation's largest metropolitan areas. Streetcars provide a type of light rail service characterized by more frequent stops and shorter trips in higher density Light rail provides quiet service on private rights-of-way and areas. Passengers board in stations. Streetcar data are included as part of light rail data city streets in many American urban areas. The trains are boarded in locomotives. Heavy rail mode data are reported on pages 30 and 31. Passengers board in stations the vehicles are designed for lower speeds and to or from track side stops in streets. outlying areas into the commercial centers of metropolitan areas.

3 $11.6 $39.0 0.5 Rolling Stock (Millions) $2.0 26 .7 104.8 4. Passenger (Millions) 21.953. Report Year 2009 Statistical Category Bus Paratransit Publico Trolleybus Vanpool Systems.4 $367.4 1.477.3 $2.858. $2.0 $4.0 Revenue Vehicles with Alternative Power Source 33. Operating 192.4 $0.5 Revenue per Unlinked Trip.438.5% Employees.8 Other (Millions) -$7.5 $150. Vehicle Operations 127.986 471 Employees.7 0. 0.5 3. 100.3 $89.2 40.7 Operating Expense by Function Class: Vehicle Operations (Millions) $9.7 Other (Millions) $484.5 $0. General Administration 19. 297 71 Employees.0 $114.452 190 40 104 32 Miles.0 -$9.5 3.5% 8.2 40. Non-Vehicle Maintenance 11.1 Other Fossil Fuel Consumed (Gallons. train.477 176 168 1.6 $8.3 10.1 Services (Millions) $1.4 $11.3 1. Passengers (Millions) $4.0 Miles.8% 89.3 Hours.1 Materials and Supplies (Millions) $2.868 78.138.2 $1.66 $2. Vehicle Total (Millions) 2.5 $54.458.0 $44.587 54.5 Casualty and Liability (Millions) $432.3 37.1 $53.6 Operating Expense by Object Class: Salaries and Wages (Millions) $7.0 $23.1 --.91 $2. Unlinked Passenger (Millions) 5. Buildings (Millions) $1.2 $0.3 Speed.8 $483. 158 337 Employees.546 --. Number of 1.2 $0. 1.3 $310.0% 4.9 --.799 1. Average (Years) 7.3 92.5 1. Ferry boat is a water-borne transit mode.54 $1.577.3 $2.0 $57.7 Utilities (Millions) $230.957 5.75 Expense.704.9 Electricity Consumed (kWh.1 3. $5. Ferry boats are the largest transit vehicles. 212 9 Employees.013 Revenue Vehicles Operated at Maximum Service 52.8 <0. Vehicle Total (Millions) 177. Millions) 218.8 $1.557 454 10.538.0 $232. or auto and to make lengthy water crossing.116. Passenger only and passenger/vehicle ferries are both found in transit service.319.8 Expense.300 --.582 8.961.7 $0.6 12. Table 22: Roadway Modes National Totals.610.5 $13.0% 2.5 $511.7 174. Ferry boat mode data are reported on pages 30 and 33.0 $5.8 $1.1 Fares Collected.32 $0.529.517 4. Capital 2.331.5 14.9 $53.011.0 11.0% --. $15.9 $47.4 $1.9 7.832 68.9 $19.477 1.995 381 --. Millions) 455.4 --.9 --.639 --.9 4.1 $88.176.0 $112.5 Facilities.0 $14.757 --. Capital Total (Millions) $4. 1.3 $53. Average $0. Vehicle Maintenance 33.1 $116.5 --. Millions) 0.0 Purchased Transportation (Millions) $1.088 6. Vehicle in Revenue Service.9 $565. $22.041.966.6 $54.1 174.2 $1.1 $68.0 $23.620 531 12. Vehicle Revenue (Millions) 160.1 $1.7 --.741.242 --. 68.3 $485.8 Non-vehicle Maintenance (Millions) $712. Ferries allow travelers to avoid very long trips by bus.741. Average (Miles) 3.319 55 Employees. Operating Total (Millions) $18.5 3.0 $21.2 $0.7 $0.6 33.2 13.7 7.9 $17.0 $57.1 $0.9 $53.8 4.8 $41.5 $1.5 $38.6 $0. 100.8 1.1 $224. Vehicle Revenue (Millions) 2.261 11.5 --. 20 4 Diesel Fuel Consumed (Gallons.6 $119.0% --.5 71.0 $4.5 $763.8% Revenue Vehicles Accessible 99.2 Miles.2 $35.122.577.510 100. Stations.0 Vehicle Maintenance (Millions) $3. Guideway.7 Purchased Transportation (Millions) $1.070 Trip Length.6 Fringe Benefits (Millions) $5.2 General Administration (Millions) $2.0 Hours. Average (mph) 12.8 4.6 113.0 $82.4 0.693 Revenue Vehicle Age.700 1 5 77 Trips.1 $0. 8.5 $80.4 $0.3 Revenue Vehicles Available for Maximum Service 64. MODAL DATA Ferry boat service can greatly reduce the distance people would travel if forced to drive around bodies of water.8 1.7 $0. Admin.

