You are on page 1of 9

5.13.

2 Grid Deviation Water Table 

Grid  deviation  method  applied  in  other  quantitative  studies  appears  to 
provide a more convenient form of representation of hydrogeological variables (Saha 
and  Chakravarthy,  1963).  To  evaluate  the  recharge‐discharge  zones  this  method  is 
widely  adopted  (Narasimha  Prasad,  1984;  Balasubramanian,  1986;  Subramanian, 
1994;  Sakthimurugan,  1967  and  Harinarayanan,  2000).  It  is  objective,  more 
informative and brings out more sharply the regional trend by eliminating the local 
interference (Biswas and Chaterjee, 1967). Grid deviation water tables for the study 
area have been prepared by using the following methodology. 

1. Bimonthly water levels, measured below ground level have been recalculated 
to water level altitude Above Mean Sea Level (AMSL). 
2.  An  average  elevation  of  water  table  for  each  observation  well  has  been 
computed for the months from January to December 
3. Annual average water level of each well has been computed. This is called the 
well average. 
4. Using  the  well  average  of  wells,  a  zonal  average  has  been  computed  for 
watershed and it is called the grid average. 
5. The  deviation  of  values  between  well  averages  and  the  grid  average  for  all 
wells have been computed. 
6. The  deviation  can  be  used  to  prepare  a  thematic  contour  map  called  grid 
deviation groundwater table map. 

The  grid  deviation  water  level  and  well  average  of  the  area  is  presented  in 
Table 5.5. The grid deviation water table map of the study area is given in Fig. 5.19. 
The positive zones are recharge zones and negative zones are discharge zones, and 
are  lying  nearer  to  confluence  point.  The  wide  spacing  of  contours  and  the 
disposition  in  discharge  is  suggestive  of  flat  to  gentle  hydraulic  gradient  of  water 
table and moderate permeability of the formation. It is found that the area under the 
discharge  is  more  that  the  recharge  zone.  The  normal  groundwater  potentiality  is 
expected  to  be  higher  in  the  discharge  zones  than  the  recharge  zones 
(Balasubramanian, 1986). 
153 
 
 
Figure 5.19: Grid deviation map of the study area 
 

154 
 
5.14 Statistical analysis of water­level data of borewell/openwell of 
the study area 

It  has  been  observed  during  the  last  five  decades  that,  percentage 
groundwater  utilizations  have  almost  doubled.  There  are  arguments  that  extensive 
rice  and  wheat  growth  has  encouraged  the  people  to  extract  more  and  more 
groundwater  causing  decline  in  the  water  table.  The  declining  water  table  reduces 
runoff  due  to  base  flow  and  hence  the  inflow  to  a  wetland  (Sanjay  k.  Jain  et.  al., 
2008,).  For  detecting  the  trend  in  changes  of  the  water  level  data  statistical  trend 
analysis is performed. 

5.14.1 Non­parametric test for trend detection 

Recently,  the  Mann–Kendall  non‐parametric  statistical  procedure  given  by 


Mann (1945) and Kendall (1975) has been extensively used to assess the significance 
of  monotone  trends  in  hydro‐meteorological  time  series  such  as  precipitation, 
temperature and stream flow (Gan, 1998; Zhang et al., 2001; Burn and Elnur, 2002; 
Xu et al., 2003 and Yang et al., 2004). The non‐parametric statistical tests are flexible, 
and can handle the idiosyncrasies of data like presence of missing values, censored 
data, seasonality and highly skewed data. This test was later  on modified  by Helsel 
and Frans (2006) to form the Regional Kendall (RK) test for trend. In this form, trends 
at numerous locations within a region are tested to determine whether the direction 
of  trend  is  consistent  across  the  entire  region.  Like  the  Seasonal  Kendall  test,  the 
Regional Kendall test is  an “intrablock” test  (Van Belle, G.  and Hughes, J. P., 1984). 
Test  statistics  are  computed  on  each  block  of  data  separately,  and  the  overall  test 
combines the individual test statistics so that no cross‐block comparisons are made. 
For the Regional Kendall test, the blocking factor is location. If some locations exhibit 
an upward trend while others exhibit a downward trend, their S statistics will cancel 
out, and no consistent trend in the same direction across the locations will be found. 
The  Regional  Kendall  test  looks  for  consistency  in  the  direction  of  trend  at  each 
location,  and  tests  whether  there  is  evidence  for  a  general  trend  in  a  consistent 
direction  throughout  the  region.  The  Regional  Kendall  test  substitutes  location  for 
season and computes the equivalent of the Seasonal Kendall test. For computing the 

155 
 
Regional  Kendal  test,  the  water  level  data  of  the  study  area  was  processed  on  the 
computer  coded  program  developed  by  USGS  (2005).  The  performance  of  this 
program  was  explained  in  detail  when  Mann‐Kendal  and  Seasonal  Kendal  test  was 
explained. In this program the third format (itype = 3) produces the Regional Kendall 
(RK) test. 

5.14.2 Output of Regional Kendal Test of Water Level Data of Pre and Post­
monsoon (1990­2007) 

The  regional  Kendal  test  was  performed  on  pre  and  post‐monsoon  water 
table data. Normally, the groundwater levels are recorded four times in a year such 
as the pre‐monsoon, monsoon), post‐monsoon and irrigation periods. The unit of the 
groundwater level records is meter below ground level (m.b.g.l). The pre‐ and post‐
monsoon  monitoring occasions are more important  as they reflect the influence  of 
both natural and anthropogenic intervention more accurately.   The out  puts of  the 
regional Kendal test are presented in the following Tables 5.8 and 5.9. 

