You are on page 1of 326

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?

R=19870002268 2018-04-05T03:56:00+00:00Z

11, - ,:J-_ ;_7<_"5 (

RF Project 7126201762009
Interim Technical Report

AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE AERODYNAMICS OF A


NACA 0012 AIRFOIL WITH A SIMULATED GLAZE ICE ACCRETION

Michael B. Bragg
Department of Aero and Astro Engineering

N8 7- t 1 7 C t
iI_ AI<RODYNA,_TC£ Ci'-A _ACA 6012 AiRI'OiL l_J.Yi!
A SIMULATED GLAZE IC[ ACCEkIICN interi_
lechnical Ee_c[t (Ohic State El;iv.) 318 P
CZCL OIA G3/02

NASA-LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER


21000 Brookpark Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44135

Grant No. NAG 3-28

November 1986

The Ohio State University


Research Foundation
1314 Kinnear Road
Columbus, Ohio 43212
AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE AERODYNAMICS

OF A

NACA 0012 AIRFOIL WITH A SIMULATED GLAZE ICE ACCRETION

M. B. Bragg

The Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio

AARL TR 8602
ABSTRACT

An experimental study has been conducted in the Ohio State

University subsonic wind tunnel to measure the detailed aerodynamic

characteristics of an airfoil with a simulated glaze ice accretion.

A NACA 0012 model with interchangeable leading edges and pressure

taps every one percent chord was used. Surface pressure and wake

data were taken on the airfoil clean, with forced transition and

with a simulated glaze ice shape. Lift and drag penalties due to

the ice shape were found and the surface pressure clearly showed

that large separation bubbles were present. Both total pressure and

split-film probes were used to measure velocity profiles, both for

the clean model and for the model with a simulated ice accretion. A

large region of flow separation was seen in the velocity profiles

and was correlated to the pressure measurements. Clean airfoil data

were found to compare well to existing airfoil analysis methods.

PRECEdinG PAGE. 8LANK NOT FILk_5

iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS

£as

ABSTRACT iii

TABLE OF CONTENTS V

NOMENCLATURE vii

I. INTRODUCTION 1

II. EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS 3

Wind Tunnel and Model 3


Velocity Profile Measurements 6
Data Acquisition and Reduction 7

III. DATA REDUCTION 8

Pressure Data 8
Split Film Data
IV. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ii

Pressure and Force Measurements 12


Velocity Profile Measurements 19
Data Presentation 24

Vl SUMMARY 27

REFERENCES 30

TABLES 32

FIGURES 37

APPENDIX A: RUN SUMMARIES 59

APPENDIX B: PRESSURE DISTRIBUTIONS 67

APPENDIX C: WAKE SURVEYS 237

APPENDIX D: VELOCITY PROFILES 259

V
NOMENCLATURE

c Airfoil chord length


Airfoil drag coefficient, Drag/q_c
Cd
Airfoil lift coefficient, Lift/q_c
C 1
Airfoil moment coefficient about x=c/4,
Cm
Moment/q_c 2
Pressure coefficient, P-P_/q_
Cp

a Volume median diameter


Hot film output voltage
EI'E 2
k EI/E 2
LWC Liquid water content
m Mach number
P Pressure
q Dynamic pressure
R Reynolds number
e
uev Streamwise and normal
velocity components
Vtot Total velocity measured by
hot film probe
chordwise and normal coordinate,
x,y
or y can be the boundary layer
coordinate
Y-SEP Y location of separation streamline
Y-STAG Y location of u component
stagnation streamline
Angle of attack
6" Boundary layer displacement
thickness
9 Boundary layer momentum thickness

lower surface
1
upper surface
U

Co
freestream condition

vii
I. INTRODUCTION

Ice formation on an airfoil often leads to a sizeable leading

edge protuberance. This protuberance causes a leading edge separa-

tion bubble to form, thus reducing the lift and increasing the drag.

As the angle of attack is increased, the bubble will eventually fail

to re-attach causing a reduction in airfoil stall angle and maximum

lift. For unprotected airfoils, these aerodynamic penalties are im-

portant and further research is needed before they can be accurately

predicted.

Airfoil aerodynamic penalties have been investigated by other

researchers, primarily by making lift and drag measurements. Jacobs

[i] in 1932 measured the lift, drag and moment change due to various

protuberances on a NACA 0012 airfoil. While these protuberances

were not specifically ice simulations, the data show the sensitivity

of the airfoil to any leading edge disturbance. In the 1950's the

NACA investigated the effects of ice on airfoil performance. Some

of these results can be found in the work of Gray [2,3], on the NACA

65-212 and NACA 65A004 airfoil with actual ice accretions. These

data show the adverse effects of ice on airfoil performance, but

report only the integrated lift, drag and moment data. More recent

studies such as that by Korkan, et. al. [4], Lee [5] and Flemming

[6] have also reported lift, drag and moment effects on airfoils

with simulated ice shapes.

In an attempt to obtain more detailed flowfield data, Bragg

et.al. [7,8] have obtained surface pressures on airfoils with simu-

lated rime and glaze ice shapes. These data give not only the

integrated lift, drag and moment data, but provide information on


the length of the bubble, re-attachment and trailing edge

separation. Flow visualization data reported by Bragg [9], give the

first information about the glaze ice separation bubble geometry.

_pproximate bubble shapes reduced from photographs of oil flow on a

splitter plate are presented for two different glaze ice shapes at
two angles of attack.

Recently sophisticated computational tools have begun to be ap-

plied to the problem of an airfoil with leading edge ice accretion.

Potapczak [i0] used a parabolized Navier-Stokes code to predict the


aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with and without ice.
Cebeci [II] has modified his interactive boundary layer technique
to make similar calculations. The results of these calculations are

encouraging, but more experimental data are needed to fully develop


and validate these methods.

This report presents the initial results of a detailed experi-


ment to study the effect of a particular glaze ice shape on a NAC_

0012 airfoil. Part of this work has been published previously by

Bragg and Coirier [12,13] in summary form. The purpose of this


report is to present a single report with as much of the detailed

data as possible. It should be noted that this work is continuing

and more and better data are currently being acquired, and plans for

more tests are being made. It was, however, felt that a report

presenting the data gathered to date would be valuable at this time.


II. EXPERIMENTALAPPARATUS

Wind Tunnel and Model

These tests were conducted in the Ohio State University's sub-

sonic wind tunnel located at the Aeronautical and Astronautical

Research Laboratory. The tunnel is of conventional design with ap-

proximately a three-by-five foot test section, eight feet in length.

The tunnel operates at speeds from zero to 220 feet per second at

Reynolds number of up to 1.3 x 106 per foot. The tunnel is of open

return type and uses four turbulence screens and honeycomb in the

settling chamber to reduce the tunnel turbulence. The tunnel will

accommodate airfoils mounted vertically in the test section or

three-dimensional models, strut mounted using an internal strain

gauge balance. Tunnel speed, Reynolds number and Mach number are

measured through facility transducers.

Standard wind tunnel instrumentation was used for this test.

Pressure measurements were made using a Scanivalve system. Two

scanivalves capable of measuring 48 pressures each were used. The

valves were connected in series sharing one pressure transducer to

reduce calibration time and improve the accuracy of the

measurements. No cut-off valves were used for this test. A single

traversing total pressure probe was used to measure the airfoil

wake. The probe was located approximately one chord length

downstream of the model trailing edge and was traversed automati-

cally by the computer system.

3
Two different NACA 0012 models were used for this test. Both

models were 21 inches in chord and had a span of 39 inches. The

models were mounted vertically in the tunnel providing a height

(actually width since the model was mounted vertically) to chord

ratio of 2.62. Simulated ice shapes were used with both models

which were constructed to approximately duplicate an actual measured


ice accretion. The ice was accreted in the NASA Lewis Research

Center's Icing Research Tunnel on a NACA 0012 airfoil, also of 21

inch chord [14]. In Figure I. the measured ice shape, as recorded

from an actual tracing, compared to the one used in this test.

Data were first taken on NACA 0012 Model No. 1 while construc-

tion was continuing on the more complex model. This model was made

from a section of a UHIH helicopter rotor blade. Since the model

had twist, all data were taken and the angle of attack was reported

on the model center line. The model used external one-eighth inch

tubing to provide surface pressure information (pressure belts) and

the wooden ice shape was internally tapped. Although pressure data

and wake data were acquired on this model, see reference 12, it is

considered preliminary and will not be presented here. Split film

measurements of the separation bubble were taken using this model

and will be presented. NACA 0012 airfoil coordinates clean (i.e. no

ice shape attached) are given in Table I. The coordina£es of the

airfoil plus ice shape for Model No. 1 are given in Table 2.

NACA Model No. 2 was built for this experiment with some spe-

cial features. The model has a 21-inch chord and was cut from

mahogany using a numerical control machine and laminated together to

4
form the 39-inch span. A unique feature of this model is its inter-

changeable leading edges. Past experiences using simulated ice on

airfoils has identified a problem with the proper placement of the

ice shape over the clean leading edge. To avoid this problem, the

current model has the ice shape as an integrable part of the first

15 percent of the model (about 3 inches). In this way, the first 15

percent of the model could be attached precisely to the main model

section, and the exact airfoil plus ice shape geometry would be ac-

curately known. Experience with earlier simulated models

demonstrated the need for a very dense placement of surface pressure

taps. The current model was internally tapped with approximately 90

surface pressure ports. The upper surface was instrumented with a

tap every one percent (0.21 inches) surface length back to the forty

percent chord station. Another 40 taps were located around the rest

of the airfoil, on the model centerline. Eight taps were located

spanwise at the five percent station to ensure the two-

dimensionality of the flow. The entire ice shape was also

instrumented with internal pressure taps every one percent surface

length resulting in 19 taps ahead of the five percent chord station.

The basic airfoil coordinates for Model No. 2 are the same as

those in Table i. The ice shape is also basically the same, al-

though due to the construction technique some slight differences do

exist from the ice shape of Model No. i. Therefore, the ice shape

plus airfoil coordinates for Model No. 2 can be found in Table 3.

All the force and surface pressure data shown in this report will be

from Model No. 2.


Velocity Profile Measurements

In order to measure the velocity profiles in the separation

bubble, a probe capable of determining flow reversal must be ac-

curately positioned in the model boundary layer. A split film

probe, TSI model 1288, was chosen. Here two separate films are

placed, front and back, on the same 0.006 inch diameter rod. The

plane of the split is parallel to the axis of the probe, perpen-

dicular to the freestream flow, thus allowing for the determination

of flow reversal. The probe was modified by incorporating a special

shield [i0]. The shield was set so that it touched the model before

the probe, allowing probe protection and setting the probe a known

distance off the surface of the model to start each run. This sys-

tem worked well and prevented damaging the very delicate probe. The

hot film data channels were both taken using TSI I053B anemometers

with TSI 1057 signal conditioners.

The entire tunnel set-up is shown in Figure 2. A close-up of

the traverse system is shown in Figure 3. A two-dimensional

traversing system was used to position the probe in the horizontal

plane, containing the airfoil section on the tunnel centerline. The

bottom traverse positioned the probe axially from a position ap-

proximately 15 percent chord ahead of the model to a point at the

airfoil 65 percent chord station. A L.C. Smith BBR30180 traverse

was placed on this traverse and provided the probe positioning out

from the model. The hot-film probe was supported through a TSI

probe support and shield which slid through an airfoil shaped strut

extending into the tunnel. This steel strut was rigidly mounted to
the fixed end of the top traverse and moved chordwise (along the

tunnel axis) through a sealed slide arrangement.Both traverses were

driven by d.c. motors and may be either positioned locally or

through the computer system. Probe position was determined using


standard potentiometers. Using this system probe positioning
tolerance including all errors through digitizing, was no more than
+0.003 inches or +0.00014 chord-lengths out from the model and no
more than +0.010 inches or +0.00048 chord-lengths in the chordwise

direction.
On the airfoil without ice, boundary layer profiles were

measured using a traversed total pressure probe. The traversing

system, and therefore positioning tolerances, were the same as that

used for the split film measurements. The probe was constructed of

1/32-inch stainless steel tubing compressed at the tip to reduce its

height to approximately 0.020 inches. The probe was positioned on


the surface by hand, then traversed out from the wall by the com-

puter controlled traversing system.

Data Acquisition and Reduction

The data were gathered online by the in-house Digital Computer

and Data Acquisition System. The system currently based on a

Harris HI00 computer, a 48-bit machine expandable to 768 K bytes in-

ternal memory, with virtual memory address space to 12 M bytes. Two

analog-to-digital (A/D) systems were used to acquire these data. A

high speed Datel model 256 system with a throughput rate exceeding

I00 kHz was used to acquire the hot film data. A medium speed RTP

system with 8 kHz throughput was used to sample tunnel conditions


and probe position. The system was operated through a CRT terminal

with disk and tape data storage, as well as printed and plotted data

hardcopy, all were available through the laboratory's computer

facility.

III. DATA REDUCTION

Pressure Data

The pressure data, both model surface pressures and wake data

were reduced in the usual way. Models pressures were converted into

pressure coefficients using the expression

p -- p_

Cp = I/2p_U 2 (i)

Here all pressure differences were measured directly from the

Scanivalve. The pressure coefficients were then integrated to ob-

tain the lift and moment coefficients. It should be noted that

since no cut-off valves were used, as much as 90 seconds could

elapse between the time the first and last surface pressures were

measured. Therefore, the tunnel dynamic pressure was sampled simul-

taneously with each surface pressure to provide the correct dynamic

pressure to be used in eq. (i).

Airfoil drag was obtained from the total pressure survey made

in the airfoil wake. Since the survey was made one chord-length

downstream of the model, the static pressure was assumed to be just

the free stream value. The airfoil drag was then found from the

following expression

8
Cd = 2__t Wq_- P_ (i _/Ptw-
_ q_ P_
)d <Y)
c (2)

In the implementation of this equation allowances were made for any

tunnel speed variation which occurred during the traverse. The

variation in tunnel speed across the tunnel due to model and wake

blockage at high angles of attack was also incorporated.

The lift, drag and moment coefficients, as well as the model

angle of attack, have been corrected for tunnel wall interference.

These corrections used the procedures outlined by Rae and Pope [15].

The coefficients and angle of attack were corrected for solid

blockage, streamline curvature and wake blockage; due to the test

section design, no buoyancy corrections were made. The primary ef-

fect of these corrections was a reduction in the airfoil lift curve

slope on the order of ten percent. Both the corrected and uncor-

rected values are given in the data tables. No attempt has been

made in this report to correct the measured surface pressure

distributions.

Velocity profiles were obtained from the boundary layer total

pressure probe by assuming a constant static pressure across the

boundary layer. Using a surface static pressure tap at the same

chordwise location as the boundary layer total probe, the dynamic

pressure as each location in the boundary layer was measured. For

incompressible flow this was easily converted into a boundary layer

velocity using the Bernouilli equation. Probe wall proximity and

probe Reynolds number correction were found to be small, therefore,


all total pressure probe boundary layer velocity profiles are
reported uncorrected.

Split Film Data

The split film probe data reduction utilized calibration data

of voltage versus velocity for a range of 0-300 ft/sec and several

flow angles. The total velocity sensed by the probe was determined

from

Vto t = f[(E 1 + E2)2] (3)

Here E 1 and E 2 are the voltages from the front and back of the film,

respectively, both corrected for ambient temperature effects. The

function f is a fourth order polynomial. The streamwise velocity

component, u, and the perpendicular component, v, could be deter-

mined knowing the flow angle, @ . Where @ is 90 degrees in the free

stream. Using the expression for sin @ given in reference 16,

[E 2 C- 2-hLh
2 I
h(Vt°t)
sin.?= (El2 - k2E22)max J (4)

The constant k is the ratio of E 1 , to E 2 at @ = 0 degrees and

is a function of velocity. The denominator is the value of

EI2-k2E22 at @ = +90 degrees depending on the sign of the numerator.

i0
The term h(Vto t) was assumed to be one, independent of velocity.

This was curve fit based on the calibration data as a polynomial in

V. Then u and v are

v = Vto t sin@, u = Vto t 2 - v2 (5)

Note
with u greater than zero if El 2 - k2E2 2 is greater than zero.

that with a two element split film probe the flow angle can at best

be determined only in the range -90 ° _ @ _ 90 ° • Therefore, the sign

of the v component cannot be determined. When using many samples to

determine a time averaged velocity, only the average u component can

be calculated. The average v component and average total velocity

are unknown. Therefore all velocity data presented here are the

average streamwise component, u. RMS values were calculated but are

not discussed, since no attempt was made to document the split film

frequency response. Note that each split film velocity value

presented in this report is really an average of 2048 data samples.

These data were taken at a rate of 5 KHz using a I0 KHz low pass

filter.

IV. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

In this section some of the more important results obtained

from these tests are summarized. All of the data, except the split

film measurements, were obtained on the NACA 0012 Model No. 2. A

more complete set of data is presented in the appendices.

ii
Pressure and Force Measurements

Initial tests were conducted on the NACA 0012 Model No. 2

without the ice shape. This is usually referred to as the clean

configuration. Due to the slight seam in the model at the 15 per-

cent chord location where the leading edge section meets the main

model body, there was some question regarding its affect on the

boundary layer transition location. To remove this question, and

for ease in comparing these measurements to the computational

results, tests were run with the boundary layer tripped at the five

percent chord location on the upper and lower surface. The trip

strip used was carborundum grit, nominally 0.009 inches in diameter,

attached to the model using double-sided tape. The trip was ap-

proximately 0.25 inches in the chordwise direction with the back

edge at the 0.05, x/c location. Only results from measurements at

positive angles of attack are shown for the clean airfoil, with or

without trip. Negative angles to stall were tested, but were

similar to those at positive angles of attack. All data presented

here have been corrected for tunnel wall effects by applying the

correction method of Rae and Pope [15].

In Figure 4, the lift as a function of angle of attack for the

clean model is shown. Presented are the data for a Reynolds number

of 1.5 x 106 and Mach number of 0.12. Also shown are the theoreti-

cal predictions from the airfoil analysis codes of Eppler [17] and

Smetana [18]. The lift curve slope compares well to the results of

Smetana since this code iterates on the displacements thickness to

include the decambering of the airfoil due to boundary layer growth.

12
Eppler merely assumes a lift curve slope of 2_ per radian and this

overpredicts these data. The Eppler code does contain a simple

prediction which predicts a maximum lift of approximately


Cl,max

1.12 at 1.5 x 106 Reynolds number. Using the plot of reference 15,
of 1.22 occurs at an effective Reynolds number of ap-
a Cl,ma x

proximately 2 x 106. Tests were also run at 0.9 and 2.0 x 106 in

Reynolds number with little affect on the lift.


The drag performance of this airfoil was measured and

presented in Figure 5. Here the experiment as well as the theories


of references [17] and [18] are shown with natural transition and

fixed transition. Both theories show more of a drag bucket than is

reflected in the experiment, although some bucket is also seen in

the data. At zero degrees angle of attack the experimental data

have a drag coefficient of 0.0075 with 0.0070 and 0.0067 predicted

by [17] and [18], respectively. This is probably due to some early


transition on the wind tunnel model since the data with the boundary

layer tripped compare very well to theory. With transition fixed at


the 5 percent station, the measured drag rises to 0.0106 with the

theories only 2 or 3 drag counts higher. The comparison remains ex-


cellent until the theories fail to predict the large drag rise

associated with separation at high angle of attack. Experimental

and theoretical results were also obtained at 0.9 and 2.0 x 106 in

Reynolds number. The drag increased with decreasing Reynolds number

as expected.

13
The measured and predicted pitching moment about the quarter
chord location is shown in Figure 6. For the natural transition

case, the experimental data show a slightly positive Cm which be-

comes larger with increasing angle of attack due to the boundary


layer growth. The theory due to Smetana reflects this trend but un-

derpredicts its magnitude. Near stall, Smetana's Cm prediction is

poor as would be expected. Eppler predicts the Cm trend near stall,

but since it includes no boundary layer effects, it does poorly at

low angle of attack. Fixed transition had little affect on the Cm

in the experimental or theoretical data. Changing the Reynolds num-

ber from 0.9 to 2.0 x 10 6 also had little affect on Cm-

In Figure 7, the measured pressures are compared to those

predicted by the Smetana code. Comparisons were made at matched

lift coefficient since the pressure coefficient data has not been

corrected for the tunnel wall interference. The experimental data

are for uncorrected angles of attack of 2 and 6 degrees. The com-

parisons are excellent with only some small deviation near the 15

percent chord location. This is probably due to the slight discon-

tinuity where the model leading edge joins the main element. Note

that with the very dense distribution of measured pressures near the

leading edge, every symbol represents a measured pressure, the peak

pressure was obtained in good agreement to the theory. Changes in

C with Reynolds number and with the boundary layer trip were small
P

as expected.

14
After completing the clean NACA 0012 Model No. 2 tests just

described the ice shape shown in Figure 1 was installed. The ice

shape was tested with no transition strip and with no distributed


roughness. Since the airfoil was symmetric, the clean NACA 0012

performed the same at positive and negative angles of attack.


However, with the ice shape, the airfoil was no longer symmetric and
this was reflected in its aerodynamic characteristics. The ice

shape was then tested to Cl,ma x for both positive and negative

angles of attack. For ease in data presentation, the negative

angles of attack are plotted as positive in Figures 8 and 9 and


labelled, "Ice - Lower Horn". In this way, the data are presented

as if the ice shape was removed and then inverted, upper and lower
surfaces, for these tests. Five pressure taps were located, equally

spaced spanwise, on both the upper and lower surfaces at an x/c of


0.05. These taps were compared to ensure the two-dimensionality of

the flow, particularly when large separation zones were present.

These taps compared well across the span and indicated that the flow
was indeed two-dimensional at all conditions examined.

