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CONTEMPORARY

TEACHER
LEADERSHIP
Assignment 1
Abstract
The following report focuses on the improvement of a Stage 4, Year 8 English Unit: ‘Changes’.
This unit was originally designed for use in lower-ability classes at Chifley College: Bidwill
Campus. This report proposes recommendations for the improved suitability of the unit in
regard to teaching a comprehensive class with students that are Gifted and Talented, EAL/D,
and students with a diversity of learning needs. In order to effectively achieve this, the unit
has been reconstructed through the utilisation of the Understanding by Design (UbD)
framework to ensure that the proposed changes are concomitant with success for students
in the class. The targeted areas of improvement through this report are the improved
sequencing of learning, Literacy and Numeracy development, and the development of
personal and social capabilities through the learning.

Benedict Stone
Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................... 2
Objective and Context .................................................................................................................. 2
Goals ............................................................................................................................................. 3
Recommendations........................................................................................................................ 3
Part I – Comparative Table of Unit Alterations ................................................................................ 0
Part II – Contextual redesigned program documentation ............................................................... 3
Context ......................................................................................................................................... 3
Concept Map ................................................................................................................................ 4
Scope and Sequence..................................................................................................................... 5
Assessment Schedule ................................................................................................................... 6
Unit Outline .................................................................................................................................. 7
Assessment Task........................................................................................................................... 0
Part III – Report of Recommendations ............................................................................................. 4
Reference List ............................................................................................................................. 10
Appendix – Original Program Documentation ................................................................................. 0
Scope and Sequence..................................................................................................................... 0
Assessment Schedule ................................................................................................................... 1
Unit Outline .................................................................................................................................. 2
Assessment Task........................................................................................................................... 0
Executive Summary
Objective and Context
This report has been designed for the English faculty at Chifley College: Bidwill, which is located in
Western Sydney. Chifley College: Bidwill is a comprehensive co-educational school which has
streamed classes for English. The population of the school is highly diverse, with 40% of students
being from a language background other than English (LBOTE), and with 17% of students at the
school identifying as Indigenous or Torres Strait Islander individuals. Couples with this, the
socioeconomic status of the school is relatively low, with 81% of parents in the bottom quarter of
earners. The school is relatively even in terms of female to male students, with 52% to 48% split
respectively.

Originally, this unit was taught in a Year 8 English classroom with lower streamed students at Chifley
College: Bidwill. This class consisted primarily of students from a LBOTE, with socioeconomic factors
impacting students in the classroom.

Reference: Statistics and tables above are retrieved from the MySchool Website. Retrieved from:
https://myschool.edu.au/school/41838/profile/2017
Goals
- Address the literacy concerns through the learning in the unit and incorporate further
strategies for numeracy priorities through the learning.
- Improve the integration of ICT in the classroom as a resource to support learning.
- Challenge students through an inquiry focused learning, that focuses on solving problems
through collaborative approaches to learning
- Facilitate and encourage students to be able to demonstrate learning through a variety of
means, providing flexibility in the approach to assessment
- Provide effective differentiation for students in order to meet the needs of a diversity of
learners in the classroom
- Improve the sequence of learning across the unit to ensure that learning is meaningful and
has a clear progression.

Recommendations
The following recommendations will consist of the unit being taught in a comprehensive classroom
without streaming, meaning that there will be students of mixed academic ability in the classroom.
Furthermore, in the classroom there will be students with a LBOTE, and students that are Gifted and
Talented, as well as students that identify as Indigenous and/or Torres Strait Islander, and students
that are impacted by socioeconomic issues. Inclusive in this comprehensive classroom will be a
diversity of learners, including students with additional learning needs. Therefore, the
recommendations within this report primarily focus upon differentiation, literacy and numeracy
concerns, and the improvement of sequencing and assessment in the unit.

- Improve the differentiation provided in the classroom through ensuring all students in the
class have opportunities to engage with the learning and succeed.
- Improve the explicit instruction of Literacy as well as modelling in the classroom to ensure
that students are scaffolded through learning.
- Improve the sequencing of learning to ensure that there is a coherence between units, and
that the learning within the unit of work has a clear progression to assist in the development
of skills.
- Improve the provision of formative assessment through the development of a portfolio task
that operates as a key component in the learning.
Part I – Comparative Table of Unit Alterations

Area of Concern Suggested Alteration Research Supporting suggested alteration


The provided unit which was provided did In addressing these concerns, the formal assessment of Research highlights the need for regular and
not have adequate formative assessment, the unit has been redesigned in order to be more suitable effective feedback through learning, and that this
with a lack of opportunities in the learning for diverse learners. The redesigned assessment is improves outcomes for students (Hattie, 2009; CESE,
for students to be provided feedback on embedded through the implementation of a portfolio of 2014). Fernsten (2009) notes that portfolios act as
learning. Furthermore, the formal learning that will allow for the assessment to be an effective means of both formative and formal
assessment that was provided was not transformative and act as a key facet of the learning in assessment of students learning, that contribute to
inclusive of a broad range of learners. the unit of work. This means that there is weekly the overall learning experience of students.
formative assessment of students, where students are formative assessment is a means of differentiation
able to demonstrate learning in a variety of ways. The (Doubet, 2012). Through formative assessment,
formal assessment of the unit has been adapted, with the students are included into the learning, with this
essay being reduced in length and the addition of a acting as a form of differentiation (Doubet, 2012;
creative writing task. The creative task allows for Tucker, 2018). Through the research it is noted that
students to demonstrate their learning of techniques in a assessment needs to be embedded, as it is
different form than the summative assessment of an important that the act of formatively assessing does
essay at the end of the semester. This creative task also not become the focus of the learning in the lesson
allows for a creative outlet for the representation of (McCallum, 2012). The use of portfolio tasks is
learning and for formulating ideas in new ways. supported through literature, with Didau (2014)
noting that this is effective as an approach for
allowing effective feedback and ongoing monitoring
of student progress.
The provided unit of work did not allow for The revisions that has been made to this unit are the Collaborative learning helps students to be able to
opportunities to be able to work provision of more collaborative activities as a part of the make sense of learning and consolidate
collaborative settings. As a result of this, the learning in the unit. In this, there has also been the understandings (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005; Payette
unit did not provide opportunities for the implementation of more student-centred activities for & Barnes, 2017; Laal & Ghodsi, 2011). Students with
development of personal and social students which will facilitate the development of a LBOTE are further supported through
capabilities. personal and social capabilities. collaboration, with research highlighting that group
work leads to language development and is an
effective means of differentiation (Ibrahim et al.,
2015; Arias & Garcia, 2013; Calderon, Slavin &
Sanchez, 2011; Gannon & Howie, 2010).
Collaborative learning improves motivation and
engagement of students and assists in building
empathy and diversity whilst building a support
network for students (Brame & Biel, 2015; Laal &
Ghodsi, 2011).
The provided unit does not have a clear The learning of the unit has been sequenced moving the It is important that learning includes clear intentions
sequence of learning with the activities in study of Changes from Term 3 to Term 2 so that there is a and the use of explicit teaching practices (Wiggins &
the unit organised by learning activity rather natural progression in the learning. Furthermore, the McTighe, 2005; CESE, 2014). Student achievement is
than by guiding questions and big ideas. The internal structure of the unit has been separated by bolstered through the provision of clear learning
unit also has no clear goals, questions or sequences of learning, with clear intentions and guiding goals (CESE, 2014; Hattie, 2009). The use of guiding
learning intentions. Coupled with this, the questions for each of learning sequences. Coupled with questions for learning is essential to effective
continuum of learning in the scope and this, there has been an approximate teaching time teaching and is significant in improving outcomes for
sequence lacks coherence, with concepts allocated to each learning sequence, which although at students whilst aligning with tenants of UbD
and skills not being built upon logically in the the discretion of the classroom teacher will provide a (Wiggins & McTighe, 2013). Research highlights that
units. guideline for teachers. it is essential in designing through UbD that there is
a focus and clear aim to learning where ideas are
transferable (Yurtseven & Altun, 2017).
The provided unit did not provide The recommendations are that there are further Research highlights that students benefit from
opportunities for direct instruction and opportunities for explicit teaching in the unit, with the scaffolding and that this is essential for low-literacy
explicit teaching through modelling and use of Gradual Release of Responsibility to facilitate students to support language development (Gannon,
scaffolding. The scaffolding that is apparent student learning in writing. Furthermore, the teaching of 2010; Griffith, 2010). In the inclusion of students
in the unit removes the educational paragraphing is appropriately scaffolded with students with a LBOTE, research states the efficacy of
challenge, and the modelling in the unit does being supported in activities whilst being academically modelling and scaffolding, which is an effective
not follow evidence-based pedagogies for challenged. All of the activities in the unit are scaffolded means of differentiation vis process while ensuring
literacy instruction. which provides multiple points of engagement and learning is achievable and challenging (Olsen, Land,
ensures that work is achievable for all students in the Anselmi, & Aubuchan, 2010; Wass & Golding, 2014).
class. Learning aligned with traditional knowledge Schmokes (2018) notes that explicit literacy
learning for Indigenous individuals has also been instruction in the classroom is highly effective for
provided through utilisation of activities aligned with 8 students. Yunkaporta & McGinty (2009) note the
ways learning.
efficacy of visual learning methods for Indigenous
students, through 8 ways of learning.
The provided unit has little variation in The revisions are that there are more activities in the unit Boas & Gazis (2016) note the importance of a ‘hook’
activities to ‘hook’ learners into the topic, which focus on allowing for the representation of ideas to engage students in learning. Research highlights
with a lack of opportunities for reflection on and skills through a variety of different means. In the the need for variation of activities to ensure
learning. The activities in the unit provided inclusion of activities, there is a shift toward more students have opportunities to demonstrate learning
are repetitive and rely upon teacher-centred student-centred activities which allows for more genuine achievement (Boas & Gazis, 2016; Gannon & Howie,
models of learning. learning experiences for students. In this, there is a focus 2010; Zammit, 2016). Coupled with this, research
on students being more actively involved in the process highlights the efficacy of using questions to engage
of responding, composing, and interpreting which are key learners and that this is a means of balancing
focuses of the English syllabus. engagement with learning (Wiggins & Wilbur, 2015)
Through the provided unit, there are no This has been addressed through the provision of Research highlights that the Numeracy capability
opportunities for the provision of the learning activities that use mathematical thinking. This is should be embedded so that it has a purpose in the
Numeracy capability at all. evident through timelining activities, tabling and through greater scheme of learning (Boas & Gazis 2016).
creating graphical representations of information. The Research notes that this can be provisioned through
result of this is a learning that provides opportunities for the use of activities that enable learners to
developing mathematical reasoning skills in the learning understand and partake in learning with activities
process. that incorporate mathematical reasoning (Gannon &
Howie, 2010; Boas & Gazis, 2016).
Part II – Contextual redesigned program documentation

