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RUNNING HEAD: EDID 6511 E-BOOK CONTRIBUTION

Albert P. Joseph - 20052880

Jane Pierre - 00746398

Marvin Thompson - 309101649

Meredith Connor - 20053571

Terry Hall - 94033128

A Paper Presented in Partial Fulfilment

Of the Requirements of

EDID 6511 - Facilitating and Managing Learning

Semester 1 - 2017/2018

University: University of the West Indies Open Campus

Course Coordinator Dr Camille Dickson-Deane


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CONTENTS

Proposal 3
Justification of Proposal 3
Proposed Content 6
ADDIE and Project Management 6
Learning objectives 6
The ADDIE Model, Instructional Designer and Project Management 6
Key takeaways: 10
Project Charter 11
Learning objectives 11
What is the Project Charter 11
Project Charter vs. Project Scope Statement 14
Project Charter Example 1 15
Project Charter Example 2 22
Key takeaways: 27
References 29
Appendix - Individual Contributions 31
Self-Assessment 32
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Proposal

The writers propose that two additions be made to Chapter 1: Introduction to Project

Management of the e-book ‘Project Management for Instructional Designers’ as

follows:

1. The addition of a Section 1.5: The ADDIE Model and Project Management,

and

2. The inclusion of a segment titled ‘The Project Charter’ to Section 1.4:

Introduction to the Project Management Knowledge Areas. The writers

propose that this segment be placed immediately before the segment titled

‘Project Start-Up and Integration’. Two project charter examples will be

included as part of the proposed content.

The proposed content for each addition will be accompanied by, learning objectives,

and key takeaways.

Justification of Proposal

The e-book titled “Project Management for Instructional Designers” is

“designed to provide an overview of project management principles in instructional

design” and is “tailored specifically for instructional designers” (Wiley et al., 2012).

The book includes descriptions of project management principles and video

recordings of the shared experiences of three instructional design project managers

as they relate to some of the principles.

Despite the intended purpose of the book, there is the absence of a section

that is dedicated to an introduction of the relationship that exists between project


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management principles and instructional design principles. There is no mention in

the book of the instructional design phases and how these phases compare, overlap

or are aligned with project management phases. Without this information the book

inadvertently presumes a seamless and automatic transfer of knowledge into the

instructional designer’s work environment.

Karumathil (2016) posits however that for the instructional designer to think

“like a project manager, requires a shift in perspective” by the instructional designer.

The instructional designer must shift focus from the design of learning experiences

and achieving learning outcomes, to the management of that learning project. The

group sees the addition of this relationship as being beneficial to instructional

designers who are increasingly being called upon to exhibit the characteristics, skills

and knowledge of a project manager and use project management in their

instructional design projects. Understanding for example how the ADDIE (Analyse,

Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate) model commonly used for instructional

design fits in with the phases of project management (initiation, planning, execution

and closeout) will enhance knowledge integration by the instructional designer into

his or her work environment.

Also absent from the book is a write up on the project charter, which is a very

important document in the project initiation phase of the project management

process. The words ‘project charter’ have been mentioned fleetingly in the book but

not in the level of detail required for an important component such as this. The

project charter is usually prepared by the project manager and provides evidence to

support the approval and initiation of a project.

Chapter 4 in the 5th Edition PMBOK Ⓡ Guide has been dedicated to the

project charter (Rowley, 2013). A design feature of the e-book is that each chapter in
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the e-book is aligned with the PMBOK (Wiley et al., 2012). Therefore there is a need

to update the e-book to align it with the 5th Edition PMBOK Ⓡ Guide by giving

prominence to the project charter, with the inclusion of a section on the project

charter in the e-book.


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Proposed Content

ADDIE and Project Management

Chapter 1: INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Section 1.5: THE ADDIE MODEL AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Learning objectives
1. Describe the ADDIE Model

2. Identify the relationship between the ADDIE Model and Project Management

The ADDIE Model, Instructional Designer and Project Management

Instructional systems design (ISD) is rooted in systems theory, where the

design of instruction is considered systemic and systematic. Hence the dependency

by instructional designers over the years on the ADDIE model for the design and

development of instruction.

The ADDIE model is the generic process approach, developed in the 1970s

and used by Instructional Designers and content developers to create instructional

course materials. Its five phases of: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation

and Evaluation epitomize a dynamic set of guidelines for building effective training

and performance tools.

