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Practical Class Info

Monday, September 06, 2010
1:28 PM

Instructors: Hanson Hosein, Dr. Malcolm Parks
Room: Johnson 175

Wednesdays 6p-10p: September 29 - December 8 2010
Office Hours: By Appointment
Contact: hrhmedia@uw.edu, macp@uw.edu

Twitter: #mcdmresearch, tweet archive: http://twapperkeeper.com/hashtag/mcdmresearch
Media Space Class Page http://mediaspace.washington.edu/ms/mediaspace/pg/groups/5572386

Overview Page 1
Narrative Points
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:12 PM

(1) What is changing in the communication field? Why now?

(2) What does this mean for organizations that have been accustomed to control of message, and
connecting to a traditionally passive audience?

(3) We'll use real world clients to understand this fundamental shift, helping them to learn how to
influence and persuade in the digital media era. This shift creates both risk and opportunity. Success
will require a new approach to engagement, building trust and establishing credibility through digital
tools.

(4) The Client's Objectives: distinguish between perceived and actual challenges, identify underlying
client goals, as well as measures of what would constitute success.

(5) The Client's Community: who does the client want to engage? Where are they? What are they
saying? What media are most engaging to them? Monitoring tools to identify communities. Analytics.

(6) The Community Experience: we'll use research tools to collect information from those communities,
to make sound recommendations based on fact.

(7) The Outcomes: we'll propose a convincing, implementable strategy for achieving the client's goals
(on paper and as a live presentation). The strategy will encompass an understanding of both the market
environment, and the client's internal structure.

(8) Any cautionary tales? Potential backlash to social media? Don't forget traditional engagement tools
as well. The challenges of sustaining social media campaigns.

Overview Page 2
Readings
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:13 PM

We reserve the right to modify the assigned readings with the pledge that you will have at least one
week's notice if that should happen.

REQUIRED

Li, Charlene (2010) Open Leadership: How Social Technology Can Transform the Way You Lead. San
Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

Shirky, Clay (2008) Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. New York,
NY: Penguin.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

[worth having/reading no matter what; these will be referred to in the lectures]

Benkler, Yochai (2006) The Wealth of Networks. New Haven: Yale University Press (purchase or free
PDF)

Lanier, Jaron (2010) You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto. New York, NY: Knopf

Zinsser, William (2006) On Writing Well. New York, NY: Collins.

Various articles (to be supplied online: watch syllabus for weekly updates).

Overview Page 3
Overview
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:12 PM

As the digital media revolution turns communication upside down, it also poses new challenges with
how to strategically plan, propose, and assess the deployment of these new platforms. In this class, by
confronting a real-world communication challenge that requires a team-created, strategic
communication solution students will master:

(1) How to define and frame the “problem” presented by the challenge,

(2) How to apply the appropriate research tools to the problem in order to solve it through an effective
strategy, and

(3) How to persuasively communicate this strategy in writing, in person and in multimedia.

At its foundation, the MCDM balances the conceptual with the applied: both are crucial in order to
equip students with the kind of strategic thinking you will need to influence and persuade in the digital
media era, measure the success of your efforts, and most importantly, understand why this
fundamental shift is happening now. That’s what we want you to have once you complete this core
class to the program – in addition to enhancing your critical thinking and communication skills.

Overview Page 4
Technologies
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:22 PM

Tableau Data Visualization software: students can download their temporarily licensed copies here.

Survey Analytics Platform: students can sign up here.

Web Analytics generally, Anil Batra guest

Overview Page 5
Week 1 9/29/10
Sunday, September 19, 2010
1:22 PM

DIGITAL MEDIA, BUSINESS AND RESEARCH

Class Slides link

Readings:
1. The Cluetrain Manifesto http://www.cluetrain.com
2. Shirky Chapters 1,2.
3. Li, Chapters 1,2.
4. Wired "The Web is Dead," plus debate
5. Zinsser, What Is Good Writing?

Too late to make required, but we'll discuss it: Malcolm Gladwell's New Yorker piece on social media.
Also Wired's 2009 The New Socialism. Wall Street Journal The End of Management.

