You are on page 1of 4

RESUME UAS   To focus central management 

Ch15 Quality Cost and Productivity   To train & motivate segment managers, 
Studies suggest that cost of quality production might be as much as 20% – 30% of sales   To enhance competition & expose segments to market forces 
Dimensions of Quality:  Major types of responsibility centers are: 
 Performance: how consistently a product functions   Cost centers 
 Aesthetics  : appearance of tangible products, facilities, communication materials   Manager responsible for cost only 
 Serviceability: ease of maintaining, repairing product 
 Revenue center 
 Features of quality design: characteristics that differentiate between similar products 
 Manager responsible for 
 Reliability: probability that product, service will perform intended function for specified length of time 
 Durability: length of time a product functions  sales only 
 Quality of conformance   : measure of how a product meets its specifications   Profit center 
 Fitness for use: suitability of product for advertised functions   Manager responsible for 
Defective Product is one that doesnt confom to specifications. Zero defect is the goal  sales & costs 
Cost of Quality exist  Categories Classifying QC  Investment center 
because poor quality  1. Prevention costs: incurred to prevent poor   Observable  Manager responsible for 
does or may exist:  quality   Costs available in accounting  sales, costs, & capital 

t
1. Control activities  2. Appraisal costs : incurred to determine whether  records  investment 

ne
(to prevent, detect  products, services conform to requirements,   Hidden  Abstorption vs Variabel: 
poor quality)  customer needs   Significant  If more is sold than produced, variable costing income > absorption‐costing income, opposite of Fairchild situation. 

s.
2. Failure Activities (  3. Internal failure costs: incurred when non‐  Not directly available in  Equal production & sales means equal income. The difference between variable costing & absorption costing year to 
responses to poor  conformance is discovered & product, service  accounting records 

dn
year is equal to the change in fixed overhead. Under absorption costing, fixed overhead is assigned to inventory 
quality)  re‐worked, scrapped, etc.   Estimated 
produced. Under variable costing, fixed overhead is a period expense   . 
  4. External failure costs: incurred when products   Multiplier method 

.d
Variable costing ensures that direct relationship between sales & income holds whereas absorption costing does not. 
fail to conform after delivery and recalled   Market research 
 Taguchi quality loss  Segment Reporting 

et
function  Segment Is a subunit of a company of sufficient importance to warrant performance reports. 
Acceptable Quality Level (AQL) is the optimal balance between control costs and failure costs.  Direct Fixed Expense Are fixed expenses directly traceable to a segment & therefore, avoidable. If segment eliminated, 

id
Zero defects model understates quality costs & the potential for savings from efforts to improve quality.  so are expenses. 

l
Reducing QC: 

do
 Take direct attack on failure costs to drive them to zero 
 Invest in “right” prevention activities to bring about improvement 

do
 Reduce appraisal costs according to results achieved 
 Continuously evaluate, redirect prevention efforts to gain further improvement 
Productive Efficiency When concerned with productive efficiency 2 conditions must be satisfied: 

at
 Technical efficiency: For any mix of inputs that will   Input trade‐off efficiency: Given the mixes that satisfy 
produce a given output, no more of any 1 input is  the first condition, the least costly mix is chosen. 
ah
used than necessary to produce the output 
Profit‐Linked Productivity Measurement: Is measuring the amount of profit change attributable to productivity change. 
aa
ho
@

 
ROI relates operating profits to assets employed. 
Margin is the ratio of operating to sales. 
Turnover tells how many dollars of sales results from every dollar of invested assets. 
Advantages of ROI:  Disadvantage of ROI: 
Encourages managers to focus on    Can product a narrow focus on divisional profitability 
 Relationship among sales, expenses (& possibility  at expense of profitability for overall firm 
investment if this is investment center)   Encourages managers to focus on short run at 
 
   Cost efficiency  expense of long run 
Ch10 Segment reporting, decentralization, and BSC, include transfer pricing service department charge   Operating asset efficiency 
Decentralization  Residual income is the difference between operating income and minimum dollar return on sales. 
A responsibility accounting system measures the results of responsibility centers according to information managers   
need to operate their centers. 
Firms decide to decentralize: 
 For ease of gathering, using local information 
Residual Income:  Limitation of JIT: 
 Advantage: Gives another view of project profitability   Time is required to build sound relations with suppliers 
 Disadvantages   Workers experience stress in changing over to JIT 
 Can encourage short run orientation   Production may be interrupted because of absence of inventory supply buffer 
 Direct comparisons are difficult   May place current sales at risk to achieve assurance of future sales 
EVA is net income minus total annual cost of capital. Projects with  Theory of constraints (TOC) focuses on 3 measures of   Having lower prices 
organizational performance:   Being responsive 
positive EVA are acceptable. 
 Throughput: rate of generating money through   On‐time delivery 
Transfer Pricing: Is the price charged for a 
sales   Shorter lead time 
component by the selling division to the buying   Inventory: money spent turning materials into  TOC Concept: 
division of the same company.  throughput  1. Identify constraints 
   Operating expenses: money spent turning  2. Exploit binding constraints 
inventory into throughput  3. Subordinate everything to decision made in #2 above 
 