Context

The context for the redesigned unit of work is a contemporary classroom with students of mixed ability in the classroom. Furthermore, in the classroom will
be students with a LBOTE as well as students with individual learning needs, and students that are Gifted and Talented. The class will like the rest of the
school have students that are impacted by socioeconomic issues, as well as students that identify as Indigenous and/or Torres Strait Islander
Concept Map
Scope and Sequence
Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Term 1

Fiction – Genre Study


The unit will focus on a novel study that explores how a text conforms to a specific genre. Students will explore the conventions, textual features, values, terminology, tropes of the chosen genre to evaluate
how well they conform to the genre or go against it. Types of texts: fiction, nonfiction; visual texts, media, multimedia and digital texts
Class Study of a Text: Novel and Picture Books.
Focus outcomes: EN4-1A, EN4-2A, EN4-4B, EN4-3B, EN4-5C, EN4-6C, EN4-7D, EN4-9E

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Film: Common Film Module – Change – Conceptual Study.
Term 2

students will explore the ways in which the Common Module – ‘Change’ is represented in and through texts. Students will explore the various aspects of change that influences an individual perspective
such as self (personal), social, physical, environmental and values and beliefs. This unit will also require students to explore how texts can explore how change is triggered, the process of change and the
impact of change on an individual. Students will have the opportunity to explore the concept of change through a prescribed text and compose extended responses that demonstrate their understanding and
knowledge of the concept of change.
Focus outcomes: EN4-1A, EN4-2A, EN4-3B, EN4-4B, EN4-5C, EN4-6C, EN4-7D, EN4-8D

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Non-Fiction: Environment – News, Media, and Information. Recording and Advertising Digital Voices
Term 3

In this unit students explore and respond critically, imaginatively and interpretively to a variety of media related texts. They will explore the purpose of media articles and look closely at the idea of bias and
differing points of view. Students will be provided with the opportunity to explore and expand their understanding of the influence of the media within the context of their everyday life.Types of texts: fiction,
poetry, nonfiction; spoken texts, print texts, media, multimedia and digital texts (websites, audio)
Public Voices & Changed Voices: Bias
Types of texts: media, multimedia and digital texts
Focus outcomes: EN4-2A, EN4-3B, EN4-4B, EN4-5C, EN4-7D, EN4-9E

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Drama – Introduction to Shakespeare.
In this unit students will explore a Shakespearean drama text which is regarded as quality literature. This ensures that they explore texts from other countries and times, and understand the contextual
Term 4

value of studying a variety of texts. The unit will introduce students to Shakespeare’s universal characters and their stories, as well as the richness of Shakespearean’s language to engage students. The unit
will require students to understand the key ideas, language features and form of the play ‘Romeo and Juliet’.
Students experience play reading, learning about dramatic techniques, and performance of a scene in groups. This unit includes peer and self-assessment.
Types of texts: drama; print texts
Spoken and Visual Texts, News Report Writing
Types of texts: fiction, nonfiction; print texts, visual texts
Focus outcomes: EN4-1A, EN4-2A, EN4-4B, EN4-5C, EN4-7D, EN4-8D, EN4-9E

Reference: The following scope and sequence has been developed through the use of the original documentation provided by the school, and through the use of the
recommended scope and sequence provided by NESA. Retrieved from: https://syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/assets/global/files/english_s4_sampless1.pdf
Assessment Schedule

Formal Assessment
Assessment Task Assessment Task Assessment Task Assessment Task
1 2 3 4
Assessment Book Review Common Module - Multimodal In class –
Name:
Essay Presentation News Report
Description Students are to write a Student’s write 500 – 800 Create an advertisement
Students are to write a
review based on the class word essay on the Common about a product or campaign
news report on a key event that
prescribed text which Module – Change by using directed towards an
has occurred in the
examines how the text fits their prescribed text. environmental issue. Analysis
Shakespeare play ‘Romeo and
of advertisement composition
into the key features of the Juliet’.
Students complete in-class presented to class with a
genre. creative task using Change as speech Rationale
the focus.