Guiding Questions
1. How has digital media changed business?
2. What does this change mean for research and business strategy?
3. How does the in-class client system help us understand this?

We'll also discuss our expectations for your quality of writing.

Guest Speaker: Anil Batra, VP Analytics, POP: the importance of analytics in research, available tools.

Assignment due 10/6: Which of the 95 Cluetrain Manifesto theses resonates with you most? Why?
Drawing on this week's readings (at least 3 citations), as well as any of your professional experiences,
craft a well-written (heeding Zinsser) 1-2 page essay (MAXIMUM) of how you think your Cluetrain thesis
of choice has had an impact on an organization with which you're familiar -- or should have an impact.

[I'm not a stickler for single-spaced or double, you should write as necessary. But I'll deduct points if you
go one word over two pages! Please use a Word-compatible file, no PDF's.]

Due by 10/6/2010 5:00 p.m. to Collect-It. https://catalyst.uw.edu/collectit/dropbox/hosein/11560

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 6
Week 2 10/6/10
Sunday, September 19, 2010
1:39 PM

FRAMING THE PROBLEM, THE CLIENTS

DUE: Cluetrain essay

Class Slides: link

Readings:
1. Li, Chapter 3.
2. Client Discovery sheets (uploaded to the Media Space and e-mailed as a .zip file)
3. (presented and discussed in class) Tea Party Forges Alliances in a Bid to Advance Agenda

Compelling rebuttal to Gladwell social media article: Malcolm Gladwell is #Wrong.

Guiding Questions
1. How does the type of client determine specific issues that you need to consider?
2. How do analyze client needs through appropriate questions and frameworks? [Mac]
3. How to frame the problem for further research and eventual implementation.

- Different types of clients, different kinds of considerations.
- Client presentations (pizza served to class and clients in lieu of dinner break).
- Students assigned clients and groups. First assignment? The problem.

Guest speakers: our clients, proposed timetable:

Pacific Science Center 6:30 - 6:50
EPA Climate Change and Native storytelling 6:55 - 7:15
BirdNote 7:20 - 7:40
Woodland Park Zoo 7:50 - 8:10
The New Hive 8:15 - 8:35
University of Washington Research Commons 8:40 - 9:00
City Club Living Voters Guide 9:05 - 9:25

Assignment: Research Problem (individual /15 DUE 10/13/10 by 5 pm via Collect-It): Based on an in-
class client presentation and the client discovery sheet, you will draw up paper that defines the
problem, develops the context that helps your audience understand why the problem is important, and
formulate the possible alternative solutions that should be explored based on the limited evidence
from initial sources.

For this deliverable, include:
(a) About your client.
(b) What the client thinks his/her challenge is.
(c) What you think his/her challenge is. Why? (refer back to what you heard from the presenter, do
some secondary research on the issue generally, and lay out your focused, singular representation of
how you see the client's problem. Explain WHY you think this is the problem on which to focus.
(d) Then based on your research such as using the library database, news articles, blogs, previous
attempts to create similar strategies, and even Li, Shirky etc., give us a preliminary recommendation as
to what you would suggest the client should do. And refer to 5-10 sources along the way (APA citation
style), providing a bibliography at the end (that should take up a page right there).

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 7
Remember, this is a short, fairly simple assignment. It's supposed to allow you to distill a real-world
situation in a way that makes sense to you (and that corresponds to some of the client's needs), and
applying some light research to it in order to lay out a path for further research and implementation.

Length: 3-5 pages, (includes bibliography that refers to 5-10 sources of any kind, including blogs and
media reports, to support your argument, does not include cover page, no abstract necessary, up to
you whether it's single or double-spaced. Use APA style. Please submit as Word-compatible document,
no PDF's).

APA style: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

As you look to Deliverable #2, a few thoughts:

(1) Although each of the clients varies in terms of scope and need, we intend to standardize the learning
experience you get from the process -- regardless of which client you're assigned. That said, we'd like to
hear what your ultimate client preferences are for Deliverables #3-5. So when you submit next week's
assignment, please include, at the top of your paper, your second preference for a client (assuming that
your paper indicates your first choice!).