009.100.816.768. DC 29.214. NY 119.9 (a) Metropolitan Bus Authority(MBA) San Juan.(LACMTA) Los Angeles.819.7 (a) City of Tucson(COT) Tucson. NY 21.629.1 7 City and County of Honolulu DOT Services(DTS) Honolulu.5 43 Pace .3 24 Hudson Transit Lines.965.8 33 Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority(VTA) San Jose.650.855.7 24 189.8 15 Regional Transp.7 31 Dallas Area Rapid Transit(DART) Dallas.727.4 16 285. NY 842.437. CA 60.654. PA 180. 27 .903. NY 31. WA 91.0 (a) 123.4 42 Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transp.838.296.5 49 Ride-On Montgomery County Transit Washington.207.4 (a) Utah Transit Authority(UTA) Salt Lake City. MN 66.0 46 104.7 50 (a) Not among 50 largest bus transit agencies in this category.795. VA 15. PR 18.2 27 Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority(CMTA) Austin.767.4 8 MTA Bus Company(MTABUS) New York. CA 21. FL 36.649.2 11 Metropolitan Transit Auth.195.8 36 Metropolitan Suburban Bus Auth. IL 318. CA 14.627.3 (a) 184. MI 12.517.(SMART) Detroit.8 50 65.4 41 103.805. TX 43.433.8 25 140.250.798.048. CA 50.401. CA 64.6 5 1.2 45 82.4 21 192. OH 22.672.804. of Southern Nevada(RTC) Las Vegas.3 8 230.4 (a) 230.668.7 31 166. PA 58.904.417.5 (a) 94.149. Authority(SEPTA) Philadelphia.4 10 397.8 (a) 197.671.795.5 23 183. MO 32.001.6 9 Denver Regional Transportation District(RTD) Denver.653.443. TX 38. CA 17. RI 19.9 5 New Jersey Transit Corporation(NJ TRANSIT) New York.460. IL 29.2 14 Tri-County Metropolitan Transp.3 12 Miami-Dade Transit(MDT) Miami.594. FL 23.657.399.031.539.348.5 (a) 126.222.787. GA 72.056.2 41 Foothill Transit Los Angeles. UT 20. MI 38.152.203.5 39 Broward County Transportation Department(BCT) Miami.3 27 173.com.(Short Line) New York. CO 77. NC 21. WA 13. CA 30.296.313.1 28 188.575.Suburban Bus Division(PACE) Chicago.319.1 44 Rhode Island Public Transit Authority(RIPTA) Providence.4 2 Chicago Transit Authority(CTA) Chicago.134.7 35 151. TX 72.160.495.468. AZ 21.329.3 26 171.4 42 78.190.2 19 201. Comm.4 22 259. District Commission of Hampton Roads(HRT) Virginia Beach. Inc.(SORTA / Metro) Cincinnati.4 32 153.0 29 City of Phoenix Public Transit Department(Valley Metro) Phoenix.0 6 Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority(MARTA) Atlanta.4 30 132.(MTA Long Island Bus) New York.8 3 739.790. Inc. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database.7 12 405.7 46 Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority(NFT Metro) Buffalo.3 18 Metro Transit Minneapolis. NY 3. New York.5 4 529. CA 34.4 34 146.2 38 107.975.647.8 2 1.4 49 59.9 17 Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District(AC Transit) San Francisco. WI 46.396. OH 38.485.716. MA 100.6 1 1. NY 30.7 11 460.353.6 35 City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation(LADOT) Los Angeles.5 47 73.2 45 Santa Monica's Big Blue Bus(Big Blue Bus ) Los Angeles. NY 1. NV 66.4 23 Orange County Transportation Authority(OCTA) Los Angeles.862. District of Oregon(TriMet) Portland. HI 77.5 40 Westchester County Bee-Line System New York. MD 91.5 20 Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority(ST) Seattle.886. CA 29.223.8 7 327.0 13 383.616.119.8 (a) Academy Lines.033.056.954. Auth.055. OH 17.267.267.2 15 474.085.010.029.4 48 Transp.778.8 40 136.890.112. NY 3. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank MTA New York City Transit(NYCT) New York.747.5 1 Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transp.0 14 391.849. FL 75.658.948.0 6 423.2 (a) 96.2 30 City of Detroit Department of Transportation(DDOT) Detroit.208.769.6 3 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority(WMATA) Washington.apta.9 19 San Francisco Municipal Railway(MUNI) San Francisco.9 39 202.444.570.787. Texas(Metro) Houston.7 20 254.603.7 25 Port Authority of Allegheny County(Port Authority) Pittsburgh.4 37 93.980.0 36 77.637.4 43 82.7 48 69. CA 386. Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.9 33 126.7 (a) Long Beach Transit(LBT) Los Angeles.6 16 San Diego Metropolitan Transit System(MTS) San Diego.5 29 171.1 34 Bi-State Development Agency(METRO) St. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.8 47 Trans-Bridge Lines. TX 42. Louis. NY 170.735.8 32 The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority(GCRTA) Cleveland.1 13 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston. AZ 50.3 (a) Sacramento Regional Transit District(Sacramento RT) Sacramento.7 26 Milwaukee County Transit System(MCTS) Milwaukee.953. NY 3. OR-WA 68.8 22 Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority(LYNX) Orlando.6 37 VIA Metropolitan Transit(VIA) San Antonio. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www.517.3 28 Suburban Transit Corporation(Coach USA) New York. Inc.903.605.367.082.738.3 9 208. New York.9 4 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transp. MODAL DATA Table 23: 50 Largest Bus Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.746.562. of Harris County.894.2 18 268.0 17 252.3 38 Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Auth.2 (a) Central Ohio Transit Authority(COTA) Columbus.608.515.284. CA 95.319.982.5 44 99.039.427.(King County Metro) Seattle.242.7 21 Maryland Transit Administration(MTA) Baltimore. DC 136.2 (a) Charlotte Area Transit System(CATS) Charlotte.4 10 King County Department of Transp.774.784.0 (a) 92.

(SMART) Detroit.8 23 Delaware Transit Corporation(DTC) Philadelphia.4 35 Bi-State Development Agency(METRO) St.798.983.9 47 3.7 2 Pace-Suburban Bus Div.226.5 49 Montachusett Regional Transit Authority(MART) Leominster.4 7 Metropolitan Transit Auth. IL 2.7 46 Transit Authority of River City(TARC) Louisville.038.8 30 6.8 20 VIA Metropolitan Transit(VIA) San Antonio.511.1 17 City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation(LADOT) Los Angeles. CA 2.708.8 2 27.(King County Metro) Seattle.3 (a) 4.223. Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.920.7 21 12. CA 361.902. WI 1.5 46 6.5 34 Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority(CMTA) Austin. FL 686. MODAL DATA Table 24: 50 Largest Paratransit Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.6 6 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston.3 45 Riverside Transit Agency(RTA) Riverside.192.7 39 Suffolk County Dept. FL 891. MA 1. of Public Works . PA 454. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database. of Harris County.0 (a) 5. FL 916.214. OR 440.331.412. WA 656.677. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.4 44 5. TX 1. MI 515.413. MI 781. HI 840.799. PA 1.382.678.7 18 City and County of Honolulu DOT Services(DTS) Honolulu.767.2 24 11.apta.8 29 9. WA 1.0 33 Ben Franklin Transit(BFT) Kennewick. District of Oregon(TriMet) Portland.0 26 9.2 (a) Blue Water Area Transp.4 34 7.4 48 6. OH 540.845.124.482.785.3 3 35.4 (a) 5. Authority(SEPTA) Philadelphia. CA 1.5 4 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transp.026.6 14 13.4 26 Denver Regional Transportation District(RTD) Denver.0 22 Dallas Area Rapid Transit(DART) Dallas.6 41 4.024.0 25 Mass Transportation Authority(MTA) Flint.430.002.1 22 9. MN 1.088.5 18 11.831.9 48 City of Phoenix Public Transit Department(Valley Metro) Phoenix.671.0 40 4.450.3 25 4.2 1 66.4 32 6.7 47 Spokane Transit Authority(STA) Spokane.7 10 16.237.822.366. MA 396. FL 218.0 43 Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority(MARTA) Atlanta.142.464. TX 1. PA 900.5 (a) Utah Transit Authority(UTA) Salt Lake City.685. Div.5 15 7.153.7 (a) Space Coast Area Transit(SCAT) Palm Bay.3 3 Access Services Incorporated(ASI) Los Angeles.1 1 New Jersey Transit Corporation(NJ TRANSIT) New York.0 19 6.0 12 10.534.9 45 4. NY 3. UT 500.234.4 24 Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transp.001.2 50 (a) Not among 50 largest paratransit agencies in this category.705.839.4 27 Metropolitan Council Minneapolis.8 19 Milwaukee County Transit System(MCTS) Milwaukee. RI 590.338.612.Suburban Bus Division(PACE) Chicago.0 15 Port Authority of Allegheny County(Port Authority) Pittsburgh. Benefit Area Auth.7 11 14.Transp.478.552.5 17 7.433.7 23 14.7 13 4.1 8 Orange County Transportation Authority(OCTA) Los Angeles. CA 503.1 27 11.067.5 37 3. WA 463. ADA Paratransit Services(PACE) Chicago. TX 1.5 12 Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority(VTA) San Jose.262.4 38 Omnitrans(OMNI) Riverside.2 43 3.071. CA 1.284.4 28 King County Department of Transp.290.9 5 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority(WMATA) Washington.823.581. Comm.8 16 10.634. NV 1.(ST) New York. GA 479. AZ 468.. Palm Beach County(PalmTran) Miami.3 49 3. 28 .6 29 Tri-County Metropolitan Transp.971. CA 1.2 7 11.7 (a) Broward County Transportation Department(BCT) Miami.5 8 12.007.3 35 5.(Blue Water Area Transit) Port Huron.800.7 41 Lake County Board of County Commissioners(LCBOCC) Leesburg.8 31 Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority(LYNX) Orlando.596.9 38 4.8 13 Miami-Dade Transit(MDT) Miami.4 16 Board of County Comm. CA 1. MI 488. MD 1. AZ 533.484.1 36 6.4 9 Maryland Transit Administration(MTA) Baltimore.3 50 5.887.4 21 LACMTA .0 28 10. OR 1. CA 1.8 5 17.7 (a) Lehigh and Northampton Transportation Authority(LANTA) Allentown.812.450.0 (a) 4.5 6 23.679. CO 1.0 (a) 4. MI 669.687. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank MTA New York City Transit(NYCT) New York.3 33 8.550..8 14 San Francisco Municipal Railway(MUNI) San Francisco. KY 395. MO 665.609.778.3 11 Pace .6 4 21.353.(Pierce Transit) Seattle.9 (a) 5.2 36 Capital Area Transportation Authority(CATA) Lansing.1 32 City of Tucson(COT) Tucson.0 9 16.4 42 The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority(GCRTA) Cleveland.1 44 Metro Mobility Minneapolis. IL 1. FL 465.7 30 Pierce County Transp.004.173. PA 1.7 39 4.908.3 (a) Rhode Island Public Transit Authority(RIPTA) Providence. FL 1. Texas(Metro) Houston. DC 2.293.140.3 (a) 4.com.8 31 5.230. CA 686.6 40 Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District(AC Transit) San Francisco.078. NY 5. WA 521.290.3 42 1. of Southern Nevada(RTC) Las Vegas.3 (a) San Diego Metropolitan Transit System(MTS) San Diego. CA 442.611.1 10 Regional Transportation Comm.4 20 10. TX 702.6 37 Salem Area Mass Transit District(Cherriots) Salem.107. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www. MN 669.699.944. Louis. NY 410.Small Operators(LACMTA) Los Angeles.