In Figure 8, the lift coefficient as a function of angle of at-


tack for the NACA 0012 clean and with the glaze ice shape is shown.

A large Cl,ma x penalty is seen for the airfoil with glaze ice due to

either the upper or lower surface horn. The maximum lift decreased
from the clean value of over 1.2, to the iced value of about 0.55,

over a 50 percent decrease. The angle of attack for stall was also

reduced about 50 percent. It is interesting that while the upper


and lower surface horns were quite different in shape and location,

15
their affect on the airfoil lift was remarkably similar. Stall for

the airfoil with ice shape was due to the failure of the leading

edge separation bubble to re-attach at the higher angles of attack.

This will be seen more clearly when the pressure distributions are

examined. These data were also duplicated at Reynolds numbers of 0.9

and 2.0 x 106 with little affect on the lift.

The effect of the ice accretion on drag is shown in Figure 9.

As expected, the drag increase due to the ice was significant, from

0.0075 at _ = 0 degrees clean to 0.0260 with the glaze ice shape.

The drag rose quickly with angle of attack for the glaze shape since

it stalled at only seven degrees angle of attack. The drag rise

corresponding to the lower surface horn (negative angles of attack)

was slightly larger than that from the upper surface horn (positive

angles of attack), although the trend was very similar. While this

ice shape did not correspond directly to any of those measured by

Olsen [17], it was quite similar to one of the shapes reported there

and the drag values reported by Olsen compare well to those in

Figure 9. Again, these data were repeated at .9 and 2.0 x 106

Reynolds number and no significant effects were noted.

Figure I0 shows the pitching moment coefficient measured on the

clean and iced airfoil. The ice shape cambers the airfoil which can

be seen by noting the pitching moment at zero degrees angle of

attack. The upper horn ice shape data indicate a positive cambering

since the Cm here is less than zero. As the angle of attack was in-

creased, the separation bubble on the upper surface grew, thickening

the boundary layer and decambering the airfoil causing a positive

16
increase in the moment coefficient. This continued until the air-

foil started to stall and the moment becomes a large negative, nose

down, value. The affect of the ice shape on the pitching moment,

even at the low angles of attack, may be significant in rotorcraft

applications. No significant Reynolds number effects were seen on

the measured pitching moment coefficient.


Pressure distributions for the airfoil with simulated ice are

shown in the next four figures. These pressure distributions have

not been corrected for wind tunnel wall effects. As seen in Figure

7, these corrections are not necessary. Therefore, the Cp'S here

are uncorrected and the angle of attack and lift coefficient indi-

cated on the figures for each distribution are also uncorrected

values.

In Figure II, the pressure distributions for the NACA 0012


clean and with simulated ice are shown at an angle of attack of four

degrees. Note first the zone of almost constant pressure occurring

on the iced pressure distribution at a Cp level of approximately

-1.4 . This is the separation bubble aft of the upper surface horn.

The flow accelerated from the stagnation point as it moved toward

the upper surface horn and separated as it attempts to flow over the

tip of the ice horn. The separation zone was characterized by

fairly constant but slightly falling pressure (Cp was decreasing as

the flow accelerated) for approximately ten percent chord; then the

pressure rose rapidly and ultimately returned to the clean value at

about the 40 percent chord station. Hot-film measurements indicated

re-attachment somewhat downstream of the minimum pressure point. At

17
a Cp of approximately -0.4 a constant pressure region corresponding

to the lower surface bubble was seen. This also occurred at a much

lower pressure than the clean airfoil experienced at this same loca-
tion since the flow accelerated rapidly toward the lower surface

horn before separation occurred. The uncorrected lift coefficient

at four degrees angle of attack dropped from 0.439 clean to 0.376

iced, due to the separation.


The measured pressure distributions for the airfoil with simu-

lated glaze ice are shown for various angles of attack in Figures 12

and 13. In Figure 12, pressures for 0, 2 and 4 degrees angle of at-
tack are shown. The circles represent the zero angle of attack

measured pressures. Here the lower and upper surface separation


zones were at C's of approximately -0.9 and -0.7, respectively. As
P

the angle of attack was increased, these constant pressure zones oc-

curred at decreasing pressures for the upper surface separation and

increasing pressures for the lower. Note also that atc_ = 0 degrees

the upper surface separation occurred at a higher pressure than the

lower surface separation. At 2 and 4 degrees, this was reversed

with the upper surface separation zone occurring at a lower pressure

level.

In Figure 13, the pressure distributions for angles of attack

of 4, 6 and 8 degrees are shown. Here, as the airfoil begins to ap-

proach stall, the upper surface separation bubble grew rapidly in

length and the constant pressure zone occurred at higher pressures.

Remember that the airfoil stalled at approximately seven degrees

angle of attack. As the angle of attack increased the trailing edge

18
pressure is seen to fall, as do the pressures on the entire aft por-
tion of the airfoil. At eight degrees angle of attack, the airfoil

has stalled and the scatter in the leading edge, upper surface

measured pressures was an indication of the unsteadiness of the flow

in this region.
A comparison of the 4 and -4 degree pressure distributions are

shown in Figure 14 so that the relative affect of the two ice horns
on the pressure distribution may be more easily compared. The suc-

tion side separation zone can be seen, as discussed earlier, to be

slightly longer and to have a more gentle pressure recovery for the
-4 degree case. Both suction and pressure side separation occurred

at lower pressures for the positive 4 degree measurements. The con-

stant pressure separation zones all started at the leading edge of

the particular ice horn concerned. These plots show that the lower
surface horn does, indeed, cause a more severe aerodynamic penalty

at negative angles of attack than the upper surface horn does at

positive angles. This is an interesting result since these negative

angle of attack cases are not usually considered. This finding


would be important for any surface which must operate at both posi-

tive and negative angles of attack, such as the horizontal

stabilizer. It may also have application to airfoils which operate

at lower angles of attack than that at which the ice is accreted.

Velocity Profile Measurements

Velocity profile data were taken using a total pressure probe

on the NACA 0012 Model No. 2 and a split film probe using Model No.

i. The purpose of these data was to measure the detailed boundary

19
layer and separation zone mean velocity profiles for comparison to

the computational results.

Total pressure boundary layer surveys were taken on the model

with the trip strip installed and at a Reynolds number of 1.5 x 106 .

The surveys were reduced in the standard way by assuming no pressure

gradient through the boundary layer and, therefore, applying the

measured surface static pressure through the boundary layer. Using

the measured total pressure, the velocity profile in the boundary

layer was determined. In Figure 15, a sample of the measured

profiles are shown. The profiles shown are the measured velocity

divided by the local edge velocity. The vertical lines are 1.25

U/U e apart. The y/c location, measured above the surface, of 0.02

is shown which corresponds to 0.42 inches. Profiles at several

chordwise locations are shown at an angle of attack of four degrees

in Figure 15. Since the boundary layer was tripped at x/c = .05, all

of the measured profiles are turbulent. The boundary layer dis-

,
placement thickness, _/c, calculated from the measured profiles

versus x/c for both the _ = 0 and e = 4 degree cases, are shown in

Figure 16. Also shown are the predicted values from the Smetana

analysis. Overall, the comparisons are quite good except at the i0

and 20 percent stations where the experiment showed a much larger

displacement thickness. This was probably due to the trip strip

initially increasing the displacement thickness more than would be

due to transition alone. Further downstream of the trip the

measurements and theory compared very well.

2O
Whenever a separation zone is being probed, as with the split-

film probe used in this test, the problem of probe interference must

be considered. In Figure 17 a sketch of the NACA 0012 airfoil and

the traversing system used for these experiments is shown. While

the traversing mechanism itself was outside of the tunnel, a sub-

stantial probe support strut was required to properly position the

probe. The entire traverse system consisted of the traversing


mechanism (not shown), the strut, sleeve and the probe itself.

Surface pressures were measured on the airfoil with the probe


at various locations to quantify the affect of the probe on the

separation bubble. In Figure 18 the pressure distribution on the


airfoil with simulated glaze ice is compared with and without the

probe present. The probe and support system when located at the x/c
= 0.03 location was seen to lower the pressure in the bubble. If

pressure level can be used as a basis for flow re-attachment, the

probe and support moved the point of bubble re-attachment forward.

The lower surface and the aft part of the upper surface did not ap-

pear to be significantly affected by the presence of the probe. The

position of the probe in the bubble was shown to be important,

Figure 19. Here the probe and support were positioned at three dif-

ferent chordwise locations and the surface pressures recorded. The

probe at x/c = 0.ii had the largest affect on bubble re-attachment

which occurred around x/c = 0.20. Only the x/c = 0.19 position had

little affect on the pressure level in the relatively constant pres-

sure region of the bubble. Tests were also made by positioning the

strut and sleeve but not placing the probe in the bubble. These

tests showed that the strut and sleeve could be modified so as not

21
to affect the separation zone pressures, however, once the probe was
inserted into the bubble the pressures were always affected.
The interference studies showed that the presence of the probe

affected the bubble in all cases tested. The primary results were a

decreased plateau pressure in the bubble, and an increased pressure

in the re-attachment region. The probe appeared to cause early


bubble re-attachment, shortening the bubble by a few percent chord.

Therefore, all the split-film data where the probe was in the

separation bubble included this probe interference error for which


no correction has been made.

In Figures 20 through 22, the velocity profiles are shown for


the NACA 0012 Model No. i, upper surface, in the vicinity of the

glaze ice shape. All runs were made at a Reynolds number based on

chord of 1.5 x 106 and a Mach number of 0.12. Note that the

velocity shown was actually the streamwise component of the total

boundary layer velocity and was nondimensionalized by the edge

velocity. The edge velocity was defined as the maximum velocity


measured for each profile. The vertical lines on the plot are the

zero velocity reference line for each profile. So points to the


left indicate negative velocity or reversed flow. These vertical

lines are spaced a distance apart of 1.25 times the local edge

velocity. The height scale nondimensionalized by the airfoil chord


of 21 inches and is measured from the airfoil surface. All airfoil

angles of attack are uncorrected.


The bubble shapes are also represented in Figures 20 through

22. The dashed lines are the stagnation streamline and are merely

22
taken from the point above the surface where the measured streamwise

velocity zero (i.e. the velocity changes from negative to

positive). The solid lines are the dividing stream lines. These
were found by integrating the mass flow in the streamwise direction.

The point above the surface where the net mass flow is zero defines

the dividing streamline.

The profiles for the -0.15 degree case are shown in Figure 20.
If it is assumed that separation occurred at the leading edge of the

upper surface horn, x/c = -.0225, then the first profile was only
-.0025c downstream. Therefore a relatively large reversed flow

region developed very quickly. The reversed flow region grew


initially, then decreased until the bubble re-attached around an x/c

of .08. The last profile is a fairly characteristic turbulent

profile. From the streamline plot it is clear that the reversed

flow region was relatively thick and slow moving. Conversely, the

shear layer was thin and rapidly accelerated to the edge velocity.

Figure 21 is similar but for the the 1.85 degree angle of at-

tack case. Here, as expected, the bubble was thicker and larger

than the previous case. Re-attachment occurred around the 12 per-

cent chord location. Note in the x/c = .14 profile a change in

second derivative that occurred about one-fifth of the way up on the

profile. This appears to be characteristic of all the re-attached

profiles measured to date.

In Figure 22 the profiles are shown for a model angle of attack

of 3.8_ °. Here the bubble was extremely large as shown. In Figure

22, re-attachment occurred around the 18 percent airfoil station.

23
Note that for this bubble, reversed flow extended up from the air-

foil over one-half inch in some cases. Figure 22 also shows three

profiles further downstream, aft of re-attachment. Note that here

the height scale is different from the other plots. These were

clearly turbulent profiles. Re-attachment appeared to be at ap-

proximately 18 percent chord for the 3.85 degree case. Note that

this was uncorrected and probe interference has probably shortened

all the bubble length measurements.


Data Presentation

The detailed results, run by run, are given in the appendices.

In Appendix A the wind tunnel run summaries are tabulated. The runs

are listed in order by run number and separated into groups accord-

ing to the model and configuration. For example, NACA 0012 Model

No. 2 with Glaze Ice appears as one of the group headings. For the

runs where pressure data were taken, both the uncorrected or raw

data, and the corrected values are given for the angle of attack;

lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients. Mach number and

Reynolds number are also given. For the data runs where velocity

profile data were taken, no force coefficient data are available.

In this case the uncorrected angle of attack, tunnel velocity,

Reynolds number, Mach number, and calculated boundary layer thick-

nesses are given. In the tables AOA is just the angle of attack in

degrees and VEL and U-EDGE are the tunnel velocity and boundary

layer edge velocity, respectively, in feet per second.

It should be noted that many run numbers are missing. Blocks

of run numbers are often missing which represent tunnel runs on

other models and projects. In some instances one or two runs may be

24
omitted when the data is bad or questionable due to an equipment or

software problem.
In Appendix B the pressure coefficient plots are given in run
number order. Each symbol represents a measured pressure with the

apex of the triangular symbol up, for upper surface taps, and down,

for lower surface taps. Some taps were removed from the plots due

to blockage in the pressure lines. Tabulated on each plot are the

tunnel conditions and the corrected angle of attack and corrected

integrated force coefficients. The nomenclature is straight-forward

with the possible exception of the term CDW. Since the OSU software

is also capable of calculating and outputting the integrated pres-

sure drag coefficient, the total airfoil corrected drag coefficient

obtained from the wake survey probe is given as CDW. This cor-

responds to the CD value in the table of Appendix A.

The model construction did cause some inconsistencies in the

data which should be explained. The model was constructed with a

removable leading edge which caused a spanwise seam in the model at

the 15 percent chord location. This slight discontinuity in the

airfoil surface can be seen in the pressure distribution plots, par-

ticularly on the upper surface where taps were located every one

percent chord. Some asymmetry, about zero degrees angle of attack,

was also seen in the integrated coefficients due to this model seam,

since it was slightly smoother on one side than the other. Although

an effort was made to smooth the seams, this was not completely

successful. This asymmetry was most evident in the drag data on the

clean model. Due to what is thought to be different laminar bound-

ary layer transition points, the drag was somewhat asymmetric about

25
zero degrees angle of attack. Also contributing to this was the

surface pressure tap installation. From previous experience at OSU

it is known that the presence of these taps increases the airfoil

drag since they act as boundary layer trips and as surface

roughness. This model has many more taps on the upper surface than

on the lower, which may explain in part why the drag was higher at

negative angles of attack. Even when the boundary layer trip was

installed at the five percent chord location, this asymmetry was

present. On the runs of the NACA 0012 Model No. 2 with boundary

layer trip, a small discontinuity was seen in the pressure plots

near the forty percent chord station on the upper surface. This was

the point where the pressure measurement was switched to a second

Scanivalve. Apparently some small deviation in transducer reference

pressure was present. Unfortunately, this was not discovered until

after the experiment was completed, but the data are still of ac-

ceptable quality and are included here.

In Appendix C selected wake traces are presented. It was not

felt that these data would be useful to most readers, so only a rep-

resentative sample of these plots are presented here. In these

figures the dynamic pressure in the wake, assuming that the wake

static is just the tunnel freestream static pressure, were plotted

versus the position in the wake. Since only the relative positions

of the data are used in the data reduction, no attempt has been made

to maintain a common coordinate system for all runs. The wake

deficit is then a measure of the total airfoil drag. Since, as in

the integration of the pressure distributions of Appendix B, the

tunnel dynamic pressure is measured to correspond to each wake

26
point, integrating these plots alone will not give the exact drag

value reported here. The tunnel speed variation correction is,


however, small and the two values should be very close.

The detailed velocity measurements are presented in Appendix D.


Two sets of measurements are found here; the split-film results on

Model No. 1 with glaze ice and the total probe boundary layer
measurements on Model No. 2 with the trip strip. These runs can be

easily distinguished by the plot title or run number. In addition


to the data listed for each run in the table of Appendix A, the im-

portant parameters are gives on each plot. These include run


number, uncorrected angle of attack in degrees, the probe chordwise
location, the freestream velocity in ft/sec and the model chord

Reynolds number in millions. Each symbol represents the measured

velocity at a particular height above the model where Y is always


zero on the surface. The total pressure data has somewhat more

scatter than the split-film data since each total probe data point

represents only one data sample instead of the 2048 samples averaged

for each split-film velocity.

SUMMARY

An experimental program has been conducted to document the

aerodynamic characteristics and flow field about a NACA 0012 airfoil


with simulated glaze ice. Two different NACA 0012 models were used

for the tests.


NACA 0012 Model No. 2 was instrumented with an extremely dense

distribution of surface pressure taps to provide additional details

concerning the large separation zones aft of the ice horns. Airfoil

27
lift and drag were severely affected by the ice shape as was

expected. However, the surface pressure provided additional infor-

mation about the separation bubbles. The bubbles are characterized

by a region of almost constant, but slightly falling pressure, fol-

lowed by a region of pressure recovery. Work on Model No. 1 has


shown that re-attachment occurred in this pressure recovery region.

The lower surface horn caused a larger separation zone and a more

severe aerodynamic penalty when tested at negative angles of attack

than did the upper surface horns at positive angles of attack. This
is an interesting result which should be studied further. Model No.
2 was also used to document the baseline performance of the NACA

0012 airfoil. These tests were conducted with natural transition

and transition fixed at the five percent chord location on both

surfaces. The forced transition data compared well to theoretical

results in all aerodynamic quantities including the measured bound-

ary layer parameters.

Velocity profile measurements were performed in the separated

flow region behind the upper surface glaze ice horn. Using split-

film anemometry on the NACA 0012 Model No. i, streamwise velocity

profiles have been measured at several chordwise locations and

angles of attack. These profiles have shown the bubble extent and

the large regions of reversed flow.

Much of the detailed data from these experiments can be found

in the appendices. In addition to the run summary tables, plots of

surface pressures, wake total pressure profiles and velocity

profiles are also in the appendices. It is hoped that these data

will be useful in testing and developing airfoil performance in

28
icing computer codes and providing a better understanding of the
flow field.

29
REFERENCES

lo Jacobs, E. N.,"Airfoil Section Characteristics as Affected by


Protuberances", NACA Report No. 446,1932.

o Gray, V. H. and Von Glahn, Uwe H., "Effects of Ice and Frost
Formations on Drag of NACA 65-212 Airfoil for Various Modes of
Thermal Ice Protection", NACA TN 2962, 1953.

o Gray, V. H. and Von Glahn, Uwe H., "Aerodynamic Effects Caused


by Icing of an Unswept NACA 65A004 Airfoil", NACA TN 4151,
1957.

• Korkan, K. D. , Cross, E. J. Jr., and Cornell, C. C. ,


"Experimental Study of Performance Degradation of a Model
Helicopter Main Rotor with Simulated Ice Shape", AIAA Paper No.
84-0184, presented at the 22nd Aerospace Sciences Meeting,
Reno, Nevada, Jan. 9-12, 1984.

• Lee, J. D. and Shaw, R. J., "The Aerodynamics of Rotor Blades


with Ice Shapes Accreted in Hover and in Level Flight", paper
presented at the 41st Annual Forum of the American Helicopter
Society, Ft. Worth, Texas, May, 1985.

• Flemming, R. J., Shaw, R. J. and Lee, J. D., "The Performance


Characteristics of Simulated Ice on Rotor Airfoils", paper
presented at the 41st Annual Forum of the American Helicopter
Society, Ft. Worth, Texas, May 1985.


Bragg, M. B., Zaguli, R. J., and Gregorek, G. M., "Wind Tunnel
Evaluation of Airfoil Performance Using Simulated Ice Shapes",
NASA CR 167960, 1982.

• Bragg, M. B. and Gregorek, G. M.,"Wind Tunnel Investigation of


Airfoil Performance Degradation Due to Icing", AIAA Paper No.
82-0582, presented at the 12th Aerodynamic Testing
Conference, Williamsburg, Virginia, March 22-24, 1982.

• Bragg, M. B., "Predicting Airfoil Performance with Rime and


Glaze Ice Accretions", AIAA Paper No. 84-0106, presented at the
22nd Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 9-12, 1984.

i0. Potapczuk, M. G. and Gerhart, P. M. "Progress in the


Development of a Navier-Stokes Solver for Evaluation of Iced
Airfoil Performance", AIAA Paper No. 85-0410, presented at the
23rd Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 14-17,
1985.

ii. Cebeci, T., "Interactive Boundary-Layer Analysis of Iced


Airfoils", Airfoil Performance-in-Icing Workshop, NASA Lewis
Research Center, July 17-18, 1986.

3O
12. Bragg, M. B. and Coirier, W. J., "Detailed Measurements of the
Flowfield in the Vicinity of an Airfoil with Glaze Ice", AIAA
Paper No. 85-0409, presented at the 23rd Aerospace Sciences
Meeting, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 14-17, 1985.

13. Bragg, M. B., and Coirier, W. J., "Aerodynamic Measurements of


an Airfoil with Simulated Glaze Ice", AIAA-86-0484, paper
presented at the 24th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, _,
Jan. 6-9, 1986.

Shaw, R. J., private communication, March 1982.

Rae, W. H., Jr. and Pope, A., D_o_w___el__T_z_t_ir_g,


2nd ed., John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1984.

16. Boerner, Th. and Leutheusser, H. J., "Calibration of Split-


Fibre Probe for Use in Bubbly Two-Phase Flow", DISA
_, No. 29, January 1984.

17. Eppler, Richard and Somers, Dan M., "A Computer Program for the
Design and Analysis of Low-Speed Airfoils", NASA TM 80210,
August 1980.

18. Smetana, F. O., Summey, D. C., Smith, N. S. and Carden, R .K.,


"Light Aircraft Lift, Drag, and Moment Prediction - A Review
and Analysis", NASA CR-2523, May 1975.