(2) Deliverable #2 "Research Problem" is your attempt to make sense of your particular client's stated
challenge. Put yourself in the role of a consultant. Your new client has just come to your office, and
explained the business, the need, and the challenge s/he faces. They lack resources but are asking for
the moon (typical). And they want your initial analysis fast (also typical). You can only charge them so
much (theoretically), so you need to focus what they've come to you for in a way that (a) makes sense to
you, is manageable, and gives you a clear path forward; (b) you believe will satisfy the client's core need,
even if it doesn't address every single goal or concern (their thoughts might be so unformed as to not
even recognize how to measure success). This is fundamentally an exercise in listening, processing, and
then filtering into a short recommendation that makes sense to everyone concerned -- including
yourselves!

(3) Now that you've seen a bit of the client process, if you know of organizations that might benefit from
interaction with the MCDM (and vice versa) in other classes, please consider having them fill out a Client
Discovery form. Scott Macklin oversees our Community Scholarship, and can help facilitate that
(smacklin@uw.edu, copied).

Finally, Mac and I recognize that we're throwing you into the deep end of the pool after just two
sessions together. But we've found that in our experience in the MCDM, it's just the best way to learn.
We also think the quick start and short timeline are pretty realistic given the situations many you face or
will face outside the class. Be assured that we know that it's early, and that you don't feel like you have
all the tools at your fingertips. What matters most for Deliverable #2 is your ability to synthesize what
you heard from the client, and your ability to essentially "think on your feet" and provide a way forward.

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 8
Week 3 10/13/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
12:59 PM

CHANNELS OF INFLUENCE AND PERSUASION

DUE: Research Problem

Class Slides: link (Mac's will be available as a download on Media Space afterwards)

Readings
1. Li, Chapter 6
2. Shirky, Chapter 4, 8

To be discussed, though not required: How Ford Got Social Media Marketing Right (Harvard Business
Review blog, January 2010).
And Wired article on Nick Bilton and his view on the importance of storytelling (October 12, 2010)

Guiding Questions
1. How have new digital platforms facilitated cultivation of communities?
2. Why has storytelling re-emerged as a trusted conduit in the digital age?
3. How can social media networks be used for research?

- Digital communication tools and platforms available to address clients’ problems, identify their
communities of interest. What storytelling offers. This is about using tools to tell your stories, if it's not
helping you tell your story, then you're using the wrong tool.

- Social media platforms and research
Choice of channels to reach have both cultural and technical considerations.
Mac: Overview of SNS research generally. What others have done, Mac's work.

- Class Discussion re: clients and problems.

Guest lecturer: Ford Fiesta Brand Manager Sam De La Garza (@samdelag)

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 9
Week 4 10/20/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:11 PM

MEASUREMENT AND ROI

Slides
Hanson's lecture link
Kristy Bolsinger's slides link
Survey Analytics' slides link

Readings
1. Li, Chapter 4
2. Shirky 9
3. http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/04/22/altimeter-report-social-marketing-analytics-
with-web-analytics-demystified/

Worth a look: Social Media ROI presentation on Slideshare

Guiding Questions
1. What is ROI and why is it important?
2. How has ROI changed in the digital age, and what is its relevance?
3. What do we need to know, and how do we find it when engaged in strategic research?

- ROI in a digital world. - Hanson and Mac

• Guest lecturer: Kristy Bolsinger, Social Media Marketing Strategist, Real Networks,
Gamehouse.com

- Mac: Question to outcome. What is it that we need to know, and how do we find it?

Guest: Survey Analytics, platform demo.

• Divide into teams.

TEAMS BREAKDOWN: link

Assignment
(2) Preliminary Report (Team/15 DUE 11/3 6 p.m. via Collect-It)
• Identify your chosen client, and the members of your team.
• Detail follow-up interactions that you've had with your clients, based on having shared #1 with
them.
• Conduct and outline some basic research based on the problem you’ve identified, including
secondary sources. Also detail any quantitative or qualitative research tools you would undertake
to solve this problem, explaining why those particular methods would help.
• State your hypothetical strategy based on the preliminary research.
• Describe what next steps you would take, including follow-up interaction with the client.
• Provide a bibliography for any secondary research.