3 42 8.4 37 9.1 40 VPSI. Inc.7 13 New Jersey Transit Corporation(NJ TRANSIT) New York.4 23 Kings County Area Public Transit Agency(KART) Hanford. MODAL DATA Table 25: 50 Largest Vanpool Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.5 15 29. of Greater Birmingham(RPCGB) Birmingham. WA 91.172. CA 2.931.311.1 35 Michigan Department of Transportation(MDOT) Detroit. NC 533.0 43 4. AZ 1.665. Auth. WA 1. WA 3.258. FL 83.214. OR 85.672.4 48 Reg.com. TX 880.5 44 Metro(Metro) Portland. AK 205.2 17 Pierce County Transp.0 37 North Front Range Metro.0 44 3. WA 862. Texas(Metro) Houston.9 43 Space Coast Area Transit(SCAT) Palm Bay. Miami. GA 172. CO 168.571.7 38 Regional Transportation Authority(RTA) Nashville.668.9 27 6.937.0 19 24. Honolulu.3 39 5.3 34 Spokane Transit Authority(STA) Spokane.3 48 2.096.518.8 9 Greater Hartford Ridesharing Corporation(GHRC) Hartford.911. CA 584.124.0 6 Marietta .7 7 36.(NFRMPO) Fort Collins.4 11 30.7 10 35.VPSI.5 25 Des Moines Area Regional Transit Authority(DART) Des Moines.5 4 103. IL 1. WA 99.2 46 2Plus Partners in Transportation.3 25 11. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank King County Department of Transp.3 24 7.8 30 5. GA 898.8 4 Metropolitan Transit Auth.789.086.2 11 Honolulu .9 39 Denver Regional Council of Governments(DRCOG) Denver.4 31 Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority(LYNX) Orlando.011. Louis.787. CT 110.337. WA 209.177.261.0 8 Ben Franklin Transit(BFT) Kennewick. MN 193.5 29 County of Volusia.340. HI 696.0 22 22.465.7 26 13.4 3 Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transp.1 35 6. CA 792. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database. TX 125.078.890.710.922.587.2 38 5.7 30 Madison County Transit District(MCT) St.787.3 20 15.0 45 Whatcom Transportation Authority(WTA) Bellingham. Atlanta.375. VA 165.0 32 Douglas County Rideshare(Rideshare) Atlanta.6 24 Kitsap Transit Bremerton. dba: VOTRAN(Votran) Daytona Beach.0 16 14. NC 320. VA 321.6 47 (a) Not among 50 largest vanpool agencies in this category.229. FL 132. Planning Org. 29 .090. Anchorage Anchorage.8 5 43.264.1 49 Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority(HART) Tampa. WA 846. WA 100. NY 821. FL 113. TX 318. FL 621. Benefit Area Auth.VPSI.489.apta.4 28 Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission(SPC) Pittsburgh.353.2 27 Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation(PART) Greensboro. of Hampton Roads(HRT) Virginia Beach.2 10 Snohomish County PTBA(Community Transit) Seattle. NC 204. MS 105.7 17 24.1 (a) 3. Inc.459.3 18 13.VPSI.0 45 4.6 41 6.330. CT 874.670. AL 106.9 28 8.3 9 24.8 22 Greater Richmond Transit Co.3 36 5.6 49 4.110.6 46 4. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www.3 41 Coast Transit Authority(CTA) Gulfport-Biloxi. CO 151.0 18 Charlotte Area Transit System(CATS) Charlotte.7 1 60.T.2 40 4.2 47 4.208.1 21 13.614.VPSI.487.(LACMTA) Los Angeles.4 31 8.0 32 --.7 26 Transportation District Comm. Inc(2Plus) Bridgeport. Planning Comm. Dallas.7 12 Orange County Transportation Authority(OCTA) Los Angeles.5 16 Miami Lakes . IA 312.9 6 52.3 50 2.4 15 Dallas .7 1 San Diego Association of Governments(SANDAG) San Diego.0 5 Phoenix . Inc. WA 286.) Olympia. MI 227. MO 315.4 34 5.907.809.1 8 46. TN 154.425. TX 535.619. FL 182. UT 1.7 14 Dallas Area Rapid Transit(DART) Dallas. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.245.Suburban Bus Division(PACE) Chicago.5 33 7. Phoenix. PA 215.088.374.1 2 71.483. WA 680.0 13 27.1 29 6.3 21 Intercity Transit(I. CA 2. Inc.(GRTC Transit System) Richmond.5 2 Pace .7 20 Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority(CMTA) Austin. GA 179.8 33 VIA Metropolitan Transit(VIA) San Antonio.1 50 Yakima Transit(YT) Yakima.117. Authority(TTA) Durham. TX 2.527.155.5 23 14.8 42 Skagit Transit Mount Vernon.5 36 Georgia Regional Transportation Authority(GRTA) Atlanta.258.778. of Harris County.7 19 Research Triangle Regional Public Transp.8 14 28.(King County Metro) Seattle.304.3 12 23.VPSI. (a) Metropolitan Council Minneapolis. Inc.(Pierce Transit) Seattle.6 7 Utah Transit Authority(UTA) Salt Lake City.029.962.3 3 111.