 TOC suggests that constraints (and thereby inventory)  4. Elevate binding constraints 
 
are best managed through  5. Repeat process 
Ch12 Tactical Decision Making   Having better, higher quality products 
Tactical Decision Making: Consists of choosing among alternatives with an immediate or limited end in view. 

t
 

ne
Strategical Decision Making: Is selecting among alternative strategies so that long term competitive advantage is  Ch16 Lean Accounting, Target Costing, and BSC 
established.  Lean Manufacturing Is an approach designed to eliminate waste & maximize customer value. 

s.
Tactical Model   Delivering the right product  
A general approach to tactical decision making includes:  2. Predatory pricing   Right quantity  

dn
1. Recognize, define the problem  a. A means of setting price to eliminate   Right quality (zero defect) 
2. Identify alternatives, eliminating those that are  competition   At time needed 

.d
unfeasible  b. Dumping on international market   At lowest possible cost 
3. Identify costs & benefits  3. Price discrimination   A cost reduction strategy that redefines activities performed 

et
4. Total relevant costs, benefits of each alternative  a. Charging different prices to different  5 Principles of Lean Thinking 
5. Assess qualitative factors  customers  1. Precisely specify value by each particular product 

id
6. Select alternative with greatest overall benefit  4. Price gouging  2. Identify the “value stream” for each 

l
Constrain of Tactical Decision Making  a. Using market power to set prices too high  3. Make value flow without interruption 

do
1. Pricing  4. Let customer pull value from producer 
  5. Pursue perfection 

do
Ch14 Inventory Management  Value Stream: Is all activities, both value‐added & non‐value‐added, required to bring product group or service from 
Managing inventory for competitive advantage includes:  starting point to finished product in hands of customer. 
1. Quality product engineering  5. Ability to respond to customers  Manufacturing Cell: Contains all operations in close proximity that are needed to produce a family of products. 

at
2. Prices  6. Lead times  Lean Manufacturing uses a demand pull system to reduce waste. 
3. Overtime  7. Overall profitability  ah  JIT inventory    Suppliers benefit from  
4. Excess capacity   Reduces inventory levels   Long term relations 
Inventory Cost = Cost to Acquire (ordering+Setup) + Carrying Cost + Stockout Cost   Requires close relations with suppliers   Better competitive position 
Economic Order Quantity: Is a model that calculates the best quantity to order or produce. (Economic Order Quantity) 
aa
Traditional cost management systems may not be compatible with Lean Accounting. Lean Accounting makes product 
TC   = Ordering Cost + Carrying Cost costs more simple & direct. More labor and overhead costs are assigned to products through direct tracing rather than 
Reorder Point (ROP) = Rate of Usage x Lead Time
  = PD/Q + CQ/2  allocation. 
ho

Safety Stock = Lead Time (maximum‐Average Usage) 
EOQ   =√2 ∶   Target Cost: Is the difference between sales price needed to capture a predetermined market share & desired per‐unit 
ROP menjadi = Rate of Usage x Lead Time + Safety Stock 
profit. 
= 2 /  
@

    Uses 1 of 3 methods 
 
Just in Time : Is a demand‐pull manufacturing system that requires goods to be pulled through the system by present   Reverse engineering 
demand.   Tearing down a competitors product to discover design features that create cost reductions 
Objective:  BY   Value analysis 
 Increase profits   Controlling costs   Attempting to assess the value placed on product functions by customers 
 Improve competitive position   Improving delivery performance   Process improvement 
       Improving quality  Life cycle costing includes development costs unlike conventional cost systems. Inclusion of more cost information can 
Basic inventory features of JIT address how manufacturing facilities can be designed to promote employee  be useful for assessing effects on costs and benefit future design. 
empowerment & product quality.   
Shutdowns are caused by:  JIT response  Ch17 Environmental Cost Management 
 Machine failure   Total preventive maintenance   Awareness of environmental costs is important because environmental regulations & fines have increased. 
 Defective material or sub‐assembly   Total quality control (TQC)  Quality Cost Model 
 Unavailability of material or sub‐  Using the Kanban system  Looks at costs and their impact for damage done to the environment. In addition to direct costs, there are costs to 
assembly  preventing environmental degradation. 
  1. Prevention Cost 
   
2. Detection Cost  5. Productivity 
Are costs to determine compliance with appropriate environmental standards including:  • The value added by the process divided by the value of the labor and capital consumed 
 Regulatory government laws  6. Safety 
 Voluntary standards (ISO 14001)  • Measures the overall health of the organization and the working environment of its employees 
 Management’s environmental policies  PM: General Process 
3. Internal Failure Cost 
4. External Failure Cost: Environmental external failure costs are costs of activities performed after discharging 
contaminants & waste into the environment. 