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 10
Week 5 10/27/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:11 PM

RESEARCH TOOLS

Readings
1. The End of Science http://www.wired.com/print/science/discoveries/magazine/16-07/pb_theory
2. Data With Destiny, Advertising Age (http://adage.com/digital/article?article_id=130969)

"Managing Team Performance" article (link), slideshow (link)
Peer evaluation form for teams (link). Also available on Media Space group page.

Hanson's slides for mini-lecture (link)
Mac's slides (link)

Guiding Questions
1. What impact has the ubiquity of data had on our ability to create strategy?
2. What are the most effective research tools to assess and address client needs?
3. How do we use data visualization to both assess and persuade?

- Data visualization (guest lecturer: Tableau).
- Mac: Tools to assess and address client needs. Overview of research tools.
- Hanson: Massive data, ethnographic film.

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 11
Week 6 11/3/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:16 PM

MULTIMEDIA

READINGS
Chapters 4,6 Yochai Benkler, The Wealth of Networks (2006 Yale University Press) PDF available
for free download here.

DUE: Preliminary Report

Hanson's slides.

Guiding Questions
1. What explains the evolution from mass media to networked media?
2. How can multimedia be used effectively within social networks and communities?
3. Massive data revisited.

Guest speaker: Adam Brotman, VP Starbucks Digital on Starbucks' new digital network. Adam's LinkedIn
profile.

Hanson leaves class around 9:15 p.m.
In-class group work with instructor support.

Assignment
(3) Multimedia Presentation (Team /30 to the Media Space/in-class due Dec 1 or 8): Let’s see how well
you convince others! In 5-10 minutes, create a persuasive digital presentation (slides, animation, or
video) that summarizes the essence of your proposal and really helps the client to visualize the problem
and the solution. You’ll deliver the video as a link to the COM 529 Group page of the Media Space. You
and your colleagues will be responsible for viewing each presentation, then submitting to an in-person
Q&A, where you’ll critique and grade each other.

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 12
Week 7 11/10/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:16 PM

MAKING THE CASE

Readings: Chapters 1,4 Lanier (you should really buy the book, but here's the PDF for a limited time).

Lanier article and The Social Network film critique in NY Review of Books. Link

Hanson's slides link Mac's slides link

Guiding Questions
1. What are some philosophical objections to social media?
2. How are business structures (particularly with regards to communication) changed in the digital
media era?
3. How can we be more thoughtful about our own arguments and observations by creating the right
hypothesis?

Feedback on Preliminary Report

Consultations with groups on Multimedia Deliverable (View many of last year's multimedia
presentations on the Media Space here (make sure you're logged in beforehand).

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 13
Week 8 11/17/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:16 PM

FAILURE, TRANSPARENCY AND AUTHENTICITY

Readings
1. Shirky, Chapter 10, 11
2. Li, Chapter 8, 9

Hanson's slides link

Guiding Questions
1. Why is failure a desired initial outcome in the digital media era?
2. What does transparency and authenticity really mean??
3. How do we effectively manage #1 and #2 within an organization?

- More advanced look at how digital media is shaping business processes and strategies.
Guest speaker Colleen Moffitt, Communiqué PR
Guest speaker David Evans, Psychster Twitter as an appropriate tool for advertising and crisis
management?

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 14
Week 9 11/24/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:16 PM

Work session.

In-class consultations with instructors as needed.

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 15
Week 10 12/1/10
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:16 PM

Presentations

Assignment
For those who presented in this week:

(4) Final Proposal (Team /20 DUE 12/8 to the Media Space): This is what you’ll submit to the client. In
10-15 pages:
• About the Organization
• Summary of its current outreach/engagement strategies.
• How the Client has identified its problem. Interaction that you've had with the client to clarify the
problem.
• Challenges the client faces according to your analysis (may differ from C), and how a
communication strategy will resolve this problem.
• Your strategy. Detail appropriate digital media tools in this context, and justify through research.
• Proposed Strategy -- explain why, pointing to examples of successful implementation.
• If realistic, demonstrate a sample of your strategy.
• Strategy Implementation: how much time, how much staff? Timeline.