2 2 35.8 4. Vehicle Revenue (Millions) 317.5 $61.7 0.0 $130.9 35.84 $1. Report Year 2009 Commuter Other Rail Statistical Category Heavy Rail Light Rail Ferry Boat Rail Modes Systems.2 $111.409.779.686.6 $109.2 $27.8 56.885.3 7.1 -$2.8 Revenue Vehicles with Alternative Power Source (a) 99.4% 98.0 0.133.775.254.2 Electricity Consumed (kWh.0 37. 30 .720.326 2.127 9.6 Casualty and Liability (Millions) $106.6 $73.9 666.7 $3.1 $788. Operating Total (Millions) $4.6 Non-vehicle Maintenance (Millions) $717. CA 72. Non-Vehicle Maintenance 6. Admin.3 $580.301 353 190 Employees.2 32.9 $49.9 $2.203 19.461 2. Guideway.0 4 Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database. Stations.1 $410.285 313 628 Employees.941 11.801.638.6 $3.0 0.9 1.5 3 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston.241 Employees.9 4 6.271 1.278 49.4 Purchased Transportation (Millions) $547.0 0. Average (Miles) 24.5 5 8.1 Operating Expense by Function Class: Vehicle Operations (Millions) $1.1 Hours.749 621 3.7 $88. Vehicle Total (Millions) 343.558 1.2 $111.624. Vehicle Revenue (Millions) 10.170.5% 100.4 Hours.04 $1. Vehicle Total (Millions) 10.751.4% 100.9 $7. Capital 2.194.5 $266.1 1.944 4.490 465 43 97 Miles.(King County Metro) Seattle.6 -$873.6 $9.0 4.7 $87.5 684.741 10.4 $14.3 $22.8 $2.3 Fares Collected.9 $196.227.8 Other (Millions) $244. Millions) 1.3 $190.719.0 $568.1 7.0 0.232 16.1 Utilities (Millions) $318. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www.7 Services (Millions) $427.0 0.6 5 Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority(GDRTA) Dayton.045. Number of 27 15 35 16 32 Trips.2 20.3 15.5 $528. Vehicle Operations 10.310.771.0 0.6 Other Fossil Fuel Consumed (Gallons.4 $44.0 $421.465 217 144 Revenue Vehicle Age.2 Fare per Unlinked Trip.6 1 King County Department of Transp.724.8 3 10.3 Fringe Benefits (Millions) $1.7 $549.6 9.2 Operating Expense by Object Class: Salaries and Wages (Millions) $1. MA 3. OH 3.192 9.8 89.8 $10.6 90.274 5.234 1.0 $12.1 $73.0% 98.1 69.09 $0. MODAL DATA Table 26: Trolleybus Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.3% 58.4 $71. Average $4.7 $6.0 $1.93 Expense.0 6.0 0.358 4.6% Revenue Vehicles Accessible 85. Vehicle in Revenue Service.786 2.6 $6. Average (mph) 31.058.7 1.4% 47. Millions) 1.595.2 $50.2 $0.0% Employees. Vehicle Maintenance 8.142.2 $260.805 2.9 15.552.7 General Administration (Millions) $693.6 $1.0 Miles. Passengers (Millions) $2. General Administration 3.2 2 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transp.0 6. Capital Total (Millions) $2.1 $78.8 $3.6 $128.510.625.0 $178.1 Vehicle Maintenance (Millions) $1.6 $45.6 $32.3 $363. WA 19.7 $3.199 44 584 Trip Length.8 $13.310. PA 5.0 1.1 $33.8 Rolling Stock (Millions) $461.7 3.1 $18.0 4.7 $69.1 $60.0% 59.5 $54.4 Miles.9 4.3 $3.5 $1.596 Employees.8 Revenue Vehicles Available for Maximum Service 6.4 Facilities.4 $35.5 $821. Authority(SEPTA) Philadelphia.69 $1.467.069 15.3 $187.9 $47.4 $14. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. Millions) 95.2 0.223 657 536 Employees.160.7 8.8 5.9 Materials and Supplies (Millions) $517. Table 27: Rail Modes and Ferry Boat National Totals. Operating 28.250 819 62 110 Diesel Fuel Consumed (Gallons. Average (Years) 17.1 21. Buildings (Millions) $2.223.4 $361. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database.4 $6. Passenger (Millions) 11.9 $223.0 $390. Unlinked Passenger (Millions) 468 3.028.5 $100.2 Expense.7 $207.4 17.3 $308.647.4 Speed.2 Other (Millions) -$141.6 738.978 5.5 1 106.723.0 (a) Self-propelled cars only.apta.7 $1.0 $221.com.1 $131.068 276 194 Revenue Vehicles Operated at Maximum Service 6. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank San Francisco Municipal Railway(MUNI) San Francisco.7 $91.6 Purchased Transportation (Millions) $547.5 $61.7% 82.1 $60.

OH 4.5 11 Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority(ST) Seattle. Authority(SEPTA) Philadelphia.779.4 22 Pennsylvania Department of Transportation(PENNDOT) Philadelphia.8 9 South Florida Regional Transportation Authority(TRI-Rail) Miami.6 1 1.358.223.066.868.4 5 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transp.4 22 36.6 12 Port Authority Transit Corporation(PATCO) Philadelphia.350.6 12 Virginia Railway Express(VRE) Washington.586. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database. MA 40.131.6 15 Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.2 8 292.4 11 Puerto Rico Highway and Transp. PA 95.949.170.684.(NNEPRA) Boston. UT 1.6 21 39. IL 3.647.6 5 1.522.6 17 18.(LACMTA) Los Angeles. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database.3 1 Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company(MTA-MNCR) New York.1 13 MTA Staten Island Rapid Railway(SIRTOA) New York. CA 1.8 18 Connecticut Department of Transportation(CDOT) Hartford.264.491.022. NY 79.885.764.458.7 25 2. PA 10.972.4 23 3. MODAL DATA Table 28: Commuter Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.5 10 132.582. MA 471.0 18 44. NY 7. PR 9.8 16 Northern New England Passenger Rail Auth. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www. DC 296.3 14 Altamont Commuter Express(ACE) Stockton.8 6 Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation(PATH) New York.7 2 Chicago Transit Authority(CTA) Chicago. Auth. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www. GA 83.611. NY 80.322. TX 1.135.464. Appendix A: Historical Tables.7 20 12.492.046.469.457. MA 148.4 20 North County Transit District(NCTD) San Diego.954.081.654.2 1 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority(WMATA) Washington.657.346.656. Authority(SEPTA) Philadelphia.4 13 59.569.3 17 Regional Transportation Authority(RTA) Nashville. CA 797.4 10 122.com.7 24 Metro Transit Minneapolis.2 2 1.apta.779.196.987.0 8 Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transp.976. MD 8. NY 2.apta. 31 .342.442.948.607.6 9 Miami-Dade Transit(MDT) Miami.5 7 Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority(MARTA) Atlanta.8 11 88.241.7 13 48.073.667.9 13 Dallas Area Rapid Transit(DART) Dallas.899. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.313. A full list of commuter rail agencies is available in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.101.124.7 10 Maryland Transit Administration(MTA) Baltimore. Commuter Railroad Corp.6 15 42.1 6 422.8 26 1.2 4 1. TX 1. Authority(PRHTA) San Juan. MN 78.3 4 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston.9 5 818.857. IL 202.350.756.0 14 42.8 26 Alaska Railroad Corporation(ARRC) Anchorage.962.056.744.0 3 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transp.6 14 The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority(GCRTA) Cleveland.976.2 9 254.2 6 Southern California Regional Rail Authority(Metrolink) Los Angeles.501. NY 97.9 25 Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database. CA 114. PA 518.199.016.2 8 341.5 16 32. CT 593.883.4 23 Tri-County Metropolitan Transp.218.468.4 21 Rio Metro Regional Transit District(RMRTD) Albuquerque.2 19 Fort Worth Transportation Authority(The T) Dallas.0 9 227. AK 113. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank MTA New York City Transit(NYCT) New York.359. MD 13.2 3 2.885. TN 181.8 7 419.891. WA 2. FL 18.419.1 15 31. DC 3. PA 35.201.055.3 19 35. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.4 5 San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District(BART) San Francisco. CA 46.430. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank MTA Long Island Rail Road(MTA LIRR) New York.767.0 12 109.4 1 9.com.1 11 109. IL 71.083. FL 4.6 10 Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District(NICTD) Chicago.7 4 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston.0 6 501.8 3 New Jersey Transit Corporation(NJ TRANSIT) New York.020. CA 12.3 2 2.3 15 Utah Transit Authority(UTA) Salt Lake City.052.965.256.(Metra) Chicago.2 14 18.3 4 568. District of Oregon(TriMet) Portland. OR 123.022.5 2 Northeast Illinois Reg.110. Table 29: Heavy Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.523. NY 83.0 7 Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board(PCJPB) San Francisco.1 12 90.244.6 24 1.0 3 1.653. CA 11.0 8 Maryland Transit Administration(MTA) Baltimore.5 7 527.769. NM 1.