In the analysis phase, the instructional problem is clarified, instructional goals

and objectives are established, and the learning environment and learner's existing

knowledge and skills are identified. Learning objectives, assessment instruments,

exercises, content, subject matter analysis, lesson planning and media selection are

dealt with in the design phase. The development phase is where the developers
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create and assemble the content artefacts that were created in the design phase.

During the implementation phase, a procedure for training the facilitators and the

learners is developed. The evaluation phase is ongoing throughout the design

process. Its purpose is to ensure that all stated goals of the learning process will

meet the specific needs.

Figure 1: The ADDIE Model

ADDIE is a robust model that has endured the test of time because of its step

by step linear approach to design (Morrison, 2015). However, despite its versatility

the model possesses a few weaknesses. These weaknesses stem from the ADDIE’s

strength. For as a result of its linear characteristics the model does not allow for
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flexibility within the environment, nor does it make an attempt to check to see if a

learning and development solution is an appropriate approach to solve an

instructional problem and as a result of this business needs and factors affecting

them are often ignored (Morrison, 2015).

The world as we know it has changed and continues to evolve and ADDIE is

no longer an adequate standalone tool for use by Instructional Designers. Van Rooij

(2010) affirms that in the digital age, instructional designers must possess both a

sound instructional design knowledge base and solid project management skills that

will enable them to complete courseware projects on time, on budget and in

conformance with client expectations. To assist managers to meet business needs

and solve business problems project management should be used in conjunction

with the ADDIE Model.

Instructional systems design has its strengths underpinned in systemic and

systematic thinking, and a grounded project approach: essential characteristics,

which form the backbone of project management. Pan (2012) confirms that both

systemic and systematic thinking are also adopted by managers when developing an

organization’s strategic plan. Such thinking allows managers to focus on the output

(or the value) of the business process prior to mapping out an organization’s

strategic plan and operational plan (Pan, 2012).

“Instructional designers are called to play many roles, including performance

analyst, project manager, strategic and learning consultant” and media developer

among others (ibstpi, n.d.). Due to the expansion of roles that the Instructional

designer plays and the changing environment in which they work, the instructional

designer’s competencies have been revised to include “the influence of advanced

technologies, team-based design, and business management skills” (ibstpi, n.d.).


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Brandon (2004) states that instructional design and project management are

two separate components in any rational approach to the planning of instructional

systems but they do not map directly across one to the other. They complement

rather than duplicate. However Karumathil (2016) states that “project management

fits perfectly with ADDIE”. As budding instructional designers this knowledge serves

as a guide for approaching design projects.

Gone are the days when an organization needs to hire an instructional

designer and a project manager to work on a project. The lines of separation

between the roles that both play are becoming less defined. In examining the roles of

the instructional designer and the project manager it is evident that there are many

similarities (Arshavskiy, 2014). For instance:-

● Whereas an instructional designer would analyse the needs in the first stage

of the instructional design initiative, the project manager looks at the project's

concept (Arshavskiy, 2014) and analyses the business needs during the

initiation phase.

● Utilizing ADDIE, the instructional designer develops learning objectives and

outlines the curriculum. This is similar to scope definition (Arshavskiy, 2014)

that is the focus of the project manager during the planning phase.

● “The instructional designer looks at authoring, coding and scripting as part of

the development phase of the course”, while the project manager considers

the key features, structure and success criteria etc. as being a part of the

“detailed design phase of the project” (Arshavskiy, 2014).

“A closer look at the similarities between the two disciplines then leads” to a

conclusion that an instructional designer does, in fact, “also wear a project

manager’s hat (though not in totality) when carrying out his/her role” (Arshavskiy,
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2014). “However, while the project manager looks at project sponsors, project

charters and project budgets” and the like “within the purview of their role, the

instructional design project manager has to” focus additionally on “learning

experiences, knowledge and skills gaps and learning outcomes” (Arshavskiy, 2014).

Adopted from https://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/assets/images/learningsolutions/101104/101104mgt-fig1pg13.png

Key takeaways:
● The elements of the instructional design ADDIE model (analyze, design,

development, implementation, evaluation) are comparable with the phases of

project management.