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 16
Week 11 12/8/10
Thursday, September 09, 2010
11:24 AM

Presentations

Assignment
For those who presented this week:

(4) Final Proposal (Team /20 DUE 12/13 to the Media Space): This is what you’ll submit to the client. In
10-15 pages:
• About the Organization
• Summary of its current outreach/engagement strategies.
• How the Client has identified its problem. Interaction that you've had with the client to clarify the
problem.
• Challenges the client faces according to your analysis (may differ from C), and how a
communication strategy will resolve this problem.
• Your strategy. Detail appropriate digital media tools in this context, and justify through research.
• Proposed Strategy -- explain why, pointing to examples of successful implementation.
• If realistic, demonstrate a sample of your strategy.
• Strategy Implementation: how much time, how much staff? Timeline.

Class Meetings (always beta) Page 17
Deliverables
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:01 PM

Communication challenge that requires a strategic solution: what problem are they trying to solve that
will relate to their business model. [i.e. how will the communication strategy solve a business issue]. In
other words, you'll be producing a communication solution for a business problem.

[Note: to peruse last year's deliverables, check out the Media Space page for the 2009 class at
http://mediaspace.washington.edu/ms/mediaspace/pg/groups/226/com-529-strategic-
research-2009/ -- make sure you're logged in to the Media Space before clicking this link. Requirements
are not exactly the same, but it gives you a sense of how students worked on their deliverables]

(1) Research Problem (individual /15 DUE 10/13/10 by 5 pm via Collect-It): Based on an in-class client
presentation, you will draw up paper that defines the problem, develops the context that helps your
audience understand why the problem is important, and formulate the possible alternative solutions
that should be explored based on the limited evidence from initial sources.

For this deliverable, include:
(a) About your client.
(b) What the client thinks his/her challenge is.
(c) What you think his/her challenge is. Why? (refer back to what you heard from the presenter, do
some secondary research on the issue generally, and lay out your focused, singular representation of
how you see the client's problem. Explain WHY you think this is the problem on which to focus.
(d) Then based on your research such as using the library database, news articles, blogs, previous
attempts to create similar strategies, and even Shirky, give us a preliminary recommendation as to what
you would suggest the client should do. And refer to 5-10 sources along the way (APA citation style),
providing a bibliography at the end (that should take up a page right there).

Remember, this is a short, fairly simple assignment. It's supposed to allow you to distill a real-world
situation in a way that makes sense to you (and that corresponds to some of the client's needs), and
applying some light research to it in order to lay out a path for further research and implementation.

Length: 3-5 pages, (includes bibliography that refers to 5-10 sources of any kind, including blogs and
media reports, to support your argument, does not include cover page, no abstract necessary, up to
you whether it's single or double-spaced. Use APA style. Please submit as Word-compatible document,
no PDF's.).

APA style: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

[As you look to Deliverable #2, a few thoughts:

(1) Although each of the clients varies in terms of scope and need, we intend to standardize the learning
experience you get from the process -- regardless of which client you're assigned. That said, we'd like to
hear what your ultimate client preferences are for Deliverables #3-5. So when you submit next week's
assignment, please include, at the top of your paper, your second preference for a client (assuming that
your paper indicates your first choice!).

(2) Deliverable #2 "Research Problem" is your attempt to make sense of your particular client's stated
challenge. Put yourself in the role of a consultant. Your new client has just come to your office, and
explained the business, the need, and the challenge s/he faces. They lack resources but are asking for
the moon (typical). And they want your initial analysis fast (also typical). You can only charge them so

Deliverables and Grading Page 18
the moon (typical). And they want your initial analysis fast (also typical). You can only charge them so
much (theoretically), so you need to focus what they've come to you for in a way that (a) makes sense to
you, is manageable, and gives you a clear path forward; (b) you believe will satisfy the client's core need,
even if it doesn't address every single goal or concern (their thoughts might be so unformed as to not
even recognize how to measure success). This is fundamentally an exercise in listening, processing, and
then filtering into a short recommendation that makes sense to everyone concerned -- including
yourselves!