0 2 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transp.639. FL 505.3 5 220. WI 56.613.3 1 1.5 3 327. WA 3.039.113.1 20 12.881.4 9 Denver Regional Transportation District(RTD) Denver.708. PA 1.7 8 Bi-State Development Agency(METRO) St.1 1 Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2008 National Transit Database. NC-SC 3. District of Oregon(TriMet) Portland. TN 1.3 7 Sacramento Regional Transit District(Sacramento RT) Sacramento.982. NY 6. PA 102. PA 29. MA 70. AZ 5. LA 5.2 2 Jacksonville Transportation Authority(JTA) Jacksonville.6 11 New Jersey Transit Corporation(NJ TRANSIT) New York.501. of Harris County.303.4 18 Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority(VTA) San Jose.880. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. Texas(Metro) Houston. NY 22.7 10 Utah Transit Authority(UTA) Salt Lake City.941. TN 374.642. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database.681.8 23 13.965.6 3 San Diego Metropolitan Transit System(MTS) San Diego. CO 19.805.195.4 29 Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.390. TX 18.6 1 9.0 16 59.7 26 King County Department of Transp. CA 7.173. CA 50.(VMR) Phoenix.027.3 1 151.9 9 156. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.8 22 16. CA 46.0 15 48.0 17 29.0 25 Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority(HART) Tampa. WA 1.342.341.165.580. Appendix A: Historical Tables.106. OH 2.6 27 Central Arkansas Transit Authority(CATA) Little Rock.9 19 47.2 10 133.423.5 15 Maryland Transit Administration(MTA) Baltimore.2 27 414.588.551.4 8 129.385. WA 451.759.744.577.364.365. Auth. TX 11.Seattle Center Monorail Transit(SMS) Seattle.364.443. UT 13.4 3 Monorail City of Seattle . FL 449.3 4 San Francisco Municipal Railway(MUNI) San Francisco.0 2 Chattanooga Area Regional Transp. 32 .2 14 58.0 19 Memphis Area Transit Authority(MATA) Memphis.1 29 62. Table 31: Other Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles by Type of Rail Agency.0 11 93.928.575.912. FL 8.2 21 19.1 1 8. A full list of light rail agencies is available in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.6 6 Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transp.1 13 Port Authority of Allegheny County(Port Authority) Pittsburgh. MN 9.4 24 19. OR 39. Louis.7 3 Cable Car San Francisco Municipal Railway(MUNI) San Francisco.2 1 Inclined Plane Port Authority of Allegheny County(Port Authority) Pittsburgh.9 2 135.3 20 Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority(ST) Seattle.804. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank Automated Guideway Transit Miami-Dade Transit(MDT) Miami. Authority(SEPTA) Philadelphia.559.1 12 60. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www.315.apta. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database.754.707.(King County Metro) Seattle.4 5 Dallas Area Rapid Transit(DART) Dallas.8 25 940.2 1 Tri-County Metropolitan Transp.7 13 27.863.4 16 New Orleans Regional Transit Authority(NORTA) New Orleans.408.100.6 2 374.086.LACMTA) Los Angeles.8 28 Kenosha Transit(KT) Kenosha. CA 36.2 1 185.838.9 23 North County Transit District(NCTD) San Diego.1 7 105.5 21 Valley Metro Rail.306.0 6 69.327. PA 7. MD 8.6 1 Cambria County Transit Authority(CamTran) Johnstown.5 17 Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority(NFT Metro) Buffalo. AR 119.712.8 28 183. MO 19.248.2 1 Detroit Transportation Corporation(Detroit People Mover) Detroit.6 24 Charlotte Area Transit System(CATS) Charlotte. MODAL DATA Table 30: Light Rail Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.809.com.7 26 776.5 18 17. CA 17.9 22 The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority(GCRTA) Cleveland. CA 2.apta.com. Inc. MI 1.329.7 4 206.732.5 2 2.826. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www. CA 10.3 12 Metropolitan Transit Auth.7 3 176.5 3 17. Authority(CARTA) Chattanooga.8 14 Metro Transit Minneapolis. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston.050.857.

8 19 Pierce County Ferry Operations(Pierce County Ferry) Seattle.255.7 Cable Car 8.2 9 2.209.7 68.7 17 1.8 18 Transportation District Comm.1 12 King County Ferry District(KCFD) Seattle.(GGBHTD) San Francisco.2 18 573.0 2 107. Table 34: Rail Track Miles.9 12 743.340.apta. 631.1 14 163.6 698. PR 41.0 1.758.2 15 City and County of Honolulu DOT Services(DTS) Honolulu. VA 322.Louisiana DOT(CCCD) New Orleans.011.0 1.0 0. For complete size ranking lists of all transit agencies reporting to the Federal Transit Administration 2009 National Transit Database.655. LA 2.4 Monorail 0.7 19 20.0 0.8 3 Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation(PATH) New York.732.619. in construction and design. CA 542. and planned future services based on the latest APTA Infrastructure Survey.5 21 Transport of Rockland(TOR) New York.4 1.8 0. GA 452. Dist.9 189.904.272.2 5 Crescent City Connection Div.2 13 171. while agencies are planning for hundreds of miles of additional rail lines in the future.9 89.2 13 Golden Gate Bridge.510. 156.703.0 0. Table 33 provides summary of open.651. NY 7.363.com.8 --- Construction and Design --. includes systems reporting to the National Transit Database only.7 --.4 863. Across the country. Several hundred miles of commuter rail and light rail are under construction.739.0 10 14.293. WA 201.5 10 City of Vallejo Transp. .000 miles of track on the various modes of rail transit service.3 151.8 16 Maritime Transportation Authority of Puerto Rico(PRMTA) San Juan.0 17.237.424.769.apta. WA 473.7 7 BillyBey Ferry Company.9 20 Corpus Christi Regional Transportation Authority(The B) Corpus Christi.0 6 4. ME 857. 2010 Automated Commuter Inclined Mode Not Status Guideway Cable Car Rail Heavy Rail Plane Light Rail Determined Open 21. the nation’s rail system consists of over 12.3 Heavy Rail 783.4 1.8 Light Rail 1.3 1.5 7 4.5 8 9. NY 1.9 1. TX 11.046.7 4 City of Alameda Ferry Services San Francisco.8 Commuter Rail 7.8 TOTAL 25. --.3 647.3 16 711.0 800.8 1. HI 73.4 15 1. NY 21.0 0.4 8.802.5 9 Kitsap Transit Bremerton. MA 1. LLC New York.4 4 1.8 1 New York City Department of Transportation(NYCDOT) New York. NY 3.2 72. 1.0 17. Baylink) Vallejo. CA 556.0 --- Future 4. WA 52.0 923.534.498.6 2 Port Imperial Ferry Corporation dba NY Waterway New York.0 (a) Summary Data from 2009 National Transit Database.2 6.5 21 193.1 113.454.8 All Rail Modes 9.4 69.8 1 175. Appendix B: Transit Agency and Urbanized Area Operating Statistics at www.463.8 5.8 0.8 3 14.7 0.com.8 11 3.949.6 21. see the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. MODAL DATA Table 32: Ferry Boat Agencies Ranked by Unlinked Passenger Trips and Passenger Miles.7 20 10.023.3 1.0 0. public transportation agencies continue to plan for expanded service.7 11 Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company(MTA-MNCR) New York. Table 33: Rail Route Mileage and Status of Future by Mode Projects as of September 1.2 Inclined Plane 1.1 120.0 0.636.3 --. 190.9 40.0 8.764.1 5.1 82. As shown in Table 34.3 506.283.8 Data from the 2010 Public Transportation Infrastructure Database at www.8 0.793. Highway and Transp. of Hampton Roads(HRT) Virginia Beach.6 8 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority(MBTA) Boston.9 6 Casco Bay Island Transit District(CBITD) Portland.3 120.0 0.2 4.0 0.0 5 21.8 83.7 --.2 12.0 17 Includes only transit agencies reporting to Federal Transit Administration FY 2009 National Transit Database.3 14 Chatham Area Transit Authority(CAT) Savannah. NY 1. Report Year 2009 (a) Miles of Track Mode Elevated on Elevated on At Grade Open-Cut Subway Total Structure Fill Automated Guideway Transit 0.Program(Vallejo Transit.316. WA 22.8 51. CA 1. 33 .0 0.4 2. NY 196. Report Year 2009 (Thousands) Urbanized Area Unlinked Passenger Miles Transit Agency (First City and Passenger Trips State Names Only) Thousands Rank Thousands Rank Washington State Ferries(WSF) Seattle.691.0 0.0 1.456.5 461.