Students complete a
portfolio through the course of
the semester which is marked
satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.
Weighting 25% 25% 25% 25%
Due Date Term 1, Week 9 Term 2, Week 7, 10 Term 3, Week 8 Term 4, Week 4

Outcomes EN4-1A, EN4-3B , EN4- EN4-2A,EN4- 6C, EN4- EN4-1A, EN4-2A , EN4- EN4-4B, EN4-5C , EN4-
4B and EN4-6C 7D and EN4-8D 7D and EN4-9E 6C and EN4-8D
Unit Outline
UNIT OUTLINE
Subject: Stage 4: Year 8 English Course: Film Study: Common Module – ‘Changes’ Number of Weeks: 10
Unit Overview: In this unit students will explore the ways in which the Common Module – ‘Change’ is represented in and through texts.
Students will explore the various aspects of change that influences an individual perspective such as self (personal), social, physical,
environmental and values and beliefs. This unit will also require students to explore how texts can explore how change is triggered, the
process of change and the impact of change on an individual. Students will have the opportunity to explore the concept of change through a
prescribed text and compose extended responses that demonstrate their understanding and knowledge of the concept of change.
Key Concepts/ Big Ideas The importance of this learning
- Understand how the concept of ‘change’ is The importance of this learning Is that students will be able to understand how ideas are
represented in both fiction and in non- represented in and through texts. Students will be able to understand the individual perspective
fiction set texts and media that texts highlight and understand and be able to demonstrate how texts construct and convey
- Students create their own texts that explore meaning.
the concept of ‘change’
- Students understand the way in which QTM Elements General Capabilities CCP Other Areas
change may be represented and the way Deep Knowledge Critical and Creative Thinking Aboriginal and Torres Civics and
that humans may change and the way that Strait Islander Citizenship
they may experience these changes Engagement Ethical Understanding Histories and Cultures
- Students understand the social and political Diversity and
purpose of studying the concept of ‘change’ Metalanguage Personal and Social Capability Asia and Australia’s Difference
- Students understand the impact of change Engagement with Asia
and reflect upon the experience of learning Student Direction Numeracy Work and
about ‘changes’ including their learning Sustainability Enterprise
experiences. Connectedness Intercultural Understanding
- Understand the various forms that change
can take Information and
Communication Technology

Literacy
Unit context within Scope and Sequence Syllabus Outcomes
This unit is situated within Stage 4, and continues on EN4-1A: responds to and composes texts for understanding, interpretation, critical analysis, imaginative expression and
from study of fiction, in which students have learnt pleasure
EN4-2A: effectively uses a widening range of processes, skills, strategies and knowledge for responding to and
and begun to understand English language devices composing texts in different media and technologies.
and the way in which meaning is represented and EN4-3B: uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes,
formed within and across texts. Following this unit is audiences and contexts
the study of Non-fiction which involves students EN4-4B: makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence
EN4-5C: thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and increasingly complex ideas
applying understandings on textual understanding and arguments to respond to and composes texts in a range of contexts
and analysis towards a broader range of texts. The EN4-6C: identifies and explains connections between and among texts
continuum of learning across the scope an sequence EN4-7D: demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their
and through this unit is beneficial in the way that it relationships within it
builds upon skills and understandings in the EN4-8D: identifies, considers and appreciates cultural expression in texts
learning.;

Literacy Focus Numeracy Focus ICT Focus Differentiation


Literacy focus is provisioned Numeracy Focus is provided ICT focus is provided Differentiation has been provisioned to included
through the lessons of the through the lessons through through this until through Meaningful learning through technology, which is evident
unit involving explicit the fact that there are the fact that there is the use through the digital learning portfolios that students work
literacy and writing timelining activities through of computers in the on through the course of the learning.
instruction, including the the unit, and through the classroom, evident through Experiences of learning and texts through this unit have
teaching of language provision of activities that web quest activities, and been linked to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
features, sentencing, and involve statistical data through the use of activities histories and cultures in order to engage these students
paragraphing. analysis through some of that utilise learning through and differentiate, including the use of activities that are
the provided materials in the use of ICT. The digital aligned with Yunkaporta’s 8 ways of learning.
the class. portfolio that students The activities in the unit are aligned with collaborative
partake in also acts as a group learning that are adequately structured through all
means of ICT focused activities to be able to support all students diverse learning
learning. needs.
Activities include opportunities for extension in order to
support students that are Gifted and Talented, and
adequate class time to work on activities is provisioned in
class time to ensure that students that are low-SES and do
not have access to resources at home have the same
opportunities as other students in the class.

Sequence Outcomes Teaching and Learning Strategies including assessment for learning. Assessment
Learning EN4-6C Unpacking Common Module – “Change” The portfolio
Sequence 1 EN4-7D Provide introduction to the concept. serves as an
(2 weeks) Learning Intention: Students will be able to understand the concept of Change, and the ongoing
many different ways that this may be represented in texts, and the any different ways that formative
assessment
change may take form.
measure week
by week for the
Key Inquiry Questions teacher.
1) What makes a person want to change; 2) What defines a change; 3) in what different
ways can a change occur; 4) why would the concept of change be so prevalent in texts?;
Why would we study change; What is your understanding of the concept of change, and
what does change mean to you? How do you interpret this? Students
 What is a Common Module? Provide an overview of the unit and an explanation of write a
the purpose of the Common Module. structured
- Students work together in groups to understand what the concept of ‘change’ is, response to
and use their personal reading materials, personal experiences, and discuss with demonstrate
their knowledge
one another to understand what the concept of change is. The teacher and the
of the concept of
class will create a whole-class mind map using CMAPS so that the picture and
change.
understandings of Changes can be created as a class.
- The teacher will introduce metalanguage, and technical terminologies to student
responses, explaining meanings and importance of using the technical jargon.

 What is “Change”? Students


o Class brainstorm: Discuss student’s understanding of Change analyse a short
o Dictionary meaning or provide definitions of Change film text
o Word bank: Using a thesaurus provide a list of words similar to Change
o Self-Reflection: Students compose a response reflecting on how their life has
changed in the last 5-10 years.
- Students will write a reflection focusing on what they interpret change to mean,
and what the importance of change is. Students will think about why change is
necessary, thinking about social, cultural, and historical, and personal ideas. (the
teacher will scaffold this for students, using the concept map created as a class, and
a Y-Chart, students will complete this activity in groups, working together.)
Students will upload this to the portfolio

 Aspects of Change:
o Definitions on aspects of Change: Self, Social, Environmental, Perspective,
Physical
 Quotes about Change: Provide a list of quotes which reflect the concept
and Change and get students to explain the aspect of change it reflects.
 Students provide a real life example of each aspect of Change or an
example from another text which reflect these aspects.
 PEEL Paragraph: Students are to answer the following question and
write a PEEL Paragraph based on an aspect of Change. “An individual can
change in many ways”. Reflect on yourself and link the question to an
aspect. Then, explain how it is relevant to you furthermore, providing an
example.
 Students will consider different examples from their life/community and
also the different types of change that they have experienced.
 Students will discuss the factors that may lead to a change occurring,
and for changes revolving around a person, the qualities and
characteristics that may be required for this change to occur.
 Students imagine they are in a situation of change, and explore how
they would navigate the situation, and the impacts and causes of such
changes.
 Students will research individually an aspect of change that a person has
experienced in the past. Students can choose a visual means of
presenting this information (PowerPoint, Spark video, Prezi)
 Students will create a 5 or 10 step breakdown of what experiences
individuals will face as a result of a change. In this, students will focus on
different types of changes in creating these responses, thinking about
the personal and social impacts.
 Problem solving: Students are given scenarios and determine what aspect of change
it relates too. This can be completed as a group activity.

 Trigger, Process & Impact: Think-Pair-Share - Students are given a set timeframe to
brainstorm what triggers, process and impact of ‘Change’ then swap with the person
sitting next to them and share their answers. Then as a class, compose a mind map of
“Triggers, Process & Impact”.