 
   Regional Kendall Test for Trend  US Geological Survey, 2005 
   Data set:  Pre‐monsoon‐ Regional Kendal test, input type 3            
   The record is 18 years at 11 locations beginning in year 1990. 
    The tau correlation coefficient is  0.136 
     S =    224.     z =   2.585     p =  0.0097 
   The estimated median trend throughout the region during years 1990      
    through 2007 is: 
    Change in Y = 0.5000E‐01 per year. 

Table 5.8: Regional Kendal test output of pre‐monsoon 

156 
 
           Regional Kendall Test for Trend  US Geological Survey, 2005 

Data set:  Post‐monsoon‐ Regional Kendal test, input type 3            

The record is 18 years at 11 locations    beginning in year 1990. 

The tau correlation coefficient is 0.128 

     S =    211.     z =   2.432     p =  0.0150 

The estimated median trend throughout the region during years 1990 
through 2007 is: 

 Change in Y = 0.5359E‐01 per year. 
Table 5.9: Regional Kendal test output of post‐monsoon 

5.14.3 Interpretation of Trend Analysis of Water Level Data 

In  both  the  tests,  the  level  of  significance  was  tested  at  0.05  or  5%. 
Comparing this value to the p values obtained by the software in both the tests it can 
be said indicates that in both the output files the p value is smaller than 0.05. By this 
the Null hypothesis which states that there is no trend gets rejected.  The application 
of this has resulted in the identification of trend direction of the groundwater levels 
in  the  study  area.    As  the  groundwater  levels  are  recorded  in  m.b.g.l.  (i.e.,  meters 
below ground level), the positive p value indicate a drop in the water table. Hence, a 
positive trend indicates the decline of  water level. As each monitoring well reflects 
the groundwater  dynamics  of  the surrounding  area, each trend  value gives  an  idea 
about the water table fluctuation of that area over years. 

Scatter diagrams plotted for all the 11 stations of both the pre‐monsoon and 
post‐monsoon seasons (Fig. 5.21 and Fig. 5.22) indicate an upward positive trend for 
majority of the wells and reveals decline of water levels for these observation wells.  

157 
 
 

20.00 10
15.00 8
6
mbgl

mbgl
10.00
4
5.00 2
0.00 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Kamagowdanahalli Karnakuppe
 

20 25
15 20
15
mbgl

mbgl
10
10
5 5
0 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Chikka Hunsur Udavepur
 

10 10
8 8
6 6
mbgl

mbgl

4 4
2 2
0 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Hunsur Gawdegere
 

15 15.00

10 10.00
mbgl

mbgl

5 5.00

0 0.00
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Hanagodu Gawdegere(Dug‐well)
 

158 
 
15.00 25
20
10.00 15

mbgl

mbgl
5.00 10
5
0.00 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Kattemalavadi Somanahalli
 

20
15
mbgl
10
5
0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year

Coimbatore colony
 
Figure 5.20: Scatter plot of water level data of pre‐ monsoon water level data 

15.00 4
3
10.00
mbgl

mbgl

2
5.00
1
0.00 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Kamagowdanahalli Karnakuppe
 

15 25
20
10 15
mbgl

mbgl

5 10
5
0 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Chikka Hunsur Udavepura
 

159 
 
10 10
8 8
6 6

mbgl

mbgl
4 4
2 2
0 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Hunsur Gawdegere
 

10 10.00
8 8.00
6 6.00
mbgl

mbgl
4 4.00
2 2.00
0 0.00
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Hanagodu Gawdegere(Dug‐well)
 

15.00 25
20
10.00 15
mbgl

mbgl

5.00 10
5
0.00 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year year

Kattemalavadi Somanahalli
 

15

10
mbgl

0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
year

Coimbatore colony
 
Figure 5.21: Scatter plot of water level data of post‐ monsoon water level data 

160 
 
The  monitoring  stations  showing  groundwater  level  decline  in  terms  of 
positive trends were more in number than the stations showing negative trends. The 
advantage of adopting the Regional Kendall test is that it looks for consistency in the 
direction of trend at each location, and tests whether there is evidence for a general 
trend  in  a  consistent  direction  throughout  the  region.  Patterns  at  an  individual 
location occurring in the same direction as the regional trend provide some evidence 
toward a significant regional trend, even if there is insufficient evidence of trend for 
that  one  location.  So  it  can  be  said  that  the  overall  trend  of  the  region  shows  a 
decline in the water level. The decline of the water level of the observation wells can 
be attributed to the variation of the rainfall. In chapter 3 it was discussed that there 
was a slight downward trend in the amount of rainfall received in the study area.  

To link climate variables with groundwater levels, the weather station should 
exist  in  the  recharge  zone  of  the  observation  well  (Van  der  Kamp  and  Maathuis, 
1991;  Chen  et  al.,  2002).  But,  for  a  large‐scale  groundwater‐monitoring  network  it 
may  not  be  possible.  However,  the  groundwater  level  data  itself  provides  a  direct 
means of measuring the overall impacts of both natural and anthropogenic changes 
to groundwater resources (Taylor and Alley, 2001). Such kind of a condition was seen 
in  the  study  area  where  all  the  gauge  stations  were  not  close  to  the  mentoring 
stations.  For  example  in  2002  due  to  drought  condition  a  deficit  amount  of  rainfall 
was  observed  when  compared  to  the  normal  rainfall,  due  to  which  the  water  level 
dropped significantly. This study shows that the groundwater levels of the network 
observation wells are very sensitive to the monsoon rainfall, and any irregularity in 
rainfall  influences  the  groundwater  levels.  Another  important  reason  which  has 
contributed  to  dipping  of  the  groundwater  levels  is  the  increased  anthropogenic 
activities and increase in demand which puts a stress on the water level and revealed 
that the recharge is not significant enough to balance the groundwater discharge due 
to the anthropogenic and natural processes. 

161