(b) Boarding passengers is a similar measure to "unlinked passenger trips" reported for United States transit agencies in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book.085 Total Operating Revenue and Financial Other Transportation Operations 4.4 Total Vehicle Miles (Millions) 677.2% Operating Expense (Millions) $397.632 Passenger Revenue per Passenger Non-Vehicle Maintenance 4. CANADIAN DATA Canadian Data Table 35 provides a summary of Canadian public transportation data as provided by the Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA).828.732 Total Operating Revenue Millions $3.4 Vehicle Maintenance (Millions) $1.539 Assistance (Millions) $6.7 Source: Canadian Urban Transit Association.001.5 General and Administration (Millions) $762. Dedicated Heavy Rail 1.apta.982 Total Capital Expenditures (Millions) $4.4 Other 5 Non-Government Operating Revenue Average Bus Age (years) 7.09 General Administration 5.121 Specialized Transit Services Commuter Rail 707 Number of Systems Reporting.8 Vehicle Revenue Miles (Millions) 617.752.816. Dedicated Service Light Rail 567 (Millions) 4.569 Boarding $1.0 Passenger Revenue (Millions) $3.6 Bus(d) 15.667. (c) Includes unallocated amounts.4 Employees (Full and Part Time) 51. 34 .352. totals for reporting agencies only.1 Vehicle Maintenance 8. Dedicated Service Commuter Rail 673 (Millions) 49.178. (d) Includes trolleybuses. Table 35: Canadian Transit Data Summary (All Dollar Amounts Are Canadian Dollars) Report Year 2009 Statistic Amount Statistic Amount Fixed-Route Transit Services Fixed-Route Transit Services.3 Plant Maintenance (Millions) $504.211.434 Service 68 Light Rail 715 Passengers Dedicated Service (Millions) 10.204 Total Vehicle Hours.0 Vehicle Revenue Hours (Millions) 45.40 Total Passenger Vehicles 17.138 Service Total (Millions) 16.7 Percent Bus Fleet Accessible 83.907 Adult Cash Fare. continued Number of Systems Reporting 105 Direct Operating Expenses (Millions) (c) $5.126.2 Regular Service Passengers (a) (Millions) 1.5 (Millions) $32.7 Other 5 Passengers Dedicated and Non-Dedicated Peak Period Passenger Vehicles 14.689 Total Vehicle Miles. (a) Regular Service Passenger Trips are similar to linked trips and are not the same measurement as "unlinked passenger trips" reported for United States transit agencies in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book. Average $2.0 Transportation Operations (Millions) $2.2 Operators 28.com.4 Fuel (Millions) $494. Canadian Fixed-Route Data from 1955 through 2009 and Specialized Transit Services Data from 1991 through 2009 can be found in the 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book Appendix A: Historical Tables at www.3 Total Vehicle Hours (Millions) 49.2 Heavy Rail 1.9 Passenger Boardings (b) (Millions) 2.0 Bus(d) 11.

Wages and Fringe Benefits. general management. FINANCIAL . Alternate Power is fuel or electricity generated from and planning. and general administration gas. Payment for time not actually worked includes payments to the employee Operating Employee is an employee engaged in the for vacations.CAPITAL EXPENSE DEFINITIONS: Vehicle Operations Employee is an operating Capital Expenses are expenses related to the employee at any level engaged in vehicle purchase of equipment. electricity used to propel transit vehicles. compressed natural gas. fare collection and counting equipment. vehicle movement control systems. health insurance. general insurance. describing the type work they do: social security.  Employee and Labor Definitions Vehicle Maintenance Employee is an operating  Energy Use and Vehicle Power Definitions employee at any level engaged in vehicle  Financial—Capital Expense Definitions maintenance. or any use other than propulsion cleaning. office management and services. real estate management. communication systems. holidays. injuries and damages. or a person engaged in groupings on tables. heating. in the following categories: system security activities. employee at any level engaged in general management and administration activities including Total Compensation is the sum of Salaries and transit system development. grounds and equipment. benefits to the transit agency. other insurance. liquid petroleum gas or propane. safety. market research. purchasing and stores. vehicle maintenance of vehicles. DEFINITIONS: general engineering. and garage.  Service Supplied Definitions regardless of whether the person is full-time or part-  Vehicle Characteristics and Amenities time. consistent with and fare collection activities. also called vehicle maintenance or a person providing propulsion power. a person performing inspection and  Financial—Operating Expense Definitions maintenance. liquefied natural shop. promotion. It does not include electricity used maintenance support to such persons for inspecting. fuel that is substantially not petroleum. and other payments to General Administration Employee is an operating other organizations for benefits to employees. workmen's compensation. Salaries and Wages are payments to employees for EMPLOYEE AND LABOR DEFINITIONS: time actually worked. Other benefits include transit agencies are classified into the following four categories payments to other organizations for retirement plans. for lighting. general legal services. Operating employees leave. personnel administration. repairing and replacing all components of power.  Financial—Fare Structure Definitions performing servicing functions for revenue and  Financial—Revenue Definitions service vehicles. Capital Employee is an employee whose labor hour Fringe Benefits are payments to employees for time cost is reimbursed under a capital grant or is not actually worked and the cost of other employee otherwise capitalized. gasoline. buildings. operating station. Fossil Fuel is any fuel derived from petroleum or structures. customer services. and kerosene. and other paid operation of the transit system. tunnels. ENERGY USE AND VEHICLE POWER finance and accounting. stations. GLOSSARY Glossary Definitions are grouped by topic. In addition. roadway and track. Equipment means an article operations or a person providing support in vehicle of non-expendable tangible personal property having operations activities. sick leave. and subways. it includes support for the operation and maintenance of electric power facilities. Non-Vehicle Maintenance Employee is an Electric Power Consumption is the amount of operating employee at any level engaged in non. data processing. and repairing damage to vehicles  General Definitions resulting from vandalism or accidents.  Mode of Service Definitions Number of Employees is the number of actual  Service Consumed Definitions persons directly working for a transit agency. a person engaged in ticketing a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost which equals the lesser of the capitalization level 35 . passenger other organic sources including diesel fuel.

grounds and equipment. associated with revenue and non-revenue (service) and-ride facilities but excluding transit stops on vehicle maintenance. some of those expenses are included with operating expenses in the National FINANCIAL—OPERATING EXPENSE Transit Database accounting system used herein. Operating Expenses are the expenses associated central/overhaul maintenance facilities. legal services. engineering. passenger stations. promotion. Categories An Operating Expense Object Class is a grouping of All Other capital expense are: of expenses on the basis of goods and services purchased. Nine Object Classes are reported as Fare Revenue Collection Equipment is capital follows: expense for equipment used to collect fares such as fare boxes. The four including the buildings and structures dedicated for basic functions are: the operation of transit vehicles including elevated and subway structures. light with the operation of the transit agency and goods maintenance and storage facilities. Service Vehicles is capital expense for vehicles personnel administration. and ticket machines. roadway and track. supervisor cars. including boats. All Other capital expense includes furniture. safety. structures. 36 . used to support transit activities such as tow trucks. garages and shops. track and Vehicle Operations includes all activities power systems for rail. DEFINITIONS: Facilities capital expense includes administration. operating station buildings. and passenger amenities (e. shelters. structures. and equipment of and services purchased for system operation. and police cars purchasing and stores. transit agency. fueling. such as computers and software. and system security. market research and equipment that is not an integral part of buildings and planning. Administration Buildings is capital expense for buildings which house management and support Non-Vehicle Maintenance includes all activities activities. including transit service development. The capital expense for equipment for communicating allowances include payments direct to the employee such as radios and for information management arising from the performance of a piece of work. Capital expenses in Other is capital expense that does not fall in the the NTD accounting system do not include all categories defined above. Guideway is capital expense for right-of-way An Operating Expense Function is an activity facilities for rail or the exclusive use of buses performed or cost center of a transit agency. Maintenance Facilities is capital expense for fare collection and counting equipment.000. including: maintenance of vehicle movement control systems. Categories of Facilities capital sum of either the functions or the object classes listed expense are: below. real estate management. grounds and vehicles. communication systems.g. bridges. It is the any of these items. and paved highway lanes associated with the subcategories of the vehicle dedicated to bus. ticketing and fare collection. Passenger Stations is capital expense for passenger boarding and debarking areas with Vehicle Maintenance includes all activities platforms including transportation centers and park. streets. and servicing (cleaning. turnstiles. customer services. associated with facility maintenance. injuries and damages. including administration. office management and services. building used for maintenance activities such as tunnels and subways. etc. finance and accounting. equipment. Rolling Stock capital expense is expense for general administration buildings. data processing. expenses which are eligible uses for federal capital funding assistance. insurance. Categories of Rolling Stock capital expense are: General Administration includes all activities Revenue Vehicles is capital expense for vehicles associated with the general administration of the used to transport passengers.. tunnels.) vehicles. inspection and maintenance. revenue vehicle operation. GLOSSARY established by the government unit for financial statement purposes or $5. and electric power facilities. used by transit agencies. Guideway does not include operations function: transportation administration passenger stations and transfer facilities. Salaries and Wages are the pay and allowances due employees in exchange for the labor services Communications and Information Systems is they render on behalf of the transit agency. signs. and support. benches) not in passenger stations.