19. Olsen, W., Shaw, R. and Newton, J., "Ice Shapes and the result-
ing Drag Increase for a NACA 0012 airfoil", NASA TM 83556,
1983.

31
TABLE i. COORDINATESFOR THE NACA 0012
MODEL NO. 2 - CLEAN CONFIGURATION

No. Xu Yu Xl Y1

1 0.00000 0.00000 0.00000 0.00000


2 0.00309 0.00967 0.00309 -0.00967
3 0.00621 0.01356 0.00621 -0.01356
4 0.01380 0.01984 0.02230 -0.02481
5 0.02230 0.02481 0.04080 -0.03256
6 0.03140 0.02899 0.08000 -0.04307
7 0.04080 0.03256 0.12000 -0.04988
8 0.05000 0.03555 0.16000 -0.05442
9 0.06000 0.03838 0.20000 -0.05738
10 0.07000 0.04086 0.24000 -0.05913
11 0.08000 0.04307 0.28000 -0.05993
12 0.09000 0.04505 0.32000 -0.05993
13 0.10000 0.04683 0.36000 -0.05926
14 0.11000 0.04843 0.40000 -0.05803
15 0.12000 0.04988 0.44000 -0.05631
16 0.13000 0.05119 0.50000 -0.05294
17 0.14000 0.05238 0.56000 -0.04878
18 0.15000 0.05345 0.60000 -0.04563
19 0.16000 0.05442 0.65000 -0.04132
20 0.17000 0.05529 0.70000 -0.03664
21 0.18000 0.05607 0.75000 -0.03160
22 0.19000 0.05676 0.80000 -0.02623
23 0.20000 0.05738 0.85000 -0.02053
24 0.21000 0.05792 0.90000 -0.01448
25 0.22000 0.05839 0.95000 -0.00807
26 0.23000 0.05879 0.97500 -0.00471
27 0.24000 0.05913 1.00000 0.00000
28 0.25000 0.05941
29 0.26000 0.05864
30 0.27000 0.05981
31 0.28000 0.05993
32 0.29000 0.06000
33 0.30000 0.06002
34 0.31000 0.05999
35 0.32000 0.05993
36 0.33000 0.05982
37 0.34000 0.05967
38 0.35000 0.05949
39 0.36000 0.05926
40 0.37000 0.05900
41 0.38000 0.05871
42 0.39000 0.05839
43 0.40000 0.05803
44 0.42000 0.05723
45 0.44000 0.05631

32
TABLE . (continued)

NO. Xu
Y
u

46 0.47000 0.05473
47 0.50000 0.05294
48 0.53000 0.05095
49 0.56000 0.04878
5O 0.60000 0.04563
51 0.65000 0.04132
52 0.70000 0.03664
53 0.75000 0.03160
54 0.80000 0.02623
55 0.85000 0.02053
56 0.90000 0.01448
57 O.950O0 0.00807
58 0.97500 0.00471
59 1.00000 0.00000

33
TABLE 2. COORDINATES FOR THE NACA 0012
MODEL NO. 1 - GLAZE ICE CONFIGURATION

No. Xu Yu X1 Y1

1 -0.02557 0.02729* -0.02557 0.02729


2 -0.02501 0.02877* -0.02000 0.00621
3 -0.02445 0.02922* -0.01800 0.00097
4 -0.02389 0.02945* -0.01200 -0.01151
5 -0.02333 0.02952* -0.00600 -0.02115
6 -0.00305 0.02632 0.00000 -0.02907
7 0.01857 0.02263 0.00600 -0.03577
8 0.03140 0.02899 0.01200 -0.04155
9 0.05000 0.03555 0.02166 -0.05215*
i0 0.06000 0.03838 0.02278 -0.05283*
ii 0.08000 0.04307 0.02333 -0.05290*
12 0.i0000 0.04683 0.02389 -0.05283*
13 0.12000 0.04988 0.04798 -0.04683
14 0.14000 0.05238 0.06952 -0.04026
15 0.16000 0.05442 0.09900 -0.04700
16 0.18000 0.05607 0.12000 -0.04988
17 0.20000 0.05738 0.16000 -0.05442
18 0.22000 0.05839 0.20000 -0.05738
19 0.24000 0.05913 0.24000 -0.05913
20 0.26000 0.05864 0.28000 -0.05993
21 0.28000 0.05993 0.32000 -0.05993
22 0.30000 0.06002 0.36000 -0.05926
23 0.32000 0.05993 0.40000 -0.05803
24 0.34000 0.05967 0.44000 -0.05631
25 0.36000 0.05926 0.50000 -0.05294
26 0.38000 0.05871 0.56000 -0.04878
27 0.40000 0.05803 0.60000 -0.04563
28 0.42000 0.05723 0.65000 -0.04132
29 0.44000 0.05631 0.70000 -0.03664
30 0.47000 0.05473 0.75000 -0.03160
31 0.50000 0.05294 0.80000 -0.02623
32 0.53000 0.05095 0.85000 -0.02053
33 0.56000 0.04878 0.90000 -0.01448
34 0.60000 0.04563 0.95000 -0.00807
35 0.65000 0.04132 0.97500 -0.00471
36 0.70000 0.03664 1.00000 0.00000
37 0.75000 0.03160
38 0.80000 0.02623
39 0.85000 0.02053
40 0.90000 0.01448
41 0.95000 0.00807
42 0.97500 0.00471
43 1.00000 0.00000

* NOTE: Upper and lower surface horn radius of


curvature, r/c = 0.002232 .

34
TABLE 3. COORDINATESFOR THE NACA OO12
MODELNO. 2 - ICED CONFIGURATION

NO. Xu YU Xl Y1

1 -0.02660 0.01690* -0.02660 0.01690


2 -0.02450 0.02870* -0.02220 0.00390
3 -0.02080 0.03060* -0.01750 -0.00700
4 -0.01000 0.02880 -0.01070 -0.01840
5 -0.00010 0.02680 -0.00360 -0.02840
6 0.01000 0.02500 0.00590 -0.03930
7 0.02210 0.02670 0.01500 -0.04740
8 0.03110 0.03000 0.02580 -0.05330**
9 0.04070 0.03330 0.03000 -0.05300**
i0 0.04910 0.03610 0.03970 -0.05030
ii 0.05950 0.03900 0.04950 -0.04730
12 0.06940 0.04140 0.06000 -0.04410
13 0.07940 0.04350 0.06950 -0.04210
14 0.08910 0.04550 0.07930 -0.04360
15 0.09900 0.04720 0.10940 -0.04870
16 0.10970 0.04870 0.11930 -0.05000
17 0.11970 0.05000 0.12900 -0.05110
18 0.12969 0.05140 0.14000 -0.05200
19 0.14000 0.05240 0.16000 -0.05442
20 0.16000 0.05442 0.20000 -0.05738
21 0.17000 0.05500 0.24000 -0.05913
22 0.18000 0.05607 0.28000 -0.05993
23 0.19000 0.05676 0.32000 -0.05993
24 0.20000 0.05738 0.36000 -0.05926
25 0.21000 0.05792 0.40000 -0.05803
26 0.22000 0.05839 0.44000 -0.05631
27 0.23000 0.05879 0.50000 -0.05294
28 0.24000 0.05913 0.56000 -0.04878
29 0.25000 0.05941 0.60000 -0.04563
30 0.26000 0.05864 0.70000 -0.03664
31 0.28000 0.05993 0.75000 -0.03160
32 0.30000 0.06002 0.85000 -0.02053
33 0.32000 0.05993 0.90000 -0.01448
34 0.34000 0.05967 0.95000 -0.00807
35 0.36000 0.05926 0.97-500 -0.00471
36 0.38000 0.05871 1.00000 0.00000
37 0.40000 0.05800
38 0.42000 0.05700
39 0.44000 0.05631
40 0.47000 0.05473
41 0.50000 0.05294
42 0.53000 0.05095
43 0.56000 0.04878
44 0.60000 0.04563
45 0.70000 0.03664

35
TABLE 3. (continued)
No. X Y
u u

46 0.75000 0.03160
47 0.80000 0.02623
48 0.85000 0.02053
49 0.90000 0.01448
50 0.95000 0.00807
51 0.97500 0.00471
52 1.00000 0.00000

* NOTE: Upper surface horn radius of


curvature, (r/C)u= 0.00595 .

** NOTE: Lower surface horn radius of


curvature, (r/c)l= 0.01042

36
37
ORIGINAL F,_,.,..
,._
OF POOR QUALITY

FIGURE 2. OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL.

38
ORI_:_,_:%.I__...,
.""
. ,._
OF POOR QUALII"'(

FIGURE 3. TWO-DI_fENSIONAL TRAVERSE SYSTEM.

39
i I I

NACA 0012 R " 1.5 x 106 M- 0.12


e

O Experiment, Nat. Trans.

Experiment, Fixed Trans.

__Eppler, Nat. Trans.


1.5
Smetana, Nat. Trans.
/
/
/
CI

1.0

0
0.5

--/" J i I
0 5 i0 15

ANGLE OF ATTACK, deg.

FIGURE 4. COMPARISON OF MEASURED LIFT WITH NATURAL


AND FIXED TRANSITION TO THEORY.

40
I I I

NACA 0012 Re = 1.5 x 106 M = 0.12


0.03

O Experiment, Nat. Trans.

Experiment, Fixed Trans.


Z_ O
/
Eppler I
/ /
Sme t ana /

0.02

C
d

Fixed Trans. 0
0
0
0.01
0

Nat. Trans.


I I

0 I0 15

ANGLE OF ATTACK, deg.

FIGURE 5. COMPARISON OF _ASURED DRAG WITH NATURAL


AND FIXED TRANSITION TO THEORY.

41
I I !
M S 0. 12
NACA 0012 Re - 1.5 x 106
0.2

O Experiment, Nat. Trans.

Experiment, Fixed Trans.

0.I Eppler, Nat. Trans.

Smetana, Nat. Trans.

-0. i O
OO

-0.2 I I I
0 5 10 15

ANGLE OF ATTACK, deg.

FIGURE 6. MEASURED AIRFOIL PITCHING MOMENT WITH


AND WITHOUT SIMULATED GLAZE ICE.

42
NACA 0012
6
R e -- 1.5 x i0 M = 0.12

-2.0
A Experiment, CI = 0.211

Experiment, CI = 0.658

C
P Smetana, Matched CI

-I.0

.0
o

0.4 0.6 0°8

x/c

io0

FIGURE 7. MEASURED SURFACE PRESSURES COMPARED TO


THEORY AT TWO ANGLES OF ATTACK.

43
! !

NACA 0012 R M = 0.12


2.0 e

© Experiment, Nat. Trans.

A Experiment, Fixed Trans.

1.5
[7 Ice-Upper Horn

CI
V Ice-Lower Horn

1.0

0.5

i I I

5 I0 15

ANGLE OF ATTACK, deg.

FIGURE 8. MEASUREDAIRFOIL LIFT WITH AND


WITHOUT SIMULATED GLAZE ICE.

44
I i I

NACA 0012 = 1.5x 106 M = 0.12


R e

0"12 I

0.i0 O Experiment, Clean-

[] Ice-Upper Horn

0.08 V Ice-Lower Horn

Cd
O Olsen, Ref. 13

0.06

0.04

0.0;

I I
0 5 i0 15

ANGLE OF ATTACK, deg.

FIGURE 9. MEASURED AIRFOIL DRAG WITH AND


WIT}lOUT SIMULATED GLAZE ICE.

45
r---------=--=--_
NACA 0012 R - 1.5 x 106
e
0.20

0 Clean

[] Ice-Upper Horn

0. i0 - _ Ice-Lower Horn

-0. IC

=0.2( i L__ -/
0 5 i0 15

ANGLE OF ATTACK, deg.

FIGURE i0. COMPARISON OF MEASURED PITCHING MOMENT WITH


NATURAL AND FIXED TRANSITION TO THEORY.

46
-3.0 -

NACA 0012 EXPERIMENT


- 4 deg. Re - i. 5 x 106 M - 0.12

-2.0
O Clean C1 - 0.439

V Ice-Upper Horn C1 - 0.376


C
P

-I.0

.0
o

-0.2

x/c

1.0

FIGURE ii. MEASURED SURFACE PRESSURES WITH AND WITHOUT


SIMULATED GLAZE ICE AT _ = 4 DEG.

47
-3.0

NACA 0012 EXPERIMENT


WITH SI_UALTE D GLAZE ICE
I?e - 1.5 x I0 ° M - 0.12

O a - 0 deg. C 1 --0.037
-2.0

= - 2 deg. C I = 0.167

V a - 4 deg. C I - 0.361

Cp

O.

x/c

1.0

FIGURE 12. MEASURED SURFACE PRESSURES WITH SIMULATED


ICE AT LOW ANGLES OF ATTACK.

48
-3.0 -

NACA 0012 EXPERIMENT


WITH SIMULATED GLAZE ICE
R - 1.5 x 106 H - 0.15
e

V a . 4 deg. C 1 = 0.361

D a = 6 deg. C1 = 0.521

1.0

xlc

MEASURED SURFACE PRESSURES WITII SIMULATED


ICE AT HIGH ANGLES OF ATTACK.

49
-3.0

NACA 0012

Re = 1.5 x 106 M = 0.12


-2.0
Experiment, e = -4 deg.
(Ice-Lower Horn)

V Experiment, _ = 4 deg.
(Ice-Upper Horn)

C
P

-I.0

0o

-0.2 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8

x/c

1.0

FIGURE 14. MEASURED SURFACE PRESSURES WITH SIMULATED


ICE AT _ = -4 and 4 DEG.

50
r._

N eq,j,emmQua 6, Q_j4.e4t_04_4u4144m 4e 0
0

_D

44J 4444 _ aq_41_4 4444e4M _ 4Qql4 4_J444e

o
00

Z L_

i-..4o
_,.-4 o
44J44144144BI_4MI 414444JI44 4B4 44jlqj4q4_l_ '
I.,-I
_o

H_
oZ
n 4_ eeee4eNeg 4e,e4_ a4N 4ml

_--Oj_ 4q4 _ q4 q4J4qlqlil

_X

o _Z
_ _8,e44 • • ,me,s4a 4e 4ae4e_ eq414

II II '_ll q

Z
=g
o_

40 4448 m ea4tee4 4184 _ 441444JqO44h_rt

r.....4

4 4144_4q 44 44414118 41_8444 i414ile41q 41ellll 4

u 4 r-_

_D

o (I'60HD/HDV_HnS
HAO_V £HDIHH

51
I I I I

\
\

_C] 0
\
\

52
_z

0'3

0
0

=
0
II .,-I
5
.IJ

Z_U
_.4 0
4-1,--I 0
0

_D
Z 4
H / .IJ
E-_ 1t :Z
s
s I b.I
i/ I .IJ
X 0")
r_

O'n
,.-4

,---I
¢",1

53
o ,-t _

II II II

___ _.) _._

m
o

O _0

N
I-tC_
O_
_0

II
<<
>

O_
0
f-l.1_

O_

I_0
I-I o
U

r._i-io
Z
_a
N

,-4
c_5
_a

i.-.i
<
rj

I I I I
!
o _ O

! ! !

54
44444 444nl 4q4414 41444 4_ 4 4441

444 414 q4 4444 4144 44441 444444 _


4 o
u.J o
4J4 u

c_ O3
1'--4
L,LJ r-d C.D o,i
N
44 • 44B 4a444N q_ • • q4Nq _
I--I
,.-J c_ 440
O 4 _o
4O O
"r" 44 II
I-" CO
m_
O,,--4 f-.
441 4 4J • • 44 • • 4 48
o_
I..61
¢.%j ._m
q U.l H
o Lu 4 C.j
r_ 4
4_ la.; 0
c:C Z 484
q4 C444 4 4M4484 4G4q
L.61
4q _o
z _m
44 l'--
4 4 o
i.J

N 414 441 440 44 441 ,4


4
44_84 4 ..I
1.61 Z
o.

u Z
4441 o
C_d
I__ 44 qqq q •

4 44q 4144 4418 44 4J 44 o


c.D
4 4

_-4 0
t_
d4
q4P¢* 4G 4 • • 41

44484 48444 44444484444844444

41
4

! 4q _4

d
I
:i L_
0 r_

P-.t
G_OH3/33VJ_NS 3AOBV iHgI3H

I' n
I

55
GQ_ IqQ_4 _ 4_441_1 d4_ q

P4

q4N440 ,eG 4q,eqG44Dql 4q 44_4

qlq
q4

qq ql,41 qlqlqq qqqql • (Iq qlqlq41, q


qq
q

L._

_M
_qlq qqiqlq qq,qlq qq qqlg Mu
W
44
9_ i-i E-I ,-i
--,.I 41q _H
o<o
IQ
qO ,ql • 4141 4q 44 _14ql I la._ _._ II
I'--
441 0
0 qq
4141
I--"
G I I-IM_
0 4111Q
U_DZ
0
0
444q _ 4,,n4 4qmqu44q ,--I
la.I
M<
c_ M
44 4
c_C ql
la.I
Z

414 4144 4q _u Gqql 4


q 4 la,,I
4
H
I'-
41
qP M_
"414 4q qql ql44 0
Lf) 44414 4qll q
0 44 laJ I_1_ II

U 4
0<_
U
ql mqq 4qlqdtG _-- M ,--'. -
qq tqqqqqqq

O qm
qq qJ ql qlq 41 atom wll
qqlq q _ qlqql qq qq qqlqlq _ZoO
4
4

!
eq

iJ ur)
o
I
L9

'iI

56
w

qo _ • q _G _I

Ld

_L_ Q_qL,

O OL 191 LI 41_ G _ @ LD qqDQH 4 _141 g 4 q L_

LLLL_L_I H4 Cq QL4_ _GqL_I_B I_ _-_ II


_l OQG 0
EqqL414_
_r.._

ZO,-_
O_
I_ I_ II
{J

z
mdj "gq_ _q4

q_

q94_ gl. ---- J

r_
I--I
(]BOH3/33VdBN$ 3AOBV 1H913H Q_OH3/33V_N$ 3AOgV IHgI3H

57
APPENDIX A

RUN SUMMARIES
NACA 0012 MDEEL NO. 1 - GLAZE ICE CO_IGURATION
SPLIT FILM VELOCITY PROFILES

x/c U-minE 6 IC OIc Y-STAGIC Y-SEPIC


(c_g_) x10-6 (ft/s) (ft/s) xl03 xl03
236 -0.15 0.00 1.46 131.7 171.7 0.02146 0.42626 0.014721 0.020143
238 -0.15 -0.02 1.46 131.7 166.9 0.00950 0.35212 0.006662 0.008399
239 -0.15 0.02 1.46 131.7 170.0 0.02144 1.07510 0.012993 0.018715
240 -0.15 0.04 1.46 131.7 167.4 0.01697 0.77877 0.008640 0.014875
241 -0.15 0.06 1.42 133.5 176.1 0.01214 1.79805 0.004461 0.008394
242 -0.15 0.08 1.42 133.5 169.2 0.00737 3.05670 ....
243 -0.15 0.10 1.44 132.7 160.6 0.00489 2.90518 ....
244 -0.15 0.12 1.44 132.7 160.7 0.00375 2.56528 -- --
245 1.85 -0.02 1.44 132.7 184.2 0.01161 0.21754 0.008947 0.010372
246 1.85 0.00 1.44 132.7 200.5 0.01265 -0.17896 0.020703 0.025558
247 1.85 0.02 1.44 132.7 201.7 0.03009 0.46930 0.021808 0.028466
248 1.85 0.04 1.44 132.7 201.8 0.02606 0.91716 0.016222 0.023689
249 1.85 0.06 1.44 132.9 199.4 0.02066 1.88002 0.009068 0.016413
250 1.85 0.08 1.44 132.5 191.8 0.01703 2.68549 0.006024 0.011304
251 1.85 0.10 1.44 132.5 185.3 0.01478 3.49155 0.004404 0.006891
252 1.85 0.12 1.44 132.5 176.7 0.01116 4.33792 ....
254 1.85 0.14 1.51 130.0 167.3 0.00835 4.28289 -- --
255 1.85 0.16 1.51 130.0 165.5 0.00704 4.42153 ....
257 3.85 -0.02 1.51 130.0 180.0 0.01041 0.27493 0.008068 0.009076
258 3.85 0.00 1.51 130.0 202.4 0.02907 0.14864 0.022242 0.027926
262 3.85 0.02 1.54 129.0 200.0 0.03682 0.57272 --
263 3.85 0.04 1.53 129.3 197.9 0.03195 1.15141 0.019096 0.029356
264 3.85 0.06 1.53 129.3 197.6 0.03110 1.91804 0.018119 0.027221
265 3.85 0.08 1.53 129.3 198.2 0.02875 2.72787 0.012555 0.022697
267 3.85 0.i0 1.49130.6 212.3 0.02849 3.10515 0.012515 0.021727
268 3.85 0.12 1.49 130.6 208.9 0.02717 3.90636 0.009639 0.018506
269 3.85 0.14 1.49 130.6 205.6 0.02418 4.80094 0.007583 0.012813
270 3.85 0.16 1.49 130.6 197.4 0.02072 5.57149 0.002420 0.004897
271 3.85 0.18 1.49 130.6 192.9 0.01939 6.21330 -- --
272 3.85 0.20 1.49 130.6 186.8 0.01797 6.96573 ....
273 3.85 0.22 1.49 130.6 183.3 0.01687 7.44755 ....
274 3.85 0.30 1.49 130.6 175.4 0.01279 7.94107 -- --
275 3.85 0.40 1.49 130.6 169.5 0.01223 8.40160 ....
276 3.85 0.50 1.49 130.6 166.5 0.01297 9.47147 ....