(3) Now that you've seen a bit of the client process, if you know of organizations that might benefit from
interaction with the MCDM (and vice versa) in other classes, please consider having them fill out a Client
Discovery form. Scott Macklin oversees our Community Scholarship, and can help facilitate that
(smacklin@uw.edu, copied).

Finally, Mac and I recognize that we're throwing you into the deep end of the pool after just two
sessions together. But we've found that in our experience in the MCDM, it's just the best way to learn.
We also think the quick start and short timeline are pretty realistic given the situations many you face or
will face outside the class. Be assured that we know that it's early, and that you don't feel like you have
all the tools at your fingertips. What matters most for Deliverable #2 is your ability to synthesize what
you heard from the client, and your ability to essentially "think on your feet" and provide a way
forward.]

(2) Preliminary Report (Team/15 DUE 11/3 6 p.m. via Collect-It)
• Identify your chosen client, and the members of your team.
• Detail follow-up interactions that you've had with your clients, based on having shared #1 with
them.
• Conduct and outline some basic research based on the problem you’ve identified, including
secondary sources. Also detail any quantitative or qualitative research tools you would undertake
to solve this problem, explaining why those particular methods would help.
• State your hypothetical strategy based on the preliminary research.
• Describe what next steps you would take, including follow-up interaction with the client.
• Provide a bibliography for any secondary research.

(3) Multimedia Presentation (Team /30 to the Media Space/in-class due December 1/8): Let’s see how
well you convince others! In 5-10 minutes, create a persuasive digital presentation (slides, animation, or
video) that summarizes the essence of your proposal and really helps the client to visualize the problem
and the solution. You’ll deliver the video as a link to the COM 529 Group page of the Media Space.
You'll show the multimedia in class, then submit to an in-person Q&A, where you’ll critique and grade
each other.

View many of last year's multimedia presentations on the Media Space
http://mediaspace.washington.edu/ms/mediaspace/pg/pages/view/5570992/ (make sure you're logged
in beforehand). But don't feel that you necessarily need to adhere to any specific model. You're
communicators, effectiveness is what counts, no matter what the format. My only stipulation -- the
multimedia must be self-contained, so we should be able to watch it online without your involvement in
changing slides, providing live narrative, etc.

Grading criteria:

10 Lays out the "essence" of the team's strategy in a way that the client can easily grasp, and by which,
may even be convinced.
10 Keeps your attention (pacing, production values, organization)
10 Responds clearly, succinctly and authoritatively to client and cohort Q&A

Deliverables and Grading Page 19
10 Responds clearly, succinctly and authoritatively to client and cohort Q&A

(4) Final Proposal (Team /20 DUE 12/8 or 12/13 (depending on your date of presentation of #3) to the
Media Space class group page): This is what you’ll submit to the client. In 10-15 pages:
• About the Organization
• Summary of its current outreach/engagement strategies.
• How the Client has identified its problem. Interaction that you've had with the client to clarify the
problem.
• Challenges the client faces according to your analysis (may differ from C), and how a
communication strategy will resolve this problem.
• Your strategy. Detail appropriate digital media tools in this context, and justify through research.
• Proposed Strategy -- explain why, pointing to examples of successful implementation.
• If realistic, demonstrate a sample of your strategy.
• Strategy Implementation: how much time, how much staff? Timeline.

(5) Individual Engagement (Individual /20)
• 3 substantive comments to Flip The Media (or one published post, subject to editorial submission
approval). Before the end of the quarter, please send an e-mail with URL's for links to all of your
comments or post to mqjeffrey@comcast.net)
• 7 Brief Reflections (to Media Space Class Pages for each specific Week -- substantive comment
that refers to the week's reading, class lecture or discussion).
• 5 Cluetrain Manifesto essay (1-2 pages), due 10/6/10 to Collect-It
• 5 MCDM Vision Statement and Meeting with Hanson, Anita, or Scott.