GLOSSARY Fringe Benefits are the payments or accruals to service. Utilities that is usually altered by a fare collection machine include propulsion power purchased from an outside removing some or all of the stored value as each trip utility company and used for propelling electrically is taken. telephone. Passenger Fares are revenue earned from carrying Government Funds. discounts." charges. extra cost transfers. State (also called State Assistance) is financial assistance obtained from a state government(s) to assist with paying the FINANCIAL . Adult Base Cash Fare is the minimum cash fare paid Employee Compensation is the sum of "Salaries by an adult for one transit ride. and reduced fares. extra cost behalf of an employee and payments and accruals transfers. assistance is counted as either operating or capital funding consistent with accounting practices of the Other Operating Expenses is the sum of taxes." services. Passenger Fare Revenue is listed only for operating revenue sources. with an utilities for utilization of their resources (e. Passenger fares include: the base fare.. federally mandated National Transit Database miscellaneous expenses. express service charges. Local (also called Local passengers in regularly scheduled and paratransit Assistance) is financial assistance from local 37 . Freight. zone premiums. excludes transfer and Wages" and "Fringe Benefits. for crossing a predetermined boundary. Services include the labor and other work provided by outside organizations for fees and related Passenger Fares Received per Unlinked expenses. garbage collection. etc. and quantity purchase discounts applicable direct to an employee arising from something other to the passenger's ride. Services include management service Passenger Trip is "Passenger Fares" divided by fees. than a piece of work. Government Funds. compensation of base fare. management or capital costs of providing transit service. and other utilities such as electrical power for purposes other than for electrically driven vehicles. gas. express service premiums. and quantity purchase transit agency is liable.). governments. cash discounts. contract maintenance services. advertising fees. usually plastic. zone others (insurance companies. FINANCIAL—REVENUE DEFINITIONS: and telephone. Passenger fares include: the through insurance programs. On tables services. Federal (also called Federal governmental unit from a public or private Assistance) is financial assistance from funds that transportation provider based on a written contract. federal financial conventional bus service.g. water. water and sewer.PASSENGER FARE STRUCTURE operating and capital costs of providing transit DEFINITIONS: services. are from the federal government at their original Purchased transportation does not include source that are used to assist in paying the operating franchising. temporary help. express service others for their losses due to acts for which the premiums. custodial services and security services.) on premiums. purchase to continue a trip. and expense transfers: reporting system rather than as defined in federal transit funding laws. gas. Materials and Supplies are the tangible products obtained from outside suppliers or manufactured Transfer Surcharge is an extra fee charged for a internally. zone or distance charges. sales and excise taxes (except on fuel and lubricants) are included in the Zone or Distance Surcharge is an extra fee charged cost of the material or supply. professional and technical "Unlinked Passenger Trips. Utilities include the payments made to various Smart Cards are small cards. Total Operating Expense is the sum of all the object classes or functions. cooperative agreements or private in the Public Transportation Book. and recognition of the cost discounts applicable to the passenger's ride. Passenger Fare Revenue is revenue earned from Casualty and Liability Costs are the cost elements carrying passengers in regularly scheduled and covering protection of the transit agency from loss paratransit service. etc. licensing operation. of a miscellaneous category of corporate losses. fuel and lubricants. driven vehicles. Peak Period Surcharge is an extra fee required during peak periods (rush hours). These materials and supplies include transfer to use when boarding another transit vehicle tires. peak period surcharges. Purchased Transportation is transportation service provided to a public transit agency or Government Funds. imbedded computer chip good for one or more trips electric.

trolley. When responsibility is with a public entity. or shuttle service. The by or donated directly to the transit agency. Service may be on a fixed schedule or in such as taxes imposed by the transit agency. but not rail) characterized by an electric or diesel propelled including school buses. railroad transit agency. end in calendar year 2008. group rapid transit. or mass transit) is transportation by a Commuter Rail is a mode of transit service (also conveyance that provides regular and continuing called metropolitan rail. advertising revenues. specific station to station fares. service. the vehicle suspension system and powered by concessions. while other guided transit vehicles operating without an onboard Directly Generated Funds are Financial Assistance crew. and collection agency but are considered local assistance operational features. and taxes imposed by the transit agency as enabled by a state Automated Guideway Transit (also called personal or local government. or suburban general or special transportation to the public. public transit. transit vehicles attached while moving to a moving cable located below the street surface and powered GENERAL DEFINITIONS: by engines or motors at a central location not on board the vehicle. transit agency that public transit agency for predominantly commuter ends during a calendar year. regional rail. because the decision to collect funds is made locally. concessions. employment practices and usually only one or two stations in the central business district. including vehicles are propelled by separate cables attached to passenger fare revenues. toll transfers from other sectors Cable Car is a railway with individually controlled of operations. Transit operator for the purpose of transporting passengers agencies can directly operate transit service or within urbanized areas. For most Fact Book services. and bus rapid transit (BRT). that portion of directly generated funds that accrue from tax collections. Service must be operated entity (public or private) responsible for administering on a regular basis by or under contract with a transit and managing transit activities and services. When limited to a small Directly Generated Funds that come from taxes. Other Earnings are contained within the vehicle. gasoline. operations such as bridges and roads. Types of bus service include local service. When more than one passenger cars. is generally characterized by multi- mode of service is operated. and bond proceeds. battery. state assistance. Some local funds are collected in local or Mode is a system for carrying transit passengers regional areas by the state government acting as the described by specific right-of-way. it locomotive hauled or self-propelled railroad is a public transit agency. local transfers. feeder. GLOSSARY governments (below the state level) to help cover the MODE OF SERVICE DEFINITIONS: operating and capital costs of providing transit service. railway for urban passenger train service consisting of local short distance travel operating between a central Transit agency (also called transit system) is an city and adjacent suburbs. or alternative fuel engines Transit Agency Funds. technology. except for that portion of such the Fact Book. or between urbanized areas contract out for all or part of the total transit service and outlying areas. neighborhood. or people mover) are funds earned by the transit agency such as fare is an electric railway (single or multi-car trains) of revenues. toll revenues from other sectors of agency the vehicle. Most service is provided on routes of tables it is data for all transit agency fiscal years that current or former freight railroads. Vehicles operate on Directly Generated Funds that do not come from streets and roadways in fixed-route or other regular passenger fares or from government funds. where vehicles may stop every block or two along a Government Funds. Directly Generated are route several miles long. limited- assistance. bus) characterized by roadway vehicles powered by diesel. local assistance. parking engines or motors at a central location not on board revenues. 38 . Public Transportation (also called transit. it is a multimodal trip tickets.S. charter or sightseeing service. Aerial Tramway is electric system of aerial cables Directly Generated Funds are any funds generated with suspended powerless passenger vehicles. Intercity rail Report year is the year for which data are summed in service is excluded. bond proceeds. donations. Some Directly Generated Funds rapid transit. Directly response to a passenger activated call button. Other Total Government Funds is the sum of Federal types of bus service are express service. and advertising. The report year data are the sum of service that is operated by or under contract with a the fiscal year data for each U. and bond proceeds. and stop service. Such rail service. using either provided. toll geographic area or to short-distance trips. service is often called circulator. Generated Funds are listed in three categories: Bus is a mode of transit service (also called motor Passenger Fares which is defined above.