● The roles of the instructional designer and project manager are similar.
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Project Charter

Chapter 1: INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT

1.4: INTRODUCTION TO THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT KNOWLEDGE


AREAS

Learning objectives

1. To introduce the concept of the project charter

2. Explain the role of the project charter

3. To outline the relevant sections of the project charter

4. To provide practical examples of project charters for both instructional and

non-instructional projects

What is the Project Charter

A Project Charter is a document that formally authorizes the existence of a project

and the authority to utilize organizational resources in the execution of the project

activities. It is referred to as the “birth certificate of a project” because it is issued by

the project initiator for the purpose of obtaining formal approval of the proposed

design of the project.

Project Charters are typically structured to include three major sections which are the

Introduction, Project Overview/Project Summary, and the Project Organization:

● The introduction to the project provides a brief summary of the project,

project sponsorship and authorization. It also indicates the intended

outcomes and demonstrate how they are aligned with the strategic outcomes
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of the organization. The introduction should also highlight the most important

aspects of the project: the reason the project was initiated, who will use what

is to be created and how it will benefit them. Project goals and objectives,

major milestones, deliverables, key risks and estimated total costs are also

summarized and disclosed in this section.

● Overview/Project Summary – this section will summarize the entire project

charter highlighting significant points of interest to the readers of the

document. It will include all of the information required for approval by the

stakeholders. The project background should include a statement of the

problem and how the problem will be addressed by the project, as well as, the

requirements (e.g. regulatory and industrial standards to be met, etc.).

Stakeholders who will benefit from the results of the proposed project will be

identified in this section. The project goals, outcomes and objectives will be

stated. Project goals should be linked to measurable outcomes that are

driven by project activities. Measurement criteria should be provided to show

how the achievement of desired outcomes related to the objectives can be

confirmed.

● The project scope is defined to include a description of the features and

functions of the product or service the project will deliver. The project

boundaries should be stated by outlining the major activities that will be

required to successfully complete the project. Areas not included in the scope

activities “out scope” should be identified for clarity. Significant milestones

and deliverables in the project must be identified. Internal project deliverables

required to ensure that the project is well managed must be included


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(communication plan etc.). State the criteria that will be used to assess

quality and completion of each deliverable, who will be responsible and when

the deliverable is due. The project scope document provides a summary of

the cost estimate of all resources to be required (human resources, material

and financial) to produce the deliverables and meet the project objectives

which are covered within the project scope. It should also state the sources of

funding, project risk, assumptions and constraints.

● Project Organization will explain the project’s:-

❖ Governance structure - how decisions will be made and who is

responsible. The corporate governance bodies involved in decision-

making will also be identified and described.

❖ Facilities and resources to be used.

❖ Team structure – indicate who are the team members and the reporting

and communication relations between them.

❖ Roles and responsibilities assigned to each team member should be

explained. For Example

Roles and Responsibility Matrix

Roles Responsibility

Project Sponsor ● Provides funding


● Communicates project requirement
Has ultimate authority and ● Approves project charter
responsibility for the project ● Approves changes to project scope

Project Leader/Project Manager ● Develops the project charter and other project documents with the
support of the project team and submits them for approval by the project
Functional ownership and sponsor
responsibility for the project ● Document project goals and objectives
outcomes ● Assign project roles and responsibilities
● Plan and develop strategies for achieving deliverables
● Provide formal and informal leadership
● Communicate project progress to sponsors and other stakeholders

Communication Specialist ● Communications planning and execution


Has responsibility for ● Establish communication strategies
communication ● Provide ideas for addressing critical project issues
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Project Charter vs. Project Scope Statement

It must be emphasised that the project charter should not be confused with the

project scope statement. “It may be difficult to distinguish” between the two: although

different they both contain “some similar elements” (Rowley, 2013). According to

Rowley (2013), the project charter is “created at a high level” when seeking project

sponsor approval for a project and includes a general description of the scope

among other elements (e.g. cost, time and risk). In contrast, the project scope

statement includes a more detailed description of the scope and is created during

the planning phase of the project (Rowley, 2013). Each element generally described

in the project charter is addressed in a greater level of detail in the respective

management plan (e.g. cost management plan, time management plan and risk

management plan).
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Project Charter Example 1

Disclaimer: Be advised that these charters are only examples; charter styles and
requirements vary based on the nature of the project and organizational standards.

Sample Project Charter.