60
NACA 0012 MODEL NO. 2 - CLEAN OONFIGURATION

Re xl0 -6
RUN ALPHA u ALPHA CLu CL CD u CD CM u CM MACH
deg_> deg_!
364 0.00 0.00 -0.005 -0.005 0.0080 0.0078 0.0004 0.0003 0.126 1.465
365 0.00 0.00 -0.003 -0.003 0.0078 0.0076 0.0006 0.0005 0.126 1.484
366 1.00 1.03 0.i01 0.096 0.0080 0.0078 0.0010 0.0017 0.126 1.484
367 2.00 2.06 0.208 0.198 0.0083 0.0081 0.0010 0.0025 0.126 1.489
368 3.00 3.09 0.318 0.303 0.0085 0.0083 0.0011 0.0034 0.126 1.506
369 4.00 4.12 0.434 0.414 0.0092 0.0090 0.0023 0.0053 0.126 1.507
370 5.00 5.15 0.535 0.511 0.0095 0.0093 0.0027 0.0065 0.126 1.499
371 6.00 6.18 0.652 0.622 0.0098 0.0096 0.0010 0.0056 0.126 1.500
372 7.00 7.21 0.774 0.738 0.0101 0.0099 -0.0014 0.0041 0.126 1.499
373 8.00 8.24 0.870 0.829 0.0114 0.0111 0.0004 0.0066 0.126 1.500
374 9.00 9.27 0.962 0.917 0.0127 0.0124 0.0036 0.0105 0.126 1.501
375 10.00 10.29 1.052 1.003 0.0142 0.0139 0.0058 0.0132 0.125 1.493
376 ii.00 11.32 1.134 1.080 0.0165 0.0161 0.0088 0.0168 0.126 1.497
377 12.00 12.35 1.217 1.159 0.0205 0.0200 0.0127 0.0212 0.125 1.494
378 13.00 13.37 1.279 1.216 0.0261 0.0254 0.0152 0.0240 0.125 1.494
379 14.00 14.10 0.908 0.862 0.0317 0.0308 -0.1319 -0.1228 0.118 1.407
380 15.00 15.10 0.876 0.831 0.0373 0.0362 -0.1310 -0.1220 0.117 1.388
381 16.00 16.09 0.713 0.676 0.0429 0.0416 -0.0959 -0.0887 0.117 1.394
382 12.50 12.86 1.256 1.194 0.0233 0.0227 0.0146 0.0233 0.126 1.500
384 13.50 13.87 1.298 1.234 0.0289 0.0281 0.0179 0.0268 0.126 1.497
385 4.00 4.12 0.423 0.403 0.0092 0.0090 0.0021 0.0051 0.126 1.469
386 0.00 0.00 -0.007 -0.006 0.0072 0.0070 0.0004 0.0004 0.125 1.455
387 -2.00 -2.06 -0.228 -0.217 0.0078 0.0076 -0.0005 -0.0021 0.126 1.463
388 -4.00 -4.12 -0.437 -0.417 0.0075 0.0073 -0.0037 -0.0067 0.125 1.452
389 -6.00 -6.18 -0.681 -0.650 0.0067 0.0065 0.0011 -0.0038 0.125 1.459
390 -8.00 -8.24 -0.900 -0.857 0.0127 0.0124 0.0009 -0.0055 0.126 1.469
391 -6.00 -6.19 -0.683 -0.651 0.0069 0.0067 0.0010 -0.0039 0.126 1.462
392 -5.00 -5.16 -0.563 -0.537 0.0077 0.0075 -0.0031 -0.0070 0.125 1.455
393 -I0.00 -10.30 -1.084 -1.032 0.0170 0.0166 -0.0061 -0.0137 0.127 1.478
394 -10.00 -10.30 -1.077 -1.025 0.0170 0.0166 -0.0063 -0.0139 0.125 1.458
395 -12.00 -12.35 -1.240 -1.178 0.0272 0.0265 -0.0114 -0.0200 0.125 1.458
396 -14.00 -14.16 -1.015 -0.963 0.0374 0.0363 0.1055 0.0960 0.116 1.353
397 -15.00 -15.17 -1.057 -1.002 0.0425 0.0412 0.1087 0.0987 0.115 1.333
398 -13.00 -13.37 -1.299 -1.233 0.0323 0.0314 -0.0159 -0.0248 0.125 1.455
399 -13.50 -13.87 -1.191 -1.129 0.0349 0.0339 -0.0445 -0.0520 0.117 1.360
400 0.00 0.00 -0.015 -0.014 0.0087 0.0085 0.0003 0.0002 0.168 2.018
401 1.00 1.03 0.097 0.093 0.0081 0.0079 0.0002 0.0008 0.168 2.025
402 2.00 2.06 0.203 0.194 0.0083 0.0081 0.0006 0.0020 0.168 2.017
403 3.00 3.08 0.301 0.287 0.0086 0.0084 0.0002 0.0024 0.168 2.022
404 4.00 4.11 0.407 0.388 0.0087 0.0085 0.0008 0.0037 0.168 2.016
405 5.00 5.14 0.523 0.499 0.0098 0.0096 0.0017 0.0054 0.167 2.011
406 6.00 6.17 0.622 0.594 0.0099 0.0097 0.0004 0.0048 0.168 2.016
407 7.00 7.20 0.742 0.708 0.0099 0.0097 -0.0009 0.0045 0.167 2.009
408 7.00 7.20 0.744 0.710 0.0089 0.0087 -0.0010 0.0044 0.166 1.964
409 5.00 5.14 0.523 0.499 0.0087 0.0085 0.0012 0.0050 0.166 1.964
410 3.00 3.08 0.300 0.286 0.0083 0.0081 0.0001 0.0023 0.165 1.955
412 0.00 0.00 -0.004 -0.004 0.0076 0.0074 0.0004 0.0004 0.167 1.980
413 8.00 8.23 0.843 0.803 0.0112 0.0109 0.0001 0.0062 0.166 1.959

61
CLu CL CDu CD CM u CM MACH Re xl0 -6

414 -2.00 -2.06 -0.224 -0.213 0.0071 0.0069 0.0000 -0.0016 0.167 1.970
415 -2.00 -2.06 -0.222 -0.212 0.0076 0.0074 0.0000 -0.0016 0.166 1.960
416 -4.00 -4.12 -0.420 -0.401 0.0082 0.0080 -0.0014 -0.0044 0.167 1.970
417 -6.00 -6.18 -0.646 -0.616 0.0085 0.0083 -0.0015 -0.0061 0.168 1.981
418 -8.00 -8.24 -0.868 -0.827 0.0114 0.0111 0.0003 -0.0059 0.167 1.974
420 9.00 9.26 0.929 0.886 0.0119 0.0116 0.0023 0.0089 0.165 1.948
421 i0.00 10.28 1.014 0.967 0.0140 0.0137 0.0048 0.0120 0.165 1.948
422 Ii.00 11.31 1.098 1.046 0.0158 0.0154 0.0069 0.0146 0.164 1.942
423 12.00 12.33 1.184 1.127 0.0184 0.0179 0.0093 0.0176 0.164 1.940
425 13.00 13.36 1.254 1.193 0.0220 0.0214 0.0116 0.0204 0.163 1.935
426 14.00 14.15 0.965 0.917 0.0256 0.0249 -0.1052 -0.0963 0.148 1.749
427 13.50 13.68 1.034 0.983 0.0238 0.0232 -0.0942 -0.0850 0.151 1.788
428 -i0.00 -10.29 -1.035 -0.986 0.0165 0.0161 -0.0040 -0.0113 0.166 1.958
429 -10.00 -10.29 -1.034 -0.985 0.0165 0.0161 -0.0036 -0.0109 0.166 1.960
430 -12.00 -12.34 -1.201 -1.142 0.0227 0.0221 -0.0100 -0.0183 0.166 1.957
431 -14.00 -14.20 -i.Ii0 -1.054 0.0289 0.0281 0.0919 0.0822 0.153 1.800
432 -13.00 -13.36 -1.267 -1.205 0.0258 0.0251 -0.0120 -0.0208 0.166 1.955
433 -13.50 -13.87 -1.292 -1.228 0.0274 0.0267 -0.0129 -0.0218 0.165 1.951

NACA 0012 MDDEL NO. 2 - ICED OONFIGURATION

MACH Re xlO -6
RUN ALPHA u ALPHA CL u CL CD u CD CM u CM

434 0.00 -0.02 -0.039 -0.037 0.0282 0.0274 -0.0106 -0.0106 0.127 1.476
435 4.00 4.12 0.381 0.361 0.0399 0.0387 0.0134 0.0158 0.127 1.467
436 4.00 4.12 0.385 0.364 0.0401 0.0389 0.0140 0.0164 0.123 1.421
437 4.00 4.12 0.380 0.361 0.0401 0.0389 0.0147 0.0171 0.123 1.420
438 4.00 4.12 0.380 0.361 0.0390 0.0379 0.0135 0.0159 0.123 1.421
439 0.00 -0.02 -0.043 -0.041 0.0258 0.0251 -0.0103 -0.0104 0.124 1.428
440 1.00 1.01 0.070 0.066 0.0261 0.0254 -0.0056 -0.0050 0.124 1.429
441 2.00 2.05 0.176 0.167 0.0283 0.0275 0.0007 0.0019 0.124 1.426
442 3.00 3.08 0.274 0.260 0.0333 0.0324 0.0066 0.0084 0.124 1.457
443 4.00 4.12 0.380 0.360 0.0405 0.0393 0.0144 0.0167 0.123 1.455
444 5.00 5.15 0.478 0.452 0.0537 0.0520 0.0177 0.0207 0.123 1.452
445 6.00 6.16 0.553 0.521 0.0763 0.0735 0.0075 0.0112 0.122 1.443
446 7.00 7.14 0.601 0.561 0.1141 0.1092 -0.0252 -0.0201 0.121 1.431
447 8.00 8.10 0.577 0.535 0.1519 0.1442 -0.0549 -0.0485 0.121 1.438
448 9.00 9.07 0.521 0.479 0.1897 0.1787 -0.0704 -0.0633 0.120 1.429
449 0.00 -0.02 -0.038 -0.036 0.0270 0.0263 -0.0095 -0.0096 0.124 1.483
450 -2.00 -2.09 -0.251 -0.238 0.0345 0.0335 -0.0172 -0.0187 0.124 1.482
451 -4.00 -4.14 -0.444 -0.420 0.0494 0.0479 -0.0194 -0.0220 0.123 1.477
452 -4.00 -4.14 -0.443 -0.420 0.0503 0.0487 -0.0203 -0.0230 0.123 1.406
453 -6.00 -6.13 -0.577 -0.544 0.0649 0.0627 0.0218 0.0171 0.121 1.392
454 -8.00 -8.08 -0.516 -0.486 0.0798 0.0769 0.0553 0.0500 0.120 1.379
455 -7.00 -7.11 -0.547 -0.515 0.0724 0.0698 0.0332 0.0284 0.120 1.377
456 -6.00 -6.13 -0.580 -0.547 0.0649 0.0627 0.0232 0.0185 0.121 1.389
457 -5.00 -5.15 -0.536 -0.505 0.0686 0.0662 -0.0043 -0.0079 0.122 1.402
458 0.00 -0.02 -0.043 -0.041 0.0272 0.0265 -0.0101 -0.0102 0.161 1.883
459 2.00 2.05 0.167 0.159 0.0287 0.0279 0.0008 0.0020 0.161 1.880
460 4.00 4.11 0.364 0.345 0.0417 0.0405 0.0135 0.0158 0.160 1.870
62
ALPH_
u ALPHA CLu CL CDu CD CM
u CM MACHRe xl0 -6

461 6.00 6.15 0.535 0.504 0.0769 0.0741 0.0052 0.0088 0.157 1.840
462 8.00 8.11 0.575 0.537 0.1121 0.1073 -0.0443 -0.0387 0.154 1.798
463 7.00 7.12 0.568 0.532 0.0945 0.0908 -0.0294 -0.0244 0.155 1.815
464 9.00 9.06 0.489 0.455 0.1297 0.1237 -0.0679 -0.0618 0.152 1.775
465 -2.00 -2.08 -0.238 -0.226 0.0342 0.0332 -0.0178 -0.0192 0.160 1.875
466 -2.00 -2.09 -0.239 -0.227 0.0342 0.0332 -0.0181 -0.0194 0.161 1.904
467 -4.00 -4.14 -0.424 -0.401 0.0506 0.0490 -0.0199 -0.0225 0.160 1.890
468 -6.00 -6.15 -0.546 -0.513 0.0837 0.0806 0.0038 -0.0002 0.157 1.858
469 -8.00 -8.16 -0.644 -0.601 0.1168 0.1117 0.0187 0.0135 0.154 1.826
470 -9.00 -9.16 -0.688 -0.640 0.1334 0.1271 0.0280 0.0221 0.153 1.806
471 -I0.00 -10.16 -0.729 -0.676 0.1499 0.1424 0.0360 0.0294 0.150 1.777
472 -I0.00 -10.05 -0.414 -0.384 0.1499 0.1424 0.0549 0.0496 0.152 1.794
473 -8.00 -8.10 -0.545 -0.508 0.1168 0.1117 0.0491 0.0435 0.153 1.814
474 -6.00 -6.13 -0.537 -0.504 0.0900 0.0865 0.0144 0.0101 0.157 1.859
475 -4.00 -4.14 -0.426 -0.403 0.0506 0.0490 -0.0185 -0.0211 0.160 1.894
476 -7.00 -7.13 -0.582 -0.546 0.0947 0.0909 0.0261 0.0211 0.156 1.840
477 0.00 -0.02 -0.048 -0.046 0.0250 0.0243 -0.0104 -0.0106 0.075 0.848
478 2.00 2.05 0.182 0.173 0.0278 0.0271 0.0002 0.0015 0.075 0.853
479 4.00 4.12 0.396 0.375 0.0392 0.0381 0.0143 0.0168 0.075 0.849
480 6.00 6.17 0.575 0.542 0.0718 0.0693 0.0122 0.0160 0.074 0.844
481 8.00 8.11 0.596 0.558 0.1044 0.I001 -0.0490 -0.0432 0.073 0.830
482 9.00 9.08 0.571 0.533 0.1210 0.1156 -0.0735 -0.0668 0.073 0.826
483 7.00 7.14 0.624 0.586 0.0880 0.0846 -0.0243 -0.0192 0.074 0.836
484 -2.00 -2.09 -0.269 -0.256 0.0302 0.0294 -0.0187 -0.0203 0.075 0.849
485 -4.00 -4.15 -0.470 -0.445 0.0477 0.0462 -0.0208 -0.0237 0.075 0.845
486 -6.00 -6.14 -0.603 -0.566 0.0839 0.0807 0.0216 0.0167 0.074 0.834
487 -8.00 -8.07 -0.528 -0.494 0.1044 0.1001 0.0651 0.0592 0.073 0.826
488 -7.00 -7.10 -0.581 -0.546 0.0880 0.0846 0.0527 0.0470 0.074 0.833
489 -5.00 -5.17 -0.567 -0.535 0.0669 0.0646 -0.0094 -0.0132 0.074 0.842
490 0.00 -0.03 -0.050 -0.047 0.0250 0.0243 -0.0105 -0.0107 0.075 0.862
491 2.00 2.05 0.177 0.169 0.0278 0.0271 0.0011 0.0023 0.075 0.861
492 4.00 4.12 0.398 0.378 0.0392 0.0381 0.0143 0.0168 0.074 0.857
493 6.00 6.17 0.583 0.549 0.0718 0.0693 0.0117 0.0155 0.074 0.851
494 -4.00 -4.15 -0.469 -0.444 0.0477 0.0462 -0.0210 -0.0238 0.074 0.856
495 -2.00 -2.09 -0.258 -0.245 0.0302 0.0294 -0.0196 -0.0211 0.075 0.861
500 0.00 0.00 -0.011 -0.010 0.0078 0.0076 0.0006 0.0005 0.075 0.872
501 2.00 2.06 0.213 0.203 0.0077 0.0075 0.0013 0.0028 0.075 0.873
502 4.00 4.12 0.435 0.415 0.0088 0.0086 0.0030 0.0060 0.076 0.875
503 6.00 6.19 0.691 0.659 0.0089 0.0087 -0.0026 0.0024 0.076 0.876
504 8.00 8.24 0.888 0.846 0.0129 0.0126 0.0021 0.0084 0.076 0.875
505 i0.00 10.30 1.061 1.010 0.0165 0.0161 0.0086 0.0160 0.076 0.876
506 i0.00 10.30 1.061 1.010 0.0169 0.0165 0.0092 0.0166 0.076 0.876
507 12.00 12.34 1.189 1.131 0.0244 0.0238 0.0166 0.0247 0.075 0.873
508 14.00 14.12 0.842 0.800 0.0319 0.0310 -0.1027 -0.0946 0.072 0.832
509 13.00 13.32 1.166 1.108 0.0282 0.0274 0.0011 0.0094 0.075 0.871
510 12.50 12.84 1.188 1.129 0.0263 0.0256 0.0170 0.0251 0.075 0.872
511 -2.00 -2.06 -0.233 -0.222 0.0082 0.0080 -0.0010 -0.0026 0.076 0.879
512 -4.00 -4.13 -0.452 -0.431 0.0100 0.0098 -0.0035 -0.0067 0.076 0.896
513 -6.00 -6.19 -0.714 -0.681 0.0137 0.0134 0.0061 0.0009 0.076 0.899
514 -6.00 -6.19 -0.710 -0.677 0.0133 0.0130 0.0060 0.0008 0.076 0.895

63
BEN ALPHA u ALPHA CL u CL CD u CD CM
u CM MACHPe xl0 -6

515 4.00 4.12 0.433 0.413 0.0080 0.0078 0.0024 0.0055 0.076 0.901
516 -8.00 -8.25 -0.909 -0.866 0.0146 0.0142 -0.0029 -0.0093 0.076 0.900
517 -10.00 -10.31 -1.093 -1.040 0.0192 0.0187 -0.0097 -0.0173 0.076 0.902
518 -12.00 -12.35 -1.210 -1.150 0.0269 0.0262 -0.0163 -0.0246 0.076 0.894
519 -14.00 -14.12 -0.847 -0.804 0.0346 0.0336 0.1031 0.0949 0.073 0.858
520 -13.00 -13.32 -1.164 -1.105 0.0308 0.0300 0.0005 -0.0078 0.076 0.895
521 -12.50 -12.85 -1.197 -1.138 0.0288 0.0280 -0.0191 -0.0272 0.076 0.900

NACA 0012 MODEL NO. 2 - CLEAN CONFIGURATION


TRIP AT X/C = 0.05 (BOTH UPPER AND LOWER SURFACES)

MACE Re xl0 -6
ALPHA u ALPHA CLu CL CDu cD c% cM

748 0.00 0.00 -0.006 -0.006 0.0081 0.0079 -0.0025 -0.0025 0.116 1.387
749 8.00 8.25 0.875 0.832 0.0108 0.0105 -0.0015 0.0051 0.116 1.386
750 8.00 8.25 0.880 0.837 0.0111 0.0108 -0.0025 0.0042 0.116 1.387
751 0.00 0.00 -0.006 -0.006 0.0109 0.0106 -0.0001 -0.0002 0.116 1.374
* 752 2.00 2.06 0.217 0.207 0.0111 0.0108 0.0007 0.0023 0.117 1.384
* 753 4.00 4.13 0.438 0.417 0.0115 0.0112 0.0004 0.0037 0.116 1.380
* 754 2.00 2.06 0.208 0.198 0.0110 0.0107 -0.0013 0.0003 0.117 1.385
* 755 4.00 4.12 0.430 0.409 0.0116 0.0113 -0.0012 0.0021 0.117 1.391
* 756 6.00 6.19 0.653 0.620 0.0136 0.0133 0.0006 0.0055 0.116 1.381
* 757 8.00 8.25 0.849 0.806 0.0139 0.0135 0.0045 0.0109 0.117 1.390
* 758 10.00 10.31 1.038 0.986 0.0176 0.0171 0.0083 0.0161 0.115 1.370
* 759 12.00 12.36 1.198 1.136 0.0247 0.0240 0.0139 0.0226 0.116 1.373
760 14.00 14.13 0.932 0.882 0.0318 0.0309 -0.1248 -0.1151 0.109 1.293
761 13.00 13.38 1.247 1.181 0.0299 0.0290 0.0167 0.0257 0.116 1.375
762 -4.00 -4.14 -0.463 -0.440 0.0125 0.0122 -0.0030 -0.0065 0.117 1.394
763 -8.00 -8.26 -0.856 -0.812 0.0173 0.0168 -0.0055 -0.0119 0.116 1.380
764 -13.00 -13.37 -1.190 -1.127 0.0283 0.0275 -0.0184 -0.0270 0.109 1.295
765 -14.00 -14.19 -0.939 -0.889 0.0318 0.0309 0.0728 0.0641 0.113 1.337
766 -12.00 -12.36 -1.174 -1.112 0.0285 0.0277 -0.0160 -0.0246 0.116 1.376

* NOTE: Pressure difference between transducers.