source not on board the vehicle. or tube. 7 persons. it is urban ferryboat service. operated by rail transit systems where each track is The vehicle may be dispatched to pick up several counted separately regardless of the number of tracks passengers at different pick-up points before taking on a right-of-way. streetcar. or trolley) operating passenger rail cars singly (or in short. during the period which passengers can board and ride on the vehicle. The special Passengers are counted each time they board tramway type of vehicles has passenger seats that vehicles no matter how many vehicles they use to remain horizontal while the undercarriage (truck) is travel from their origin to their destination and angled parallel to the slope. Vanpool service reported in the Heavy Rail is a mode of transit service (also called NTD must be operated by a public entity. Passenger Miles is the cumulative sum of the car. Data included an urbanized area. GLOSSARY Ferry Boat is a transit mode comprising vessels Vanpool is ridesharing by prearrangement using vans carrying passengers and in some cases vehicles over or small buses providing round trip transportation a body of water. or lease the vehicle(s). be operating singly or in multi-car trains on fixed rails. rail. Average Passenger Load is the average number of passengers aboard a vehicle at any one time for its Monorail is an electric railway of guided transit entire time in revenue service including late night and vehicles operating singly or in multi-car trains. Revenue service includes the Trolleybus is a mode of transit service (also called carriage of passengers who do not pay a cash fare for trolley coach) using vehicles propelled by a motor a specific trip as well as those who do pay a cash drawing current from overhead wires via connecting fare. and urban park ferries. and may have either high platform loading or low level boarding using steps. or rapid rail) entity must own. them to their respective destinations and may even be interrupted en route to these destinations to pick up Revenue Service is the operation of a transit vehicle other passengers. separated from other traffic for part or much of the way. formed by a single beam. The off-peak hour service as well as peak rush hour vehicles are suspended from or straddle a guideway service. or pay in some other way. open to the public and that availability must be made separate rights-of-way from which all other vehicular known. and that are generally steam or between the participant's prearranged boarding points diesel-powered. rural. or a public metro. purchase. and high platform loading. Inclined Plane is a railway operating over exclusive SERVICE CONSUMED DEFINITIONS: right-of-way on steep grades (slopes) with powerless vehicles propelled by moving cables attached to the Unlinked Passenger Trips is the number of times vehicles and powered by engines or motors at a passengers board public transportation vehicles. regardless of whether they pay a fare. When at least one terminal is within and a common and regular destination. and use vehicles with a minimum capacity of and foot traffic are excluded. operating on an electric railway with the capacity for a Vanpool included in the NTD must also be in heavy volume of traffic. vans or small Average Speed of a vehicle is the miles it operated in buses operating in response to calls from passengers revenue service divided by the hours it is operated in or their agents to the transit operator. driven by an operator on passenger miles divided by unlinked passenger trips. tramway. Also Light Rail is a mode of transit service (also called called boardings. use a pass or transfer. sophisticated signaling. in this report are the sum of vanpool data reported in Such service excludes international. central location not on board the vehicle. who then revenue service. the meaning of the phrase does not relate poles called a trolley poles from a central power specifically to the collection of revenue. include any data for vanpools not listed in the National Transit Database. Light rail vehicles are typically driven electrically Average Trip Length is the average distance ridden with power being drawn from an overhead electric line for an unlinked passenger trip computed as via a trolley or a pantograph. trains) on fixed rails in right-of-way that is often distances ridden by each passenger. usually two-car or three. board the vehicle. 39 . island. Paratransit is a mode of transit service (also called SERVICE SUPPLIED DEFINITIONS: demand response or dial-a-ride) characterized by the use of passenger automobiles. It is characterized by high compliance with mass transit rules including speed and rapid acceleration passenger rail cars Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) provisions. The vehicles do Miles of Track is a measure of the amount of track not operate over a fixed route or on a fixed schedule. rural the National Transit Database (NTD) and do not interstate. ride for free. rapid transit. subway. dispatches a vehicle to pick up the passengers and transport them to their destinations.

are either pulled by self-propelled cars or locomotives or moved by cables such as an inclined plane. Also called revenue passenger boardings/alightings but is not part of the vehicles owned or leased. either automatically by sensors or as a result of revenue service. the vehicle that supply propulsion for the vehicle. Vehicle Total Miles are all the miles a vehicle travels Exterior Bicycle Rack equipped vehicles can carry from the time it pulls out from its garage to go into bicycles of racks outside of the vehicle such as on the revenue service to the time it pulls in from revenue front of a bus or the open deck of a ferry boat.. an expectation of carrying passengers). adjust traffic lights to provide priority bus service and charter service.. is usable. system that announces upcoming stops. the time when a one-way audio announcement system that allows the vehicle is available to the general public and there is vehicle operator to communicate with passengers.e. that do not restrict access. Vehicles Traffic Light Preemption equipped vehicles are able operated in fare-free service are considered in to. leased. or otherwise Automatic Passenger Counter equipment counts controlled by the transit agency. temporarily out of service for routine maintenance and minor repairs. They who use wheelchairs. service. it includes both revenue miles and the vehicle's or train's operator to communicate with deadhead miles. Revenue service excludes school original specifications of the manufacturer. not from the vehicle's actual hour periods. GLOSSARY Revenue Vehicle is a vehicle in the transit fleet that Alternate Power transit vehicles are vehicles is available to operate in revenue service carrying powered by any fuel except straight diesel or passengers. Automated Vehicle Locator or GPS equipment Vehicles Available for Maximum Service are allows a vehicle to be electronically located or tracked vehicles that a transit agency has available to operate by local sensors or satellites. For conventional scheduled have an intercom system that allows passengers and services. Restroom is a restroom on board the transit vehicle Vehicle Total Hours are the hours a vehicle travels and available for passenger use. Vehicle Revenue Miles are the miles traveled when Public Address System equipped transit vehicles an the vehicle is in revenue service (i. Two-Way Radio equipped transit vehicles have a VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS AND AMENITIES: two-way radio system that allows the vehicle operator and the operating base or control center to Accessible Vehicles are transit passenger vehicles communicate with each other. from the time it pulls out from its garage to go into revenue service to the time it pulls in from revenue Security or CCTV Type Camera equipped vehicles service. Vehicles Operated Maximum Service is the largest Average Age of transit vehicles is calculated from the number of vehicles operated at any one time during difference between the current year and each the day. including "deadhead" miles without passengers to the starting points of routes or Passenger-Operator Intercom equipped vehicles returning to the garage. farebox. normally during the morning or evening rush vehicle's model year. or automobiles used to transport employees. bus service and charter service. including spares and vehicles gasoline. repair vehicles. 40 . For conventional scheduled services.e. date of manufacture or delivery. revenue service regardless of the legal relationship thorough which they are owned. and provides allocated space and/or priority seating for individuals Unpowered vehicles are those without motors. Revenue service excludes school operator action. returning to the garage. Vehicles operated in fare-free service are considered in Rehabilitated transit vehicles are those rebuilt to the revenue service. or a green light. it includes both revenue time and deadhead Self-propelled vehicles have motors or engines on time. Revenue vehicles do not include Automated Stop Announcement is an automated service vehicles such as tow trucks. the time when a such as overhead wire power for light rail vehicles. each other. including "deadhead" miles without have cameras installed inside the vehicle for security passengers to the starting points of routes or purposes. Fuel may be carried on board the vehicle such as Vehicle Revenue Hours are the hours traveled when diesel fueled buses or supplied from a central source the vehicle is in revenue service (i. vehicle is available to the general public and there is an expectation of carrying passengers).