 Inquiry Task: Web Quest

- After students have learned about the different aspects of change, students begin
looking at texts that they have read and studied, as well as looking at different
contemporary resources that are relevant to students for students to investigate.
- In this activity, students will write a paragraph in PEEL format about their definition Students
of change prior and will also write a definition after the completion of this activity. compose an
- Students will write a reflection on the comparison between the two different empathy task
definitions that they have written, reflecting on the changes between their based on the
responses and why they have changed their definitions and understandings. character from
- Portfolio: students will upload there two definitions of Change, and also their the film
reflections to the portfolio as a part of their evidence of learning.
Related Text Analysis: Short Film – ‘Marry Me’ directed by Michelle Lehman
Students will analyse the related text to demonstrate how texts can represent the concept
of ‘change’. Students watch, Tropfest – Marry Me and answer questions surrounding the
main persona (Chloe).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFdbZHMBxfg

Prediction Inquiry: what changes do you believe will be present in this text?
o
o Trigger: What triggers Chloe’s change in the film? It is triggered by her interest,
influence by another person or emotional connection?
o Process:
 What transformation does Chloe undergo when she tries to get
attention from Jason?
 Does Chloe encounter any new values or beliefs in the process of
changing?
 Letter writing: Write a letter to Jason from the perspective of Chloe,
explaining what you initially thought of him (the beginning of the short
film) and what you think of him now (refer to the end of the short film).
o Impact: Class discussion – As a class, discuss how Chloe had changed by the
end of the film. Was it a negative or positive change? Explain and reference
relevant examples.
Portfolio – students will write a paragraph discussing the different forms that the concept
takes through the text, and the way that forms of changes are related and can operate Students
within each other. demonstrate
Short Text Analysis: understanding of
Students will analyse a variety of texts types (visual images, poems, song lyrics, short concept through
extracts, etc.) to demonstrate their understanding of the concept of ‘Change’ in different analysis of short
texts.
texts.

 Students are to respond to the texts using the following questions.


 What triggered change?
 What process (transformation) occurred?
 What is the impact of change?

 Scaffold short responses using CTEC or PEEL formula.


- The teacher will teach this through utilising a Gradual Release of Responsibility
(GRR) approach. The teacher will demonstrate the activities, then work with the
class and scaffold students to be able to complete paragraphs.

Short Text Analysis List: Possible text(s) to use in this section.


 Song Lyrics: Tupac ‘Changes’
 Song Lyrics: Michael Jackson ‘Man in the mirror’
 Quotes about Change https://www.buzzfeed.com/jonmichaelpoff/do-i-dare-disturb-
the-universe?utm_term=.cpj5499zg#.jk3zqddnp
 Quotes about Change https://www.brainyquote.com/topics/change
 Travel Blogs/Recounts

- As well as these recommended texts, students will be encouraged to work in


groups to analyse texts that they are reading personally.

Learning EN4-1A Learning Intention: Students will be able to understand the features of visual and text The portfolio
Sequence 2 – EN4-2A based mediums for representing ideas and conveying meaning. serves as an
2 Weeks EN4-3B ongoing
Essential Questions: What stylistic features are integral to texts in order to convey ideas of formative
assessment
change? How are different types of changes conveyed in texts? Why do different texts
measure week
convey ideas differently?
by week for the
How do these techniques assist in further understanding the way in which change is teacher.
represented in the texts studied so far in the class. (Spiral inquiry approach to studying
texts)

Introduction to Techniques
 Brainstorm: Students are to brainstorm the film techniques that they know. Get
students to share their responses.
 Inquiry- the teacher will provide students will a range of written and visual texts that
represent Asian, as well as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures.
- Students will investigate how these ideas are conveyed and will create a visual
representation of the Changes that are conveyed through the texts. Students will
also create a Mind-Map that represents the various techniques used in the
representation of ideas through the text. Teacher
- Portfolio – students will upload this document to their portfolio. checks student
 Film Techniques: work to show
o Camera Angle the
o Camera Shots understanding of
o Diegetic/Non-Diegetic Sounds the technique.
o Lighting
o Montage
o Movement
o Flashback/Flash-forward

 Literary Devices:
o Metaphor
o Simile
o Symbolism
o Diction
o Foreshadowing
o Imagery
o Personification
o Point of View – Omniscient & Subjective
o Motif
Learning EN4-1A Close Study of Prescribed Text The portfolio
Sequence 3, EN4-2A Learning Intention: Students will be able to understand how the director of the film has serves as an
3 Weeks EN4-3B represented the concept of change. ongoing
Essential Questions: formative
assessment
- What forms of change are represented in the film?
measure week
- How has the director represented the Changes within the film?
by week for the
- How are the elements of change linked within the film? teacher.
Outcomes: EN4-1A, EN4-2A, EN4-3B
The following activities are designed to assist in student’s analysis of the prescribed text to
demonstrate how it relates to the concept of ‘Change’.

 Prediction: Students analyse the cover of the prescribed text to determine the aspects
of change that can be shown in the film. Students write a short response based on
their prediction.
- Interpretation of the DVD cover – students estimate what Changes they believe will
be present within the film as a result of the cover. Students will justify their
responses based on textual evidence from the cover of the case.
- Students will collaboratively create a timeline of the film, with each student in the
class taking a key event in the film to create a class timeline to put on the Students
classroom wall which will be finished for the next lesson. (this will serve as a visual write a
picctoral reference for students on the structure of the film). structured
 Character Profile: Students are to provide a brief summary of each character and response
organize them into categories of: Main Protagonist, Antagonist and Minor Characters.
 Select a character to focus on from the Prescribed Text and get students to create a
timeline on how the persona has changed throughout the film.
- Students will explain through creating a visual representation (poster, etc) of the
ways in which the composer conveys the concept through the use of narrative
elements and through the use of visual elements.
 Key Scene Analysis: Select key scenes from the Prescribed Text to analyse closely.
Identifying and referring to the film techniques and literary devices.
 Select key scenes that reflect the following aspect of change
 Trigger: What triggered change?
 Process: What process (transformation) occurred?
 Impact What is the impact of change?

Lightning Writing: Provide students with different topics that relate to your
prescribed text to get them into the habit of writing PEEL Paragraphs
- The teacher will reinforce learning on paragraphing by utilizing a Gradual Release of
Responsibility model for learning. Students will then work on learning.
- Students will source their own related texts through researching for relevant
contemporary sources. Students will then create these responses and will upload these
responses to the Portfolio.
The teacher will explain to the students about their related texts, getting students to investigate
their texts through using questioning techniques, close reading, language study, as well as analysis
of the character. The students will analyse what attributes of the character in their related texts
contribute or are attributable to the changes