64
NACA 0012 MODEL hD. 2 - CLEAN CONFIGURATION
TRIP AT X/C = 0.05
TOTAL BOUNDARY LAYER PROBE VELOCITY PROFILES

RUN AOA X/C Re VEL U-EDGE 6 /C e/c


(deg) x10-6 (ft/s) (ft/s) xl03 xl03
788 3.85 0.03 1.43 131.8 151.8 3.20166 2.10189
789 3.85 0.03 1.41 130.7 151.1 3.21301 2.10328
790 3.85 0.02 1.42 131.6 163.9 2.15226 1.42940
791 3.85 0.02 1.42 131.1 163.3 2.33087 1.50410
792 3.85 0.02 1.42 131.3 162.9 2.37040 1.57792
793 3.85 0.02 1.41 130.8 162.8 2.76799 1.79168
794 3.85 0.01 1.42 131.2 162.7 1.53397 0.93361
795 3.85 0.01 1.42 131.0 163.9 1.69846 1.02513
796 3.85 0.00 1.42 131.3 194.0 0.77307 0.43989
797 3.85 0.00 1.43 132.5 194.8 0.88946 0.55715
798 -0.15 0.03 1.43 131.1 148.0 2.30661 1.57829
799 -0.15 0.03 1.43 132.4 147.9 2.28867 1.52718
801 -0.15 0.02 1.44 132.0 155.8 1.58051 1.03879
802 -0.15 0.02 1.43 130.4 155.5 1.80664 1.17000
803 -0.15 0.01 1.44 131.8 159.4 1.10019 0.67952
804 -0.15 0.01 1.44 131.6 159.4 1.24502 0.77926
805 -0.15 0.00 1.44 131.5 159.2 0.53174 0.24111
807 -0.15 0.00 1.44 131.6 159.8 0.62718 0.33051
808 -0.15 0.01 1.49 132.9 179.8 1.12362 0.65278
811 -0.15 0.02 1.48 132.8 168.2 1.72779 1.12934
812 -0.15 0.02 1.48 132.3 168.0 1.95480 1.22531
813 -0.15 0.03 1.48 132.2 155.4 2.63122 1.74612

65
APPENDIX B

PRESSUREDISTRIBUTIONS

Pir_l_;_i_NG PAGE BLANK NOT FILMED


RUN 0364

In= R0R -.00


M 0.13
RE 1.46
CL -.005
N.
CON 0.0078
CM 0.0003

IV.

ii,

eml

Q.

i
"o'. oo o'.ao d. 40 I

O. $0
|

O. 80
|

I . O0
X/c
RUN 0365

ROR -.00
in,

' H 0.13
RE 1.48
CL -.003
! CDN 0.0076
CI'I 0.0005

==
N.

eie
I

==
(l) I

=I

O
0
=A
I _ I

"0 O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 80 O, 80 t. O0
x/c
69
RUN 0366
==
_ ROR 1.03
I
H 0.13
RE 1.48
== CL 0,096
('ql,
COg O. 0078
CH 0.0017
==
4_11,

D
t_q
e
,zwq

(...,) I

O v

0
0

"o" oo o: zo o"40 o',so o',eo _'.oo


X/C
70
RUN 0367

ano
ROR 2.06
M 0.13
RE 1.49
o
M1 CL 0.198
I CON 0.0081
CM 0.0025

o
M1

OI

&
v V VVVW_Vv v vV & &A
IIII. v_ ,,,
o _V
%
Im
D

I- O0

71
RUN 0368

AOA

_e

M I
!

8
UI

i °

A
VVVVVVV V VV

oF
Q
. P
il !

O0 d.zo o:4o o:eo O. 8O 1 • O0


×/C
72
RUN 0369

== ROR 4.12
Irt°

M 0.13
RE 1.51
a
CL 0.414
I COH O. OO90
CM 0.0053

==
¢NI.

0
O
g-

oz

II I • I

"o O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 0 • 80 I • O0
X/C

73
RUN 0370
e ROR 5.15
In.

H 0.13
RE 1.50
== CL 0.511
¢M.
CON 0.0093
CH 0.0065

&

8
O I

O
ttl
"e
!

&

V
==
"- V
D

"_0,00 0o20 Oo 40 0o60 o80 ] • O0


X/C

"74
RUN 0371

ROA 6.18
M 0.13
RE 1.50
CL 0.622
CDI4 0.0096
0.0056

O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 80 1. O0
X/C

'75
RUN 0372
a
ml.
R0R 7.21
i
M 0.13
RE 1.50
o CL 0.?38
,11".
COH 0.0099
CM 0.0041

oo

&

O I
&

D
ml"

ID
rM
I.
em
V
V

ID
W
qD
Q,
R7
"o O0 o;ao 0'.40 0'.60 o:eo 1"oo
X/C

76
RUN 0373
O
ql"
R0R 8.24
I
M 0.13
RE 1.50
O
CL 0.829
1 C0H 0.0111
CM 0.0066

==
m.k
I

g
m. A
!

O..Odlo

vvvVVVV v vv

| | II i L
O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O. 80' 1. O0
×/C

7"7
RUN 0374
= ROR 9.27
U'I.

A 0.13
RE 1.50
== CL 0.917
,el'.
COH 0 0124
CM 0.0105

==
leIL
A

A
O...tM. A
(..tl

O
t
emq I
!

_m

&
AA A
O
N
"q
vv v__
O VVVVVVV V VV

:0 II

0.20
II

0.40
|

0.60 o'.eo z'.oo


X/C

78
RUN 0375

R0R 10.29
_ M 0.13

RE 1.49
CL 1.003
CON 0.0139
CM 0.0132

A
AA&

vv v_'_
Q9
0
VVVVVVVV VV

V V

o'.eo 1. oo
g,.d II V II |

O. O0 O. ZO 0'. 4.0 0.60


X/C

79
RUN 0376
8
e: R0R 11.32
I
M 0.13
RE 1.50
CL 1.080
I
C0H 0.0161
CM 0.0168

c..._! A

&&&A_ ...
VV V V'_F
vvvvvvv v vv

o'zo 0:40 o:eo |

O. O0
!

1. O0
X/C

8o
RUN 0377
g
12.35
M 0.13
RE 1.49
CL 1.159
COX 0.0200
CM 0.0212

A
A
a,
a,
a,

O
O

D
D
l..=I

VVVV_V v _ _V

, b
I | |

--© 0,20 0,40 O.tSO O. 8O 1. O0


X/C

81
D
RUN 0378
Q
laR
,l=,4,. R0R 13.37
I
H 0.13
O RE 1.49
O
CL 1.216
.=l,

I
CDH 0.0254
CH 0.0240
O
D
..a

t,q,
I

(.,)1

&

°oI VVVVVVV V VV V v v v ,,
":o{_v v o"=o o'.4o o"so o:eo _'.oo
X/C

82
RUN 0379

an° R0R 14.10


H 0.12
RE 1.41
a
In
CL 0.862
!
COH 0.0308
CH -. 1228

cM

b,

w,,,4_
I

8, A

oz A

i ° q,P
q, q7
V
O
O ___,Vq 7
O

q7

O'q

0. D0 0'.zo 0:40 I
O. 60
W
0.80
I
1. DO
X/C

83
RUN 0380

_ R0R 15.10
I

H 0.12
RE 1.39
_ CL 0.831
' CON 0-0362
CH --1220

Q
tit

i, mt
!

& &A
]'_PA"_"rA
"-_ A & A

_m

W
V
0
Q

_ v
Q
_ V

o,V
o._,
"o. oo o.ao
Ir

o'..o o'.eo |

1,00
×/C

84
RUN 0381
0
0
ROR 16.09
!
M 0.12
RE 1.39
CL 0.676
CDH 0.0416
CM -.0887

N.

0
o

qp=4

D
O
o

==
"l
0

:O.O0 '
O.ZO '
O.40 ' 60
O. 0'. 80 1'. O0
X/C

85
D
RUN 0382
O
U')
qlm4,
I
R0R 12.86
H 0.13
O
O
RE 1.50
CL 1.194
fml.
I
CDN 0.0227
O CH 0.0233
a

e
OZ.,
I

o.,:._
(,.11

$,

8
I

&

O
O

g
:0 a',ao 0"40 o:eo o'eo l', oo
X/C

86
RUN 0384
g
ROR 13.87
I
M 0.13
g RE 1.50
CL 1.234
CON 0. 0281
CM 0.0268

OI

==

Sp+H
,i;'
II • II I

• 00 0'. 20 O" 4,0 O. SO O. 80 1 • O0


X/C

87
RUN 0385

_, AOA 4.12
M 0.13
RE 1.47
CL 0.403
i_iIo
COH 0.0090
CM 0.0051

8.

8
0 !

&
0
0

_V
"I
0
V

o:20 o'.40 o'.6o d.eo 1'.oo


X/C
88
RUN 0386

al° ROR -.00


M 0.12
RE 1.45
CL -.006
CON 0.0070
CM O.OO04
8

mini
I

(.3 I

F
0
In

Oq

ir | I • I

0.20 0.40 0.60 O. 80 1 • O0


X/C

89
RUN 0387
==.
_, ROR -2.06
I
M 0.13
RE 1.46
==. CL -.217
(N,
COM 0.0076
CM -.0021
==.
¢_ll.
I

UI

,T°
•1 h,
0

"o_. ao
X/C

90
RUN 0388

°°- ROA -4.12


i M 0.12
RE 1.45
== CL -.417
COH 0.0073
CM -.0067

==

==

o.. '_
V

¢3
U'l
0=
!

==

¢3
O
II !

"1)oo o'.zo o",_o 0.60 0.80 I,O0


X/C

91
RUN 0389

ROR -6.18
(r),
' H 0.13
RE 1.46
Uigq CL -.650
N,
CON 0.0065
CM -.0038
V

V
0

UI
V
V
0

"=
! V

0
0

_d

":ooo O. 20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1. O0


X/C

92
RUN 0390
0
ql"
-8.24
I
0.13
1.47
-.857
ql".
0.0124
-.0055

D d
0

O0 20 O 40 ( 6O © 80 1.00
X/C

93
RUN 0391
==.
,'_ ROR -6- 19
I
M 0.13
RE 1.46
==.
7 CL -.651
t'M,

CON 0.0067
CM -.0039
==.
¢M

_=,11,

(.11

0
VV
"g
I

&
0

koo o',=o o'.40 o'.so _,eo 3'oo


×/C

94
RUN 0392

R0A -5.16
I
M 0.13
RE 1.45
== CL -.537
(_11.
I
C011 0. 0075
CH -. 0070
==
N
t 7

(3

" V
w=l.
!

v
==
IL.) I

¢3
In
"m
I

g
"I
O

==

"o"oo o:2o o'.4o o:eo o'.eo l'.oo


X/C

95
RUN 0393

ROR -10.30
M 0.13
RE 1.48
.= CL -1.032
qP
CDH 0.0166
CM -.0137
= iP'
al'J

(.)1 V

0
ql'
V
,BBI,
I
V
V

0
QID

Or
A,_,,, X • =,,¢,

O0 0.20 40 O, 60 80 l • O0
X/C

96
RUN 0394
_V
I/t, ROR -10.30
a
M 0.13
RE 1.46
CL -1.025
CON 0.0166
CM -.0139
==.
iP'
h,

==.
(n
V

I I I

oo c zo o:4o O. &O O. 80 1 • O0
X/C
97
RUN 0395

ROR -12.35
I
7 H 0.13
RE 1.46
CL -1.178
CON 0.0265
CH -.0200
4

(jI

8
e

I I I

O0 20 40 O. 60 O. 80 f. O0
X/C

98
RUN 0396

_ ROR -14.16

H 0.12
RE 1.35
CL -.963
CDH O. 0363
CH 0. 0960
7
0;
I 7

?-

,_
Q.N.
(_)t
V
o
ql-

o.zo 4. 40 o'.so o'.eo 1"oo


X/C

99
RUN 0397

_, ROR -15.17
!
M 0. II
RE 1.33
_'_ CL -1.002
t,
I
COH 0.0412
CM 0.0987
g
I

8 i7
!

(,jI V

=. V
g,q,

VVVV, VVV V V V

| |

O0 0.20 0.40 0.60


X/C

lOO
RUN 0398

ROA -13.37
' M 0.13

RE 1.46
CL -I-233
Imq_
I CON O. 0314
CM -.0248
D
0

g=4,
!

==
!

a-_ ?
¢..._
e

0
0

V
_m

o_ W'

__ W'W'W,W,

• O0 • 20 0.40 O. 60 0', 60 ] • O0
X/C

i01
BUN 0399
g
,,.,_. RCIR -13.87
M 0.12
IRE 1.36
CL -1.1P_9
g,,,,ll _

I COW O. 0339
CM -.0520
0

(..)' !

I 7

v
(r'_.

""o;-oo o. 20 o, 4o o. 60 o, ao z. oo
X/C

102
RUN 0400
O
D
R0R -.00
!
H 0.17
RE 2.02
CL -.014
t'ql
COg 0.0085
CM 0.0002

D
t_
m

_m
!

(,.11

_m

O
m
O
A.

V
O

_o_.oo o'.2o 0.40


|

0.60 e. ea z" 00
X/C

103
RUN 0401

ROR 1.03
I
M 0.17
RE 2.03
CL 0.093
N,
CON O. 0079
CH 0.0008

IJl

(,j I

_0" O0 0".20 0".40 0'6o. 0'80. ]'. O0


×/C

104
RUN 0402

_ ROA 2.06
M 0.17
RE 2.02
CL 0.194
CON 0.0081
CH 0.0020

0
In
ii

iml,
I

UI

"m
0

"_; oo o' 2o o'.4o o'.so o"so |

1. O0
X/C

105
RUN 0403

_, ROR 3.08
M 0.17
RE 2.02
== CL 0.287
CON O. 0084
CM 0.0024
8
!

Q
14t
M
!

&

==V
QI
Q

g
oo
X/C

106
RUN 0404

_ I:IOR 4.11
I
H 0.17
RE 2.02
CL 0.388
¢M
CON O. 0085
CH 0.0037

0 I

0
a
O

c)Z V
_..
oW

gv
"0. O0 d,2o' o'.40 o'.60 o'.oo 1',oo
X/C

107
RUN 0405
8
_r_4

I •ClOll 5.14
M 0.17
/:rE 2.01
qNI CL 0.499
CDH O. 0096
CM 0.0054

5]

o'.so o'.eo _. oo

108
RUN 0406

g
m, ROR 6.17
M O. t7
RE 2.02
CL 0.594
CON 0.0097
CR 0.0048
0
&

&

==
I

(,jI

V
V

¢3
¢3 F
IP II |

O0 o, zo o; 40 o', so o, so 't. oo
k'/C

109
RUN 0407

= ROR 7.20
!
M 0.17
RE 2.01
CL 0.708
qll',
COH 0.0097
CM 0.0045

_N. A

0
t
qlmt

_V

VWW
V
oo o;:,o o"40 o'.eo o'.eo 1'.oo
X/C

110
RUN 0408
O
t
ROR 7.20
I
M 0.17
RE 1.96
CL 0.710
ql'.
CON 0.0087
CM 0.0044

In,

O
O

D
t

g
tl ' II II | II

"0 O0 O. 20 0'. 40 O. 60 O. 80 1 • O0
X/C

iii
RUN 0409
0
0

rl,
I
ROR 5.14
M 0.17
RE 1.96
CL 0.499
CON 0.0085
CH 0.0050

&
0
0

|
O. 20 o:,,o o'eo ]. O0
X/C

112
RUN 0410
O
D
R0R 3.08
!
M 0.17
RE 1.96
== CL 0.286
¢M
COH 0.0081
CM 0.OO23

==
¢M

D
U't
m

8
O !

&

"e
O

p,
==7
:0 00 |

0.20

0.40

0.60
|

0.80
|

1. O0
X/C

113
RUN 0412

ROR -. O0
!
M 0.17
RE 1.98
CL -.004
COil O. 0074
CH 0.0004

0
141

UI

0
Itl
!

# • 11
O. 60 O. 80 ) • O0

114
RUN 0413

R0R 8.23
M 0.17
RE 1.96
CL 0.803
COX 0.0109
CM 0.0062

AA,_

vvvVVVV qp, vv vv _

g
"o oo o. _o o'.eo _'.eo 2- O0
X/C

115
RUN 04]4

_ ROR -2.06
I
M 0.17
RE 1.97
CL -.213
COkl 0. 0069
CM -. 0016

0
IA

,Ill
!

%
O

4&

O
|

00 0.20 O. 40 o' so o: ea 1'. oo


X/C

116
RUN 0415

lr)° ROR -2.06


M 0.17
RE 1.96
CL -.212

COW 0.0074
CM -.0016
g
N

O
Ifl

g
n ,_,,
OI

o

¢1

Ir | _' g •

":o:oo 0.20 0.40 0.80 0.80 1.00


X/C

117
RUN 0416

In. ROR -4.12


M 0.17
RE 1.97
CL -. 401
COla O. 0080
CM -. 0044

8.
_'"J
r.je
7 V

_,L
"o. oo II

0,20
g

0, 40

0.80 o" 8o I.O0


x/c

118
RUN 0417
0
0

ROR -6.18
I
H 0.17
RE 1.98
CL -.616
nl

7 COH 0.0083
p, CM -,0061
0
w
0

&
I

0
W
I/b

Iml
I

W
(.1 I
V

_W w
V
V
V V

eel
0

g | • !

O.O0 0.20 0.40 a. s0 o; no t. oo


X/C

119
RUN 0418
=.
m, AOA -8.24
M 0.17
RE 1.97
CL -.827
CDH 0.0111
CM -. 0,059

IJ I
d

o
i1"
W_ m
I

_m

V
VW

0
I
0.40
X/C

120
RUN 0420
o

ROA 9.26
M 0.16

RE 1.95
CL 0.886
qlk.
! COW 0.0116

& CM 0.0089

trl.

(_) !

o
W

0
'7

o VV,_,WVV v W V'_

0 O0 O" 20 O. 40 O. 60 0'. eO 1 , O0
X/C

121
RUN 042t
0

In, ROR t0.28


I
R O. t6
k RE 1.95
0
W
CL 0.967
I
COW 0.0t37
CH 0.0120
0

I I II • I

"0. O0 O, 20 0',40 O. 80 O, 8 0 I . O0
X/C

122
RUN 0422
o
o
ROR 11.31
!
M 0.16
RE 1.94
CL 1.04-6
COW 0.0154
CM 0.0146

==
It'_

==
Iz

(...)

%
I

t=
0
0
7
v_vVVVV V VV
V
V
g | g
jr I
O0 0.20 O. 40 O, 60 O. BO I.,O0
X/C

123
RUN O423

AOA 12.33
0.16
fie 1.94
CL 1. t27
COW 0.0179
CM 0.0176

_a

"!

AAA,a ,a ,=,=,=
9"9" 9" 9" 9,e',e
v9"vvg'9"9 . 9' 9"9'
9"

J ! • II I

O0 O. 20 0.40 0.60 0.00


×/c

124
RUN 0425
==
ROR 13 36
I'

H 0116
RE
CL 1 I 94
93
let
gil
! CDN 0.02t4
CR 0,0204
0
O

leq
!

==

tt I'_.
O0

d_
o_ x

==.
In.

VV VV v.-

II • g |

0.20 O. 40 O, 60 0.80 1", O0


X/C

125
RUN 0426
O
I1"
u; R0R 14.15
!
M 0.15
RE 1.75
== CL 0.917
roll',
COH 0.0249
CM -.0963

_q

==
Irll°

{.}!
,A

I==D 4
I

O
m &A & &
!

v
WV VW
i, el

VVWVVVV _ v-
V
V
==
"0 O0 o:zo 0'.40 o'6o o'.eo !
1,00
k'/C

126
RUN 0427
o
qP
ROR t3.6B
M O.t5
RE t.79

CL 0.983
CON 0 O232
CM -.OBSO

(:
¢:

,Jk
o

¢:)
W
Om
!

7
'_p'V
VV

VVV_V,97_ _v

I xip,

= V

| • W II

-'0, O0 O. 20" 0.40 O. 60 O. 80 ! . OO


X/C

127
RUN 0428
O
ml.

R0R -10.29
M 0.17
q

RE 1.96
==. CL -.986
q,.,

C0H 0.0161
CM -.0113
==.
(Ill.
I

O
O

(=)i
W

O
ml" V
,wq

==
W

A .,_&A

o:4o 0'.so o'.eo 1


) .00
X/C

128
RUN O429
0

_.Ii7 ROR -10.29


!
H 0.17
4;,
RE 1.96
CL -.985
qP,

COW 0.0161
CH -.0109

tW),
!
V

0
0

V.-,

o;80 I' . O0
! | |

O. 20 O. 40 O. 60
X/C

129
RUN 0430

ROR -12.34
I
M 0.17
p,
RE t.96
CL -1.142
COW 0.0221
CM -.0183
==
V)
!

g v
n In.
cJ, e

sip,

Vsi;,

g | |
O0 O. 20 O. 4,0 O. 60 O, 80 1. O0
X/C

130
RUN 0431
o

ROll -14.20
M 0.15
RE L.80
CL -1..054
qii,.
COW O. 0281
CM 0.0822

lel,

lr,_) !

xi7
o

!
xp'

WVWWVWW W WW xp'
Io

O. O0 0'. O0 1', O0

131
RUN 0432
V

rc R0R -13.36
M 0.17
RE 1.95
CL -1.205
COW 0.0251
CM -.0200
O
O

ql),,

(..) I

V
O
O

V
V
¢mmB

m_

V V
V _ .,.=--A
_!b,
A _b,A _ '=""

I • !
o: 20 0,80 O. 80 1.00

132
RUN 0433

ROR -t3 87

_= RE
M t 95
0117.
CL 1 28
!
COW O. 0267
CH -.0218
0
0

¢=
0
I' "1" T I
O. O0 O, 20 O, 40 O, 60 O, 80 I . O0
X/C

133
RUN 0434
¢3
Ca
ROR -.02
I
H 0.13
RE 1.48
CL - 037
7 CDH 0.0274

CH -.0106
Ca
Ca

¢3
In

Ca
Ca

a_,=,
(..,1 !

Ca
tn

Ca
V
in

6
V

Ca
Ca
I p ! ! ! i
2O O, O0 0.20 0.40 0.60 O, 80 ] ,00
X/C

134
RUN 0435
0
ASA 4.12
l
M 0.13
RE 1.47
CL 0.361
I COW 0.0387
CM 0,0158

0
in

(_) !