 
Environmental cost reports reveal 1) the impact of environmental costs on firm profitability & 2) relative amounts 
expended in each category. 

t
ne
3 formal Assesment stages    Objective: to reduce environmental impacts 
 Inventory analysis  5 objectives for environmental perspective 
 Types, quantities inputs needed   Minimize use of raw or virgin materials 

s.
 Environmental releases   Minimize use of hazardous materials 

dn
 Impact analysis   Minimize energy requirements for production, use of 
 Effects of competing designs  product 
 Relative ranking of effects   Minimize release of solid, liquid, gaseous residues 

.d
 Improvement analysis   Maximize opportunities to recycle 

et
Because environmental pollution is equivalent to economic inefficiency, all failure activities are non‐value‐added. 
 

id
Performance Measurement Process 
Performance measurement is primarily managing outcome, and one of its main purposes is to reduce or eliminate 

l
do
overall variation in the work product or process. The goal is to arrive at sound decisions about actions affecting the 
product or process and its output. 

do
Benefit of PM: 
• how well we are doing 
• if we are meeting our goals 

at
• if our customers are satisfied 
• if our processes are in statistical control 
• if and where improvements are necessary. 
ah
We need to Measure for 
1. Control 
aa

• Measurements help to reduce variation.  
2. Self Assesment 
ho

• Measurements can be used to assess how well a process is doing, including improvements that have been 
made. 
3. Continous Improvement 
@

• Measurements can be used to identify defect sources, process trends, and defect prevention, and to 
determine process efficiency and effectiveness, as well as opportunities for improvement. 
4. Management Assesment 
• Without measurements there is no way to be certain we are meeting value‐added objectives or that we are 
being effective and efficient 
General Category of PM: 
1. Effectiveness 
• A process characteristic indicating the degree to which the process output  conforms to requirements 
2. Efficiency 
• A process characteristic indicating the degree to which the process produces the required output at 
minimum resource  
3. Quality 
• The degree to which a product or service meets customer requirements and expectations 
4. Timeliness 
• Measures whether a unit of work was done correctly and on time 
 
PM Systematic Process:  BSC  
• Balance Scorecard adalah salah satu cara untuk mengukur current performance financial suatu entitas. 
• Balanced scorecard digunakan karena tidak ada satu ukuran pun yang dapat memberikan gambaran atas 
performa maupun focus atas area‐area kritis pada suatu bisnis. Manajemen ingin mendapatkan suatu proposi 
yang seimbang atas pengukuran financial dan operasional 

t
ne
s.
dn
.d
et
 

id
1. Decide the outcomes wanted. 
First Law of Performance: If you try to be the best at everything, you’ll be the best at nothing. 

l
do
If you can pick something you are sure you would succeed at, that choice probably should be your number one 
 
objective. 

do
2. Describe the major work processes involved. 
Second Law of Performance: People are more important than the process, but a good process is important to 
people. 

at
To improve the chances of meeting objectives, be sure to understand the system, that is, the operational structure 
that underlies the effort  ah
3. Identify the key results needed. 
Third Law of Performance: If you can’t describe it, you can’t improve it. 
aa
Ultimately, the final products of the system are those that meet the strategic results–the objective–desired by the 
company. 
4. Establish performance goals for the results. 
ho

• Fourth Law of Performance: If you don’t have a goal, you can’t score. 
• The PAIN is worth it if the goals are: 
@

• Profitable (Is it worthwhile to improve this? Favorable Benefit/Cost?) 
• Achievable (Can it be improved? How? Who will do it?) 
• Important (Does it matter to anyone?) 
• Numerical (Without a number, you won’t know when you get there.) 
• The GAIN is in reaching the goals, because: Goals Are Improvement Numbers. 
5. Define measures for the goals. 
• Fifth Law of Performance: Measuring the  • are based on measurable data 
activity usually improves the activity, but not  • contain normalized metrics for benchmarking 
the result  • are practical and easily understood by all 
• reflect results, not the activities used to produce  • provide a continual self assessment 
results  • provide a benefit that exceeds the cost   
• relate directly to a performance goal  • are accepted and have owners 
6. Select appropriate metrics. 
Sixth Law of Performance: If you know the score, you should be able to predict the outcome