Assessment Task: (class task) – students will work in class to create a piece of creative writing that
uses techniques that the director of their set text has utilised. Elements of the film that students
can focus on are (character development, setting, images, descriptive writing, language
techniques, sentence structuring, tension, narrative arc/ voice, and structure) students should try
to utilise at least one stylistic feature.
- The piece of writing may be a diary entry, descriptive piece, narrative, report, or other
creative document that has the primary focus of change as a central element to the story.
Learning EN4-4B Connections to the world and to other contexts. The portfolio
Sequence 4, EN4-5C serves as an
2 Weeks EN4-8D Learning Intention: Students will be able to understand the significance in the representation of ongoing
Changes within texts formative
assessment
Essential Questions: What is the social significance of representing the changes that humans go measure week
through? How can we construct texts that represent changes for particular purposes? by week for the
teacher.
Learning Activities:
- Group task: students will work in small heterogenous groups working towards creating a
presentation for the rest of the class on how interconnected the nature of change is and
the relationship between changes both within a text and across texts.
- Students will write a short 1 paragraph reflection on this, uploading this to the portfolio.
Learning EN4-4B Essay Writing: Preparing the students for the Assessment Task The portfolio
Sequence 5, EN4-5C serves as an
1 Week EN4-6C Learning Intention: students will be able to write an essay that utilises PEEL paragraphing ongoing
EN4-8D to be able to communicate understandings about texts and consolidate knowledge in formative
assessment
written forms.
measure week
by week for the
- Utilise the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model to ensure students are able to teacher.
write effective paragraphs that convey understandings of the concept of change
through cohesive written paragraphs.
- The teacher will get students to put information into a table that they understand
so that they can choose any text to compare with the prescribed text of the
learning to be able to write a cohesive essay response to the question provided in-
class.
- The teacher will ensure to effectively model the structure of an essay.
 Provide a list of examples from the prescribed text. Then do a joint-constructed PEEL
Paragraph where the class has to provide the Point, Explanation and Link.
Formative Task:
 Students compose an extended response to show how the concept of ‘Change’ is
explored in the related text ‘of their choosing. The response must include
supporting textual references.
 Students will upload this response to the portfolio for feedback from the teacher.
Assessment: Essay Response
Student’s write 500 – 800 word essay on how the prescribed text studied explores the
Common Module – Change.
This response must be typed, edited, drafted and corrected before submitting the final
copy to classroom teacher. Students will start the task in class having 2 lessons to work on
the task and ensure that it is drafted, edited, and finalised before handed in to the teacher
by way of uploading to the online portfolio portal .
Assessment Details Outcomes
Assessment Part 1 EN4-4B
Students through the course of the semester will complete pieces of work in class, and complete reflections as a part of EN4-5C
homework. Students will upload these tasks to the online learning portfolio for the unit. The teacher will provide feedback on EN4-6C
each piece of work for students which students can use to further their learning. At the end of the semester, students will be EN4-8D
provided with a satisfactory /unsatisfactory for this component of the learning. Through the course of the semester, the
teacher can request that students upload additional work to the portfolio. This assessment serves as both a formal and
formative piece of assessment that allows for the teacher to understand the achievement of students in relation to the
learning intentions.
Assessment Part 2
Students will write a piece of creative writing during the lesson for 40 Minutes. Through this task students will use a stylistic
feature (technique) from the prescribed text to create their own piece of creative writing that focuses around the concept of
change. In this task, students can create their own story through using a character from the prescribed text.
Assessment Part 3
Students will write an essay comparing the ways in which the prescribed text and related text convey understandings of
change. This assessment will be completed in and out of class, with students having 2 lessons to work on the task, with the
assessment due at the beginning of the next week.
Evaluation of the Learning and Teaching Indicators of Learning
Evaluation of the efficacy of learning through the course of this semester will be achieved through the use of formative Formative
assessment of all student work in the class, and through the use of directed open-ended questioning and direct observation in assessment throughout
the lessons. The portfolio will allow for a week by week understanding of the achievement of students in relation to the the course of the
learning goals of the unit. learning, and the use of
formal and informal
assessment measures in
the learning.
Assessment Task
Year 8 English – ‘Change’ Assessment

Faculty: English Subject: Common Module – Change

Task Number: 2 Year: 8

Date Given: Term 2, Week 1 Date Due: Term 2, Week 10,

Note: The components of this task are worth 25% of your yearly assessment.

Outline/Description of Task:
This term you have engaged in a study of the Common Module Concept – ‘Change’. The
following assessment requires you to undertake in the following three components;

Part 1 – Digital Learning Portfolio (with reflections) – 5%


This task requires you to complete pieces of work in class as a part of your usual classwork and
upload these to an online digital portfolio. You will be instructed to write reflections and upload
classwork as a part of the learning through the course of the semester. At the end of the semester
in Week 10, you will be provided either a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory grade for this component.

Note: Individual activities that are required throughout the unit will need to be uploaded by the first
lesson of the next week, including all relevant reflection activities. Through the course of the unit,
the teacher will provide feedback weekly to the documentation and reflections uploaded to assist
with learning.

Part 2 – In class Creative Writing – 5%


In class, you will be required to write a piece of creative writing that uses a feature or technique of
the prescribed text in order to create a piece of creative writing that has the central focus of
Change.
DUE DATE – Week 7 (in-class)
Note- in the case of absence, a medical certificate will be required in order to sit this in a later
lesson.

Part 3 – Essay – 15%


This task requires you to write an essay that incorporates your knowledge and understanding of the
concept through your Prescribed text (Film) and Related text.
The task must be drafted, edited thoroughly for mistakes and a final copy will need to be submitted
on the allocated due date.

This Task must be 500-800 words in length and will be completed over the course of two lessons.
You will then hand in your completed assessment task.
DUE DATE – Week 10
Assessment: Part Three

Assessment Task: Essay

During this term you have engaged in the study of the Common Module Concept
– ‘Change’, through the close analysis of your class Prescribed text (film) and Related
text.

THE TASK: Essay

The task requires you to answer the essay question featured below. The task must
be drafted, edited thoroughly for mistakes and a final copy will need to be submitted
on the allocated due date.

When constructing a response you should ensure you:


 Answer the question using correct essay structure (PEEL, STEEL, etc…)
 Address features of your text (ideas and techniques)
 Provide evidence from your text to support your argument
 Publish your response in a font size between 12 - 14
Question - How is the concept of ‘Change’ explored in your prescribed text?
In your response, you must support your argument with examples from your Prescribed
text and Related text

Syllabus Outcomes Being Assessed What it will look like


4B - A student makes effective language Have you demonstrated a clear and
choices to creatively shape meaning skilful understanding of the film and
with accuracy, clarity and coherence related text? Detailing how it relates to
the concept of Change?
5C - A student thinks imaginatively, Have you identified the aspects of the
creatively, interpretively and critically text that reflect the concept of Change?
about information, ideas and arguments
to respond to and compose texts.
6C - A student identifies and explains Have you referred to the techniques and
connections between and among texts. demonstrated that you understand how
they are used to shape meaning within
the film and Related text?
8D - A student: identifies, considers and Have you produced a correctly
appreciates cultural expression in texts structured essay, using appropriate
information, evidence, and ideas related
to the idea of change?
OUTCOMES 4, 5, 6, 8 (Mark / 15 )

Criteria Tick Mark

• Skilfully explores how the concept of change is portrayed in


the Prescribed Text and Related Text
• Presents a sophisticated response demonstrating well-
_______
A
developed understanding of the texts’ ideas based on
relevant textual knowledge
_______
13 –
• Organises, develops and expresses ideas effectively, using
language appropriate to audience, purpose and form
_______ 15

• Effectively explores how the concept of change is portrayed in


the Prescribed Text and Related Text
• Presents a substantial response demonstrating a developed
_______
B
understanding of the texts’ ideas based on textual
knowledge
_______
10 –
• Organises, develops and expresses ideas competently, using
language appropriate to audience, purpose and form
_______ 12

• Adequately explores how the concept of change is portrayed in _______


the Prescribed Text and Related Text
• Presents a sound demonstrating understanding of the texts’
_______
C
ideas based on some textual knowledge
• Organises, develops and expresses ideas adequately, using
_______
7–9
language appropriate to audience, purpose and form

• Describes aspects of the concept of change through the


Prescribed Text and make some reference to the Related _______

Text
• Attempts a response demonstrating limited understanding of _______
D
ideas based on limited textual knowledge
• Attempts to organise and express ideas with limited _______
4–6
appropriateness to audience, purpose and form

_______
• Attempts to describe elements of the text(s)
• Demonstrates elementary textual knowledge
• Attempts to organise a response in an elementary way _______
E
_______
0–3
TOTAL Mark =

/ 15
Assessment: Part One
There is no marking rubric for this component of the assessment. As a part of your regular
lessons for English, there will be classwork activities and homework that will be required to
be uploaded to the online learning portfolio. You will be advised of all pieces of material for
this, and the due date for each component will be advised in the lessons.