0
L¢)
%

0
0
e_
0

o=
0

0
0
• _ | | |

2O 0,00 O. 20 O. 4,0 O, 50 O. 80 1 • O0
X/C

135
RUN 0436

$,v'l. ROR 4, 12
M 0.12
RE 1.42
0
CL 0,364
CDN O. 0389
CM 0,0164
0
0

0
U3

Q
In

0
0

¢:3
U')
•m
0

V
0
0
II t
-.20 D, O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 80 O, 80
X/C

136
RUN 0437
0

ROR 4.12
M 0.12
RE 1.42
o
In
CL 0.361
!
COH 0.0389
CM 0.0171
0
0

0
In

(,.)l

o
0

"I
0

v
o
0

| f |
m 2O O. O0 0.20 O, 40 O. 60 0.80 1. O0
X/C

137
RUN 0438
==
Ir;. ROR 4.12
I'! 0.12
RE 1.42
= CL 0.361
l"tl.

COW 0.0379
CH 0.0159
0
0

¢:_
In
o

0
0

h .,..°
¢..jl

0
In
$

Om

=_ ,a=,_,
'm
o

==J -.20 0.00 0.20


II |
O. 40 0.60 0.80 1.00
X/C

138
RUN 0439
==
_ A0A -.02
M 0.12
RE 1.43
O
CL -.041
! COW 0.025t
CM -.0104
O
O

O !

o
10'1

¢=
D
Bm
v
O

o
bo
¢_-
v

o
O
B-
¥ J | • |
|
o 2O 0.00 0.20 0.40 0,60 ft.80 1. O0
X/C

139
RUN 0440
0
(=

ROR 1.01
M 0.12
RE 1.43
CL 0.066
COW 0.0254
CM -.0050
g
N.

O
it)

(.,%1

0
V)

O
C=
B-

O
V

'a V
O

V
A

I I • • IF
O.20 O. 40 O. ¢0 0.80 I. 00
X/C

140
RUN 0441

ROR 2.05
M 0.12
RE 1.43
0
tit CL 0.167
,G
I COW 0.0275
CM 0.0019

A
0
O VVV VVVVV VV
If'=
0

"d
O

V
0
0
II i !
2O
|

O, O0 0:20 0'.40 0.e0 O, O0 1, oo


X/C

141
RUN 0442
==
"I A0A 3.08
M 0.12
RE 1.46
r_ll.
CL 0.260
CON 0.0324
CM 0.0084

(:

g
a..=..
(.,)!

¢:
In

A
O
¢=
A A
O
O-
W
vvvvvv v vv vvA__,
v
=;-

O
O
l,
II
an 2O O. O0 0.20 •

O. 40

O, $0
|

O. $0
|

I . O0
×/C

142
RUN 0443

Pl. ROR 4.12


M 0.12
RE 1.46
CL 0.360
CDW 0.0393
CM 0.0167

I%1

(:
If)

ira0

A
0 !
A

0
O v v_iz_zv_z _z vv
II I ,,_ _ _i z
0 v v _7"

_V
eq
O

V
0
0
| |
W,4
2O 0.00 O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 0.80 z'oo
X/C

143
RUN 0444

_'. AOA 5 15
I

FI 0.12
RE [ .45

N
CL 0.452
CDN 0. 0520
CH 0.0207

N.

O
It)

O..M.
(,.)!

O
If}

O
O V
O

Z_
"l
¢D

O. 20 O. 40 0.60 O. 80 I .00
X/C

144
RUN 0445

_ AOA 6.16
M 0.12
fie 1.44
CL 0.$21
COW 0.0735
CM 0.0112

N,

(__1
%
%
0

0
0
e-
._._,ii;,,_,VV
siP'
VV
0 v
V

Bi
0
V

0
O

2O 0.00 0.20 O. 40 O. 60 0.80 I . O0


X/C

145
RUN 0446
==
,,; AOA 7.14
I

M 0.12
RE 1.43
CL 0.561
I
CDW 0.1092
CM -.0201
0
O
i

ol
e,,,i

a.. t,.i.
(..}1

O
If}

I A

¢}
O V
e_
_,vyVV V V VV
¢D V v

A
"I
O
V

_ W vl • 1 1
-. 20 O. O0 0.20 0.40 O. 80 O. 80 1 . O0
X/C

146
RUN 0447

m ROR 8.10
M 0. t2
RE t.44
0
t_
CL 0.535
&
I
COW O. t 442
CM -.0485

g
d'_ll.

0
if)

==
A ,q.
tr,_l

o V
o VVVVVV V VV
v
o V

",=
Q

O. O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O, 80 I. O0
X/C

147
RUN 0448
O
O

ROR 9.07
M 0.12
RE 1.43
CL 0.479
CON 0.1787
CM -.0633

O
In

0
0
p_

V
v

"a
O

V
0
O

• • | g
i 2O O. O0 O. 20 0'. 40 O. 60 O, 80 1 . O0
×/C

148
RUN 0449
g
,,;. R0R -.02
H O. t2
RE t.48

B
CL -.036
N.
CDW 0.0263
CH -.0096
g
¢,

N,

O
¥1

Iml

(_)1

O
Vl

I
A

O
O
g'==
V
O

"I
O
V

¢:) R
O
z_ , I
• g

m 2O 0.00 o. 20 o: 40 o. so 0.80 I .00


X/C

149
RUN 0450
g
ROR -2.09
H 0.12
RE I. 48
CL -.238
N.
C0N 0.0335
CM -.0187
g
_11,.
I

e-I,,
I

(,.)1

O
D-
O

B,
O

W'

¢D Z_
O
,4k
II g • • l

o 2O O. O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O. 80 ! . O0
X/C

150
RUN 0451
==
Irl. ROR -4.14
I,I O. t2
RE I .48
= CL -.420
CDW 0.0479
CM -.0220

O
If)

II"q
I

g v
'9'
h 0,.0. ,i7

O v
It3 sit
!
v
v
v

O
O
IP m
¢D

IP I
v
O

A
O
D
| |
eml
am, 20 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0, e0 1" 0o
X/C

151
RUN 0452
O
Q

@0R -4.14
!

M 0.12
RE 1.41
CL -.420
N,

COH 0.0487
CM -.0230

N.

O
It}

$,,,l,

(_)!

w'

el
O

A_
O
Q
B-- A_
I 20 o: oo o" 20 o: 40 o: oo o', 80 1.' O0
X/C

152
RUN 0453

Ira. ROR -6.13


M 0.12
RE 1.39
=
I_Jl..
CL -,544
CDW 0,0627
CM 0.0171

O
In

O
0
t,

fll =,.,.
(..)t _VV V

V
V V

II
Q
a_

o
o ax
|

- 20 O. O0 O. 20 o',4o O. 60 O. 80 I. O0
×/C

153
RUN 0454

m,
|
ROR -8 "
06 .

N 0.12
RE 1.38

N,
CL -.486
CON 0. 0769
CN 0.0500
g
B

N,

O
if)

(.11
v v
vv
O 'q__ii_vvv V v vv
tr) v
v

'w
A
0

o
Od

A
O &
0

_. ao o'.40 o"so II W
m 20 O, O0 O, 80 1.00
X/C

154
RUN O455
g
II1.
ROA -7.11
M 0.12
RE 1.38
CL -.515
COW 0.0698
CM 0.0284

I1_11°

O v
O

(L ,"..
(,.)! v

V _ VVVV V
V V V
O V VV
!
V V

Z_AAA

I
0, II0 ! .00

155
RUN 0456

01, ROR -6.13


N 0.12
RE 1.39
CL -.547
CON 0.0627
CN 0.0185
g
N

In

it,..) !

V V
V
V

o
= A
• w w | @ w
- • 20 O, O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O. 80 I . O0
X/C

156
RUN 0457
O
O
R0R -5.15
!
M 0,12
RE 1.40
CL -.505
I%11.
COW 0.0662
CM -.0079

s
fill.

O
tt_

O
C} VV
V
(.I_! V
'qF
V
O
In 'W V

V
O
v
O _A
O

v{=
",=
O

O
O

a 2O o'.00 o'.2o o;40 0"=0 e

O. II0
|

1. O0
X/C

157
RUN 0458
g
je'l. R011 -.02
H 0.16
RE 1.88
CL -.041
N.
CDH 0.0265
CH -.0102

N.

g
a_ e-_,.
OI

v
O

O
O
V
O

'W

O
M
O ,A
|
a 2O O. O0 O. 20 0". 40 O. 60 O. 80 I. O0
X/C

158
RUN 0459

_. ROR 2.05
H 0.16
RE 1.88
CL O. 159
I COW 0.0279
CH 0.0020

==
Jl_J..

(:
Ift

O'q,,
I

==
rt.q°
(,..1 !

(:

0 V
A
V
O
0 X
F I II I
=m 20 0', O0 O, 20 O, 40 O. 60 O. 80 l , O0
X/C

159
i
RUN 0460
(=
O

ROR 4.11
!

M 0.16
RE 1.87
CL 0.345
hi,

COW 0.0405
CM 0.0158
oo

O
if)

A
A
(..)!
A
A
O
W

V
(=
m
vvvvvv v vv
O V V
V

a_v
B.
O

w'
(=
O
| J | • W II
m 2O 0.00 0.20 O. 40 O. 60 0.80 [. 00
X/C

160
RUN 0461

_, AOA 6.15
I
H 0.16
fie 1.84
CL 0.504
N.
COW 0.0741
CM 0.0088

_II.
I

O
If)

0
0

9,

Oqi
0 9,

9'
O
O
.I II

n 2O O. O0 O: 20 O: 40 O" [0 0", O0 1; O0
X/C

161
RUN 0462
==
w; R0R

N.

==
IM.

trt

¢D
O

A =-%
rJ8

O
IT1

"9
0

g • |

O, 20 O. 40 I . O0
×/C

162
RUN 0463

==
_, AOA 7.12
M 0.16
RE I .81
=. CL 0.532
N
CON 0.0908
CM -.0244
o
O

==
ai .,q.
¢_)1

o
o VV
• =
V_,VVVV V VV
o
V

II' d

V
o
Q
0_
ir | • ! I
,i= 20 0.00 0.20 O. 40 O. 80 O. 80 t . O0
X/C

163
RUN 0464

,,; R0R 9.06


I
M 0. t5
RE t.78
= CL 0.455
N
CDW 0. t 237
CM -.06t8
g
N,

O
W

(_1) 1
A

O
W
AA a_ a_ a_
I

V V VV vv Vv
O V V VVVVV
¢=
V V w
V

=;- AV

-.20 0,00 o',2o 0,40 O. 80 o_80


|

1,00
X/C

164
RUN 0465
O
O

ROR -2.08
I
M 0.16
RE 1.87
CL -.226
(RJ,

CON 0.0332
CM -.0192
g
N,

O
If')

(,J) l

"I
O

O
d_
0 zh
• • _ I II
m 20 O. O0 O. 20 O. 40 0 _60 O. 80 I. O0
X/C

165
RUN 0466
0
0

ROR -2.09
M 0.16
RE 1.90

a%ll.
CL -.227
COW 0.0332
CM -.0194

_U

qlme
!

==
n ,..i.
O!

v
v

;' w

vv

_p,

0
tD

• | • • • II
i
20 O. O0 O. 20 O. 40 O, 60 O. 80 1. O0
X/C

166
RUN 0467
g
IRI. ROR -4.14
M 0.16
RE t.89
CL -,40t
N.
CON 0.0490
CM -.0225
g
N

O
If)

e,,e,m
I

g
1%,".
(_1) 1 V

a_

O=1
O

O
O

e,_4 I | |
Ill 20 O. 20 O. 40 O. IrO O. 80 1.. 00
X/C

167
RUN 0468
==
dell. R0R -6. t5
M 0. t6
RE t.86

N,
CL -.5t3
COW 0.0806
CM -.0002
==
N.

It}

@=I,6
I

V
g
It i,-%
f__ltl
V V V

O V
B V
I V

V VV
V

AAA
,=;-

I1= m
O

Q A
Q

• | • t | |
m 2O O. O0 O.20 O.40 O.60 O. 80 1. O0
X/C

168
RUN 0469

== ROR -8.16
01°

N O. t5
RE t,83
CL -,60t
COW O. ttt7
CM 0.0t35

==
fU°

O
If)

V
¢..)1

V VV V

Oe
O

Oe
O

0
O

m 20
|

0.00 o"=o o"40 o; eo o: eo ;. oo


X/C

169
RUN 0470
0
O

ROR -9.16
H 0.15
RE 1.81
CL -.640
INI,

CON 0.1271
CM 0.0221
g
&

Ill
e

iI_l I
!

O!

V V
V
V
0 V

! V

0
0

.;; , .
-. 20 o. oo o. 20 o'.40 o. eo o" 8o II

I .00
1(/12

170
RUN 0471
==
_ ROA -10.16
M 0.15
RE 1.78
0
CL -.676
!
CON O. 1424
CM 0.0294

==

I
V

g
fll .-=.
(.)!

0
In
V
! V
V VV

AAAAA
(D
0 n
A
(P-

el
0

0
0
0=

am 2O 0: oo 0.20 0.40 0.60 0,80 1. O0


X/C

171
RUN 0472
g
_I ROR -tO 05
M 0.15
RE 1.79
_. CL -,384
I COW 0.1424
CM 0.0496

&
I

O
If')

4me

g
0..,"

172
RUN 0473
g
,';
I
AOA -8.10
M 0.15
RE 1.81
= CL -.508
t%;.

COW 0.1117
CM 0,0435
==
&

O
If)

(.,)!

O
0

B=m
0

(:
A
O

am 2O o"oo o"ao o:40 d. G;o d. eo 1'.oo


X/C

173
RUN 0474
O

I
ROR -6.13
M 0.16
RE 1.86

N.
CL -.504
COW 0.0865
CM 0.0101
g

¢D

(.)l

O
V
I
V V

V V V

O
O A
• I I • I
I
20 O. O0 0.20 O" 40 O. tIO O. 80 I . O0
X/C

174
RUN 0475

let. ROR -4.14


M 0.16
RE 1.89
CL -.403
COW 0.0490
CM -.0211
g

O
if)

f-e

(.11

O V
V)
V 'W
V

db
_p'
O

O
O A
"i
|
emJ
am 20 O.O0 0.20 0.40 0, 80 0.80 1.00
X/C

175
RUN 0476
g
R0R -7,13
M 0,16
RE 1.84

CL -,546
CON 0,0909
CM 0,0211
g
N

(jI

o V V
V
VV
V V
V

Oe

0
A
liP_

m
2o o:oo o'2o o: 4o o:eo 0:80 1".oo
X/C

176
RUN 0477
O

R0R -,02
I
M 0.07
RE 0.85
=. CL -.046
N.
C0W 0.0243
CM -.0[06
g
N.

¢_
It}

(.)1

O
In

e-

v
Oi
O
v

O
O
o.J A

• I |
,=l 2O O. 00 o. 20 d, 40 0.60 O. 80 l_OO
X/C

177
RUN 0478
g
_, AOA 2.05
H 0.08
RE 0.85
CL O. I73
('M°
I
CON 0.027I
CH 0.0015
==
!

==
(_,. =-I.

0
In

_1 VVVV_'V V VV AA

"==
o
V
A
V

"-. 20 O. 80 I. O0
X/C

178
RUN 0479
==
01. ROR 4.12
M 0.07
RE 0.05
CL 0.375
COW 0.0301
CM 0.0160
g
Jill,

Ilml_
I

(,,,,) !

0
I¢l

,A
V A
O AA
0 v _yvvvvv v vv
O
ll-
v
V V

II I
AV
0

V
0
0
"i
| I

20 oo •

O, 20
B

O, 40
|

O. 60 O. 80 !. O0
×/C

179
RUN 0480

";I ROR 6 •
1,7
H 0,07
RE 0,84

RJ.
CL 0,542
CDN O. 0693
CH 0.01.60
=o

o
It')
,lime

(.,)!

•e
Q
V

ImP

O0
X/C

180
RUN 0481

_- ROR 8.11
I

H 0.07
RE 0.83
0

CL 0 558
NI

' CON 0.1001


CH -,O432
g
d_l

(_,)1

0
In

O0
X/C

181
RUN 0482
g
lrl. ROR g.08
H 0.07
RE 0.83
N.
CL 0.533
COIl 0.1156
CH -.0668
g
&
!

¢D
W

¢=
¢D
LM.
(Jr

O
It)

V'W'
V
yV, VVV V _' VV
v

II, g
o

o
v
¢D
B

- 20 _. 0o o:2o O. 40 O. 80
iW

O. 80
|

1.00
X/C

182
RUN 0483
g
WI. R0R 7.14
M 0.07
RE 0.84
CL 0.586
N.
COW 0.0846
CM -.0192
g
&

(.,)1

¢D

VV
V _vvvvvv vv
o
v v

A
"I
a
v

O0
X/C

183
RUN 0464

Ill. ROR -2.09


H 0.07
RE 0.85
N.
CL -.256
CDW 0.0294
CH -.0203
O

&
!

¢D
It)
iml

(.,)1

v
,=;-

== A
.:_-20 .,..
-0. O0 o:20 o"40
' o:so o'.eo 1'. 00
X/C

184
RUN 0485
00
In. FIOFI -4.15
M 0.07
BE 0.84
CL -.445
C0W 0.0462
CM -.0237
g
&

O
If)

,lime

V
fll t-i.
(_11

0 V V
VZ

VV
V
V V VV
Q
O
Om
.A"
O

el
¢
0

.=
..:'; ,C,-, i ,
-. 20 O, O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 80 O. 80 ! . O0
XlC

185
RUN 0486
o
o
_Blla

I
ROR -6.14
M 0.07
RE 0.83
=
¢M CL -.566
CON O. 0807
CM 0,0167
==
N,

0
if)
M

¢D
0
L"%
O!
VVVVVV

V
O V v
In
I 'w'V

'v'
V V

o
o

I ill I1 | II
-. 20 O. O0 O_20 O, 4O O. 60 O; 80 1, O0
X/C

186
RUN O487
g
Iw). ROR -8.07
M 0,07
RE 0.83
CL -.494
N.
COW O. tOOt
CM 0.0592
g

(I=.l
I

g
tie-..
OI

_ VVVVVVV V VV
0 V V
it)
V_F
V

O
¢D V
0==

0
It}
",m

0
O
II_
4me
-,20 O, O0 o. 20 0',40 o, so o',eo t" oo
X/C

187
RUN 0488
==
in. ROll -7. t0
M 0.07
RE 0.83
= CL -.546
N,

COW 0.0846
CH 0.0470
g
(NI,

O
Vt

I=l
!

g
0_==%
¢.1!
V
'_p_'vvvvvv V
V
O
In

VV
V
V

O V AAAAA
O

8
BI
O

O
O
B- A
| II • e |
20 O, O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O. 80 1, O0
X/C

188
RUN O489
g
let. ROR -5.17
M 0.07
RE 0.84
CL -.535
CON 0.0646
CM -.0132
g

ql"q I
!

__iVv V
v
(..31 v

v
0
t_
v
v
v

0
O

m 2o o. oo o: 20 o"40 o'.oo d. eo ;', oo


X/C

189
RUN 0490

an. ROR -,03


N 0,07
RE 0.86

& CL -,047
CDH 0.0243
CN -.Or07
g
&

o
In

g
D

0,.'.
C.)I

Q
In
II e
I

o
o
v '%
O-

o
v

"-'. ao "_. oo d.ao 0:40 o:eo o'.eo t'.oo


X/C

190
RUN 0491
O
O

ROR 2.05
I
M 0.07
RE 0.86
CL 0.169
N,
COW 0.0271
CM 0,0023

N.

O
IO
D

g,ml
I

g
D

(.jl
A

O
IO

V
O
O
"=
O

el
O
V
A
V
O
O

| |
- 20 o'.20 o',40 o: So O. 80 1. O0
X/C

191
RUN 0492
O

ROR 4.12
H 0.07

¢D
RE 0.86
t_
CL 0.378
N.
!
C01,1 0.0381
CH 0.0168
g
N,

A
== A
n M°
(..)l

v A
O A&
V,V,V'_'v'_' 'w' 'tiTv V VA_,_ A
v v

B!

" .00
X/C

192 C --_
flUN 0493
g
el. ROA 6.17
H 0.07
RE 0.85
CL 0.549
d'_a..
COW 0.0693
CPI 0.0155

0
If)

,Imm I
!

n ,-,o
(_1!

o
In

?,-,

0
V

O E'
0

20 _ oo g.20 (/.40 o'.so o:oo 1'.00


X/C

193
RUN 0494
g
I
AOA -4.15
M 0.07
IRE 0.86
CL -.444
COW 0.0462
CM -.0238
g

IL,', v

O v v

' I"

v
v V Vv

Vl
ell

e,moll W I _ II II |

, 20 . O0 O. 20 O. 40 O, 60 O. 80 1, O0
X/C

194
RUN 0495
g
_, R0R -2.09
N 0.07
RE 0.86
CL -.245
N
CDN 0.0294
CH -.021!
g
N,

O
IfJ

V
"a
0

0
0

o 20 _b I . O0 0.20
| O, 40
| O. 60
II O, 80
| 1 , O0
I_

X/C

195
RUN 0500

ROR -.00
N 0.08
RE 0.87
CL -.010

CON 0.0076
CH 0.0005
0
O

N
I

O
if)

gaul
I

¢..)1

0
if)

1,00
X/C

196
RUN 0501
g
415. R0R 2.06
H 0.08
RE 0.87
CL 0.203
N.
CON 0. 0075
CM 0.0028
==
N.

g
0.. ".
(.,)1

'v' ,_

""""" -- ;+.,÷%
V

•m
o

7
o
0,),
04

"o, oo O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O. 80 I'. O0
X/C

197
RUN 0502
g
In. R0R 4.12
H 0.08
RE 0.87
CL 0.415
N.
CDH 0.0086
CH 0.0060
g
No

&

X/C

198
RUN 0503
g
,;, ROR 6.19
' N 0.08
RE 0.88
CL 0.659
CDW 0.0087
CN 0.0024

"I
0

0
III II

O0 0.20 O, 40 0.80 I. O0
X/C

199
RUN 0504

"! AOA 8 24
H 0.08
RE O. 87
ql"° CL 0.846
CDH O. 0126
CH O. 0084

(,.,) !