Deliverables and Grading Page 20
Clients
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:21 PM

Pacific Science Center 6:30 - 6:50

EPA Climate Change and Native storytelling 6:55 - 7:15

BirdNote 7:20 - 7:40

Woodland Park Zoo 7:50 - 8:10

The New Hive 8:15 - 8:35

University of Washington Research Commons 8:40 - 9:00

City Club Living Voters Guide 9:05 - 9:25

Deliverables and Grading Page 21
Grading
Monday, September 06, 2010
1:10 PM

Your final grade will be based on the total points received. The following is the scale used to determine
the final grade.

* 95-100 = 4.0
* 90-94.9 = 3.9
* 87-89 = 3.7
* 84-86.9 = 3.5
* 80-83.9 = 3.2
* 77-79.9 = 2.8

4.0
Excellent and exceptional work for a graduate student. Work at this level is extraordinarily thorough,
well-reasoned, methodologically sophisticated, and well-written. Work is of good professional quality,
shows an incisive understanding of digital media-related issues and demonstrates clear recognition of
appropriate analytical approaches to digital media challenges and opportunities.
3.7
Strong work for a graduate student. Work at this level shows some signs of creativity, is thorough and
well-reasoned, indicates strong understanding of appropriate methodological or analytical approaches,
and demonstrates clear recognition and good understanding of salient digital media-related challenges
and opportunities.
3.5
Competent and sound work for a graduate student; well-reasoned and thorough, methodologically
sound, but not especially creative or insightful or technically sophisticated; shows adequate
understanding of digital media-related challenges and opportunities, although that understanding may
be somewhat incomplete. This is the graduate student grade that indicates neither unusual strength or
exceptional weakness.
3.3
Adequate work for a graduate student even though some weaknesses are evident. Moderately thorough
and well-reasoned, but some indication that understanding of the important issues is less than complete
and perhaps inadequate in other respects as well. Methodological or analytical approaches used are
generally adequate but have one or more weaknesses or limitations.
3.0
Fair work for a graduate student; meets the minimal expectations for a graduate student in the course;
understanding of salient issues is incomplete, methodological or analytical work performed in the
course is minimally adequate. Overall performance, if consistent in graduate courses, would be in
jeopardy of sustaining graduate status in "good standing."
2.7
Borderline work for a graduate student; barely meets the minimal expectations for a graduate student in
the course. Work is inadequately developed, important issues are misunderstood, and in many cases
assignments are late or incomplete. This is the minimum grade needed to pass the course.

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MCDM Practices and Policies
Wednesday, September 15, 2010
12:16 AM

Disability
To request academic accommodations due to a disability, please contact Disability Resources for
Students, 448 Schmitz, 206-543-8924/V, 206-5430-8925/TTY. If you have a letter from Disability
Resources for Students indicating that you have a disability that requires academic accommodations,
please present the letter to me so we can discuss the accommodations that you might need for the
class. I am happy to work with you to maximize your learning experience.

MCDM Electronic Mail Standards of Conduct
Email communications (and all communications generally) among MCDM community members should
seek to respect the rights and privileges of all members of the academic community. This includes not
interfering with university functions or endangering the health, welfare, or safety of other persons. With
this in mind, in addition to the University of Washington's Student Conduct Code, the MCDM establishes
the following standards of conduct in respect to electronic communications among students and faculty:

• Email communications should be limited to occasional messages necessary to the specific educational
experience at hand.

• Email communications should be responded to, if at all possible, within 48 hours. In particular regard
to student communications with faculty, if an email from a student to a faculty member does not
receive a response within 48 hours, then the student should investigate other ways of contacting the
instructor (telephone, office hours, etc.).

• Email communications should not include any CCing of anyone not directly involved in the specific
educational experience at hand.

• Email communications should not include any blind-CCing to third parties, regardless of the third
party’s relevance to the matter at hand.

Communications and Meeting with the Instructors
We're happy to confer with students on a regular basis – in person (before or after class, or by
appointment), and by e-mail. Hanson usually checks his campus e-mail several times a day M-Th, less
frequently on F-Su. Please use clear subject lines (add “urgent” if the message is time sensitive). Expect
to get a reply back within 24 hours, so take this into account if you’re close to a project deadline.