Your responsibilities
- When assigned a piece of work, you will have it uploaded to the online portfolio by
the beginning of the next week. In cases where this is not possible, advise your
classroom teacher.
- Make sure to put effort into the reflections and activities, as this is an essential form
of feedback for you to be able to keep learning and improve your capabilities in the
unit

Teacher Responsibilities
- Your teacher will provide feedback on your reflections and uploaded documentation
within 2 lessons to ensure that you have feedback to enable you to keep improving.

Assessment: Part Two


This task requires you to work in class to create a piece of creative writing using a feature or
technique that the Director of your prescribed text has used to convey ideas and meaning in
your text. You will use this feature to compose a piece of original creative writing that has
change as a central element to the piece of writing.

Note – You will be provided more information regarding this task in the week prior to this
assessment, and the content covered in the unit at the point of assessment.
What am I being marked on?
- You have identified and then adequately used a technique or feature of your
prescribed text
- You have composed a piece of creative writing that demonstrates change.
- You have used narrative devices and made informed decisions in the composition of
your writing .

Syllabus Outcomes Being Assessed What It Will Look Like


4B - A student makes effective language Have you adequately used language
choices to creatively shape meaning with features and English language techniques to
accuracy, clarity and coherence convey your representation of Change?
Is your writing clear, well-written, and is
your sentencing accurate?
5C - A student thinks imaginatively, Have you identified and made change a
creatively, interpretively and critically about central element of your piece of writing.
information, ideas and arguments to respond
to and compose texts.
Part III – Report of Recommendations
The ‘Change’ unit of work has been taught at Chifley College: Bidwill Campus in

Stage 4 since 2014 and has been effective in engaging lower-ability students into the study of

film as a medium for the representation of meaning. This report serves to outline proposals

for this unit based upon the Understanding by Design (UbD) approach to unit development.

An essential facet of UbD is the continuing evaluation of programs to ensure the

effectiveness of the learning being provided, and that the unit is aligned with current

evidence-based research. The purpose of this report is that it will allow for discussion of the

improvement of this unit within the English faculty. Through this report, the focus of the

suggestions will be in order to make sure that the unit is suitable for a diverse body of

students in a comprehensive classroom with varying ability levels in the class. The areas of

improvement being posited aim to improve the ‘Changes’ unit of work in regard to the

development of Literacy and Numeracy as well as personal and social capabilities,

assessment, and the improved sequencing of learning through the unit.

Literacy and Numeracy development

Contemporary research highlights the importance of classrooms that utilise direct

instruction and scaffolding, and that classrooms utilising such approaches are beneficial over

those that do not incorporate these strategies (Dooley & Thangapeumal, 2011; Olsen, et al.,

2010; CESE, 2014). Through the original unit, scaffolding is provided, although it is limited

due to the scaffolding removing educational challenge, with literacy instruction being

reduced to codes and conventions. McKenney (2018) states that teaching literacy in this

manner of codes removes the critical and creative thinking from learning, which is

counterintuitive as students do not provide authentic responses. Therefore, it is the first

recommendation that the unit adopts an evidence-based approach to modelling and


scaffolding where learners are supported whilst being provided an educational challenge.

Coupled with this, it is advised that students are provided more opportunities to write.

Schmoker (2018) notes the benefit student have from having increased opportunities to write.

Wass & Golding (2014) and McKenney (2018) state the increased engagement and success

for students that are supported in learning in this manner whereby engagement is provided

through the educational challenge, whilst learners being supported through scaffolding.

In the provision of these approaches, it is necessary to ensure that interventions are

based on sound evidence-based practice, and as such the modelling and direct instruction in

the unit will be provided through the use of the Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR)

model. GRR is an effective means of modelling and scaffolding learners (Gannon & Howie,

2010; Boas & Gazis, 2016). Furthermore, in the attainment of literacy learning, the spiral

approach to conceptual understanding is employed in relation to texts. It is through a spiral of

inquiry that students have a better understanding of concepts, especially when paired with

clear intentions (Gallagher & Little, 2018).

Originally, the unit had no opportunities for the development of Numeracy

capabilities in the classroom, with no use of mathematical reasoning skills. The research

highlights the need to focus on the development of these capabilities in the English classroom

and that in order to do this effectively it should be embedded into the learning continuum

(CESE, 2016). Therefore, it is the recommendation that tabling, timelining and the use of

graphical representations are utilised for students to be able to understand learning in the

classroom to be able to use Numeracy capabilities effectively (Gannon & Howie, 2010; Boas

& Gazis, 2016).

Personal and social capabilities


Personal and social skills are essential to develop, especially in a classroom with a

diversity of students with various skills, backgrounds and understandings. The original unit

of work had opportunities for collaborative learning which leads to social skill development,

albeit these activities were tokenistic with no discernible connection to deeper learning and

the building of understandings. Research highlights that collaborative learning leads to

students developing empathy, cultural competencies and communication skills, which are

integral to a diverse classroom (Laal & Ghodsi, 2011). Ibrahim et al., (2015) further this,

stating that group work learning operates as a means of differentiation that creates a support

network for students. Through group work activities, students are exposed to new ideas,

perspectives and understandings which in turn deepens the learning for students (Payette &

Barnes, 2017). the benefits of group work are far-reaching and are suitable activities for UbD,

with research highlighting that it is an optimal platform for inquiry learning, allowing

students to work towards reaching solutions in a student-driven way (Arauz, 2013).

In light of this, it is recommended that the unit be revised to include further

opportunities for collaborative learning in which inquiry is the basis of the learning. This will

allow students to be supported through the differentiation that is provided in group learning

environments. Through this recommended alteration, students will be able to develop

personal and social capabilities, and students with a LBOTE will be facilitated with

opportunities for language development (Brame & Biel, 2015; Ibrahim et al., 2015).

Learning sequencing

The focus of UbD learning is on the development of deep understandings with skills

and learning that is transferable. It is through backward design that this can be achieved, and

essential to this is that units of work operate with one another as a part of a program that is

cohesive, rather as individual units of work (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005). Research highlights
the need for continuity of learning across units, and that students have better achievement

when concepts are built within and across units (CESE, 2014). As a result of this, it is

recommended that there are clear links between the learning of Term 1 in regard to the

representation of ideas through texts, and the learning in Changes which is focused on the

representation of ideas in film. This can be achieved through the moving of ‘Changes’ from

Term 3 to Term 2, which will allow for a cohesive flow of learning. This will also benefit the

learning of Unit 3 which is concentrated on multimedia learning that can build on the

concepts of the unit of Change.

In the original unit of work, there is a lack of internal sequencing, evident through

there being no essential questions, learning intentions or explicit learning goals. This results

in the learning having no clear aim or direction. Coupled with this, the organisation of the

learning is in relation to broad topic and led by learning activities. As a result, there is a

section of learning in the unit on techniques which is not connected to the broader

understanding of the concept of Change. Research highlights that an essential component of

UbD is the provision of learning that is framed around concepts, with clear intentions and

questions to guide the learning (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005; McTighe & Wiggins, 2013;

Yurtseven & Altun, 2017). This is furthered through Hattie (2009) who notes the benefit of

transparent learning where students and teachers are both aware of the intentions and reasons

for learning, which can bolster achievement in the classroom.