• III | g

O. O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 80 O. 80 I. O0
X/C

200
RUN 0505

1o.3o
H 0 08
RE 0.88
B CL 1.010
qlk,
CDI, I 0.0161
CN 0.0160

Irl,

Z_
A

a_AZ_AA .,.
V VV kVV V V _'*'_

I If I

0.40 0.60 0.80 I . 00


X/C

201
RUN 0506

ROR 10.30
M 0.08
r
RE 0.88
CL 1.010
ql',

CDW 0.0165
CM 0.0166

In,

0
A
_I_ I
I

A
A
Ak
A_
Q..N. A
_k=,1 l
A

0
,11,
%
Ole i
I

"0. 0 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 I .00


X/C

202
RUN 0507
g
ROR 12.34
H 0.08
RE 0.87
CL 1.131
lID,
! CON 0.0238
CH 0.0247
g
if),

as

g
O. eql.
(=,It I as
as
as
o
o

O
0

0', 80 l', O0
X/C

203
RUN 0508
g
in. ROR 14.12
H 0.07
RE 0.63
CL 0,800

COil 0,03[0
CH -, 0946
g
&

AAAA,

vV V
o
e- VVV V VV
o

v
Be
v
j7
v

0.20 o: 4o o: 8o o'.eo t'. oo


X/C

204
RUN 0509
O
0
l:iOR t 3.32
H 0.08
RE O. 87
g CL ! 1 08
W,
t COW 0.0274
CH 0,0094
0

o _P'
o, v
"0, 0 O. 40 O. 60 O. I10 1. O0
X/C

205
RUN 0510
g
ROR 12.84
N 0.08
RE 0.87
g
,=; CL 1.129
CON 0.0256
CN 0.0251
==

=
,e,,,

g
LW!.
(.1tl

o
o
DI
0

0 V
.o.____V .
I e •

O. 60 O. 80 1. O0
O. aO O. 20 O. ,;0x / C

206
RUN 051 !
g
Irl,. R0R -2.06
H 0.08
RE 0.88
CL -.222
N..
CDN 0.0080
CM -.0026

IP'•,
!

g
0.. ,,_°
iL,)I

odk

"0 oo o"2o o'.4o d.eo d.eo 1:oo


X/C

207
RUN 0512
o

I
ROR -4.13
N 0.08
RE 0.90

N.
CL -.431
CDW 0.0098
CN -.0067
g
N.

0
in

(l==e ,=
I
9'

9'
g
•q

L0"l.

9"

A
A
=;-

=
-6 g

o. 2o 0.40 o. 60
g

0.80
|

1.00
X/C

208
RUN 0513

_, ROR -6, 19
H O,08
RE 0,90
_q
CL -.68!
COW 0.0t34
CN 0,0009
V

IR/,

9'

In

9'

O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. $0 O. 80 l . O0
X/C

209
RUN 0514
==
Imo ROR -6.19
M 0.08
RE 0.89
&, CL -.677
COW 0.0130
CM 0.0008
V

N,

O
If}

g
IB. J",
¢JI
V
V
V
VV
V
V

0.20 O. 40 O. 80 O. 80 1.00
X/C

210
RUN 0515
g
Ira.
ROR 4.t2
H 0.08
RE 0.90
CL 0.4t3
N.
COW 0.0078
CH 0.0055

N.

_w
V

o=
0 ILIII
/
_.oo o.2o o:4o o:eo o.eo 1.00
X/C

211
RUN 0516

If'l. ROR -8.25


M 0.08
RE 0.90

ql.,
CL -.866
CON 0.0142

CM -.0093

B_

in,

==.
in,

¢J;4

V
'V'
0
g

oo 0.20 0.40 O. 60 O. 80 1.00


X/C

212
RUN 0517

gOR -10.31
I
V M 0.08
RE 0,90
CL -1.040
raP',
COH 0.0187
CM -.0173

let.
!
A&

g
dWl.
I
V

O..N.
V

o v
ml.

I I I I
O, 20 O"40 O. 60 O. 80 1. O0
X/C

213
RUN 0518
O
¢D
ROl:i -12.35
!
H 0.08
RE 0.89
g CL -1. 150
@

BD,
CDW 0,0262
CH -,0246
g
oL

v
_..m.
(,.t!

g
N.

v
v
'v V
_,_ vv v v _'-"-

":o."_"Lo o"20 o; ,o o"so ,;. ,o 1".oo


X/C

214
RUN 05t9
g
011. ROR -14.12
!
H 0.07
RE 0.86
0
It)
CL -.604
&
!
CDN 0.0336
CH 0.0949
g
&
!

¢D
It}

?
0
V V
V V V
V V
VV

o A

.o..;..o
o._ 2o o. 4o o. so o. eo 1. oo
X/C

215
RUN 0520

ROE -t3.32
H 0.08
RE 0.89
CL -t. tO5
COl4 0.0300
CH -.0078

==
i_ll,

X/C

2]6
RUN 0521

ROll -t2.85
M 0.08
F RE 0.90
CL -t.t38
IO°
CDW 0.0280
CM -.0272

,@,

mlk,

V
g
O..WI.
OI

N.
v

O 4 V
V

'W'V
v
Vv

0.20 0.40 O. 4;0 O. 00 1. O0


X/C

217
RUN 0748
O

ROR -.00
!

H 0.12
RE 1.39
& CL -.006
COil O. 0079
CH -. 0025

•we
!

II ,==
(rji

_4

&

"d eo 0.20 0,40


W

O. 60 O. 80 1.00
11

X/C

218
RUN 0749

Itto ROR 8.25


H 0. I2
RE 1.39
CL 0.832
qlk°
CON 0.0105
CH 0.0051

g
let.

0.1%i. A
(..11

line

o
10
41'
I

0.20 O. +.0 O. 60 O. gO I . O0
x/c

219
RUN 0750

ROR 8.25
M 0.12
RE 1.39
CL 0.837
qJ.o
COW 0.0108
CM 0.0042

L.N. A

c_
q_
geq

_q

8,

"0 O0
6

O, 20

0.40
g

O. 80

O. 80
,

I.

O0
X/C

220
RUN 0751
g
_, AOA -.00
M 0.12
RE 1.37
CL -.006
N,
COW 0.0106
CM -.0002

N
!

Iiq

g
ilk _..
(..,11

oo o"2o o"4o o"_o o"oo 1; oo


X/C

221
RUN 0752
g
B

tr!. ROR 2.06


N 0.12
RE 1.38
CL 0.207
lf_;°
CDW O.0t08
CH 0.0023
g

g
inl ,==.

I1' a
o

iz

i||l

":o. oo o'.2o o: 4o o'.eo o: eo 1',00


×/C

222
RUN 0753

AOA 4.13
H 0.12
RE I .38
CL 0.417
COW 0.0112
CM 0.0037

Jill,

5
_s

o
o
BM
o

O. O0 0.20 O. 40 0.60 O. 80 1'. O0


×/C

223
RUN 0754
O
O

!
ROR 2.06
M 0.12
RE 1.38

N.
CL O. [98
CDW 0.0107
CM 0.0003
g
B

N.

¢,,JI

"j
0

O,
04

I • II • I
O0 O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O. lbO 1 • O0
X/C

224
flUN 0755

ill. A0A 4.12


M 0.12
fie 1.39
CL 0.409
f_ll.
COW 0.0113
CM 0.002L

0
If)

C.)l k
0 A,,_ A
0 VVVVVVV V VV
Om
0 V
V

c;"

I II I I |
"b" oo o. 20 o. 40 o. eo O. 80 1. O0
X/C

225
RUN O756
==
ltl° R0R 6.19
M 0.12
fie 1.38
CL 0.620
N.
!
b, COW 0.0133
CM 0.00S5
O
=.

o
I¢)

OI

D
o

V
V
II I
o

O. 20 O. 40 O. 60 O. 80 ! . O0
×/C

226
RUN 0757

AOA 8.25
H 0.12
fie 1.39
CL 0.806
COW 0.0135
CM 0.0109

ii,

till

z_

O..N.

(Iml

"o'.oo o'.2o o' 40 o'.eo o'.eo ,'.oo


X/C

227
RUN 0758

tO.3t
H O. t2
RE 1.37
CL 0.986
qlk.
C0W O.Ot7t
CN O.Ot6t

A
Irll,

A
A
A
(.Jl

O
A
!

O
O
"q
I

I; m
V VV
O
VVVV VVV
V
V

"0 00 O, 20 O. 40 O. q;O O, 80 1 , O0
X/C

228
RUN 0759
O
O
ROR 12.36
I
M 0.12
RE 1.37
CL 1.136
W.
CON 0.0240
CM 0.0226
g
I¢},,

O
O

(_)1

O
=., z
!

0
O AAA_AZ_,,M _.
"=

oI? VV VV_"
VV_,VVVV V' V_'
V
V
"o'.ob 0.20 0.40 o.eo 0. go 1. o0
X/C

229
RUN 0760
==
#'1, ROR 14.13
;4 0.11
RE 1.29
N. CL 0.882
COil 0.0309
CH -.1151
g
N.

e,,I a
!

A_
AA
A

V
V
o
o v V
O- _V V
VVVV " .
VV

?,, V
c;'

d,2o o;_o o:eo O. 80


|

I. O0
X/C

230
RUN O761
O
O

ItS
4=,l
ROR 13.38
I
M 0.12
RE 1.37
CL 1. 181
e,,,e a

COW O. 0290
CM 0.0257
==
,end

.me t
I

==
o

A
==
Irl.

Oq
¢}

g g g g

0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 I . O0


X/C

231
RUN 0762
==
(RI. ROR -4. t4
PI O. t2
RE 1,39

I%1,
o
CL -.440
CON O. 0 t 22
CH -.0065
g
o

¢:
It}

==
(L i-,.
(,j) l

o
B

oel
A

==
_'oo •
o. 20 o; 40
11
o. 60

o. eo
|
1. oo
X/C

232
RUN O763

Yr. FIOR -8.26


M 0.12
RE 1.38
CL -.812
ql..
COW 0.0168
CM -.0119
0_
'9.
dn,:

a..N
(__11

O
ql'

v
!

0
g
i" v
vv

I iP |

O0 O. 20 0".40 O. 60 0.80 t ,00


X/C

233
0
RUN 0764

ImB ROR -13.37


!
H 0.11
,RE 1.30
p,,; CL -1.127
!
CON 0.0275

¢D
CH -.0270
O

qlzq
!

==
OlD

==
(.J!

g
It),.

9'

==
v
v
v

,00 0.20 0.40 O. tro o. 80 1. O0


X/C

234
RUN 0765
O

ROR -t4,t9
M O. tt
7 RE t .34
CL -.889
CDW 0.0309
CM 0.064t

Irl.
I

==
Irl.

O.N.
(.11

VV

O
I0
V VVVVVVV V V V V V
VV

o: 40 o'.;o o"eo 1', O_

X/C

235
RUN O766
oV
O

I,,_° ROR -12.36


I
M 0.12
RE 1.38
=. CL -1.112
I10°
CON 0.0277
CM -.0246
=,
=.

V
==

g
o

O_lrl.
(.,11

(N,;.
V

&
O d 'W'
V

&
Oil
VV y V _,_
0

0"o'.__ o: 20 o"4o • • |

O. 60 O, 80 t. O0
X/C

236
APPENDIX C

WAKE SURVEYS

227
RUN 0365
CD O. 0076
AOA 0.00
HACH O. 12

A.. o
W

(/1
W m

f_lO/
(it)
lid

XO
G:
'T

o"
III
0

g
iii1_.

c_.oo :.oo 4.00 I.oo 8.oo t_).oo I_.0o


I | | | |

POSITION JN HAKE (IN)

238
RUN 0367
CD 0.0081
AOA 2 • 06
c_" HACH O, 12

_a

•-i, o
I,,,,4g,e

(/')

_=/
(/)
ill

ll,- ii

Q:

o*
c;"

IU
0
IIi
0

I;i

gO 5, 0.1/I/
POSITION ,IN HAKE (IN)

239
RUN 0369
CD O. 0090
ROR 4. [ 2
NFiCH O. 12
_T

I--e_e

bJ

r
a- m

V I I I I I

• O0 S. O0 I. O0 7. O0 II. O0 D. O0 I O. O0
POSITION IN NRKE (IN)

240
RUN 0371
CD 0,0096
AOA 6.18
HACH O. 1::)

c;"

IM
Dm
o

,,m,,o
t,,ie me

(/1
I,kl

Ul
I,I,J

G:
3C

go z"oo "1:oo e"oo s'.eo z'e.eo


PO$ IT ! ON I N HAKE (IN)

241
RUN 0373
CD 0.011!
AOA 8.24
HACH O. [2

3
c;"

t,.ql_

(/1
U.I

u./al

IL/

li= m

G:
_r

,11.
O
I,
O

g
• ,40
POS,IT]ON ]N HAKE (iN1

242
RUN 0375
CD 0,0139

ROR 10,29

] - I HACH O. 13

W
r

IE
Z

II
0

ao 7:o0 e'.oa J'.oo tb.ao t't.aa


POSITJON JN HFiKE (IN)

243
RUN 0377
CD 0.0200
AOA 12.35
_- .13

I.-4_l

Q,)
I_J
rS/

lil,m
0

g
I I II

oo _.oo e.oo o.oo Ib.oo t i .oo t_.oo


POSITION IN HAKE (IN)

244
RUN 0439
CD 0.0251
ROll -. O2
m HRCH 0.12

°l V

_U

L m

N
0
Qq
0

g
.i I.oo nP..oo t_.oo l'a.oo t_.oo 2b.oo 2_Z.O0
POSITION IN PlFIKE (]Hi

245
RUN 0377
CD O, 0200
ROA [2.35

.-"a
11'_8 wO

IcJ

Q'm

(Z
Z

POSITION IN MAKE (IN)

246
RUN 0441
CD 0.0275

AOA 2.05

__.___ _ O. 12

,...bo
ii-_ g.e

(f)
UJ

_l'JO
O'J

iY"

=e

Im

"m
0

.W

247
RUN 0443
CD 0.0393
AOR 4.12
HACH O. IS

'P_'O

_.a-
w

ILLIIm
OC.i

@0
ID
r
Q'(LM

UJ ..

T,

ell' .aO
POSITION IN HAKE (IN)

248
RUN 0450
CD O. 0335
ROll -2.09
HRCH O. t2

IC;o

W
r

_0

o
Iq
0

g Q,

% m I'o.oo I_.0o i:l.oo Ik.oo Ik.oo


POSITION IN HI:iKE (IN)

249
RUN 0451
CD 0.0479
I ROll -4.14

i] HI:iCH O. [ 2

i
1'-41,4
I_'1°

-°1
,,,g!
Na-f
UJ

A- m

g
u tb.oo tt.oo t_.oo ' Ik.eo t'o.oo ab.oo
POSITION IN HRKE (IN)

250
RUN 075[
CD 0.0!06
RSR 0.00
MRCH 0 • 1.2
c?

g,m
a

c_"

,,-m,a

@,,)

""4
al_o

@,)
I,¢,1

O:

O
B,
m

IM
m
il,
0

,00
POS.I T ! ON ! N _IRKE (.I'N)

251
RUN 0752
CD 0.0108
ROll 2.06
=_..
HIclCH 0.12

"-_0
I,-4,,,4

0')

Go

_l_O

%' POS]TJON JN HRKE (JN) .oo

252
RUN 0753
CD O. 1120
ROR 4.13
=_. MRCH O. 12
=;-

¢;-

=;-

I_11=,,4

(f)O

W
r
a.. m

CE
-r

o
0,
0

Bw

• O0 4:00 6'.00 e'.oo 1_.00 i_.O0


POSITION .IN NRKE (IN)

253
RUN 0756
CD 0.0133
I:iOFi 6.19
HFICH 0.12

Pb o
ll,-4.,.,.0

O. o
W

laJ
==-.j
(jl")0
(/1
I,JJ

XO
(E
:X

oN
Ie
0

II | III I II

O0 2.00 4.00 8.00 I1.00 10.00 I_Z.O0


POSITION IN HI:IKE (IN)

254
RUN 0757
CO 0.0135
ROR 8.25
MRCI:I O. 12

,.-b o
i..-i g.e

(3")

Q,)

IL m

m
I,
D

N
0
II
0

O0 2. • O0
POSITION IN WAKE (IN}

255
RUN 0758
CD 0.0171
ROll 10.31
MILCH O, 12

la.i

Xo
¢E

c;"

POSITION IN HllKE (IN)

256
RUN 0759
CD O. 0240
ROR 12.36
HRCH O. 12

"_0
I--I,,,4

0')

mr-
L m

ql,
0
O,
Q

_m

e.

oo e'.oo I'e.oo Ib.oo eb.ao 2h.ao 2b. O0


POSITION IN HRKE (IN)

257
RUN 0761
CD 0.0290
ROll 1:3.38

_, _,,,_HRCH 0,12

_0
Lo]

L m

0
Oq
0

8
O,

o1.oo e'oo s_.ao lb.oo 2b.oo 2_1, O0

POsI'r ION IN HRKE (1 N)

258
APPENDIX D

VELOCITY PROFILES

259
o

NRCR 0012 M]TH GLRZE ]CE "1


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 236
o ROR -.15
ql"
X/C -.00
VEL 131.7
RE 1.46

0
O

O
m
Oi

Z
N
w

O
>-N
el

Q
IO

,=;-

o (D Q
ql,
0 0
0
Q

=;-4o. oo
f a.o0 46.0o eb.0o z_0.0o ] 60. O0
!
200.00
II
240, O0
U (FT/SEC)

260
o

"1 NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE ml


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 238 (9
ROR -.15 (9
X/C -.02 0
VEL 131.7
RE 1.46

11

z
w

o
>-1o

Q
o

=;- 4
0
0
®
o
t_ 8
0

0 Q

2:_o.oo
B !

°-40. oo o'. oo 40.00 g'O. O0 1'20. O0 160.00 2bo.oo


U (FT/SEC}

261
o

_;- NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE =1


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 239
o ROR -. 1S
,it
_;. X/C 0.02
VEL 131.7
RE 1.46

o
o

I0
J_

e=

0
Q

¢ 0 ®
= 0
_ •

| |
-40. O0 O. O0 40.00 eo. oo 1_o. oo l_o. oo zoo. oo z_o. oo
U (FT/SEC)

262
o
,q,
"i NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE -I
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 240
o ROR -.IS
ru
X/C 0.04
VEL 131.7
RE 1.46

L--m
¢= i

Z
=,,,-I
w
o

=;-

o
i
>,.to
4"
II
0
o
qP @
0
om

o
t_
B
¢;.
Q

40.00 eo.oo 1_o. oo 1_0.0o


| |
°-40. O0 0;00 200. O0
II
240. O0
U (FI/SEC}

263
O
,qp
el NRCR 0012 MITH GLRZE ICE ul
eme
UPPER $URFRCE

RUN 241
¢= ROR -.15
N
X/C 0.06
VEL 133.5
RE 1.42
(D
o
0
OI ®
|

o
ID
4"
z
0
w

0 8

¢;- @

Q (D(9
O
=;-
Olp
0

== B
=.J
°-40.00
.
0.00 ,:o.oo e'o.oo 1_o.0o 16o.oo abo.oo 2_o.oo
U (FT/$£C}

264
o

,iPa NRCR 0012 HJTH GLRZE ICE ml


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 242
¢} ROR -.15
em X/C 0.08
YEL 133.5
RE 1.42

o
¢}
e_
,,me

0
¢0
¢;-
z
w

o
>,._

¢
® ®
o
(%1

G,"
(am)

#
B
'mr "r T Ir- T I 1
_o.oo 40.00 80.00 120.00 180,00 200. O0 240.00 200,00
U (FT/SEC)

265
o

e. NRCR 0012 WiTH GLRZE ICE ,1


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 243
¢= ROR -.15
X/C 0.10
YEL 132.7
RE 1.44

o
O
ed
®

o
m
c;"
7'
w

&
O 0
qP

O
I%1

| ! |
;0.00 e'o.oo 1oo.oo 1;_o. oo 1,_o.oo ,eo.oo 1_o.oo zoo.oo
U (FT/SEC)

266
o
,qp
NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE =1
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 244
o ROR -.15
I%1
ea
X/C 0.12
e=,e
VEL 132.7
RE 1.44

0
o

o,

z
w

o
>.,ID
¢;- 0
(9
0
dl)
0

,=;- ®
0
®
0
o
I'M
=;-
0

o
o
o,
)
%i ,00
I

10s.0o l_,s. 0o
I

zz6.00 {3s. 0o
I

14s.0o l'_s. 0o 166, O0


U {FT/SEC}

267
O

NRCR 0012 M]TH GLRZE ]CE =1


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 24S
O ROR 1.8S
N
o.
X/C -.02
eml

VEL 132.7
RE 1.44
Q
o
(= 0
el

ei 0

(=l
>._.-
o

o
qP

0
Q
oi

° 81

_40.00 0'.00 46.00 e6.00 1_0.00 lto.oo 2'00.00 2'40. 00"


U (FT/SEC}

268
o
qr
NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE =1
UPPER SURFRCE

246
==
RUN
0 ROR 1.85
N
X/C 0,00
YEL 132.7
RE 1.44

0 (g
0 &
el
O=a o
6

0
Q
z
I--,I 0
w

o
>..to B
=;- Q
@
® (D

O P
ql"