The charter below is a sample of a charter created for the instructional design
project. It aligns with the ADDIE Instructional model. The brief explanation that
precedes the sample charter is designed to assist you in understanding how the
instructional design project phases may align with the project management
phases.

[Initiation phase: Analysis phase: In both project management and instructional


design this is the foundational phase which involves developing the main purpose
of the work. This is the phase where contextual analysis and needs assessments
are done and stakeholders identified for instructional design. Incidentally this is
also the phase where the project charter is developed for project management in
order to gain buy in and financing from project sponsors. The project charter
would contain information derived from similar analyses. It would provide
justification for the project, document the needs to be addressed and the outcomes
as well as who will be responsible.]

[Planning: Design: The activities at this phase outline what will be done
throughout the project, and how it will be done. For instructional design it will
involve developing the lesson and selecting instructional strategies that will best
deliver the stated objectives. For project management it is here that the various
plans are developed for example, the scope management plan, cost management
plan, risk management plan, quality management plan etc.]

[Execution: Pilot/Test/Develop/Implement: This is the phase where the project


is rolled out or implemented according to the plans. In the instructional design
context it is here that the pilot lesson will be launched and tested.]

[Closeout: Evaluate: Here is where the project activities end and the key
successes of the project are noted as well as the lessons learned. Instructional
designers will assess client satisfaction. Instructional designers will also conduct
assessments on the content, the entire design process and materials.]
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BACKGROUND
The Royal St Christopher and Nevis Police Force In its Strategic plan 2016 – 2019

listed under the category of service improvement, improvements in training and

continuous training as a key priority. Additionally, a need for training in the areas of

evidence and procedures and criminal law has been name as critical to

achievement of its crime solving initiatives. Consequently, a training manual has

been proposed as one of the initiatives to achieving its training mandate. The

evidence training manual project is expected to commence on 1 November of 2017

and terminate by 30 May 2019. The manual is intended to improve the overall

training of officers. The evidence module would form part of the larger training

manual and would be useful in the following ways:

 An introduction to subject matter;

 Outline procedures to be followed during training;

 A reference to subject matter after training; and

 A general reference document.

As part of the training initiative the module will assist in ensuring that there is a

consistency in the presentation of the content. Additionally, it provides the

opportunity to consolidate all relevant information for training on the subject.

SCOPE

The project team will analyze, design and develop, pilot and evaluate the module.

This module will to be utilized. The team would be responsible for obtaining the

organization's current training material as well as the following activities:-


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❖ Conducting front end analyses

❖ Creating sample task that would utilize tested instructional methodologies.

❖ Compiling and arranging the material in modular format

❖ Testing, evaluating and modifying modules

❖ ·Preparing hard copies and electronic samples of the module

The completed module will contain the following:-

❖ Behavioural objectives

❖ Sample lesson plans

❖ Sample practice exercises

❖ Sample assessments

❖ Most current information related to subject matter

OBJECTIVES

❖ Complete front end analyses 30 November, 2017.

❖ Define all relevant information (scope) for module by 30 November, 2017

❖ Define module objectives by 10 March 2018

❖ Define planning requirements for pilot module by 5 October, 2018

❖ Complete instructional flowchart for pilot module by 5 August, 2018

❖ Conduct user and stakeholder meeting on by 5 November, 2018

❖ Develop prototype for pilot module by 5 August, 2018

❖ Revise module based on evaluation May 30 2019

❖ Complete and pilot module March 5 2019


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GOVERNANCE

Sponsor – The Royal St Christopher and Nevis Police Force

Executive Sponsor – Government of St Kitts & Nevis

The following are team leaders:-

❖ Project Manager- Marvin Thompson (ID)

❖ Team member – Albert Joseph (editing, compiling)

❖ Team member – Meredith Connor (graphic/layout)

❖ Team member – Terry Hall – (prototype leader)

❖ Team member- Jane Pierre – (logistics)

SCHEDULES

❖ Complete front end analyses 30 November, 2017.

❖ Define all relevant information (scope) for module by 30 November, 2017

❖ Define module objectives by 15 January 2018

❖ Define planning requirements for pilot module by 15 March, 2018

❖ Complete instructional flowchart for pilot module by 15 March, 2018

❖ Conduct user and stakeholder meeting on 15 March, 2018

❖ Develop prototype for pilot module by 15 April, 2018

❖ Revise module based on UAT by 5 May, 2019

❖ Field Testing completed by ,January 2019

❖ Complete and pilot module 30 August 2018

❖ The project duration is 1 November 2017 to 30 November 2018.