As a result of this, it is recommended that the unit be split clearly into defined

sequences of learning with explicit learning intentions and questions to guide the learning of

each sequence. in doing this, it is necessary to organise the learning so that it has greater

coherence. It is necessary for there to be more explicit links between the learning to create a

clear aim to learning, whereby the sequences build logically from one another which is

aligned UbD approaches to learning. Exemplifying this is the use of the spiral inquiry
understanding in the teaching of techniques which links the learning of this to the study of the

texts allowing for a deeper understanding of previously studied texts in the unit (Gallagher &

Kittle, 2018). Cullen & Hill (2013) state the benefit of such an approach to ensure that

learning is meaningful and engaging for students.

Assessment

The original formative assessment in the unit lacked opportunities for regular

feedback for students. Research highlights that regular feedback is paramount, and when

provided regularly leads to markedly higher gains for students (Hattie, 2009; CESE, 2014).

The most effective means to provide feedback to students is through formative assessment of

learning in the classroom which also acts as a tool for differentiation that provides an avenue

for adjustments to learning. The summative assessment that was provided in the unit only

provided one means of representing learning, and research highlights that there is a need to

ensure that all assessment is transformative and leads to overall student understanding

(Popham, 2011). Research highlights that the focus of assessment should be to document and

monitor change, and McCallum (2012) states that this should be embedded in order to not

make assessment the focus of learning. There is some formative assessment in the original

unit, although it is not embedded and does not provide enough opportunities for monitoring

students and providing effective feedback. Tucker (2018) reiterates the importance of

embedded assessment, with formative assessment acting as an inclusive approach to teaching.

The first recommendation is that the summative assessment be adjusted to incorporate

a portfolio. Didau (2014) and Fernsten (2009) state the efficacy of portfolios as a formal

assessment measure, as well as a formative assessment during the learning. Furthermore, the

summative assessment should be adjusted through the addition of a creative task. This will

allow for the unit to provide multiple opportunities to demonstrate outcome achievement,
which is inclusive as a form of differentiation via output, which is effectively provisioned

when coupled with the increased formative assessment through the portfolio (McCallum,

2012). The creative task will allow for the demonstration of learning in a different context,

with the portfolio acting as a means of students being able to demonstrate understandings

throughout the learning process. The portfolio has a focus on reflecting on learning which

allows for students to think about experiences of learning and how ideas have developed.

Research highlights that this is effective as a method of engaging students in metacognitive

processes which deepens learning (McKenney, 2018).

Conclusion

It is necessary as a part of designing using UbD to continually ensure that units and

programs are aligned with educational research to ensure the efficacy of learning. Therefore,

it is essential to engage in the evaluation and assessment of units of work. The unit of Change

has been evaluated in terms of its suitability for a comprehensive class with students of

varying ability, including students with a LBOTE. The recommendations have been made to

improve the provision of literacy and numeracy in the learning as well as assessment and

sequencing in order to improve the learning for the new context. It is the hope that this report

will lead to discussion on how to further improve this unit of work in the English faculty at

Chifley College: Bidwill.


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Appendix – Original Program Documentation
Scope and Sequence

Term 1 Term 3 Term 2 Term 4

Fiction - Genre Study: Non Fiction: Film: Common Module Drama: Introduction to
Mystery/ Adventure Environment – News, – Change – conceptual
Topic Crime/ Superheroes Media & information study
Shakespeare

Reporting &
Class Study of Text: Advertising & Digital texts Visual Literacy – visual Spoken and Visual
Novel and Picture features/ Film Texts
Books Public Voices & techniques News Report Writing
Changed Voices: Bias
1 – 10 1 – 10 1 – 10 1 - 10
Weeks
Assessment Schedule

Assessment Task Assessment Task Assessment Task Assessment Task


1 2 3 4
Assessment Book Review Multimodal Common Module - In class –
Name:
Presentation Essay News Report
Description Students are to write a Create an advertisement Student’s write 700 – 900
Students are to write a
review based on the class about a product or campaign word essay on the Common
news report on a key event that
prescribed text which directed towards an Module – Change by using
has occurred in the
examines how the text fits environmental issue. Analysis their prescribed text.
Shakespeare play ‘Romeo and
of advertisement composition
into the key features of the Juliet’.
presented to class with a
genre. speech Rationale
Weighting 25% 25% 25% 25%
Due Date Term 1, Week 9 Term 2, Week 7 Term 3, Week 8 Term 4, Week 4

Outcomes 1, 3 , 4 and 6 1, 2 , 7 and 9 2, 6, 7 and 8 4, 5 , 6 and 8


Unit Outline

Stage 4: Year 8 English Term 3: (10 weeks) Teacher:


Unit Overview:
In this unit students will explore the ways in which the Common Module – ‘Change’ is represented in and through texts. Students will explore the various aspects
of change that influences an individual perspective such as self (personal), social, physical, environmental and values and beliefs. This unit will also require students to
explore how texts can explore how change is triggered, the process of change and the impact of change on an individual. Students will have the opportunity to
explore the concept of change through a prescribed text and compose extended responses that demonstrate their understanding and knowledge of the concept of
change.
Outcomes: Learning Across the Curriculum Assessment:
EN4-4B: makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning
General Capabilities Essay:
with accuracy, clarity and coherence.
Student’s write 700 – 900 word
EN4-5C: thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about Critical and creative essay on the Common Module –
information, ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts. thinking Change. This essay is to be prepared
Information and at home then submitted on the due
EN4-6C: identifies and explains connections between and among texts. communication
date.
technology
EN4-8D: identifies, considers and appreciates cultural expression in texts.
capability
Quality Teaching:
Literacy Course Components and
Weighting :
Intellectual Quality Quality Learning Significance
Environment Personal and social
Components:
-Deep Knowledge -Engagement (E) -Connectedness (C) capability
(DK) -Student direction (SD)
Responding
-Metalanguage (M)

Weighting:
25%
Unpacking Common Module – “Change”

 What is a Common Module? Provide an overview of the unit and an explanation of the Students use the
purpose of the Common Module. discussion to write their
own definition of
 What is “Change”? ‘Change’.
o Class brainstorm: Discuss student’s understanding of Change
o Dictionary meaning or provide definitions of Change
o Word bank: Using a thesaurus provide a list of words similar to Change
o Self-Reflection: Students compose a response reflecting on how their life has changed
M
in the last 5-10 years.
Students write a
 Aspects of Change: structured response to
o Definitions on aspects of Change: Self, Social, Environmental, Perspective, Physical demonstrate their
 Quotes about Change: Provide a list of quotes which reflect the concept and knowledge of the
Change and get students to explain the aspect of change it reflects. concept of change.
 Students provide a real life example of each aspect of Change or an example
from another text which reflect these aspects.
 PEEL Paragraph: Students are to answer the following question and write a
PEEL Paragraph based on an aspect of Change. “An individual can change in
many ways”. Reflect on yourself and link the question to an aspect. Then, explain
how it is relevant to you furthermore, providing an example.

 Problem solving: Students are given scenarios and determine what aspect of change it
relates too. This can be completed as a group activity. Students analyse a
short film text.
DK  Trigger, Process & Impact: Think-Pair-Share - Students are given a set timeframe to
brainstorm what triggers, process and impact of ‘Change’ then swap with the person sitting
next to them and share their answers. Then as a class, compose a mind map of “Triggers,
Process & Impact”.

Related Text Analysis: Short Film – ‘Marry Me’ directed by Michelle Lehman
Students will analyse the related text to demonstrate how texts can represent the concept of
‘change’. Students watch, Tropfest – Marry Me and answer questions surrounding the main
persona (Chloe).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFdbZHMBxfg

o Trigger: What triggers Chloe’s change in the film? It is triggered by her interest, Students compose
influence by another person or emotional connection? an empathy task based
o Process: on the character from
 What transformation does Chloe undergo when she tries to get attention from the film.
E Jason?
 Does Chloe encounter any new values or beliefs in the process of changing?
 Letter writing: Write a letter to Jason from the perspective of Chloe, explaining
what you initially thought of him (the beginning of the short film) and what
you think of him now (refer to the end of the short film).
o Impact: Class discussion – As a class, discuss how Chloe had changed by the end of
the film. Was it a negative or positive change? Explain and reference relevant
examples.