If you disagree with a grade that you receive:
(1) Wait 24 hours after we return your assignment.
(2) Re-read the graded assignment.
(3) Write your reasons for disagreement with the grade.
(4) Turn in your note indicating your reasons for disagreement, along with your graded assignment.

We will contact you and make an appointment to discuss the issue with you within 48 hours. In any
situation that you wish to meet directly with Hanson or Mac, please do not hesitate to contact them by
e-mail.

MCDM PRACTICES AND PRINCIPLES
The Master of Communication in Digital Media is a degree program primarily for working professionals,
intended to balance fundamental theory and concepts with practical tools. It focuses on the economic,

Deliverables and Grading Page 23
intended to balance fundamental theory and concepts with practical tools. It focuses on the economic,
political, social and cultural impact of new communication technologies and encourages students to
apply these concepts to their spheres of interest.
Many of our students are looking to advance their careers – some within their present organizations,
others in new professional directions. They want a new perspective on technology. Although a few may
pursue additional studies after completing the MCDM, the MCDM is not integrated into the
Communication Department doctoral program.

At the end of the program, students should be able to:
(1) Communicate with influence and persuasion within a digital media communications ecosystem.
(2) Understand what constitutes a successful communication endeavor within that ecosystem.
(3) Grasp the big picture of technology and communication, and provide strategic leadership within an
organization based on these key insights.

The MCDM provides high quality instruction with conceptual and practical applications. As such:
- The syllabus should clearly lay out expectations and learning objectives.
- Class projects should flow directly from larger learning objectives.
- Grading and workload (3 hours a week per credit hour including class time) at this grad school level
should also reflect that most students are working full-time, which may require instructors to be realistic
and flexible in their expectations.
- A minimum of 2.7 is required for each course that is counted towards the degree.
- Final grades should be submitted in a timely manner.

In order to provide greater details into grade expectations, the following guide is circulated to all MCDM
faculty to consider as they assign grades each quarter:

4.0
Excellent and exceptional work for a graduate student. Work at this level is extraordinarily thorough,
well-reasoned, methodologically sophisticated, and well-written. Work is of good professional quality,
shows an incisive understanding of digital media-related issues and demonstrates clear recognition of
appropriate analytical approaches to digital media challenges and opportunities.
3.7
Strong work for a graduate student. Work at this level shows some signs of creativity, is thorough and
well-reasoned, indicates strong understanding of appropriate methodological or analytical approaches,
and demonstrates clear recognition and good understanding of salient digital media-related challenges
and opportunities.
3.5
Competent and sound work for a graduate student; well-reasoned and thorough, methodologically
sound, but not especially creative or insightful or technically sophisticated; shows adequate
understanding of digital media-related challenges and opportunities, although that understanding may
be somewhat incomplete. This is the graduate student grade that indicates neither unusual strength or
exceptional weakness.
3.3
Adequate work for a graduate student even though some weaknesses are evident. Moderately thorough
and well-reasoned, but some indication that understanding of the important issues is less than complete
and perhaps inadequate in other respects as well. Methodological or analytical approaches used are
generally adequate but have one or more weaknesses or limitations.
3.0
Fair work for a graduate student; meets the minimal expectations for a graduate student in the course;
understanding of salient issues is incomplete, methodological or analytical work performed in the
course is minimally adequate. Overall performance, if consistent in graduate courses, would be in
jeopardy of sustaining graduate status in "good standing."
2.7
Borderline work for a graduate student; barely meets the minimal expectations for a graduate student in

Deliverables and Grading Page 24
Borderline work for a graduate student; barely meets the minimal expectations for a graduate student in
the course. Work is inadequately developed, important issues are misunderstood, and in many cases
assignments are late or incomplete. This is the minimum grade needed to pass the course.

In closing, MCDM students are expected to:
- Write coherently and clearly
- Complete assignments on time and as directed.
- Not miss more than two classes a quarter, unless due to extreme circumstances.
- Engage as much as possible with colleagues and the instructor.
- Stay current with the latest developments in digital media.

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