During that time a number of key milestones would be realized.


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BUDGET

The project is a fixed cost contractual arrangement. Resources expertise has been

sourced from various public departments in order to keep cost at a minimum.

Team members will temporarily reassigned to the project and paid their usual

salaries plus a small stipend.

CONSTRAINTS

❖ Government and organization scarce resources

❖ Experience of the project manager and project team

RISK

❖ Government of the organization diverting resources for some other higher

priority

❖ Leadership change and has new priorities

❖ Change in legislation

❖ Vendor(public department) general lack inefficiency

❖ Releasing of funding/ delay funding

DEPENDENCIES

❖ Government making resources available in a timely manner

❖ Legal department of government providing documents in a timely fashion


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❖ No major changes to legislation

STAKEHOLDERS

❖ Training instructors

❖ Supervisors

❖ Commissioners, middle managers

❖ Branch board executives

❖ Project team

❖ Subject matter experts

❖ Guest Instructors

ASSUMPTIONS

❖ Laws will not be changed during the period

❖ Training in evidence will remain a key priority in during the time

❖ Manual will still be considered a key resource to achieve mandate

APPROVAL

_______________________________ ________________________

Executive Sponsor Date

_______________________________ _________________________

Director of Training Date

______________________________ __________________________

Project Manager Date


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Project Charter Example 2

The following charter is designed for a project of a non-instructional design nature.

It provides information on the scope of a project aimed at preparing a kitchen

garden. The various tasks to be undertaken, the deliverables and those who play

an integral role within the project are discussed. As with any project there are risks

and constraints that need to be addressed and these will also be dealt with.

PROJECT CHARTER - EXAMPLE TWO

INTRODUCTION

Summary of Project

It can be agreed that the cost of preparing meals for a large team can be very

expensive. Multiply that daily and the price becomes exorbitant. The

environmental club has therefore decided to embark on a project of having a

kitchen garden to reduce the cost of purchase. The space has been identified for

planting herbs and seasonings and to also plant vegetables such as cabbage,

carrots, lettuce and spinach. The project has been planned thoroughly and the

team has sought sponsorship for the project.

Project Sponsorship

The club has written several agencies and two organizations are willing to partner

to make the project a reality. They are the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation

on Agriculture (IICA) and the supermarket chain Massy.


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Intended Outcomes

The project intends to accomplish the following :

1. Identify and prepare an agricultural space for a kitchen garden

2. Plant a variety of vegetables, herbs and seasonings to supply the kitchen for

student consumption.

Alignment with Strategic Outcomes

This project will be quite ideal in that it will assist the school in providing healthier

and more nourishing meals to students. It is the school’s goal to ensure that all

students receive a healthy and nutritious meal daily.

OVERVIEW/ PROJECT SUMMARY

Scope

The need to have all students receive at least one nutritious meal daily is

paramount. The environmental club has seen it necessary to commence a kitchen

garden to assist in reducing spending and to enhance the meals that students

consume with more vegetables. Within the scope of this project a total of twenty

five agricultural beds will be prepared so that peppers, carrots, tomatoes and other

vegetables can be planted. These crops will be harvested once ready and will be

utilized in the school’s kitchen.

Deliverables

● Backfielded area for crop planting

● Completion of 25 raised beds

● Kitchen garden with a variety of vegetables


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Schedule

The schedule outlines the individual tasks involved in the project and the expected

length of time for completion.

Task Estimated Time

Transportation of topsoil 1 day

Backfielding of the area 2 days

Creation of agricultural beds 2 days

Planting of crops 2 days

Budget

An allocation of $1000.00 will be made towards the project. This will include $500

towards the purchase of gardening tools and the other $500.00 towards materials

and labour.

Stakeholders

● School principal

● IICA/Massy

● Students

● Teachers

● Parents

● Cook

● Agricultural officer
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Risks

● Students will run on agricultural beds during playtime

● Crops will be eaten by crabs or destroyed by pests

● Crops will be exposed to too much rain or sunlight based on the identified

location

● Crops will be stolen by intruders

Constraints

● The designated area is not spacious enough to plant a large variety of

crops.