Short Text Analysis:


Students will analyse a variety of texts types (visual images, poems, song lyrics, short extracts, etc.)
to demonstrate their understanding of the concept of ‘Change’ in different texts.

 Students are to respond to the texts using the following questions. Students are to
C  What triggered change? analyse short texts to
 What process (transformation) occurred? relate it to the concept
M  What is the impact of change? of change.

 Scaffold short responses using CTEC or PEEL formula.

Short Text Analysis List: Possible text(s) to use in this section.


 Song Lyrics: Tupac ‘Changes’
 Song Lyrics: Michael Jackson ‘Man in the mirror’
 Quotes about Change https://www.buzzfeed.com/jonmichaelpoff/do-i-dare-disturb-the-
universe?utm_term=.cpj5499zg#.jk3zqddnp
 Quotes about Change https://www.brainyquote.com/topics/change
 Travel Blogs/Recounts

Introduction to Techniques

 Brainstorm: Students are to brainstorm the film techniques that they know. Get students to
share their responses.
 Film Techniques: Teacher checks
o Camera Angle students work to show
M o Camera Shots students understanding
o Diegetic/Non-Diegetic Sounds of techniques.
o Lighting
SD o Montage
o Movement
o Flashback/Flash-forward

 Literary Devices:
o Metaphor
o Simile
o Symbolism
o Diction
o Foreshadowing
o Imagery
o Personification

o Point of View – Omniscient & Subjective


o Motif

Close Study of Prescribed Text


The following activities are designed to assist in student’s analysis of the prescribed text to
demonstrate how it relates to the concept of ‘Change’.

 Prediction: Students analyse the cover of the prescribed text to determine the aspects of
change that can be shown in the film. Students write a short response based on their
prediction.
 Character Profile: Students are to provide a brief summary of each character and organize
them into categories of: Main Protagonist, Antagonist and Minor Characters.
 Select a character to focus on from the Prescribed Text and get students to create a
timeline on how the persona has changed throughout the film.
Students write a
 Key Scene Analysis: Select key scenes from the Prescribed Text to analyse closely. Identifying structured response.
and referring to the film techniques and literary devices.
 Select key scenes that reflect the following aspect of change
 Trigger: What triggered change?
 Process: What process (transformation) occurred?
 Impact What is the impact of change?

 Lightning Writing: Provide students with different topics that relate to your prescribed text
to get them into the habit of writing PEEL Paragraphs.

Essay Writing: Preparing the students for the Assessment Task Teacher scaffolds the
structure of an essay for
 Provide a cut and paste PEEL paragraph relevant to your prescribed text so students can class.
SD identify the POINT, EXPLANATION, EXAMPLE AND LINK.

 Provide students with a list of sentence starters (POINT). Students are to then continue on
with the sentence and compose a PEEL paragraph providing the explanation, example and
link.

 Provide a list of examples from the prescribed text. Then do a joint-constructed PEEL
Paragraph where the class has to provide the Point, Explanation and Link.
Formative Task:

 Students compose an extended response to show how the concept of ‘Change’ is


explored in the related text ‘Marry Me’ by Michelle Lehman. The response must include
supporting textual references.

Assessment: Essay Response


DK
Student’s write 700 – 900 word essay on how the prescribed text studied explores the
Common Module – Change.

This response must be typed, edited, drafted and corrected before submitting the final copy to
classroom teacher.
Assessment Task

Bidwill Campus Assessment Task


Faculty: English Subject: Common Module – Change

Task Number: 2 Year: 8

Date Given: Term 3, Week 5 Date Due: Term 3, Week 7,

This task is worth 25% of your yearly assessment.


Student Name ……………………………………... Class
…………………

Outline/Description of Task:
This term you have engaged in a study of the Common Module Concept – ‘Change’. This task
requires you to write an essay that incorporates your knowledge and understanding of the concept
through your Prescribed text (Film) and Related text.
The task must be drafted, edited thoroughly for mistakes and a final copy will need to be
submitted on the allocated due date.

Syllabus Outcomes Being What it will look like


Assessed
4B: A student makes effective language choices Have you demonstrated a clear and skilful understanding of
to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and the film and related text? Detailing how it relates to the concept of
coherence. Change?

5C: A student thinks imaginatively, creatively, Have you identified the aspects of the text that reflect the
interpretively and critically about information, ideas and concept of Change?
arguments to respond to and compose texts.
Have you referred to the techniques and demonstrated that
6C: A student identifies and explains connections you understand how they are used to shape meaning within the
between and among texts. film and Related text?
Have you produced a correctly structured essay, using
8D: A student: identifies, considers and appropriate information, evidence, and ideas related to the idea
appreciates cultural expression in texts of change?
Term 3: Year 8 English Assessment Task
ASSESSMENT TASK No:
2
Course Components and Weighting
selected:

Components
Weighting
Writing 25%

Assessment Task: Essay


During this term you have engaged in the study of the Common Module Concept – ‘Change’,
through the close analysis of your class Prescribed text (film) and Related text.

THE TASK: Essay

The task requires you to answer the essay question featured below. The task must be drafted,
edited thoroughly for mistakes and a final copy will need to be submitted on the allocated due date.

When constructing a response you should ensure you:


 Answer the question using correct essay structure (PEEL, STEEL, etc…)
 Address features of your text (ideas and techniques)
 Provide evidence from your text to support your argument
 Publish your response in a font size between 12 - 14
How is the concept of ‘Change’ explored in your prescribed text?
In your response, you must support your argument with examples from your Prescribed text
and Related text

Prescribed Text List


 8A – (1984) ‘The Karate Kid’ directed by John G. Avildsen
 8B – (2007) ‘Bridge to Terabithia’ directed by Gabor Csupo
 8C – (2007) ‘The Game Plan’ directed by Andy Fickman
 8D - (2009) ‘The Blind Side directed by John Lee Hancock
 8E – (2015) ‘Inside Out’ directed by Pete Docter
Year 8 AT3 Essay Marking Criteria
OUTCOMES 4, 5, 6, 8 (Mark / 15 )

Criteria Tick Mark

• Skilfully explores how the concept of change is portrayed in the Prescribed _______
Text and Related Text
• Presents a sophisticated response demonstrating well-developed
A
understanding of the texts’ ideas based on relevant textual knowledge _______
13 – 15
• Organises, develops and expresses ideas effectively, using language
appropriate to audience, purpose and form
_______

• Effectively explores how the concept of change is portrayed in the Prescribed _______
Text and Related Text
• Presents a substantial response demonstrating a developed understanding of
B
the texts’ ideas based on textual knowledge _______
10 – 12
• Organises, develops and expresses ideas competently, using language
appropriate to audience, purpose and form
_______

• Adequately explores how the concept of change is portrayed in the _______


Prescribed Text and Related Text
• Presents a sound demonstrating understanding of the texts’ ideas based on
C
some textual knowledge _______
7–9
• Organises, develops and expresses ideas adequately, using language
appropriate to audience, purpose and form
_______

• Describes aspects of the concept of change through the Prescribed Text and _______
make some reference to the Related Text
• Attempts a response demonstrating limited understanding of ideas based on
D
limited textual knowledge _______
4–6
• Attempts to organise and express ideas with limited appropriateness to
audience, purpose and form
_______

• Attempts to describe elements of the text(s) _______


• Demonstrates elementary textual knowledge
• Attempts to organise a response in an elementary way
E
_______
0–3

_______

TOTAL Mark = / 15