¢;- =,
o 0
¢; Q

°-40.00
L
0.00
1'

40. O0
T

80.00
I

120. O0 200.
T
O0
I
240. O0
U (FT/SEC)

269
O
ql'
NRCR 0012 WIIH GLRZE ICE -1
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 247 _P
O ROR 1.85
I'M
X/C 0.02
VEL 132.7
RE 1.44

e,_
o
JI

Z
h,q

Q
®
0

g) (9
_P
o D

0
Q
Q _
N 0

o
0

-40.00 o:oo 4b.oo sb.oo 1_o.oo l'eo. oo z'oo.oo 2_o.oo


U (FT/$EC}

270
¢}
ql"
"a
NRCR 0012 _JTH GLflZE ICE ,,1
UPPER $URFRCE

RUN 248
O ROR 1.8S
N
el X/C 0.04
VEL 132.7
RE 1.44

Q
0
.i"

0
O
=;- 0
0
z
w

o _ZD
=;-

o
qP
0

,%
Q 0

c;"
®
0
Q
o
o
Q
! Ir | I
md O, O0 0'.00 40.00 !10. O0 1_0.00 lEiO. O0 200. O0 240.00
U (FT/SEC]

271
qP
NACR 0012 NITH GLRZE ICE
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 249
O ROR 1.85
n,I
X/C 0.06
YEL 132.9
RE 1.44

¢D
D

¢:)
m
=;-
z |
e
o
>,.u_

Q
,It

,=;-

Q
I%1
D
=;- Q
@

-_10. O0 o'.oo 4b.oo fo.oo l'zo.oo l'eo.oo zbo.oo


U (FT/SEC}

272
o
,qr
el
NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE -,1
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 2S0
o ROR 1.85
Pd
el
X/C 0.08
• EL 132.5
RE 1.44

o
¢=
el

®
®
¢=

i
I0

¢;-
z
w

o
>,.u_
¢;-
0

o
,it qi_®
Q

_X9
dP
Q
N Q
=;-

(]o

=.,p
°-40. O0 d.oo 4b.oo 86.00 1_o.oo lko.oo zbo.oo z4o.oo
U (FT/$EC)

273
o
qP
NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE =1
UPPER SURFACE

RUN 2S1
ROR 1.85

i
O
t_
X/C 0.10
YEL 132.S
RE 1.44

0
¢1

!
0
0
m
@
g)
Z 0

Q
>-CO
=;- @
0

o
_P

,=;- Q
lip
O

O I
f_J
aid

g)

| I I

o'.o0 4b.0o so.oo tzo.oo _so.oo zbo.00 2_o.oo


U [FT/SEC]

274
¢)

"i NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE =l


UPPER $URFRCE

RUN 252
o ROR 1.85
t%l
el
X/C 0,12
VEL 132,5
!
=me

RE 1.44

0
¢)
e

¢)
m
¢;-
z
O
Q
Q
>.to
Q
O

¢=
,qp
6,

(D
®
0
o
N

%8 ®Q
I I i I
"" O0 _
o(_, 40°00 80. O0 120. O0 180. O0 Z()O. O0 240. O0 280. O0
U (FI'/SEC)

275
Q

el NRCR 0012 M]TH GLRZE ICE al


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 254
¢D ROR 1.85
I'M
X/C 0.14

t
Oi

VEL 130.0
RE 1.51

O
O
O

0
m

Z
w

o
ml'

c;"

¢m
O 0 ®
O
,=;-
(D • 0

o.J
O '
40. oo s6. oo ob.oo 1'oo.oo l_o.oo 1:!o.oo sko.oo lbo.oo
U (FT/SEC)

276
o
qP
NRCR 0012 HITH GLRZE ]CE =t
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 255
o ROR 1.85
l%1
X/C 0.16 ®
YEL 130.0
RE 1.51

o
0
el

z
w

o
>.._
,=;- 0

o
v
R
¢;-

0
o ®
=;- (P®
®

00
"l

°80. O0 e6.oo lbo.0o lJ, o.oo 1_o.oo 1_o.oo 1%o.oo z oo.oo


U (FT/SEC}

277
o
ql'
o, NRCR 0012 MZTH GLRZE ICE ,,1
UPPER SURFRCE
®

0
N
Ba
RUN
ROR
X/C
VEL
257
3.85
-.02
130.0
|
RE 1.Sl

Q
¢D
o.
|
¢)
I0

h,q

0
>..u_

o
ql,' l
®
0
o
hi

o ,,.
0.,, _,
°-4o.oo o.oo 4b.oo eb.oo iJ_o.oo ,ko.oo 2bo.oo 2_40, O0
U (FT/SEC)

278
o
IO
NRCR 0012 MITH GLRZE ICE =I
&- UPPER SURFRCE
t

RUN 258
o ROR 3.8S
qP
X/C 0.00
&. VEL 130.0
RE 1.$1

C)
o

(:

el

o
!
o.

¢)

o.
o

Q • •

o 0
'lip

c;"

== i
%, 0.00
!
O. O0 4b.oo .b.oo l'zo.oo 1%o.oo zbo.oo 2;o.oo
U [FT/SEC)

279
C:D

NRCR 0012 M]TH GLRZE ICE =1


`4-
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 262
o ROR 3.05
ql'
X/C 0.02
`4.
VEL 129.0
RE 1.54

,4"

Q
0
OI
tml

Am_

Q
>..N

0
I0
O
=;- _m
Q B
0@
4'
m
qP

o
o

le I |
-, O. O0 O. O0 40. oo 8o. oo 1_o. oo t eo. oo zoo. oo z4o. oo
U (F'r/SEC]

280
o

el NRCR 00t2 MITH GLAZE ICE =1


UPPER SURFACE

N
4l I
RUN
ROR
X/C
263
3.85
0.04
|
i
VEL 129.3
RE 1.53

o
o
,I I

o
o
O Q
l0
,=;-
z
I,,-,,l
w
Q
¢= O
>,,_
,=1-
ql)

®
O
v

,=;-

o
N e
,=;-
B
0
_P
O
o
,=;
od O. O0 o;oo 4b.oo eS.oo z_.o.oo ndo.oo z6o.oo z:qo.oo
U (FT/SEC)

281
Q
qP
NACR 0012 HJTH GLAZE TCE -,1
UPPER SURFACE

0
I%1
RUN
AOR
264
3.85
|
X/C 0.06
¥EL 129.3
RE 1.53

0
O

O
ID
am) (5
Z
0
O

o
qP Q
c;" 0
II

c;"

o •
=. B
ii
o-40, O0 O. O0 46.00 eb.oo 1_o.oo lko.oo 2'oo.ao |
240_. OO
U (PT/SEC]

282
0
ID
NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE -1
&- UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 265
O AOR 3.85
qP
X/C 0.09
&- YEL 129.3
RE 1.53

0
o

r;"

¢:)

el

z
w

o
>-N
OI

D
II

,=;-
®
eQ
®
@
Q@
® Q
c;"

==
om

o., O. O0 eb.oo z_o.oo |

O. O0 40. O0 lifO. O0 2O0. O0 2_10. O0


U (FT/SEC)

283
o
g
&. NRCR 0012 MITH GLRZE ICE =1
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 267
0 ROR 3.85
qp
X/C 0.10
&-
VEL 130.6
RE 1.49

&-

a
Ip
Bml
tma

/
Z
w

o
_,,r_
ej

O
,rod

c_"
L,-U
O
dm
a e@
qP
c_" 0

el
I
°-40. O0 O. O0 4b.oo e6.oo z_o.oo s'oo.oo z'oo.oo z:_o.oo
U {FT/SEC)

284
o
m
HRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ]CE =t
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 268
o ROR 3.85
i, _/C 0.12
VEL 130.6
RE 1.49

mI

i i

o
)-N
o,
fd

0
m

=;-

o ®
qP
e4
0

,F D
o
dp®P
=. !

0. o0 _. oo 4b.a0 e6.o0 j_0.0o l&o.0o z6o.o0 240, O0


U (FT/SEC)

285
0
ID
NRCR 0012 NITH GLRZE ICE =1
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 269
O
qP
ROR 3.85
X/C 0.14
YEL 130.6
RE 1.49

Q
0

0
oll
¢lm

Z
1,11

0
>-rV

Q
IB
c;"
edP
®'B
ee
0
ql, • •
c;" eo
ee
Q
0 aP
io.oo o:oo 4b.oo 8b.oo 1'2o.oo 3_o.oo 2bo.oo 1

24 O. O0
U (FT/SEC)

286
Q
m
NRCR 0012 MITH GLRZE ICE -1
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 270
O AOR 3.85
ql'
X/C 0.16
VEL 130.6
RE 1.49

es
O
&.

e,
wine

>-N
O

l.e
e, t
o

qP ee

o
Q
o. m(9
I
o _O. O0 O. O0 4b.oo sb.oo 1'2o.oo {so. oo 2bo.oo 2_o. oo
U {FT/SEC}

287
0

NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE al


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 271
Q ROR 3.85
X/C 0.18
VEL 130.6
RE 1.49

Q
,4"

0
I@
.m

z
I,.,,.I

II e

o
I0

,G"

,,,e,
0

mP
elQ

el_

% 4b lIO0 Oh. O0 J_o.oo Ido.oo II g


200, O0 2_10.00 28O'. O0
U (PT/SEC)

288
o
m
NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE -1
&-
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 272
D AOR 3.85
ql'
X/C 0.20
&-
YEL 130.6
RE 1.49

Q
0

O
ID

1
o.

0
>-N
• a

Q
m

Q
@
O
qlP

oJ
I II I
_" oo 4o. oo sb.oo n2o.oo t_o.oo zoo.oo z4o. oa z_o. oo
U (FT/SEC)

289
0
O
NACA 0012 H]TH GLAZE ]CE ml
&-
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 273
O ROR 3.e5
'ql"
X/c 0.22
&-
VEL 130.6
RE 1.49

0
Q

&-

0
tO
I) I
tree

6m_

Z_
I.m,I
w

0
>-ru
el
m_

0
tO

c;"

eG )
o i
,qp ale

o
o
e..

46.00 1_,o.oo Iko.oo :,b0.o0


F | II
°o_ oo 80.00 240. O0 2OO. OO
U (FT/SEC)

290
0
m
RRCR 0012 HITH GLRZE ICE ml
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 274
0 ROR 3.85
v
X/C 0.30
_EL 130.6
RE 1.49

0
0

O
W
"i

...;'

O
m

c;"

_. ®0 _p
Q

. 100"_.
0"_ ,20.0-_ 140.00
¥

180.00
1
200. DO"
U {F'I'/SEC)

291
' 0
m
&- NRCR 0012 WITH GLRZE ICE -t
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 275
O ROR 3.85
ql'
&- X/C 0.40
¥EL 130.6
RE 1.49

0
0

0
B
t
Z
w

oel
eme

0
m
,=;-

0
ql.
c;" 0

1.00 8_.00 -0 • 00 120.00


1 140.00
r 1_00. O0
U (FT/SEC)

292
0
m
NRCA 0012 HITH GLRZE ICE _1
&-
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 276
0
ql"
ROR 3.85
&- X/C 0.50
YEL 130.6
RE 1.49

0
O

&-

0
U_
e.

Z
Iml
w

0
>.rv
ol

0
W

&-

0
qP

&.

qpe
11 II
60. O0 80. O0 100. O0 z_o.oo z_o.oo zko.oo zko.oo ioo..oo
U (FT/SEC)

293
o

el NRCR 0012 HOOEL a2 MITH TRIP R'I' X/C-.OS


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 78B
0 ROR 4.00
el X/C 0.70
VEL 131.8
RE 1.43

O
o
el

ID
,=;-

0
>,,, LO
,=;-

o
ql"

,=;-

o
N

dp®_°
®,,s
o0
I. 00 sb. 00_ e'o. oo 2bo.oo 2do. oo 2t0.00 z_0.0o bo,oo
U {FT/SEC)

294
¢=

o== NRCR 0012 MODEL -2 WIIH IRIP R'r X/C-.05


ewe
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN ?89
o ROR 4.00
N
X/C 0.?0
YEL 130.?
RE 1.41

o
¢l
Om
f=O

o
qo
¢;-
Z
w

o
>,._
¢;-

¢D
ql"
=;-

o
N
¢;-

o
o
t
I | I I I I I
=, 1.00 60.00 80,00 100, O0 120,00 140,00 160, O0 100.00
U CFT/SEC)

295
ID

=;- NRCR 0012 HODEL =2 MXTH TRIP RT X/C-.O5


UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 790
m
qP

c;" X/C 0.S0


ROR 4.00
YEL 131.6
RE 1.42
w,!
ql"

=;-
8

>-N
let

c;"

qP
i
O
=;-
I
0
W 0
(aB
c;"

ID
0
=;- eQ

BJ
0
OI
60, O0 00. O0 lbo.oo 1_o.oo l;eo. oo lko.oo lbo. oo z'oo.oo
U {FT/SEC)

296
NRCR 0012 NOOEL =2 MJTH TRiP RT X/C-.05
UPPER SURFRCE

I
RUN 791
m 80R 4.0O
ql,
X/C 0.5O
VEL 131.1
RE 1.42

o
ql,,

F'I

z !
w

>,, I_,l
B=
,D

em

®
0
I" I' 1' 1" 11" 1

80, O0 100. O0 120. O0 140.00 180.00 IBO. O0 200.00


U {FT/SEC}

297
Idea
NFICFI 0012 MODEL "2 H,[TH TFI.[P FIT X/C-.O5
UPPER SURFFICE

RUN 792
m FIOFI 4.00
X/C 0.50
VEL 131.3
RE 1.42
|
O
ql'
c;" i
N
M
c;"

,el,

c;"

c;"

Q
m _
o

0
Q
cl_ ®
0
eb.oo z6o.0o 1_,o.oo 1:_o.oo zko.oo I iJo.oo abo.oo
U (FT/SEC)

298
tO
in
NRCR 0012 NSOEL ,,2 glTH TRIP RT X/C-.O_
,=;- UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 794
tO
ql'
RSR
_/C
4.00
0.30 !
¥EL
RE
131.2
1.42 |
o
,i,

,=;-
!

P1

>.N
Q
@.
II
0

0
tO
0

I0
0

g)

%a.aa 16o.oo 1_0.o0 z_0.o0 1'eo.0o z'eo.oa 200. O0


U (FT/SEC)

299
HACA 0012 MOOEL a2 MITH TRIP AT X/C-.05
UPPER SURFACE

RUN 793
I0 AOR 4.00 Q
q,
X/C 0.50
VEL 130.8 |
RE 1.41

qP

i
|
z
II(9
w
e
0

c;"
&

m
o em

em

eeJ

%b.oo oh.oo 1bo.oo l'ao.oo 1%o.oo l&o.oo lbo.oo 200. O0


U (FT/SEC)

300
el NRCR 0012 HOOEL a2 WITH TRIP RT X/C-.OS
o
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 795

"4 X/C
ROR 0.30
4.00 I
0
YEL 131.Q

=.
el

I
RE 1.42 !

"I
o

z
I,-,,I
!
>-N

i
W
8
giI

=;- o
E
O

ID
0

=;-
II

o I _,
o (9
Ow

°6o.oo 8'0.00 2'o0.00 1_o.0o 1,_o.oo lko. oo 11o.oo zbo. 00


U (FT/SEC)

301
QID

NACA 0012 NOOEL a2 MJTH TRiP AT X/C-.OS


UPPER SURFACE

AUN 796
m
qP
AOA 4.00 0
_/C 0.10
YEL 131.3
RE 1.42

O
,qp

N
M

10
J

I
m I
o

m
_0
• •

oo I II |
I
1_8, O0 148.00 IS8, O0 168.00 J'78.00 1'1111,
O0 19B. O0
U (FT/SEC)

302
qlO
NRCR 0012 MODEL m2 WITH TRIP RT X/C-.O5
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 797 (D
ROR 4.00 g
X/C 0.10 O
¢;
YEL 132.5 I
RE 1.43 @
g

ow
I
o

t'u

Z.

>,._

0
o
0
,=;-
0(9
O
Q
D ®

42. O0 z_o.oo z_e.oo z6o.oo z_4.oo zbz.oo z_o.oo z_e.oo


U (FT/SEC)

303
U
in
HRCR 0012 HOOEL 02 HXTH 7flXP R7 X/C-.OS
UPPER SURFACE

RUN 798
IB
v
ROR
X/C
0.00
0.70
YEL 131.1
|
Q
RE L.43
!
v
#

N
F'I

>-N
O

eP
O0
O

QO
oil •
I
0
o•
O0
O °
ID
8
I. O0 16.oo 16o.oo t'to.oo n_o.oo 1_o.oo 1_o.oo
U (FT/S(C)

304
NRCR I)012 MODEL e2 MrTH ]KrP R; X/C-.OS
UPPER SURFRCE

I_UK 7S9
ROR 0. O0
X/C 0.70
Y'EI. 1,32o4
RE 1.43

N
!
M
Oe
0
4row4
Z
qm#

N
.,,k

t
Q

c;"
8'
o8
0
am

°41 _1._0 eb.n n'o.n _bo.oe fzo. 0a ,_o.oo iko.oo li10.01W


U (FT/SEC)

305
Op
tit
HRCR 0012 R00EL .2 HITH 1RIP Rl X/C-.0S
c;" UPPER SURFACE

RUN 801
D R0R 0.00
qr
X/C 0.S0
c;" YEL 132.0

Q
qP
c;"
RE t.44

I
!
N
M 8
c;"
dm_
Z
one
_mp
ql'
>.N
Oi
O

ep
t
c;"

m
B
m
• I
C) • •

ee

o
s6o.oo do.n 1_o.ol 1§o.oo t_o.oo _SO. 01/ 1_10. OO
U (FT/SEC)

306
m
In
NRCR OOlZ MODEL .2 MrTH ]RIP AT X/C-.05
UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 802
AOR O. O0
X/C O.SO
YEL 130.4

P,E 1.43 i

=
!

0
Oq t
o
0
• •
O
OQ

r,O0' I_.fO t'ol.oe :;7.o0 zi_.o. 1_7.00 111"7.00


U (FT/SEC)

307
U
In
NRCA 0012 HOOEL e2 XTIH 1RIP A; X/C-.OS
UPPER SURFACE

RUN 803
U R0R 0.00
ql"
XfC 0.30
Q"
V'EL 1,3L. II
RE L.44

(M
lel

4m_
Z
eke

>,.N t;

im
.d
|
m
0
• •

• •

go
O
1.00 lbo.oo 1;o.. nko._ l_o.oe 1'40. U IS'0.00
U (F'[/S(C)

308
HflCA 0012 ROOEL -2 MITH TRIP AT X/C-.OS
UPPER SURFACE

RUN 904
AOR O. O0
X/C 0.30
YEL 131.. 6
RE 1,.44

Die
i
|
0

c;'
!
t
I
0
Qe Q

oeD

t)
0 S
©
1.00 lbo. oo 11o.oo 1_o.oo 1_,o.oo 1_o.oo 1"so.oo 2;to.oo
U (FT/SEC)

309
m
in
d" NRCR 0012 HOOEL a2 MXTH TRIP RT X/C-.OS
UPPER SURFRCE

I ROR 0.00
qP
RUN
X/C O.605
10
d"
YEL 131.S
RE 1.44

Q
)
q.

d"

i
IFI

d"
Z

qP
)-ev
d"
e

IP
aD

d" !
m

d"
!
0 • •
o •
d
I?.. O0 l_,o.oo l_e.oo lbJ.oo f4_.oo _kz. oo 1_0. O0 lke.oo
LI (FT/SEC|

310
Z NACA 0012 HOOEL -2 M]TH 1RIP A1X/C=.OS
UPPER SURFACE

RUN 807
AOA 0.00 •
X/C O. LO m
1.31.6
L.44
t

Wins

U
&

D
i
.l
0

• •

,ko.oo z_e.oo zbe.oo 1:.. oo tkz. ee _'g'O. O0 1811. 0111


U (F'|/SEC)

311
_. HRCR 00),2 flO13(L =2 HT;H TflrP AT X/C= • 05
UPPER SUflFRCE

ROR O. O0
_4
X/C O.2O
'/EL
RUN t32.9
808 i
RE 1.49

5EL"
I
O"
i
3
L"
!
IO
Q
0
Qm

hO0 t _lJO.01_ lbo.oo abo.oo z_o.oo


U (#'T/STC)

312
U
in
NACA 0012 ROI)EL e2 Mr'l'H 1RIP R'i' I/C--.05
UPPER SURFACE

U
V
RUN

X/C
811
ROR 0.00
O. 40
i
'ql"
YEL 132. e
RE 1.41)
i
It

ab,q
w
ql,
:).._

J
I0 #
c;"

m
t:l

0=
CI.O0 lbo.oo 1_o.oo 1:co.oo lVo.. z'eo.oe z'oo.oo
U (F'I'/S(C)

313
im

c;" NRCII OOIZ I'lOOEI. eZ MIRTH TFIIP FIT X/C-.O5


UPPER SURFACE

RUN 81,2
El
qP
c;"
FIOFI
X/C
YEL
O. O0
O.'tO
1,32.3
!
FIE 1.48 |
i
Q
V

|
III
._b
em

m
Q o
c;"

8IPJ
I
_b.ao eb.ao l"..oe 1_.o0 x,lo.oo 16o.oo lko.oo abo.oo
IJ' (,F'T/SEC)

314
_, NRCR 0012 rill)EL a2 M]'TH 1RrP R; X/C-.05
o" UPPER SURFRCE

RUN 813
g ROR 0.00
qr
X/C 0.6O
c;"
YEL 132.2
fie 1.48 ie
I0
qr

ql,

,8"
io
,.) ee)

i
o Qe
0

Q •

r. 0'0" 80.00 8 180. OO


U (FT/SF.C)

315