● The school’s proximity to the sea might prevent certain crops from growing

fully.

● Students are not adequately informed about agriculture.

Assumptions

● It is assumed that the planting of these crops will adequately provide

vegetables for student consumption.

● Planting of the crops would significantly reduce the kitchen’s weekly

expenses.
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PROJECT ORGANIZATION

Governance

Sponsor- IICA, Massy

Project Manager- Fintana Edward (Managing, strategizing)

Agricultural Officer- Gertrude Charles (Monitoring)

Planters/ Harvesters- Students

Project Authorization

Date:

By initializing each page and signing below, I _____________________, the

Project Sponsor, approve the project described herein and authorize it to begin.

IICA

By: _______________________________________________

Signature of Project Sponsor

_______________________________________________

Project Sponsor Printed Name

MASSY

By: _______________________________________________

Signature of Project Sponsor

_______________________________________________

Project Sponsor Printed Name


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Project Approvals

Name Role Signature

Fintana Edward Project Manager

Gertrude Charles Agricultural Officer

Keishell Francis Sponsor (IICA)

Martina Compton Sponsor (Massy)

Key takeaways:
1. The project charter is the “Birth Certificate” of the project. It is issued by the

project initiator for the purpose of obtaining formal approval of the proposed

design of the project.

2. Project Charters are typically structured to include three major sections which

are the Introduction, Project Overview/Project Summary, and the Project

Organization.

3. Each element generally described in the project charter is addressed in a

greater level of detail in the respective management plan.

4. The project charter and the project scope statement share some common

elements. The project charter however is used for project approval (with

generalised descriptions of the elements) and the project scope statement is


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created during the project’s planning phase and contains a more detailed

description of the project scope.


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References

Arshavskiy, M. (2014) The Role of an Instructional Designer as Project Manager.

Retrieved from https://elearningindustry.com/the-role-of-an-instructional-

designer-as-project-manager

Brandon, B. (2004). Closing the Loop in e-Learning Development: How to

reconnect instructional design and project management. Retrieved from

https://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/articles/283/closing-the-loop-in-e-

learning-development-how-to-reconnect-instructional-design-and-project-

management

ibstpi. Instructional Designer Competencies - Welcome to ibstpi. Welcome to

ibstpi. Retrieved 4 December 2017, from http://ibstpi.org/instructional-

design-competencies/

Karumathil, A. (2016). Think Like a Project Manager to Design Your Learning

Solution. Td.org. Retrieved 26 November 2017, from

https://www.td.org/Publications/Magazines/TD/TD-Archive/2016/08/Think-

Like-a-Project-Manager

Morrison, M. (2015). The ADDIE Instructional Design Model #HRBlog - RapidBI.

RapidBI. Retrieved 4 December 2017, from https://rapidbi.com/the-addie-

instructional-design-model-hrblog/

Pan, C. C. S. (2012). A Symbiosis Between Instructional Systems Design and

Project Management/

Rowley, J. (2013). 5th Edition PMBOK® Guide—Chapter 4: Project Charter.

4squareviews. Retrieved 27 November 2017, from


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https://4squareviews.com/2013/02/14/5th-edition-pmbok-guide-chapter-4-

project-charter/

Rowley, J. (2013). 5th Edition PMBOK® Guide—Chapter 5: Project Charter vs.

Project Scope Statement. 4squareviews. Retrieved 28 November 2017,

from https://4squareviews.com/2013/03/08/5th-edition-pmbok-guide-

chapter-5-project-charter-vs-project-scope-statement/

Van Rooij, S. W. (2010). Project management in instructional design: ADDIE is

not enough. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(5), 852-864.

Wiley et al. (2012). Project Management for Instructional Designers | Simple

Book Production. Pm4id.org. Retrieved 5 November 2017, from

http://pm4id.org
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Appendix - Individual Contributions

Action Contributed by

1.The ADDIE Model and the ID Project Manager- Jane Pierre

learning objectives and key takeaways

2.Project Charter write up-to include learning objectives, Meredith Connor & Terry Hall

key takeaways

3.Project Charter – example 1 Marvin Thompson

4.Project Charter – example 2 Albert Joseph

5. Proposal and Justification of Proposal Meredith Connor & Terry Hall

6. Editing All of us
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Self-Assessment